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The Hartford herald. [volume] (Hartford, Ky.) 1875-1926, January 13, 1875, Image 4

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THE HERALD.
THE BALLAD OF BREAKSECK.
BY KISS x. c. rice
The mi shinM oat on the mountain erf St:
Far down the valley the thadows fall;
AW -rimm and gold is tlio glowing west;
And wheeling an.1 spirting the eagles call.
Tli- gnod ship rides with a filling sail;
The f ailors are Ailing, "Away 1 away!
W must Ft cm the tide ere the north wind fail;
The night and the breeze brook no delay."
The yoang mate lingers upon the strand
Near a ducky maiden with flashing check;
In hi broad brown palms he holds her hand,
And cagernnd low are the words theytpcak.
"Weep not, Nckama; I shall return;
Wait for me on the mountain ride;
When the woods in their autumn glory barn,
I shall come again to claim my bride."
Slowly the Indian lifts ht r head;
Dry is her cheek, clear her eye,
"Nrkama will wait as thou hast said; -
The ton cf the pale face cannot lie.
Seeking the sails on the stream below,
Under the shade of the tall nina tree.
When the beeches arc gold and the sumachs
clow.
From the mountaia-top I shall watch for
thec."
Tho sailors are calling: the broad sails flap:
Erom his neck Dirck looses his great gold
chain,
Flings the gleaming links in Nekama's lap.
Then springs to the shallop's stern again.
Tho stoat ash bends to the rowers' will
Till the small boat reaches tho vessel's side,
When he turns to Nekama, waiting still,
Sad, but calm in her savage pride.
Bails the ship under high Cro' Nest,
Wearing and tacking in Martyr' Reach,
While Dirck looks back with a man's unrest,
And Kekama lingers upon the beach.
Fade the sails to a vague white speck;
Loom the mountains hazy and tall;
Dirck watches still from the vessel's deck,
And the girl moves not, though the night
dews fall.
A year has passed, and upon the hills
Scarlet and rnsset have faded to brown;
Ko sound is heard but the flowing rills;
The summer's voices are hushed and gone.
Tho late sad crow en a bare beech top
Caws and swings in an autumn wind;
The dead leaves fall and the acorn's drop
Breaks the stillness and scares the hind.
Wrapped in her blanket Nckama stands,
Scans the horizon with eager eye.
Late he lingers. She clasps her hands,
And a sadners dims ber wido dark eye.
Is It a mist o'er tho distant shore?
Look how the maiden's dusky face
Glows and brichtens! A moment, moro,
And the white speck changes, and grows
apace.
"Ho comes! he comes!'' From the wigwams
near
Gather the braves and squaws again;
The men arc decked with arrow and spear,
And the women of wampum and feathers vain.
Flecked is tho river with light canoes,
Laden with gifts for tho welcome guest;
The spoils of the chase let him freely choose;
Close to the ship aro the frail barks pressed.
Brown and still as a bronze relief,
Shyly Nekama keeps her place
Behind her father, the Mohawk chief,
Who, plumed and tall, with a painted face,
Grasping a spear in his nervous hand,
Looking in vain one face to see,
Turns and niters his proud demand;
'Dirck Brandsen comes not: where lingers
he!"
"Dirck stays in Holland," the sailors say;
'He has wedded a dame of wealth and state;
He sails no more for many a day
God send us all like happy fate!"
Dark grows the brow of the angered sire;
Can the white man lie like a Huron knave?
The eves of the maiden burn like fire.
But her mien is steady, her words arc brave.
From her bosom she drags the great gold chain
Dashed at the captain's feet it lies:
"Take back to the traitor his gift again:
Kekama has learned how a pale faco lies!"
Proudly she steps to her light canoe;
Bends ber paddle at every stroke;
The graceful bark o'er the waters flew,
Nor wist they a woman's heart had broke.
Up the monntain Kekama hies;
Stands in the pine-tree's shade again:
Scans the scene with her wido wild eyes;
Moans like a creature in mortal riain.
The dark cloud crowd round the mountains
peak:
Caws the crow on the bonchs o'er head;
The great limbs bcnd,and tho branches creak
"Ah, why do 1 live? lie is falser- sue said
A shriek is hfard through the gathering storm:
A rnsning figure darkens toe air;
Ont from the cliff springs a slender form,
And a maiden's grief lies buried there.
Towers the gray crag frira and high;
Drips the blood trom its rugged side;
Loud and shrill is the eagle's call
O'er the mnttcriag wash of the angry tide 1
But the Storm King nods to old Cro' Nest,
. Whcro the pine-trees wave the hearse
crows call.
Though the Mohawk sleeps 'neath that rocky
crest,
While the leaves on his ruined astleso fall.
To-day on the Hudson sailing by,
Under the shadow of Breakneck Hill,
We tell tho legend, and heave a sigh,
Where Nekama's memory lingers still.
AGRICULTURAL.
The Debit and Credit Acconnf
No one can pursue a business intelli
gently and profitably without carefully
kept debit ami credit accounts. With
these accounts carefully kept, the farmers
can by yearly ballanccs see just what lie
is doing. If the account is too heavy on
the debit side, the farmer can see just
where he is tending, and will by this in
formation be mlluencd to take a new
track, and recover himself before he has
gone too far.
xvoiv, January, is here, and we
advise all who have not done so be
fore to open an account with the farm and
its operations. Here are the items that
should be
CHARGED AGAINST THE FARM.
Interest on the capital invested, at the
usual rate, 10 per cent.
The taxes.
The depreciation in value from exhaus
tion.
The interest on the capital invested in
implements, farm machinery and the
Hock employed to work the Inrm.
The depreciations in value of these
from use. Tins item can be estimated bv
the average length of time these articles
JaM by good usage.
The value of manures and peede. and
of the materials for repairs and improve
ments.
The interest on these until returns are
lisd on their life.
The cost of all labor, both of the owner
and his hired help, at the rale he psys
lor tieii).
The actual cost of board for his hired
help.
All female labor employed in the pro-
, .? , . . . .
uuciion oi uuuer, encese, etc
CKCOIT TUB FAUM 1TD:
All its products, both that sold and
that consumed by the futility.
The enhanced market value of the
farm
i'rmanent improvements.
Tte rent of the dwelling-house.
We can not too strongly urge the im
parlance of a knowledge if jiit how our
atSi'm arc going. If the tacts, uliieh
will In1 brought out i thei-c acc.'UHts
each tr, shew that no are tm Ihe dotvn
grade, we shall be'prompt to call a hale,
and to begin earnest inquiry as to what
to do. If it should be lound by compar
ing notes with cur neighbors that cxclu-
ive corn-erowinf! was the cause of our
trouble, we should take a new track. If
it chould prove to be an attempt to grow
.ilient, or any other special crop inai
rauFed the failure, we should cast about
i hee tust what our farms', and our loca
tions to markets, require that we should
lo.
Friend", we repeat again what we have
olten t-aid in the tanner: iiiiorimition
aim lit our busincM). and upon kindred top-
lies at the bottom of success, buc-
cess was never secured without it, except
n rare cases of force of circumstance.
We must, above all, have reliable infor
mation about our business all'airs, and
how can we have it. except we carefully
collate it, and compare it, and weigh it?
Onen your accounts on the 1st oi jan-
iinrv. keen the items, li win prumui
you to look carefully after the little de
tails, and save much tuai is now wasitu.
Indiana Farmer.
A Xe Hoa-se Oi.seiise.
A correspondent of the Farmers' Home
.Tnnrn.il writes thus of a new didease
horses near Harrodsbure, Ky.
The first cases that occurred in Jlercer
county were at Mr. T. C. Coleman s, and
11. IU. OjeiIllUI O Ul ATttlIIC UlUVB-IUMM;
and lmth these frentleraen lost several val
uablc animals during the summer and
fall, before any successlal remedy was
found. The disease appears to be a kind
of distemper, which first effects the horse's
throat and nose, anu u not urreoiuu m
time, progresses into the lungs, when it is
thpn considered as nasi all cure. This
dit-temper is much more virulent and fa
tal than the old, well-known aisiemper
that eflecta all young hor.es, and Is also
considered much more troublesome than
epizootic, although not so contagious
ilr. A. S. ilcCann has, wuuin uie msi
few weeks,, lost several fine horses from
it, and now has others under treatment
The only remedy yet tried by these
gentlemen which appears to be followed
by any beneficial results is a very strong
croton oil blister applied to the throat,
which, in most cases, has been attended
with sncedv relief and ultimate cure.
The firbt symptoms of the disease, as Mr.
McCann stales, is the horse's manifest
desire for water and inability to swallow.
Said he: "I observed a horse of mine
standing in a branch- for some time, Ire-,
quently putting his mouth to the water,
but never swallowing any. This going to
the branch and trying to drink was re
pealed for several days belore l nouceu
a swelling in inc throat, nen i imme
diately began the blister treatment, and
in twenty-four hours the horse was able to
drink, and is now nearly well."
The disease dtflers from ordinary dis
temper in several respects, and is no dis
criminator in ages, as it attacks young
horses or colts as well as the old work
horses or brood-mares. It has not made
much prouress in this county as yet, but
appears to be slowly progressing through
the northern portion.
Treatment of Winter Apples.
When the apples are put away in the
cellar, manv think the work is done, ex
cept bringing them out again to eat; but
it is a mistake. They should be careiai
lv overhauled every two weeks, the
specked ones picked out and used, while
the sound ones will keen the longer, i
never take offense at having a dish of
armies set before me that have been
washed ou nicelv and the uecaycu specks
cut out. It rather impresses me lavor-
ably with the good judgment of the host
and hostess that oiler them. inesc are
usuallvauite ripeand good. All varieties
that have a tendency to shrivel, when in
barrels or boxes, should be laid on the
irround in the cellar on some clean straw'
or a little dry lime strewn upon the
"round wi'l prevent their getting an thing
of an enrlhv smell. Manr varieties, if
not all, arc ripened up quickly by bring
ing into a warm room a few days before
needed. With all the destruction of the
borer. I do hone the time Is not far dis
tant when a dish of nice apples will ever be
a part of the entertainment of the long
evenings of winter; a thing we have a faint
recollection of in years gone by, but so
long ago that we almost forget how it
went. Mural world.
Hitherto it has been the custom lo
consult onlv in a partial degree the wish
es or necessities of the farmer in the mat
ter of political contests, but, thanks to the
grange movement, a better day has
dawned, as will be seen by the following
which we copy from a recent is'sue of the
Lcxinzton Daily .Tress: "We have no
disposition to find fault with the (Ky.)
State Central Committee, believing it to
be composed of gentlemen anxious to do
what is best for the people of the State
generally, and not unmindlul of the in
terests of the Democratic party; but we
think the objection of theCourier-Joiirnal
to the time set for the calling ol theuuber
natorial convention is well taken. It is
a pity fo keep the candidates in agony for
quite bo long a time; but the gravest ob
jection is that in May the larmers will be
more busy than in the previous months,
and so will have much difficulty in at
tending the convention. We think ifwill
be admitted thai the farmers have an in
terest in the next Gubernatorial nomina
lion, and will take an active part in it
If any one is foolish enough not to believe
it. he will have Jits eves opened about the
time the convention meets." Farmer's
Home Journal.
THE GRANGERS.
Hems Gathered from Various
.Sources, that are 1" Interest to
the Farincr-Krotlici'liooti.
A "Grange Land and Immigration
Company" has commenced operation in
Arkansas.
The directors of the grange warehouse
at Delavan, Wis , announce the reports of
extravagance in its management and mis
appropriation of funds a malicious slander.
It was shown at the Iowa State Grange
that there were now 2,000 Grangers in
that State, an increase over last year of
101:, and that iU'J smaller Granges have
been consolidated with others.
In May, 1RCG, the first Grange was or
ganized in Washington city. The next
was that at St Taul, Minnesota, eix years
ago. Now there are more than 21,000
Granges, with a membership of 1,300,000.
Cherokee County Council, Texas, urges
Patrons everywhere in the cotton-growing
States to ascertain as soon as the ginning
season is over, how much cotton has been
put up at each gin, nnd report the statis
tics to the .National orange, m order to
put it out of the pouer of speculators to
control the priec of cotton to suit them
selves.
The Monthly Bulletin of the National
Grange, for December 1, tavs that the in
crease of new granges for November was
3C1, and the tola! number organized up
to that tune wnsl,0. The JJulletin
aleo gives the times of meetings of State
gmnge.'S yet to Ik.' held, as follows: Arknn.
tai, fourth Wednesday in January; Color
ado, second Tuesday in January; Kansas,
third Tuesday in February; Georgia,
third Wednesday in January; Illinois,
second Tuesday in December; Iowa, sec
ond Tuesday in December; Maine, second
Tuesday in "December; Maryland, first
Tuesday in March; Massachusetts, sec
ond Tuesday in December, Michigan,
third Tuesday in Ja unary; Nebraska,
third Tuesday in December; New Hamp
shire, December 15, New Jersey, Janu
ary 19; New York.second Tuesday in Jan
uary; North Carolina, third Wednesday
in f ebruary. Ohio, second 1 uesday m
March; South Carolina, third Wednesday
in February; Tennessee, third Wednes
day in February: Virginia second
Wednesday in January; W. Virginia,
econd Thursday in Jan.; Wis., Jan. 5.
A lady of Walnut Creek (Kansas)
Grange put a rod in pickle for the men
some of whom are not slow to urge the
women to more active participation in
crantre work and here is one of her cuts:
"There has been a creat deal said in the
grange about women not doing their part
in working or talking. As for work, the
women do more than the men, for at home
they have the work to do in the house,
and a large share of the men's work to
do, such as planting corn and. setting out
hedec: and. it they have a walk or a gar-
den.'l am sure they have to build them,
and are laughed at about their work. In
fact, the farmirs' wives and daughters
do all kinds of work, except to plow, and
they can t hold the plow As to talking,
the men have so much to say that when
they get done there is no time for us, and
we have to write a little pitiful thing
called an essay, and which they olten ask
to see, and then they will put it in their
coat porket and lose it, it they can, lor
?. i. -i. .i .i .i.
iney Know u is ueuer man uiey t;n uu,
The lournals inimical to the Fatrons
of Husbandry let no chances pass to ad
vertise the short-comings ol an individual
or officer here and there. The wonder
really is that so an extensive organization
should have escaped with so little of
fraudulent endeavor. In relation to the
defalcation of the State treasurer, 'Quisen
bury, of Missouri, the Executive Commit
tee, which has lately closed its session,
has deposed the defaulting officer; has
taken mortnges upon everything he has
cot. and claim that they will eventually
recover all the money which had gone
into liia hands about S20.000. There
will be no criminal prosecution, but the
terms thev have dictated to uuissnuury
will leave him penniless. J he chairman
of the committee States that during the
week thev have contracted with Eastern
manufacturers for a great nuanlitv of far
mine machines and implements at whole'
sale prices for the use "of the Missouri
Patrons next spring. Western liural
THE WIND'S WHISPER.
ET A. D. n.
The Fire was talking in its sleep. Do
vou know how that could ber .Listen
don't you hear the faint little crackle, that
delicate snap under the big log? V.at this
is an old-fashioned lire-place, where they
pile the great logs on one another, nnd
then the blaze goes leaping and roaring
up the chimney, carrying all the heat
with it, 'tis true. Hut that has nothing
to do with my storv.
it the rire hadn t been asleep, it would
not have been so indiscreet as tell what
it did. And what do vou think that was?
Why. all about what Santa Clans had
been putting into those 1 i I tic stockings by
the chimney. Fortunately, there was no
listener but the big pink Shell that lay on
the hearth. The Shell listened, and then
moaned and sighed, till the Fire opened
one little red eye and then snapped O'.d:
"What is lho-inatler, Sl.nllV VVI.r J
you moan and sish?''
. ., ,, 1 CM. -11 It .. lt.
Ail. saiu uie onen, twu uik
inc of the merry Christmas Eve. and it
made me think of the last night I was on
the seashore.
The Shell sighed again, and the Fire
opened another red eye, saying:
"Tell me about it."
"You never saw the sea,'' said th
Shell, dreamily. "You do not know how
the white waves dash against the rocks,
nor how the wind can howl over thd
waters. You cannot think how gran
and awful, and yet how beautiful, is th
sea. The last time 1 6aw it the waves
were half asleep and the moonbeame
danced among the ripples. Ah! it was
lovely on that Christmas Eve."
"How did you know it was Christmas
Eve?" asked the Fire, sleepily, for it was
dozing again.
"The Wind told me so," sighed th
Shell, and the Fire turned gray and wen
quite lo sleep. The Shell felt lonely, and
wished itselt back by the dear old sea.
It sighed so mournfully that the Win
heard it and stole down the chimney,
softly, that it should not wake the Fire.
It crept into the moaning Shell and kissed
it so light and lovingly that it brought
back the sea-side memories more vividly
and the poor, lonely bhell sobbed like
tired child.
"Why are you sad, pretty Shell?" asked
the Wind.
"I was lonely, so lonelv," answered th
Shell;"the Fire does not know my dear sea
andean not tell me of the thin I love,
But I am not sad now, dear Wind, foryou
arc here to comfort me. Tell me one of
your pretty stories, as you uted to do
among the rocks by the sea."
The Wind hummed a little song, and
kissed the shell again beloreit commenced.
"Do you know that to-uight is Christ
mas Eve? I remember the first Christ
mas Eve; it happened a long, long time
ago. 'Where was it?' In a far off laud
one that vou never saw; it is far on th
other side of the sea you love; it is a beau
tiful land, I think, and I have heard
men say that the dear All-Father loved it
well. 'Do I think so?' Yes, I do. for
the hills and valleys of that country are
what was never seen elsewhere. Let me
tell you what it was. I had kissed all
the ilowers goodnight, and peeped at the
dear little birds asleep in their nests, and
then 1 went to sleep among the hills.
After awhile I waked. It Eecmed that
I heard once more the song of the morn
ing stars. You have seen the sun coming
up from behind the sea, with his flaming
banners and quivering beams of light, but
you never saw such a sight as I did that
night; for the Angel of the Lord came
down, and the glory of God lighted up
the land. Then there came a throng of
angels down from heaven, and they sang
together till all the land was filled with
melody, and the glorious harmony rose to
the very stars. Oh! it was like that
mighty song that rose when the earth
was pure and fresh, when all things sang
praise to Him that made them.
"Sing you the song of the nngels?"
"I can not, dear Shell; only God's an
gels can sing it, but I caught their woids
and remembered them:"
" 'Glory to God in the liighcjt, andon earth
peace, good will towards men.' "
Once more the Wind kissed the Shell
and then soared upward into the gray
dawn of a Christmas morning, caroling.
"Glr.ry to God iD the highest."
Through the window crept the rays of
the morning sun, whispering gently:
"Pt.ii-con earth, good will towards men."
ifALcrox nouns.
There was no fleck in all tho bluo
Of that purosky we sat beneath,
Anil, wave Ly wave, the waters drew,
Or seemed to draw, a peaceful breath;
A blessed calm was on the shoro,
A roseate glow upon the pea,
Tho trouble of the world was o'er,
And life's unrest had ceased to bo,
Tho anguish of the tortured breast,
Tho bitter pans of doubt and foar,
These vcro but phantom of unrest,
That made the sunshine triply dear:
Tho gleaming lids of tear-bfight eyes
There were no longer tears to fill;
Sonow was lost in glad surprise
It was not sadness made us still.
Tho life of that ono hour to live,
That ono to hold, tho rest to loose
We were content, though clouds might give
iho future all Its rainbow hues;
A'tcndcr joy was all our own,
Kaugbt else had in it a place or part
Lore touched to its divinest tono
The chords of rapture in the heart.
Anil when tho hard awakening came,
Tho dream bad glorified tho sleep;
Our lives are brighter for tho flame
That.inrenso-fcd, our memories keep;
Tho angels of the hours we knew
For ever radient we behold,
As those the monkish painters drew
Sniilcout of solid heavens of gold.
Te Slyle at Washington Wed
dings.
The English fashion has become unl
versal in Washington in conducting wed
dings. Groomsmen are done away with
and ushers take their places. As these
last are essential to the number of eieht
the supply of suitable and available young
men wouut oc exhausted it eight more
wftMonyy m jjrMmamen. .Besides
the etlect around tne chancel is finer, l
the girls' pretty dresses are not marred
by the intermingling of black coats.
Gentlemen ought to rejoice that they do
not have to go through the trying ordeal
of knceliug around a chancel in full view
of hundreds of eager, curious eyes behind
them; girls who attend a wedding just
lor the sake ol scenic efiect The float
ing drapery of the bridesmaids appears
to even greater advantage when the
lair wearers kneel in graceful postures,
but the men look ridiculous with their
coat-tails todching the steps, and the
soles of their boots turned upwards. At
a glance the observers can easily tell i
those boots are old or new, and the ntim
ber worn. So groomsmen are things of
the past, and the best man has only to
stand by the groom until he receives th
bride. The ushers, after seating th
guests, walk up the aisles of which they
have charge, alter the bridal party enter.
anu iaKc siue seats.
A Minister Drunk at (be Commuii
ion Table.
Cincinnati Special, 25th, to Chicago Tribune,
There was a stunning sensation to-day
in one ol our high-toned Episcopal
churches (St. John's) on the occasion of
the Christmas services and communion,
riie rector of this church, the Rev. C. D.
Davidson, died recently, and his place has
not vet been supplied. . Today another
minister, of Covington, had been secured
to ofuciate. Unfortunately, the latter
gentleman had partaken rather freely of
egg-nog before going to the church; nnd,
worse still, when he got there he dived
into the jug of communion wine, drink
ing long and often, of the rich juice of the
grape. He managed to get through the
lormal services decently, but by the time
he commenced on his Christmas sermon,
the mixture of egg-nog and wine had so
rorked upon his brain that he was badly
oil" and wandered sadly. He rambled
arniiflriuiMpiug.frniM a-4,ui in auotli
er in such a way that all could see that
the man was drunk. At last, when the
thing became unbearable, the Wardens
gave the signal, and the congregation, a
small one, got up quietly and left with
dignity, leaving the minister to talk to
empty benches.
The violet grows low and covers itself
..... . , .,,,
with its own tears, anu oi an nowers
yields the sweetest fragrance. Such ii
humility.
AI.ONZO TAYLOR,
' Fashionable Barber and Hair Cutter,
HARTrORD, KY.
Shop, on Market street, two doors north o
ho Crow House. nol tf
Ii. J. LYOX.
Dealer in
Groceries and Confectioneries.
HARTFORD, KY.
Keeps constantly on hand a lirgo assortment
of all kinds of Groceries and Confectioneries,
which he will sell low for cash, or exchange
for all kinds of
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
I will also pay tho highest cash price for
hides, sheep pelts, eggs, butter, bacon, potatoes,
beans, etc. nol Jy
QKO. KLEIK, JOHN it. KLEIH.
GEO. KLEIX it JIKO.
HARTFORD, KY.
Dealers in house furnishing good, for general
kitchen and table use.
Yi keep constantly on hand, the celebrated
Arizona Cooking Stove,
Seven ulics for cither coafor wood. House
keepers aro delighted with its superior cooking
and bakinr. It has no equal anywncrc. lall
and sco for yourself.
TINWARE.
All kinds of tiawaro made and repaired on
short notice
E. ,S5IALL'S
TEADE PALACE,
HAIiTFORD, KY.
Dealer in Staple and Fancy Dry Goods,
Gents and boys custom mado
CLOTHING.
A No. 1 stock of
BOOTS AND SHOES,
HATS AND CAl'S,
FURNISHING GOODS,
CLOAKS, BLANKETS,
1'URS, NOTIONS, AC.
I also keep a large and well selected stock of
Ladies' Dress Goods,
Sola at Sew Yorl I'riccs.
All kinds of
COUNTRY PRODUCE
Bou-'lit at the highest market price.
TO. K. tiltEGOlCY.
(County Judge.)
ATT OR NE Y AT L A W,
IIArtTFOKD, KY.
rrompt attention given to the collection of
claims. Offico in 'ho courthouse.
JISSE E. TORLK,
Hartford, Ky.
w. 5. SWEIXET,
Owensboro, Ky.
I'OGL,E fc SWEEXEY,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
nAKTFORD, UY.
Will pmclico their nrofession in Ohio and
adjoining counties and in the Court or Appeals,
Office on Market street, near courthouse".
JOIIX C. TOWXSCXI).
(Formerly County Judge,)
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
HARTFORD, KY.
Will practico in all tho courts of Ohio conntv
and tho circuit courts of tho 5th judicial dis
trict. Business solicited andjirompt attention
guarantccu.
JOHN P.'BARRETT,
ATTORNE YIA T LAW,
and Real Estate Agent,
HARTFORD, KENTUCKY.
Prompt attention
!,:. ' win i r , .
iiMtiua. ,, nt uuy, sun, lease, or rent lanas or
uipcrai privileges on roasonaDIo terms. Will
write deed, mnrlrmffi,, 1..... I- nH .
tend to listing and paying taxes on lands be-
tuugiug iu iiuu-rcsiucms.
r. r. MoitCAN, o. c. wedbLvo.
raoir.GA3f;fc;WEDMXG,
ATTORNEYS AT L-AW,
nARTFORD, KY.
(Office west of courthouse over Hardwick
Nail's store.
Will nractico in Inferior and snnerior courts
nf M. nmmnni,l(l,
Special attention given to cases in hank-
i.P. Morgan is also examiner, and will
take depositions correctly will bo readv to
uuiigc ail flatties u, mi iiuica.
OEMRY B. VCHE3ET, . Sill. E. HILL,
.HcIIEXRY & HILL,
ATTORNEYS COUXSELLOltSATLA TP.
nARTFORD, KY.
"Will practice in Ohio and adjoining counties,
anu m tne uourl ol appeals oi Kentucky.
nol ly
D.'II. FRENCH,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
AND F.B1L ESTATE AGENT,
HARTFORD, KENTUCKY.
Prompt attention given -to tho collocticn of
claims.
Will practice in all tho courts of Ohio and
adjoininc counties.
Will buy, soil, lease, or rest real estate or
mineral privileges on reasonable terras.
nol ly
E. D. WALKED,
E. C. ZICBBASD.
tvALKEH &. IITJ2BARD,
A 2 T ORKNEYS AT L AY7 ,
AND REAL F3TATE AGENT, """""
HARTFORD, KENTUCKY.
. not la
E. I KARXETT,
PRACTICAL SURVEYOR,
HARTFORD, KY.
Would respectfully announco to the pcopli
of Ohio county that he is prepared, atall times
to do any kind of surveying, running lines,
laying off lands and lots, Ac. at shoit notice
ierms reasonable and to suit times,
nol 2m
J. F. COLLINS
DEALER IN
GROCERIES, COFECTIONERLES,
&c, xc.
COUXTRY PRODUCE
Bought at
The Highest Market Price.
Remember the place, west side publio square,
opposite the court souse, naruoru, ivy.
nol ly.
JOSEPH VAUCIIT,
BLACKSMITH,
HARTFORD, KY.
All kinds of Blacksmithing done in good
stylo and at tho lowest price torcajii oniy.
JIORSE-SHOEJNG.
made a specialty. Will shoe all round for $1 25,
nol ly
int. nir.Diricc, a. t. ball.
IIAKDYt ICK fc XALL,
dealers in
DRY GOODS. GROCERIES, HATS, CAPS,
QUEENSWARE, ic.
Which wo will sell low for cash, or exchangi
for country produce, paping the highest market
price. noi ly
Z. WAYNE GRIFFIN,
HARTFORD, KY.
Dealer in
Drugs, Medicines and Chemicals,
Fine Toilet Poaps, Fancy nair and Tooth
Alrusu es, l'eriumery anu rancj j-unch
Articles, Trusses and Shoulder
Braces,
Garden Seed.
Pure Wines and Liquors for medical puiposos
Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Dye' Stuffs,
Letter-paper, Pens, Ink, Envelopes, Glass,
rutty, uaruon on, uamps ana vuimnejs.
Physicians' prescriptions accurately com-
pounaeu.
Notice,
Tho Ohio Co. council, P. of IT., will meet at
tho Court-house, in Hartford, on the 23th day
oi January, lio,aiiu o clock a.m. All dele
gates are expected to attend, as there will be
important;hu!incss to attend to.
J. W. UAKNiilT,
By order of Secretary, pro tcm.
stepuen;woodwakd, 0. i P.O.
B. I'. BEKRYJIAA',
Fashionable Tailor,
HARTFORD, KY.
Coats, Pants and Vests cat. mide and re.
paired in the best style at the lowest prices.
THE CKOW HOUSE,
Opposite the Courthouse
HABTroBD, XT.
VAUGnT & HUDSON, .... Pbofrietobs.
Comfortablo rooms, nromnt attention, an J
low prices. The traveling publio are rerpect-
rully invited to givo ns a share of patronage.
Every exertion made to render guests comfort
able. STAGE LIXE.
Yanpht k TTnil.nn nt
uuj uciwcen naruoru anuueaver Dam, morn
mff and evpnint.. rnnn,f!nr vltt all - -
ger trains on the L. V. 4 Southwestern rail-
roaa. rasscngers set down wherever they de
sire. not lv
JAS. A. THOHAS, GEO. A. PLATT.
JAS. A. THOMAS fc CO.
HARTFORD, KY.
Dealers in ataplo and fancy
DRY GOODS,
Notions, Fancy Goods, Clothinir. Boots and
Shoes, Hats and Caps. A largo assortment of
these goods kept constantly on hand, and will
be sold at the very lowest cash price.
ooi jy
J. T. BASRETT, J. L. CASE, W. GKUELLZ.
JSO. P. BARRETT & CO.,
Newspaper, Book,
AND
JOB PRINTING,
Corner Court Place and Piccadilly street.
HARTFORD, KY.
AH orders promptly executed. Special at
tention given to orders by mail. Write for a
prico list. Address
Job Printers,
Hartford, Ky.
JOIIX I TRACY fc SOX.
UNDERTAKERS,
HARTFORD, KY.
Manufacturers and dealers in all kinds of
wooden coffin:, Irom the finest rose wood casket
to the cheapest pauccr coffin.
23A1I kimlj of co En trimmings constantly on
nana ana lor sale.
Keep a line hearse always ready to attend
funerals.
Wagons and Bvggies,
constantly on hand or made to order. Partic
ular attention given to plow stocking.
nol ly
J. F. YAGER,
Sale and Livery StaUe,
HARTFORD, KY.
I detir to inform tho citizens of Hartford
and vicinity that 1 am'prepared to furnish Sad
dle and Harness Stock, Buggiesand conveyan
ces of ell kinds on the most reasonable terms.
Horses taken to feed or board by the day, week
or montn. A liberal snare 01 patronage solid
ted. nol ly
3l. II. W1XLLUIS,
Dealer in
DRY GOODS,
GROCERIES,
Hardicarc, Queenswarc,
Hats and Caps,
Boots and Slioes.
Abo dealers in
Leaf Tobacco,
HARTFORD, KY.
I will sell very low for cash, or exchange
for all kinds of country produce. My motto
is "Quick sales and small profits. nol Jy
HOUSEHOLD
AND
KITCHEN FURNITURE
For Sale.
I have the following articles for sale which
I wilt sell low for cash, or on time for note
bearing interest and well secured, viz.
1 tine tin sett. 1 parlor shovel and ton?4. 1
oil cloth for table (5 yards), 1 larre clothes
basket, 1 marble top center table, 1 tin slop
bucket, 2 fly brushes, 1 wash pan, 1 pepper
mill, 2 grate fenders, 1 grate, 1 lot of window
blinds, 3 candle sticks, 2 china spittoons, I
small garden hoe,l large garden hoe, 1 garden
rake, I coffee pot, a lot of tin plates, pie and
cakepansl patent washing machine, 1 patent
churn dasher, 1 meal seire, 1 cotton bed cord
1 pair coal grabs, 3 lard cans, I pair fire irons,
1 pair counter scales, H barrel of salt, 1 bunch
cane to bottom chairs, 1 tin bucket, 1 sot cane
bottom chairs, 1 dining-room chair, 2 stools,
2 fancy parlor screens mantles and grates, and
several other articles too numerous to mention.
If these thins aro not sold at private sale I
will sell atjpublic auction on Monday the 1st
day ef February, 1875.
JOHN P. BARRET T.
L. F. IVOEKXEIt,
BOOT & SHOEMAKER.
nARTFORD, KENTUCKY.
Repairing neatly and promptly done.
REPRESENTATIVE AXD CIIAMP-
lOn Or AMERICA ART TASTE
PROSPECTUS FOR 1875 EIGHTH TEAK.
THE ALPINE
THE ART JOURNAL OF AMERICA,
ISSCID ItOTTBLT.
A 31AGNIFICANT CONCEPTION WON
DERFULLY CARRIED OUT.
The necessity of a popular medium for th a
representation of the productions of our grtat
artists has always been recognized, and many
attempts have been made to meet the wast
The successive failures which have so invariably
followed each attempt in this country to estab
lish an art journal, did not prova the indiffee
enee of the people of America to the claims of
high art. So soon as a proper appreciation of
t. , . n .1 .v:i:, . - : . t
hum nuu. auu nu .win, iu uiccb Ifc W CI O laoWD,
the public at once rallied with enthusiasm to
its support, and the result was a rreat artlstio
and commercial triumph THE A L DINE.
TbeAldine while issued with all of the regu
larity, has none of the temporary or timely in
terests characteristic of ordinary periodicals.
It is an ilezant miscellanv of cure, liirht. and
graceful literature, and a collection of pictures,
tho rarest collection of artistis (kill, in blaek
and white. Although each succeeding number
affords a fresh pleasure to Its friends, the real
value and beanty ol The Aldine will be most
appreciated after it is bound up at the close of
me year, untie omer publications may elaio
superior cheapness, as compared with rivals of
a similar class. The Aldine Is a unique and
original conception alone and unapDroaehed
absolutely without competition in price or
cnaracier. Ane possessor or a complete vol
umo cannot duplicate the' quantity of fine pa
per and engravings in any other shape or nam-
per 01 volumes, jar ten nmtt iu cott ana Mm,
there t iXe ehromo, leeidet!
The national feature of The Aldine must be
taken in no narrow sense. True art is cosmo
politan. While The Aldine Is a strictly Ameri
can institution, it does not confine itself to the
reproduction of native art. Its mission is to
cultivate a broad and appreciative art taste, one
that will discriminate on grounds of istrinsio
merit. Thus, while pleading before the patrons
of The Aldine, as a leading characteristic, the
productions of the most noted American artists,
attention will always be given to specimens
from foreign masters, giving subscribers all the
pleasure and instruction obtainable from home
or foreign sources.
Abo artistic Illustration or American scenery.
original with The Aldiae is an important fea
ture, and its" magnificent plates are of asise
more appropriate to the satisfactory treatment
of details than can be afforded by any inferior
page. Thejudicious interspersion of landscape.
marine, figure and anima: subjects, sustain an
unabated interest, impossible whera tba inn.
of the work confines the artist too closely to a
single style of subject. The literature of The
Aldine is a light and graceful accompaniment,
wormy 01 me annuo leaiures, wnn only saea
technical disquisitions as do not interfere with
tne popular interest or tne work.
PREMIUM FOR 1875.
Kvery subsciber for 187S will receive a beau
tiful portrait, in oil colors, of tho same nsbla
dog whose picture in a former issue attracted so
much attention.
"Man's Unselfish Friend"
will be welcome to every home. Everybody
loves sueh a dog, and tha portrait is executed
so true to the life, that it seems the veritable
presence of the animal itself. The Rev. T. Se
Witt Talmago tells that his own Newfoundland
dog (tbe nnest m .Brooklyn) barks at it. IU
though so natural, no one who zees this pre
mium ehrcmo will have the slightest fear of
Dems nuien.
Besides the ehromo every advance subscriber
to The Aldine for 1S75 is constituted a member
and entitled to the privileges of
THE ALDINE ART UNION.
The Union owns the orizinals of all The Al
dine pictures, which with other paintings and
engravings, are to be distributed among the
member?. To every series of 5,000 subscribers
100 ditTervut pieces, valued at oter $1,500. ate
distributed as soon as the series is full, and tho
awards or eacn series as made, are to be pub
lished in the next succcding issue of The Al
dine. This feature only applies to subscribers
who pay for one year in advance. Full partic
ulars in circular sent on application incloaisg a
stamp.
TEB1IS:
One Subscription, entitling to The Aldine one
year, tee unromo, and the
Art Union,
Six Dollars per annum. In Advance.
(No charge for postage.)
Specimen copies of The Aldine, 50 cents
The Aldine will hereafter be obtainable onlr
by subscription. There will be no reduced or
club rates; cash lor subscriptions must be sent
the publishers direct or handed to the local
canvasser, without responsibility to the pub
lisher, except in cases where the certificate is
given, bearing tee lac-simile signature 01 JAS.
Surrox, President.
CANVASSERS WANTED.
Any person wishing to act permanently as a
local canvasser, will receive full and prompt ia
formation by applying to
THE ALDINE COMPANY,
53 Maiden-Lane, New York.
Unqucstionvlly the lest Sustained Work of
the kind in the World.
HARPER'S MAGAZINE.
ILLUSTRATED.
Xo'.ice, of tie Freu.
The ever increasing circulation of this ex
cellent monthly proves its continued adapta
tion to popular desires and needs. Indeed,
when we think into how many homes it pene
trates every month, we must consider it as en
tertainers, of the public mind, for its vast popu
larity has been won no by appeal to stupid pre
judices or depraved tastes. Bostom Glole.
The character which thir Magazine possesses
for variety, enterprise, artistic wealth, and
literary culture that. has kept pace with, if it
has not led the times, should cause its con
ductors to regard it with justifiable compla
cency. It also entitles them to a grtat claim
upon the publio gratitude. The Magazine has
done good, and not evil, all the days of its
life. Brooklyn Eagle
TERMS.
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by the publisher.
Subscriptions to Harper's Magazine,Weekly,
and Bazar, to one address forone year, $10 00:
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dress for one year, $7 09: postage free.
An extra copy of either the Magazine, Week
ly, or Bazar, will be supplied gratis for every
club of five subscribers at 4 00 each, in one
remittance; er six copies for $20 00, without
extra copy: postage free.
Bach nunlere can te eupplied at any time.
A complete set of of Harper's Magazine, now
eomprissing'19 Volumes, in neat cloth binding,
will be sent by express, freight at expense of
purchaser, for 2 25 pey volume. Single vol
umes, by mail, postpaid, $3 00. Cloth eases,
for binding, 58 cents, by mail, postpaid.
Address HARPER k BOTHERS,
New Xork.

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