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The Hartford herald. [volume] (Hartford, Ky.) 1875-1926, February 03, 1875, Image 4

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THE IIERALD.
.1 G R IV utT.ttlift'b.
HOUSEHOLD MINTS. - ,
" ni:.vxiiOTnnn's Gingerbread.
Cup and a half of molasycsT "cup rieh
sour cream, tcasncon salaratus, table-
, !-joii ginger; mix. i
' W.viiivt? rtANxns. Scald flan-
ml lycfore you make it upyas ithrinks
-jat the lirst washing. Much of the
Miniikm;; nn-c ironi there tons too
much roan, ami the water 'beinir too
icold. Never use soda for flannels. I
Uaceioh lASfAitiis. UccasionallyJ
ffllacc in the water a email niece of thel
extract flicorico-antl put between the I
wires, 'at one end of. the center perch, I
. piece of white sugar. The seed-boxes
should contain sulucient seed tor the
rflay. Admixture of the canary. Tape I
'and henipjsecd is usually given, tmtj-t
lieiiqi'EceiLJs too fattening. AVehave
always found canary and rape the best
f I ...M 1?a1 f
- jooa wun occasionally a muo ucrman
'"bT- A,,! a - 1
VJ vivi.'. .A.- a iiiL.ii;i a sa a.
mf 1. 1 . . .. Jl . . . .J... 1 . 1
SS"K
M,ius .u , ...w..-
large end down because the air bub-
Mc does not spread so much as when
thp rtmII mirl i rlnwn this snreadintr
tne smaii cna is aown mis spreauing
Of the. air bubble being known to aflect
tlie freshness and "yitolity. of the egg.
" Eggs stored with the "large end down
. . will keep good for hatching more than
a mouth, wh'ile the others cannot bode-
pended on after two weeks.
To . Clean SLarble. Take two
ounces of common soda, one of pumice
3tone,and,one of finely-powdered chalk;
ift them through a"Rno sieve and mix
themwith water; then rub the mixture
''ell all over the marbld and the stains
will be removed; now wash the marble
over with soap ad water, and it will
. be as clean as it was previous to its be-
ing stained. Sometimes the marble is
stained -yellow from iron rust; this. can
be removed with lemon juice.
Cooking Bice. Put into -the oven
a' pan with rice and the requisite quart
tity of water or milk, and keep it cook-
ing till, done half an hour perhaps
then turn it, without stirring, into a
' dish for the table. The rice grains,
' feathery as snow flakes, will be whole,
and the skin which forms over the mass
in the commencement of cooking and
it can be stripped off before turning out
the rice prevents the escape of the del-
icate aroma of the rice, and you have a
fine flavored food, in place of the pasty,
insipid result of boiling and stirring.
Boiled CnESTNUTS.-FeeI oil the shell
4 of the chestnuts with a sharp knite,
cover them with water and boil until
. the skm can be peaied on reaoiiy.
- Peel this off, return them to the water
Jn- which they were previously cooked
(unless it oe very uarn;, cover cioseiy
and stew gently until they are very ten-
der, drying the water nearly or quite
out They are much whiter and sweeter
. if the hard "shucks" are taken off be-
, fore boiling, and they are nice to han-
. die. oerve warm lor breaKiast. 11,
however, this Tequires too much time,
. then rinse them thoroughly with
' boilingSvater and dry them with aSspft.
cloth. In this case each plate should
be provided with a sharp knife.
. To Keep Pl ants.over .Night TVrrn-
out FntE. I have kept many plants
nicely all winter without any fire at
night, in the following manner: Have
inade, of wood or zinc, a tray of any
size you' may need it about four inch-
'es deep, with a handle on either end,
watertight paint it outside and in,
. put in each corner a post as high as the
tallest ot your plants, and it is ready
for tise. Arrange your flower pots in
it, and fill between them with sawdust;
this absorbs the moisture falling from
the plants when you water thtm, and
retains the warmth acquired during
thenar, keeping the temperature of
the roots even. When you retire at up stakes" and removing from the "old
night spread over the posts a blanket land marks." They have been stcad
or. shawl, and there is no danger of ily accumulating as farmers and gath-
their freezing. The tray can be placed
on a stand or table and easily moved
about. Cor. American arm Journal,
TreatdaO Wounds. Every person
Should know how to treat a flesh wound,
. Every one is liable to be placed in cir-
r , J
cumsiances away iruin surgical auui
veterinary aid, where he may save his
.own life, the life of a friend or a beast,
simply by the exercise of a little com-
mon sense. In the first place, close
the lips of the wound with the hands
and hold them firmly together to check
the flow of blood until several stitches
can be taken and a bandage applied,
Then bathe the wound a long time in
cold water. "Should it be painful," a
correspondent says, "take a panful of
burnmg coals and sprinkle upon them
common brown sugar and hold the
wounded part in the smoke. In a min
ute or two tho pain will be allayed, and
the recovery proceeds rapidly. In my
case a rusty nail had made a bad wound
in my foot. The pain and nervous ir-
ritation were severe. This was all re-
moved by holding it in smoke fifteen
minutes, and I was able to resume my
rcadmgui comlort. We have olten
recommended it to others with like re-
suit. -Last week one of my men had a
finger-nail torn out hy a pair of ice
tongs. It became very painful, as was
to be expected. Held in sugar smoke
twenty minutes, pain ceased and prom-
iscdfspeedy recover-."
. .
Weights untl Measures.
" The firans friven 1k?1ow liavn often
been printed in detachments. We give
them collectively, that housekeepers
and farmers may have them in con
vciiiciit ,-hape lor reference:
weight of grain, ac.
Pounds to Founds to
bufliel. bushel
Wheat. CO Apples, drieJ 2S
'.".28
Itye -.50 Teaclies
Corn...... ...5(5 Coarse salt
Oats ...32 FjnefcalU
Barley 48 Totatoes ,
.50
.00
r.
GO
Buckwheat .
..42 Pras
...CO Ik-an?
45 Cantor Leans.,
CO
.00
Clover sect..
Timothy son!..,
4G
i rr. r-
iii1...il.V"'"'it Pnrmf7T.'""7,n
jltacsrassectd U MoikthI wa! 70
BOX MEASURES. , '-
Farmers and'jnarkct eardencra will
find a f crica-of tox measures very usc-
Ifur; and tliev, can readily be made si
any one who understands the two-toot
rule, -and can handle the saw and the
hammer. A box 16 by 16 inches
.square, and 8 inches deep, -will contain
a Ifiislicl, or 2150.4 cubic inches, each
men in uepui noiaing one gallon.
A box 24 by 11 145 inches square,
and8 inches.dcep, wrll also contain a
bushel, or 2150.4 cubic inches, each
inch in depth holding one gallon
A box 12 by 11 15 inches square,
and 8 inches deep, -will contain half a
bushel, or lUz.o cubic inches, each
inch in depth holding half a gallon
A box 8 by 8 inches square, and 8
inches deep", will contain.half a peck,
or 298.8 cubic inches. The gallon dry
measure.
A Jx)x 4 by 4 inches square, and
l-o inches deep will contain one
quart, or 0712, cubic inches,
measuring land.
Qnc 16Q e
4,840 squareyards, 43.560 square feet
8l.fF! One square yard
contains. 9 square feet,
. r 1
TIIE SIE OF'A BMB& TO
One acre 280.71 feet 12.65 rods
nalacre 117 58 Rtt 8.91r-od,
Third acre' 120.50 feet 7.30rods
Fourth aero 104.36 feet 6.32 rods
Eighth acre 73.79 feet 4.47,rods
COXTAIN
C4 paces
35 paces
37 paces
32 paces
22 paces
now, to estimate chops i-ee acre.
Eramo -together four light sticks,
measuring exactly a foot square inside,
and with this in hand walk into the
field and select a spot of fair average
yield, and lower the frame square over
as many heads as it will inclose, and
shell out the heads thus enclosed care-
fully, and weigh the grain. It is fair
to presume that, the proportion will be
the 43,56Pth part of an acre's produce.
To prove it, go through the field and
make' ten or twelve similar calculations,
and estimate by the mean of the whole
number of results. It will certainly
enable the farmer to make a closer cal-
culation of what a field will produce
than he can by guessing.
Voting Man, Stick to It.
There is a deal of regret expressed
in speeches, letters to agricultural pa-
pers, and in editorials by kind-hearted,
well-intentionei editors, that the boys
are leaving the farms. No doubt many
young men have realized the fact that
farm life is no harder than city life,
Many have been wise enough to return
to the farm after testing the realities of
hfe in a city, liut the boys who leave
the farm for the city or village follow
the examples of older men. lne num
ber ot well-to-do-tarmers who have re-
alized beautiful homes, reached middle
age and sold their farms, bought vil-
lage or city lots ana seuieu on mem
with a view of "taking things easier,"
is not a small one. These men do so
yrith the same or similar motives with
I which young men leave the farms, and
Ithey are as often disappointed in 'the
results. .
I We know farmers, both young and
old, who have abandoned profitable
and beautiful homesteads, removed to
the village, invested their capital in
trade, got pretty thoroughly "cleaned
out" in a business in which they had
no practical experience, and haTe
bouglitback their homesteads at an
advanced price, running in debt to get
possession of them, and workiug hard
and contentedly to pay again for what
they once possessed. Some of these
men have said to us within the last two
months, " a farmer is a fool who sells
his farm thinking to have an easier
and happier time in a village or city."
The effect ot such reaction in the case
of these examples upon those who stick
to the farm is exceedingly wholesome.
It renders them content. They have
1 not wasted their substance in "pulling
ering about their homesteads all the
modem appliances for the conservation
of comfort and content. The farmer
who "sticks to itf'is sure to win what
city-made money rarely purchases in'
dependence, happiness, and a sense of
I . a-L- U -J? II
security wmcn is uiu result ui ucu
doing. Hural Neto Yorker.
1
Winter Work.
One of the oldest and most extensive
farmers in Vermillion county, Indiana
I has experimented largely on destroying
brush and briars, and on the methods
of preventing sprouting after being cut,
After extensive experiments, ho finds
that by cutting under brush and briars
in the winter, when the ground is fro-
zen hard, say in January or i cbruary
that they are most easily killed. They
sprout some in the spring, but a little
care in cutting them back for a year
'effectually destroys them, the roots rot
and they disappear. The ground
should be frozen hard when the first
cutting is done. Cutting at such time
brcaksandshiversthcstcmtothcground
and although he has no lengthy theory
on the subject, a thorough and practi
cal test of the method proves it a good
one. It has been tried on extensive
areas of land. We also hear that in
tho southern part of the State this
method has been tried with success
and those having tracts of land encum
bcrcd with brambles and briars which
they wish to make available, should try
this method during the cold weather.
We need liaidly add that one could
keep warm at that kind of work. In
mna fanner.
Aslies K Food 1'or Cattle.
The Live Stock Journal has a corres
pendent who found his cattle given to
. . ii i.
tne nabitoi eating woou, cnewnig oones
&c. They became thin in flesh, re-
fused to eat hay and presented a sickly
appearance, aic mm no impression
that their food lacked the constituents
for making boner and liw neighbors
used bone-meal without noticing any
good results whatever. At last, he put
alKmt four bushels ot leached ashes in
his barn yard, and threw out to them
alxmt a shovelful each day. They all
ate with evident relish. After turning
them out to jasture, he put", one peck
of dry ashe3 per "week on the ground in
the. pasture : J. hey ate it all, and
gnawed off the grass where it had been
lying". The cattle began to improvej
gaining flesh and looking better than
they had lor several years. He says
this morbid appearance was unnoticed
years' ago, from the fact ttiaMhe ground
was new anu asny irom tne purning oi
the woods and land clearings. Since
L 1 n . , -. -
this discovery, ho gives one quart of
ashes mixed with one quart-ot salt to
twelve head ot cattle about once a week.
Protecting Young Trees from Rub-
Hits. ,
Of all the plans for the protection of I
young orchards Irom rabbits, 1 hnd
nothing that so well agrees with my
own experience and judgment as the
following: Mix soft soap and the flour
of sulphur to tho consistency of a
thick" paste, and -apply onco or twice
during the-winter with a brush.
The other, which is by all means the
best, is to take a piece of common build-1
mg paper, about eighteen inches in
height aud ten or twelve wide, and
bend it loosely around the tree, and
tack it with a shingle tack near the cen
ter, and the.work is done m the most
effective manner. Common building
feltwilL nlso do. Before putting the
paper around the tree, it should be ex
amined for horera. Tlie- pnper will
probably retain its position for two or I
three years. It will also afford a good I
protection to trees that have been set
out during the falL Cor. Rural World.
l'onnder.
Founder is an iuflamation of the
parts between the crust, or wall, and
the coffin bone, including the lamina:,
whence the namo by which it "is now
distinguished (lamintis). The com
mon cause of founder is drinking cold
water when exhausted or fatigued by
long continued exertion; but excess
ive exertion alone will, and olten does,
produce acute founder, and is at ali
times the predisposing cause of this dis
ease. The treatment should be by
first removing the shoes. Next give a
mild dose of physic. The feet should
be kept constantly wet by tying a piece
of felt or flannel around each pastern,
and allowing it to fall over tho hoof,
where it is to be constantly wetted with
mixture composed of water, two
parts; alcohol one part. Or let the
feet be kept moist by poultice, two
Earis uran, wun one pari on meai.
ong rest in a roomy, loose box, tho
floor covered with tan or sawdust, is
necessary to perfect recovery. Spirit
of tlie Times.
R. P. R ERR Y.1IAX,
Fashionable Tailor,
HARTFORD, KY.
Coats, Pants and Vests cut. made 'and re.
paired in the best etylo at tho lowest prioeo -
not I j -
HOUSEHOLD
AND
KITCHEN FURNITURE
For Sale.
I have tho following articles for sale which
I will sell low for cash, or on time for note
bearing interest and well secured, viz.
i nne-iin sen, i parior i novel anu tongs, l
oil cloth for table (5 yards), 1 largo clothes
basket, 1 marble top center table, 1 tin slop
bucket, 2 fly brushes, 1 wash pan, 1 pepper
mill, 2 grato fenders, 1 grate, 1 lot of window
blinds, 3 candle sticks, 2 china spittoons, 1
small garden hoc, 1 large garden hoe, 1 garden
rake, 1 coffee pot, a lot of tin plates, pio and
cake pans,;i patent washing machine, 1 patent
churn dasner, 1 meal ecive, 1 cotton bed cord
1 pair coal grabs, 3 lard cans, I pair nre irons,
1 pair counter scales. 14 barrel ofsalt.l bunch
cane to bottom chairs, 1 tin bucket, 1 set cane
bottom cbairs, 1 dining-room chair, 2 stools,
2 fancy parlor screens mantles and grates, and
several other articles too numerous to mention.
If these things are not sold at private sale I
will sell at.public auction on Monday tho 1st
.J - f VaI.-,. , DTK
day ef February, 1875.
JOHN P. BARRETT.
xvn. n. WILU.UIN,
Dealer in
DRY GOODS,
GROCERIES,
Hardware; Qucenswarc,
HaU and Caps,
Boots and Sliocs.
Also dealers in
Leaf Tobacco.
HARTFORD, KY.
I will sell very low for cash, or exchange
for all kinds of country produce. My motto
is" Quick sales anil small profits." nol ly
TIIE CROW HOUSE,
Opposito tho Courthonso
11AHTF0ED, TLX.
VAUGIIT & HUDSON, .... PHorniETOES.
Comfortable rooms, prompt attention, and
low prices. Tho traveling public aro respect
fully invited to give us a share of patronage.
Every exertion inadoto render guests comfort
able. STAGE LIXE.
Vaught Jt Hudson also run a stage twice a
day between Hartford and Beaver Dam, morn
ing and evening, connecting with all passcn
ger trains on the L. P. k Southwestern rail
road. Passengers set down wherever they de
sire, nol ly
J. F. COLLIN'S
DEALER lit
GROCERIES, COFECTIOXERIES,
Ac, &c.
COUXTUY rilODUCE
Bought at
The Highest Market Price.
Remember the place, west side public square,
t . i ti r i
pposiic me court uou:c, jiur uvru, a;,
ol ly.
JSO. T. BARRETT, , . JXO. L. CASE,
WALLACE GRCELI.E. '
M P. BARRETT & CO.,
Newspaper, Book,
e. a-
AND
JOB
MINTING,
Corner Court Placo nnT Piccadilly street.'
HARTFORD, KY.
All orders promptly executed. Special at
tention given to orders by mail. Writo for
pries list. Address ...
JOUN P. BARRETT 1- CO.,
Job Printer!,
Ilartford, Ky.
GREAT BARGAINS
y0 ,e had during the next 30 day
in
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
BOOTS, SHOES
HATS- CAPS
AND
3ST O T X O -DO" & m
XT nre determined to closo out in order to
mako room for our Spring Stock.
All kinds of Country Produce taken in ex
change for goods. janl3 4w
THE SAINT LOUIS TIMES.
Daily, Weekly and TreWecMy.
THE LIVEST, CHEAPEST AND BEST
DEMOCRATIC PAPER IN THE WEST.
Tlt
Largest Weekly PubUslied
Uniteil States.
tiie
The Times Company take pleasure in an
nouncing to tuopooplo ol tne ureat west tnat
thev nre now rutliehinir tho Largest, Cheapest
and Best Democratic Paper in the country. It
is their design to mako this journal occupy
thn fi.M In tha Western States onen for a
I Cheap. Newsy and Sound Democratic Paper,
I . . 1 ' . . . . T. 1 . T -1 1 . of
giving all the news, PoHticaI,Religious, Scien
tific, Social and Commercial one whoso edito
rial columns will bo devoted to a fair discus
sion of tho great Political questions in which
the whole nation is interested, to the defense
of Constitutional Democratic Government, and
tawaee a relentless war on any and all parties
and factions which seek to destroy or pervert
it.
The Daily Times
Will bo issued every day, except Sunday, in a
folio form, containing thirty-two colums of the
latest news Foreign and Domestic. A reduc
tion in prico has been made in proportion to
tne reduction in size.
Tlie Sunday Times.
Will be issued regularly as a Mammoth Doublo
sheet, containing sixty-tour columns oi .news,
Literary and select Reading, and will bo fur
nlshcd to the Dally Subscribers without extra
charge. The unparalled increase ot tne circu
tation of this edition is evidence of its popu
larity, and no pains will bo spared to mako it
worthy of public connaenco anu patronage.
The Td-Wcckly Times,
A four-naco sheet, will be mailed to subscrl
bers every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday
mornings. This edition is designed to supply
those who have not tho mail facilities to obtain
the daily issues, and yet desiro a paper oftencr
than onco a week.
Tlie Weekly Times,
"Mammoth Edition," containing sixty-four col
umns of tho latest and most important news
nnd carefully selected reading matter of all
kinds a paper for the Farmer, tho Merchant,
.. . l . , 1 II I!.' ! 1 1 1. - ' I
tne btuucm, tue i uuuiiuu uuu iuu ucuurai
Reader. At the end of tho present year tho
circulation of this edition, at tho present
rate of increase, will not bo less than 100,000
copies.
TERilS POSTAGE PREPAID:
Daily, 7 copies per week, einglo copy, $S 00
per year. In clubs or hvc or more au.
Sunday limes, singio copy, $i uv per year.
In clubs of fivo or more SI 73.
Tri-Wcckly Times, $100 per year. In clubs
of five or moro S3 75.
Weekly Times, $1 5(1 per year. In clubs of
fivo or moro $1 25,
Ten per cent. Commission
allowed on above rates to thoso who will act
as agents. Money can be deducted when sub
scriptions aro sent. All money should bo sent
by Post Office Order, Draft, or Express to the
Ji1h nf TIIK TIVP.S POMP ANY.
St, Louis. Mo.
ALOXZO TAYLOR,
Faihionablc Barhcr and Hair Cutter,
HARTFORD, KY.
Shop, on Market street, two doors north of
1VM. V. GREGORY.
(County Judge.)
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
nAirrroRD, ky.
Prompt attention riven to the collection of
claims. OCBco in the courthouse.
JESSE E. rocLi.
Hartford, Ky.
W. 5. ST7EE2TKT,
Owensboro, Ky.
FOG1.E fc SWEENEY,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
HARTFORD, KY'.
Will practice thoir profession in Ohio and
adjoining counties ana in the Uourt or Aupcals
Office on Market street, near courthouse".
JOIEV C. TOWXSESD.
(Formerly County Judge,)
ATTORNEY' AT LAW,
HARTFORD, KY.
Will practlco In all the courts of Ohio county
and tho circuit courts of tho 5th judicial dis
trict, iim mess solicited and prompt attention
guaranteed.
JOHN O'FLAHERTY.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
HARTFORD, KY.
Cdlkcliona Promptly Attended to
Offlco on Market street, over Mauiv's tin
snop. janZO Jy
.
JOHN P.JSARRETT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
and Real Estate Agent,
nARTFORD, KENTUCKY.
Prompt attention given to tho collection of
Claims, n ill Buy, sell, lease, or rent lands or
mineral privileges on reasonablo terms. Will
write deeds, mortgages, leases, 4c, and at
tend to .listing and paying taxes on lands be
longing to non-resitients.
r. P. MOEOAS,
a. C. WEDDING.
MORGAN A 1YEDDIXG,
ATTORNE YS AT LA
IF,
HARTFORD, KY.
(Oflico west of courthouse over Hardwick 4
Nail's store.
Will practice in inferior and snperior courts
of this oommonwcalth
Special attention given to cases in bank
ruptcy. F. P. Morgan is also examiner, and will
take depositions correctly will b ready to
oblige ail parties at all times.
BESET D. UcriEKRT,
SAM. X. HILL.
McIIEXRY A HIU,
ATTORNEYS Jt COVXSELLOltS AT L.l W.
nARTFORD, KY.
win practiCQinOhIojinda.ljo!nIn counties.
and in tne court or Appeals ot hentueKy.f
no I ly.
1. II. FRENCH.
ATT OR NEY AT LA W.
AND ERAI ESTATE AGEMT,
HARTFORD. KENTUCKY.
Prompt attention given to the collodion of
claims.
Will practice in all the courts of Ohio and
adjoining counties.
U ill uuy, sell, lease, or rent real estato or
mineral privileges on reasonablo terms.
nol ly
E. D. WALKER,
E. C. HUBBARD.
WALKER fc HUBBARD,
A 2 TOR NEY S AT iiW,
AXD REAL ESTATE AGENTS,
HARTFORD, KENTUCKY.
nol la
E. I. RARXETT,
PRACTICAL SURVEYOR,
HARTFORD, KY.
Would respectfully announce to the people
of Ohio county that he is prepared, at all times,
to do any Kind or surveying, running lines,
laying off lands and lots, ic, at shoit notice.
Terms reasonable and to suit times:
nol 2m
JOSEPH VAUGHT,
BLACKSMITH,
HARTFORD, KY.
All kinds of Blacksmithing done in good
style and at the lowest price for cash only.
HORSESHOEING.
made a specialty. Will shoe all round for $1 25,
not ly
Z. WAYNE GRIFFIN.
HARTFORD, KT.
Dealer in
Drugs, Medicines and Chemicals,
Fino Toilet Seaps, Fancy Hair and Tooth'
lirusn-cs, reriumery anu f ancy xoiiet
Articles, Trusses and Shoulder
Braces,
Garden Seed.
Pure Wines and Linuors for medical purposes
Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Dye' Stuffs,
Letter-paper, Tens, Ink, Envelopes, Glass
Putty, Carbon oil, Lamps anu Chimneys.
Fhysicians' prescriptions
pounded. . .
accurately com-
nol ly
L. J. LYOX.
Dealer in
Groceries and Confectioneries.
HARTFORD, KY.
Keeps constantly on hand a largo assortment
of all kinds of Groceries and Confectioneries,
whieh ho will sell low for cash, or exchango
for all kinds of
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
I will also pay the highest cash price for
niiics,sneeppcits,cggs, Duller, oacon,poii.
(jeans, etc.
i
HARTFORD ACADEMY.
The second session of this school will com
mence on Monday, February1 1,1875, and con.
tinue .twenty n eeks under the charge of
MAL.UUL1U MCINTXKK, A. B.
Terms per session, ono-htlf at tho middle
of the session and one-halft the elose
Primary .$I0 00
Junior ........ 15 00
Higher English 20 00
Latin and U reck-..... ......... 23 00
No incidental fee will be charged.
Special attention paid to fittins bovsfor col
lege.
lioard can be obtained at from $2 SO to $3 00
perVeek.
For any information apply to tho Principal
at Hartford, Ky. r
The Hartford Seminary.
The Fourth session of this school, under the I
control of J. E. Haynes. PrinciDal. and Miss
Emma Haynes, Assistant, will commence on I
Monday, February 22, 1S75, and continue for I
twenty weexs.
Terms Per Sctlon.
Primary Department $10 00
Junior 35 oo
Senior 20 00
German (extra) 5 00
No contingent fee.
German children will not be charged for Ger
One half of the tuition fea to hn tM in arl-1
vance, and the remainder when the session is
half out. i
n iT.rln.tlnn f. . . rl.V
protracted illness. '
It is very important that pnpll ha in at- I
cuumiw a iug cuiuiuencemeni ox tne session.
Total number of of nunlls in attendanco last
session iuu.
J.
.E. HAYNES, Principal.
nl lm
Plow Stocking
AND
GENERAL "WOODWORK.
The undersigned would respectfully
nounea to the citizens of Ohio county, that
they are now prepared to do all kinds of
WOODWORK
at their new shop in Hartford. They hare se
cured tho services of a competent workman to
STOCK PLOWS,
and they guarantee satisfaction, both as to
work and rniczs, in all .cases. They will
make and
WAGONS AND BUGGIES,
and will make and furnish
COFFINS AND BURIAL CASES
at tho lowest possible prices. Call and sco us
before engaging your work elsewhere.
PATRONAGE SOLICITED,
nnd satisfaction guaranteed. By close applica
tion to business we hope to merit the support
of our mends, J1AU21 J: uuiir.
Jan. 20, 1875. ja20 ly
E. SMALL'S
TRADE PALACE,
HARTFORD, KY.
Dealer in Staple and Fancy Dry Goods,
Gents and boys custom mads
CLOT H 1 NC .
A No. 1 stock of
BOOTS AND SHOES,
HATS AND CAPS.
rUirNISHTNGGOODS,
CLOAKS, BLANKETS,
FURS, NO HONS, AC.
I also keep a largo and well selected stock of
Ladies' Dress Goods,
Sold ntXcw York Prices.
All kinds of
COUNTRY PRODUCE
Bought at tlie highest market price.
JOIIX 1. TRACY fc SOX.
UNDERTAKERS
HARTFORD, KY.
Manufacturers and dealers in all kind3 of
wooden coffins , Irom the finest rose wood casket
to the cheapest pauper comn.
All kinds of coffin trimmings constantly on
Keep a fino hearso always ready to attend
lauerai).
Wagons and Buggies,
constantly on hand or made to order. Partic
ular attention given to piow eiucMug.
nol ly
Geo. zleix. joiw H.HJU.
GEO. KLEIN & BKO.
HARTFORD, KY.
Dealers in house furnishing good, for general
kitchen and tablo nte.
We keep constantly on band, the celebrated
a rnlnnn CfTrO
Seven sixes for either coal or wood. House
kef pers are delighted with its superbr cooking
n n . I i.bin. IE m II II l-uubi au I iluvi.i
anil see for yourself.
TINWARE.
All kinds of tinware made and repaired on
short notice
3. F. YAGEK,
Sale ami Livery Stable,
HARTFORD, KY.
I desire to inform the citizens of Hartford
anil vicinitv thatl am'prepared to furnish Sad
dle and Harness Stock, Buggiesand convey an-
ccsof all kinds on the most reasonable terms.
Horses taken to feed or board by the day, week
or month. A liberal share or patrcnago solici
ted. n01 T
WST. flAEO-WICK,
HAKDWICK fc XALL,
CEALIBS I.t
DRY GOODS, OROCERIES, HATS, CAPS,
BOOTS, SHOES, HARDWARE,
QUEENSWARE, Ac.
Which we will sell low for cash, or exchange
for country produce, paping the highest market
price. . n-ji ly
Ii. F. 1TOER.VER, -
BOOT SHOEMAKER.
nARTFORD, KENTUCKY.
Repairing neatly and promptly done.
REPRESENTATIVE AND
CHA1IP-
IOX OF AMERICAN AST TASTS
rKosrECTCS roc 1875 eighth teas.
THE AU31NE
THE ART JOURNAL OF AMERICA,
13SCIDM05THLY. "
MAGNIFICAKT CONCEPTION WON
DERFULLY CARRIED OUT.
The necessity of a popular medium for tho
representation of the productions of our great
artisu nas always oeeir recognized, ana many
attempts have been made to meet the want.
The successive failures which have so invariably
lish an art iournal. did not crave tha indiffM.
followed eacn attempt in mis country to estab
I enee of the people of America to the claims of
Ihlzhart. So soon as a proper appreciation of
. . .... . V : 1 ? 4 . . f. 1
the publia at once rallied with enthusiasm to
its support, and the result was a rreat artistia
and cviuminUI triumph THE ALDINE.
JCno Aldlne wniie Issued witn all of the regu
larity, has none of the temporary or (lately in
terests characteristic of ordinary periodicals.
It is an elegant miscellany of pure, lizbt. and
graceful literature, and a collection of pictures ,
tha rarest collection of artistic skill, in black
and white. Although each succeeding number
affords sfresh pleas uro to its friends, the real'
value and beauty o! TheAldine will be most'
appreciated after it is bound up at the elosa of.
tnevear. wnilo otner publications may claim
superior cheapness, as compared wth rivals of
a similar class. The Aldlne is a unique and
original conception alone and unapproached
absolutely witnout competition in price or
character. The possessor of a complete vol
ume cannot duplicate the quantity of fine pa
per and engravings in any other shape or num
ber of volumes, for ten lima if ml: and Lie.
there U tlie eAromo, letidet!
The national feature Of Tne Aldine must be
taken in no narrow sense. True art is cosmo
politan. While The Aldlne Is a strictly Ameri-
ran institution, it aoes Dot connne itseii to ins
peproduction of native art. It mission Is to
cultivate a broad and -appreciative, art taste, on
tnat will uiscriminare on grounds oi intrlnslo
merit. Thus, while pleading before the patron
of The Aldlne, as a leading characteristic, the
productions ol the most noted American artists,
attention will always bo given to specimens
from foreign masters, giving subscribers all tha
pleasure and Instruction obtainable from horns
or foreign sources.
The artistic illustration of American scenery.
original with The Aldine is an important fea
ture, and its magnificent plates are of a' size
moro appropriate to lne satislaetory treatment
of details than can be afforded by any inferior
page. The judicious interspersion of landreape,
marine, figure and animal subjects, sustain an
unabated interest, impossible where the scops
of the work confines tho artist too closely to as
. i .i.i. r.r TV. lit.,.!... .r TV.
I Aldine is a light and- graceful accompaniment.
worthy ot tne artistic features, wun only suen
technical disquisitions as do not interfere with;
the popular interest of the work.
PREMIUM FOR 1875.
fe
Svery sub;ciber for 1875 will receive a beau-
Itlful portrait, In oil Colors, of the sams nobUJB
dog whose picture In a former issue attracted se
muoh attention. ,
"Man's Unselfish Friend"
will be welcome to every home. Everybody
loves such a'dog, and the portrait is executed
so true to ine me, mat it seems ine veritable
presence of tho animal itself. The Rev. T. Ds
Witt Talmage tells that his own Newfoundland
dog (the finest in Brooklyn) barksat it. Al
though so natural, no one who sees this pre
mium ehromo will have the tPghtttt fear of :j
being bitten.
Besides tne cbromo every advanee subscriber
to The Aldine for 1875 is constituted a membrjj
and entitled to the privileges of
TIIE ALDINE ART UNION. 1
The Union owns the originals of all The At-
dino pictures, which with other paintings and
engravings, are to be distributed among the
members. To every series of 5,000 subscribers
100 different pieecs, valued at over $2,500, ars
distributed as soon as the series is full, and the
awards of each aerias as made, are to be pub
lished in the next sueeeding issue of The Al
dine. This feature only applies to subscribers
who pay for one year in advance. Fall partic
ulars in circular-sent on application inclosing s
stamp.
TERUS:
One Subscription, entitling to The Aldine ona
year, tne inromo, ana tne - .
Art Union,
Six Dollars per annum. In Advance.
(No charge for postage.)
Specimen copies of The Aldine, 50 cents
The Aldine will hereatter be obtainable onlv
by subscription. There will be no reduced or
eIaD ntct. ror subscriptions must be rent
1 the publishers dirtct or ba
the publishers dirtct or handed to the local
canvasser, without responsibility to the pub
lisher, except in eases where the certificate la
given, bearing. the fas simile signature of Jas.
Sottos, President.
CANVASSERS WANTED. "
Anv person wishing to act permanently as a.
local canvasser,' will receive full and prompting,
UIlBilUUU UJ Vv 3 B
THE ALDINE COMPANY,
53 Maiden-Lane, New York.- -
Unyuestionvlly the lest Sustained Work ef-
the kind in the. II orla.
HARPERS MAGAZINE
..a
ILLCSTBATED.
Jioticet vf tie Prm.
The ever increasing circulation of this ex- .
cellent monthly proves its continued adapta
tion to popular desires and needs. Indeed,
when we think into how many homes it ptne-1
trates every month, we must consider It as en
tertainers, of the public mind, for its vast popu
larity has been won no by appeal to stupid pre-
: lu-dices or depraved tastes. Botton Glol.
-1 . Lf.L ,1!. If !
auo cawicictHuicu .air .uagAiiua possessee
for variety, enterprise, artistic wealth, and.
literary culture that has kept pace with, if.it
has not led the times, should cause its con
ductors to regard it with justifiable eompla-.
cency. It also entitles them to a great claim
upon the publia gratitude. The Magaxlne has)
done good, and not evil, all tho days of its''
life. Jirootlyn Earjle
TERMS.
Pottaje Free to all Subtcrilert i tie United
matte.
Harper's Magazine, one year 00
Si 00 inclunes prepayment of U. S.postogs
by the publisher.
Subscriptions to Harper's juagatine, eexiy,
and Bazar, to one address for one year, $10 00:
or, two of Harper's Periodicals, to one ad
dress for one year, S7 09: postage free..
An extra copy of either the Magazine, Week
y, or Bazar, will be supplied gratia for every
club of five subscribers at $4. 00 each, in -one
remittance; or six conies for $20 00, without
extra copy: postage free.
Rati iiuatSer can le tvpplied at any time.
A complete set of of Harper's Magazine, now
comprissing 49 Volumes, in neat cloth binding,
will bo sent by express, freight at expense of
purchaser, for 2 25 pey volume. Single vol
umes, by mail, postpaid,. $3 00. Cloth cases,,
for binding, 58 cents, by mail, postpaid- '
Address HARPER Jfc BOTHERS,.
NewXirfc-

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