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The Hartford herald. [volume] (Hartford, Ky.) 1875-1926, May 26, 1875, Image 4

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THE HERALD.
AGRICULTURAL,
Feeding Ntviue in Summer.
A corresdondent of the Germantown
Telegraph writes: "During the hot sum'
mer months I would feed very little
solid food, such as corn in the ear or
nncracked. I would keep the hogs
upon green food constantly.either crass.
oats or rye, and feed them at regular
intervals, once or twice a day, upon
mashed food, either short?, chopped
oats or rye, buckwheat, etc, fed in
troughs. When fed in this way, and
at the same time allowed access to wa
ter and shade, hogs will bear crowding
brough the hot months, a very good
time, II not the beat,- to tato on ncsti.
This puts them in the best of condition
for corn feeding, which should com
mence about the 1st of September,
when the new corn is still soil and ten
der."
This writer is on the eve of finding
out that the hog requires bulky food as
well as the cow or horse. Because
Pork is usually made by feeding grain
many farmers have almost ceased to
retard the hoc as a frrass-eatin tr animal.
When farmers shall study the nature
ot the pig and feed it accordingly,
.there will be little trouble with cholera,
scurvy or other diseases. Both are no
doubt occasioned by errors in feeding
and unclean surroundings. One point
mentioned in the above paragraph
needs correction, and that is, that it is
dangerous to feed high in summer.
This idea has grown out of the fact that
diseases are more prevalent m warm
weatherp but the cause of greater pre
valence-of disease is that concentrated
food creates fever in the stomach, and
the hot weather increases the difficulty.
Cold weather carries off much of the
unnatural heat, and thus modifies the
effect of grain diet alone. Now the
pig should be fed in such a way that
the stomach will be healthy all the
time, and the summer heat will aid
the growth and the laying on of fat
With grass or other green food, given
with meal, the pig may be fattened
much cheaper in summer than fall or
winter; it requiring little food to keep
up animal heat. 1 he summer is the
economical time to make pork; give
plenty ot clover, green rye, oais, tur
nips, beets, carrots or other green food
relished by the pig, and with this giv
corn meal, ground oats, peas or any
other grain, and your pigs will make
healthy pork, and the pork will cost
ou percent, less than that made in
winter. Live Stock Journal.
Forty Bashels of Wheat per Acre.
A writer in the Practical Farmer tells
how he gets his big crops of wheat:
'For the past five years I have aver
aged forty bushels per acre of wheat
of the finest quality, always being over
weight. I think I am still gaining
every year, and attribute this to the
system pursued, and especially to keep
ing sheep. Illy rotation is corn, bar
ley, with clover; third year, clover;
and fourth vear. clover mowed dowi
for wheat. 'I have never missed a crop
of clover by seeding it with barley. It
gives the grass seeds a chance which
oats do not. I raise full crops of bar
ley, which do not at all interfere with
the grass, but I think barley rather
helps by the slight shading. After the
barley is cut, the clover makes aston
ishing growth, giving me superior late
pasture. Owing to danger from mice,
I pasture it down pretty close. My
sod is clay loam. I plow down the
rank clover about rine inches deep,
give it one harrowing, then haul out
my manure and spread. This I plow
down shallow, as I consider it necessa
ry to have the fertilizer near the sur
face tor the roots of the wheat plant
I use the drill, putting in one bushel
and one peck to the acre. Never had
wheat hurt by freezing."
Wire and Cut-Worms.
A correspondent of the Live Stock
Journal gives the following prevent
ive of the ravages of these insects in
corn-fields: Soak the seed in coperas
water twentyfourhours before planting,
keeping the water a little warm, say
seventy degs. Fahr. One pound of
coperas in three gallons of water to one
bushel of seed. He tested it last year,
and not a hill was touched. The cop
eras turns the seed black, but does not
Kijure the germinative properties.
Another preventive Is the following:
Soak your seed one night in a tub
of equal proportions of lye made from
ashes and urine, with a fair portion of
blue stone dissolved therein. Pour off
the liquid through a basket into a tub,
to preserve for use again. Then, while
the com is wet, take a first class article
of plaster, and mix and stir till each
and every grain is thickly and thor
oughly coated with the plaster, so as
to cover the entire surface of the grains.
Then plant as usual, being carelul not
to break or rub off the coating. It is
t-aidto be, by those who have tested
it, a complete preventive against
those annoyers to all fanners.
Making and Saving Haj-.
J. K. Winston, a fine practical far
mer of Allensville, Ky., writes to the
Rural Sun in regard to making hay,
as follows: Believing it the duty of ev
ery one to advauce the interest and
happiness of his fellow-man, I have
concluded to give to my fellow-farmers
some information I trust may be of
great practical as well as pecuniary
benefit. The subject of hay making
and saving is one of great importance
to almost every one. and especially the
making and saving of clover hay, as
it has been found not to be easily kept,
unless stored undercover, or if stacked,
to be thickly capped of with wheat
straw or timothy. Now, it may be
!"- as safrlv as any other variety of
hay, stacked aloncr raid uncapped with
anything else. The-plan- to cure and5
pave' H inis: as soon as tnu ciover a
m full bloom start your mower, being
careful not to cut until the dew is en-
tirelv off. and as soon as the clover is
well" wilted run up into winrows, and"
then put in cocks, taking care not to
let any remain uncocked of each day's
cutting, as soon as you can, alter
putting m cocks, proceed to stacK, ana
in the following way: Cut your stack-
poles of the desired height you wish to
make vour stack, ana let tne poies ue
selected that have bunches of limbs at
intervals from top to bottom. Then
cut off the branches, leaving the arms
three or four feet long, and be careful
to leave a bunch of the arms near the
ton of the pole. After setting the pole,
lay some brush or pieces of rails at the
bottom, to keep the hay off the ground
and proceed to stack your cloven and
if your man knows anything about his
business, you will find your hay will
keep as sweet and long as any other
nay pur up in sucks.
I cut and stacked last season a large
lot of rlnver in this way, and after
standing out the whole wmur. it was
found as sound and sweet as whei hrst
stacked. The arms left to the stack
poles keep the hay from settling a par
tide, and in this way give it good ven-
tilation and drainage. Try it, brother
farmers, and you will thank me tor the
information.
Go To Work.
Under this caption, the Sunny
South has the following well-said and
sensible article:
"The great curse of the South
idlers, white and black. In all of our
towns and cities there are hundreds of
strong, healthy and fine looking young
men of all colors standing or strolling
about the streets irom day to day, and
from week to week, with no occupation
and, of course, no money; and yet the
white ones dress well, and look lat and
seem happy, lne universal excuse.
'There is nothing to do. What an
idea! when we have here in the South
the grandest opportunities ever offered
tor any people to accumulate fortunes;
a land teaming with resources, and
should literally flow with milk and
honey. There is no time for idlers,
If you can't get work in one department
get it in anotner. Aieave ue cuius
and get out on little farms. Get
few acres of land, make it rich, plant
no cotton, and in a few years you will
be comfortable,, independent and on
the high road to fortune. Don't try
to be merchants, lawyers, preachers
nor teachers. Everybody cannot be
long to these professions. Be farmers,
producers, and not consumers. In
other words, go to work; there is work,
and hard work t)0, and plenty of it to'
do. lhe vineyard is large, the labor
ers few, and idlers crowd the market
places. The fields are white, and the
harvest is great, and there is work
enough for all. Reaping is work for
the strongest man, who nils bis bosom
with grain at one sweep of the sickle;
the feeblest man can reap a little, and
now and then gather a sheaf. Boaz
can go forth among the reapers and
direct them to their toil; and even tim
id Ruth can follow after to glean the
shattered stalks, and find some hand
fuls dropped to encourage her in her
work. There is work to do but who
will do it? It is not forming resolu
tions, joining societies, or making
great ado; but it is putting your shoul
der to the wheel yourself. .let every
man begin at home, building against
his own dwelling, and live in humble
dependence on the Lord, and stand
ready to do His blessed will."
Something New and Good.
A live Grange out in Minnesota has
passed the following resolutions, which
are unique and worthy of imitation:
Whereas, It behooves us as far
mers and Patrons of Husbandry, to use
our best endeavors to advance the
cause of agriculture, and increase the
funds of onr Grange; therefore,
Revolved, first, that the male members
01 our orange do eacn iurnisned one
hundred kernels of corn, to be planted
the present season, the corn produced
to be the property ot our Grange, to be
disposed of at a corn festival some time
in December next.
Second That our Grange pay as a
premium for the largest yield from one
hundred kernels, one dollar; for the
second largest, seventy-five cents; and
for the third largest, fifty cents.
Third That any member refusing
to compete for the premium, or to make
the most he can from his share of the
seed, shall be deprived of any of the
benefits of this act.
Fourth That each member shall
be prepared to iuniih two disinterest
ed witnesses to substantiate his state
ment, if required; also items of inter
est about cultivation, soil, planting,
etc.
Fifth That a committee of three be
appointed to select the seed, award the
premiums and attend to any other busi
ness necessary to carry out these reso
lutions. Sixth That these resolutions be
published in papers friendly to the
Patrons, and that other Granges in the
State are invited to adopt these or sim
ilar resolutions.
Seventh That the State Grange be
invited to offer a premium of fifteen
dollars for the largest yield, ten dollars
for the second largest yield and five
dollars for the third largest yield from
one hundred kernels, to be paid by the
Grange furnishing the same. Rural
World.
A southern planter's opinion is that
there is but one of two alternatives for
us to choose either to be slaves, many
of us and our offspring after us, or to
by. freemen; and to be freemen we must
first stop the credit system, if we have
to live on bread and Water to do so.
A very .-ound and sensible opinion it is,
too.
No fanner is excusable who makes
his field work a reason for not attend
ing to the vegetable garden.
Dreary Homes.
Of all the dreary places deliver us
from the dreary farm houses which so
many people call "home." Bars for a
front gate; chickens wnllowing before
the front door; pig-pens elbowing the
hotrse fn the rear; scraggy trees never
cared for, or no trees at all; no flower
ing shrubsr no neatness,, no trimness.
And vet a lawn and trees, and a neat
walk, a pleasant porch and- a neat fence
in front do not cost a great deal. They
can be secured little by little at odd
times, and the expense hardly telt.
And if ever the time comes when it is
best to sell the farm, fifty dollars so in
vested will often bring back five hun
dred. For the men are rare that have
money to invest in farms who are insen
sible to pleasant surroundings and the
inducement they oiler to wile and chil
dren. HOUSEHOLD HINTS.
To prevent hard soap, prepared with
soda, from crumblinor. the bars mav be
dipped in a mixture of resin soap, beef
tallow and wax.
A little camphene drooped between
the neck and stopper of a glass bottle
will render the latter easily removed if
jammed fast
lo make silk which lias been wrinkled
appear like new, sponge on the surface
wuii a wea& soiuuon oi gum araDic or
.i i i . . . i i
white glue, and iron on the wrong side.
If you get a fish, bone in your throat
and sticking fast there; swallow an egg
raw; it will be almost sure to carry
down a bone easily and certainly.
When, as sometimes by accident, cor
rosive sublimate is swallowed, the
white of one or two eggs will neutral
ize the poison, and change the effect to-
that ot a dose of calomel.
Kerosene and powdered lime, whit
ing or wood ashes will scour tins with
the least labor.
Plain Cake.t Two cups of sugar.
one of milk, three of eggs, one-half cup
of butter, two teaspoonsful of cream of
tartar, one ot soda, four cups of flour.
Alake two loaves.
Minute Loaf Cake. Three cups
ol nour, one and a halt cups ot sugar,
one cup oi miiK, one cup oi raisins.
one-half cup of butter, one teaspoonful
ot cream ot tartar, one-halt teaspoonful
of soda, one egg. This makes a large
loat.
Cookies. One teacup half lard
and half butter; one of thick cream
two of sugar; one coffee-cup milk: one
heaping teaspoonful of salaratus; two
cream tartar; knead soft; bake
quick oven.
Tapioca Pudding. Dissolve a tea-
cupful of tapioca in a quart of water
over night In the morning pour off
tne water, ana dou it in a quart oi
milk, with two teacupfuls of sugar,
Pare and core eight apples, filling the
opening with a lump of sugar and a
bit of cinnamon: put in a baking dish
and pour the tapioca over them. Bake
two hours"; serve cold.
To mnko crumb fritters, put crumbs
of bread into sour milk; when quite
soft mash with a spoon, and for a quart
add one beaten egg, one teaspoonlul of
li. -JJ a a- 1 ir i
suit, uuu uuur ui lua&e a sun Datier,
Fry on a griddle.
To make excellent raised doughnuts,
take a pint of milk, two eggs, one cup
of yeast; mix with flour to make stiff
batter, .Let it rise several hours.
Then stir in two cup3 of sugar, three-
fourths of a cup of butter, two-thirds
of a teaspoonful of soda, spice and salt
to taste; mould it and let it rise again
A writer in the Poidiiy World ob
served his fowls addicted to the habit
of pulling feathers very carefully, and
noticed on the ends of the ireshly
plucked feathers that the quill was
covered with an oily substance.
occurred to him that the oil was what
the fowls were after, and acting on
that idea tried an experiment of feed
ing small scraps of tallow to them, and
found it worked admirably, the com
motion of the yard ceasing at once, and
the fowl becoming peaceable and quiet.
He found that an occasional feed of
kitchen grease or fatty matter prevent
ed the inclination by supplying the ap
petite Deiore it gets in a morbid con
dition.
A Texus Gentleman wlio Is Learning all
Awui me uiw.
Dallas Herald
Reuben Brooksliaw. charged with
burning the house of Jacob Menezer, has
been subjected to more hardship in ascer
taining his late than any criminal, if he
be one, on record. He was first tried for
burning a house other than a dwellin
house, for which he was convicted, but
was granted a new trial, upon which the
district attorney dismissed the case against
mm, and had him reindicted for burning
a dwelling house. He was acquitted of
una ouenee, and promptly upon the bring
ing in of the verdict the district attorney
u Mini nguiu iiiuiuii-u, upuu wuicii in
dictment he has had three trials, the jury
in each instance railing to agree. Under
such circumstances Mr. Brookshaw has
good reason to complain of the torture h
has endured, and there must be a defect
in the law or in its administration when
a man a liberty can be so experimented
upon.
ATrlnl anil Verdict That arc an Insult
o justice.
Frankfort Yeoman.
The jury in the case of Col. W. J. Ter
rell, on trial in the Criminal Court of
Grant county last week, charged with the
murder of lion. Harvey Myers, in Cov
ington about a year aso. brought in
verdict on last Saturday eveninsr of "vol
untary manslaughter,'' and fixed his pun
ishment at seven years in the Penetenti
I m ilt i .
ary. joi. xerreii s counsel promptly ap
plied for a new trial, which Judge lie-
Manama granted.
The Touchstone of Fortune.
(Washington (D. C.J Chronicle.
More than one business man has found
in judicious advertising the touchstone of
fortune. It uon t require a column to
make known to the public that a mer
chant has something to sell which th
people want A column is better than
a square to attract the attention, but of
tentimes a few lines will answer the pur
pose. A costly sign can be read only by
a few passers-by, but an advertisement is
spread before thousands and does the
work intended a hundred times more ef
fectually. A word to tbe wise is euflici-cicut.
W.H. P. GREGORY.
(County Judge.)
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
HARTFORD, KY.
Prompt attention eWen to the collection of
claims, umce in he courtnouee.
E. F. STBOTIIER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
HARTFORD, KENTUCKY.
Will practice in all the courts of Ohio counts
and the circuit courts of adjoining counties.
vtmvn upstairs over J. w. iewis- oia
stand. nO tf
JOHN OfliAHEBTY.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
HARTFORD, KY.
Collediom Promptly Attended to
Office on
Market street, over Mauty's tin
shop.
janZOly
jessc e. roan,
Hartford, Ky.
Km X. 8WEE9ET,
Oweasboro, Ky
FOGLE &. SWEENEY,
ATTORNEYS AT LA W,
HARTFORD, KY.
Will practice their profession in Ohio and
adjoining counties ana in me uourtoi Appeals
umce on Jiarxet street, near courmouse.
r. r. XOBOAK,
O. C. WEDBlRO.
MORGAN & WEDDING,
ATTORNE YS AT LA
HARTFORD, KY.
w,
(Office west of courthouse over Hardifick k
A airs store.
Will practice in inferior and superior courts
oltbls commonweaitn
Special attention given to cases in bank
runtcv.
F. P. Morgan is also examiner, and wll
take depositions correctly will be ready to
oblige all parties at all times.
E. P. WALKER,
X. C. HUBB1XD.
WALKER fc HUBBARD,
Al TOR'.NEYS AT LAW,
AHP SEAL ESTATE AGENTS,
HARTFORD,.
KENTUCKY.
not la
BEXET P. MCHCKET,
SAX. E. HILL.
McIIENRY HILL,
ATTORNEYS: COUNSELLORS AT LA W
HARTFORD, KY.
Will practice in Ohio and adjoining counties
ana in tne uourt or Appeals oi A.eniuxy.
sol ly.
JOITN C. TOWNS END.
(Formerly County Judge,)
ATTORNEY AT LAW
HARTFORD, KY.
Will practice in ail the courts of Ohio county
and tbe circuit courts ot me tin juaieiai cus
triet. Bu iness solicited andjirompt attention
guaranteed.
JOHN P. BABBETT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
and Real Estate Agent,
HARTFORD, KENTUCKY.
Prompt attention given to tbe collection of
claims, win ouy, sen, lease, or rent tanas or
mineral privileges on reasonable terms. Will
write deeds, mortgages, leases, Ao., and at
tend to listing and paying taxes,on lands b
onging to non-retiaents.
ROYAL INSURANCE COMPANY
OF
LITERPOOL
Heenrlty and Indemnity.
CAPITAL, 810,000,000 GOLD.
dsn Assets, over $12,000,000 Gold
Cash Assets in U. S., $1,837,934 Gold.
Losses paid without discount, refer to 12th con
dition ox uompany I policy.
BARBEB ACASTLEMAN, General Agents,
Louisville, Kentucky.
BARRETT BRO.. Agents,
HARTFORD, KY.
JAB A. THOMAS,
OEO. A. FLATT.
JAS. A. THOMAS fc CO.
HARTFORD, KY.
Dealers In staple and fancy
DRY G4)0DS,
Notions, Fancy Goods, Clothing, Boots and
Shoes, Hats and Caps. A large assortment of
these goods kept constantly on hand, and will
be sold at the very lowest cash prioe.
nolly
Plow Stocking
AND
GENERAL WOODWORK.
The undersigned would respectfully an
nounce to the citizens of Ohio county, that
they are now prepared to do all kinds of
WOODWORK
at their new shop in Hartford. Thojhre se
cured the services of a competent workman to
STOCK PLOWS,
and they guarantee satisfaction, both as to
woee and reiciJ, in all eases. They will
make
WAGONS AND BUGQIE3,
and will make and furnish
COFFINS AND BURIAL CASES
at the lowest possible prices. Call and seo us
before engaging your work elsewhere.
PATUONAGE SOLICITED,
and satisfaction guaranteed. By close applica
tion to business we hope to merit the support
of our friends, MAUZY HURT.
Jan. 20, 1875. ja20 ly
GEO. KLEIN,
GEO. KLEEST fc BRO.
HARTFORD, KY.,
Dealers in house furnishinggood, for general
nana, mo
AJEiXZONA. COOKING STOVE,
Seven sises for either coal or wood.
and baking. It has no equal anywhere, van ana see tor yourseu.
Cancer and Sore Eyes Cared.
Those afflicted with Sore Eyes or Cancer would
do well to call on
D. L. GREGORY,
Todd's Point, Ky, whe has been very suc
cessful in the treatment of these diseases. Ha
can cure any cancer on the surface, if taken in
in time. He treats upon the system of "no cure
no pay." Give him a trial. nol7 em
NOTICE.
Wanted to borrow $3,000 for two or three
years, for wbicn ten per cent. Interest win oe
ata payaoie semi-annually noie 10 oe one
f interest Is not Dromntlr naid. and will se
cure the lender by a'mortgige on real estate;
and as an additional security will give him to
hold at collateral real estate lien noies worm
at least $6,000. Address "MONEY," care
Herald office, Hartford, Ky.
J. F. YAGER,
Sale and Livery Stable,
HARTFORD, KY.
I desire to Inform tbe citisent of Hartford
and vicinity that 1 am prepared to furnish Sad
dle and Harness Stock, Buggiesand conveyan
ces of all kinds on the most reasonable terms.
Horses taken to feed or board by the day, week
or month. A liberal share of patrcnage solid
ted. nol ly
FOR SALE.
A government land warrant for services ren
dered in the war ot 1812, for ISO acres of land,
at a
REASONABLE PRICE.
For further information apply to J, M
Rogers, Beaver Dam, Ky., or John P. Barrett
Hertford, Ky.
OREEJf RITER
WOOLEN MILLS
JAMES CATE,
Manufacturer of every description of Woolen
uooas.
My mill has been enlarged and improved
making the capacity three times greater than
last season. We also have a full set of
Clote Dressing Machinery,
For Cassimeres, Tweeds, Ac,
and are manufacturing a superior article of
JEANS. LINSEY.
PLAID. TWILLED
AND PLAIN FLANNEL,
BLANKETS.
BALMORAL SKIRTS.
CASSIMERES, TWEEDS,
Stocking Yarn, &c.
Wa have large and superior Wool Carding
Machinery, ana warrant an our work.
Goods manufactured by the yard, or in ex
change for wool.
Highest market price paid In cash for wool
GEANGEKS
are solicited to correspond with me. I will
make spec! il contracts with you,and make-it to
your interest to ao so.
JAMES CATS,
nol6 So Rumsey, McLean Co., Ky.
1875
AGAIN I
1875
X.OTJUTII.I.E WEEKLY
COURIER-JOURNAL
Continues for the present Tear its liberal ar
rangement, whereby, on the 31st of December,
1875, it will distribute impartially among its
suoscnoerB
910,000
in presents, comprising greenbacks and nearly
one thousand neful and beautiful articles.
Tbe Courier-Journal is a long-established
live, wide-awake, progressive, neWsy, bright
and spicy paper. 4
No other paper offers such inducements to
subscribers and club agents. Circulars with
full particulars and specimen copies sent free
on applicatisn.
Terms, $2 00 a year and liberal offers to clubs.
Daily edition $12. Postage prepaid on all
papers without extra charge. Address
W. N, UALDKMAN,
President Courier-Journal Company
Louisville, Ky.
Jj. J. LYON.
Dealer in
Groceries and Confectioneries.
nARTFORD, KY.
Keeps constantly on hand alarge assortment
of all kinds of Groceries and Confectioneries,
which he will sell low for cash, or exchange
for all kinds of
COUNTRY PRODUCE.
I will also pay tbe highest cash price for
hides, sheep pelis,eggs, butter, bacon, potatoes,
beans, etc. nol ly
WK. GRAVES,
House
WM. T. COX.
Carpenters.
We respectfully announce to the citizens of
Hartford and Ohio county, that we are pre
pared to do House Carpentering, Furniture Re
pairing, and any kind of Wood-work, on short
notice at reasonable terms. Shop in Mausy's
old stand.
noU6m GRAVES &JC0X.
JNO. M. KLEIN
kitchen and table use.
We keep constantly on
ceieuratea
House-keepers are delighted with its superior cooking
JNO. P. BARRETT & CO,
Newspaper. Book,
AHD
JOB PRINTING,
Corner Court Plaee and Piccadilly street.
HARTFORD, KY.
All orders promptly execi ted.
tention given to orders by mail,
price list. Address
Special at
Write for
JOHN P. BARRETT A CO.,
Job Printers,
Hartford, Ky.
TUB SAINT LOUIS TIMES.
Daily, Weekly and TreWteJiiy.
TUB LIVEST. CHEAPEST AND BEST
DEMOCRATIC PAPER IN THE WEST,
The
Largest Weekly Published
United States.
the
The Times Company take pleasure in an
nouncing to the people of the Great West that
they are new publishing the Largest, Cheapest
and Beat Democratic Paper in the country. It
Is their desispi to make this journal occupy
the field in the Western States open for a
Cheap, Newsy and Sound Democratic Paper,
giving all the news, PolitieaI,Religious, Scien
tific, Social and Commercial one whose edito
rial columns will be deroted to a fair discus
sion of the great Political questions in which
the whole nation is Interested, to the defense
of Constitutional Democratio Government, and
t wage a relentless war on any and all parties
and factions which seek to destroy or pervert
it.
The Daily Times
Will be Issued every day, except Snnday, in a
folio form, containing thirty-two eofamsof the
latest news Foreign and Domestic. A reduc
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REPRESENTATIVE AND CHAMP-
I02t OF AVKSICAN ART TAITZ
rsosncrrs fok 1875 eighth tmk
THE VLXI2rE
THE ART JOURNAL OF AMERICA,
usrinvoarnLT.
MAQNIFICANT CONCEPTION WON
DERFULLY CARRIED OCT.
The necessity of a popular medium for the)
representation of the productions of our great
artists nat always Been reeognlsed, and maay
attempti have been made to meet the want
The tneeessive failures whieh have to Invariably
roiiowea eacn attempt in this country to estab
lish an art journal, did not prove the indlffee
enee of the people of America to the claims of
high art. So toon at a proper appreciation of
the want and an ability to meet it were shown.
tne publie at one rallied with enthusiasm to
its support, and the result wat a rreat artiitlo
and commercial triumph THE ALDINE.
ao Aiaine untie issued wiia allor therera-
Urity, has none of the temporary or lfwf In
terest! cnaractentus ot orainary periodicals.
It Is an elegant miscellany of pure, light, and
graceful literature, and collection of pictures,
the rarest collection of artistic skill, in black
and white. Although each succeeding number
affords a fresh pleasure to its friends, the real
ralue and beauty ol The Aldine will be most
appreciated after it it bound np at the elose of
the year. While other publications may claim
superior cheapness, u compared with rivals of
a similar clast, Tbe Aldine it a nniqne and
original eoneeptlon alone and unapproached
absolutely without competition In price or
character. The possessor of a complete Tol
ume cannot duplicate the quantity of fine pa-
er and engravings in any other shape or nam
er of Tolumes, for tm lines its tort: and tin.
litre it ll cArono, leridetl
Tbe national feature 01 Toe Aid ne must b
taken In no narrow sense. True art It cosmo
politan. While The Aldine It a strictly Amerl
ran inttitution. It doet not confine Itself to the
peproduction of native art. Its mission It to
cultivate a broad and appreciative arttaste,on
mat win aisenminate on grounds 01 mtrintie
merit. Thus, while pleadingbefore the patrons
of The Aldine, at a leading characteristic, the
productions of the mostnoted American artists,
attention will always be given to specimen!
from foreign m as ten, giring subscribers all th
pleasure and instruction obtainable from horn
or foreign sources.
The artistic Illustration of American tcenery,
original with The Aldine it an important fea
ture, and its magnificent platea are of ails
more appropriate to the satisfactory treatment
of details than can be afforded by any Inferior
page. The judicious Interspersion of landscape,
marine, figure and animal subjects, sustain an
unabated interest, impossible where the scop
of the work confines tbe artist too elosely to a
tingle ttyle of subject. The literature of Th
Aldine is a light and graceful accompaniment,
worthy of the artiitlo features, with only such
technical disquisitions as do sot interfere with
the popular interest of the work.
PREMIUM FOR 1875.
livery tubsciber for 1875 will receive a beau
tiful portrait, in. oil colors, of the time noble
dog whose picture In a former Issue attracted so
much attention.
"Han't UnseluK Friauf'
will be welcome to every home. Everybody
lores such a dog, and tbe portrait is executed
so true to the life, that it seems the veritable
presence of the animal itself. The Rev. T. I
Witt Talmage tells that hit own Newfoundland
dog (the finest in Brooklyn) bark at it. Al
though so natural, no one who sees thit pre
mium ebromo will bare the slightest fear of
being bitten.
Besides the ehrome every advance subscriber
to The Aldine for 1S75 it constituted a member
and entitled to the privilegei of
THE ALDINE ART UNION.
The Union owns the originili of all Th Al
dine pictures, which wllh other paintings and
engravings, are to bo distributed among th
members. To every series of 5,000 subscribers
100 different pieces, valued at orer $7,500, ar
distributed as toon at the series It full, and th
awards of each terlet at made, ar to be pub
lished In the next tuceeding issue of The Al
dine. This feature only appliet to subscribers
who pay fer one year in advance. Full partic
ulars in circular ttst on application inelotisg a
stamp.
TERMS:
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year, the Chromo, and th
Art Union,
iSTr Dollar per annum, In AJvanet.
(No charge for postage.)
Specimen copies of The Aldine, 50 cents
The Aldine will hereatter be obtainable only
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lisher, except in eases where the certificate it
given, bearing the fae simile signature of J AS.
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. CANVASSERS WANTED. -Any
person wishing to act permanently at a
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formation by applying to
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Unjucitionvbly the Ust Sustained Work c
the kind in Oie World.
SAPPER'S MAGAZINE
rLLrmuTiD.
Xt!en of tit Prtu.
The ever increasing eireulatioa of this ex
cellent monthly proves its continued adapta
tion to popular desires aad neeaj. Indeed,
when we think Into how many hornet it pene
trate every mostb, we must consider it as en
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larity hat been won no bv anneal to shield nra-
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Tne character wnich tntr Magaslno possesses
for variety, enterprise, artistic wealth, and
literary culture that has kept pace with, If it
has not led the timet, thould cause its con
ductors to regard it with jnttifiabl compla
cency. It alto entitles them to a great claisa
upon the public gratitude. Th Magazine has
done good, and sot evil, all th days of its
life. Bnollya Eaglt
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Slatu.
Harper's Magaiine, one year ..M OS
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Ah extra copy 01 eitner tne iit jaiine, wsek
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Bad NHtiiert tan h npptitd at my tim:
A complete set of of Harper's Maeasine, now
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