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The Hartford herald. [volume] (Hartford, Ky.) 1875-1926, February 16, 1921, Image 1

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THE HARTFORD HERALD.
Subscription $l.o0 Per Tear, in Advance " "" ' " s, ef i:; fahu libwim h a, am." A'trfa ,o& Printing Neatly Executed.
ft 47th YEAR.
HARTFORD, KYV, WEDNESDAY, FEI5RUARY 10, 1921.
NO. 7
! I'
ll
r
i '
THREE PRISQKERS ESBftPE
FROM STATE REFORMATORY
Two Murderers and One Embez
zler; Guards Fail to Per
form Duty.
Frankfort, Ky., Feb. 13. -Heber
Hicks, youthful slayer of Mrs. Joy
Sparks, Clay,. Ky., who escaped elec
trocution by the Tote of one Juror,
was among three prisoners fleeing
Xrom the Frankfort Reformatory
early tonight. The others are:
Roy Blackburnr Frankfort, for
mer bookkeeper of the BTjard of
Charities and Corrections, sentenced
for forgery, . .
Chester Phelps, Knox County,
erring a life term for murder.
The men sawed two bars from a
window at the north end of the
white cellhouse. Guard Charles M.
Bryant saw Hicks, the last man go
ing out, and gave the alarm.
Frankfort, Ky., Feb. 14. Four
guards who had charge of the cell
house of the Frankfort Reformatory
where two life-termers and another
prisoner sawed their way out early
last night were suspended today by
Warden William H. Moyer, At the
same time the warden said he was
conducting an investigation to as
certain why George Hicks, captain
of the guards, deliberately violated
his special Instructions and let He
ber Hicks, '20-year-old slayer of a
young woman In Webster County,
out of his cell..
LOUISVILLE LIVESTOCK MAR
' . KET MONDAY, FEB. 14, 1021
Cattle Receipts 1,588 head,
against 1,663 last Monday, 1,537
v twe- weeks ' ago and 1,269 . a year
'agdA fairly good supply arrived
for the opening day's trade but ac
tlvity was displayed from the start,
offerings selling on a.;' steady to
strong basis. Fairly good call for
the best light butchers at steady
prices: medium and common grades
unchanged. No change In canner,
cutter or bull values; best canners
S3 down; best bolognas $5 5.50
Fairly good demand for the best
milch cows at prevailing prices,
Trade in heavy steer division early
indicated steady to strong prices; a
few sales early around $77.25
Big demand for the ' best quality
stock cattle at prevailing prices;
medium and plainer kinds less ac
tive. ' "
Calves Receipts 242 head. Mar
ket active at Bteady rates. Best
veals $ 10.50 11; medium to good
$58; common to medium $3 5.
Hogs Receipts 1,667 head,
prices established on a steady basis.
Demand active, from all sources.
Best hogs, 200 pounds and up, sold
$9.50; 120 to 200. pounds $10; 90
to 120 pounds $9.25; 90 pounds
down $8.25; throwouts $7.25 down.
Sheep and Lambs Receipts 38
bead. Trade generally unchanged.
Best sheep sold $3 down, bucks $2
down; best lambs ranged from $7
to $10; seconds $4 5.
'SLEEPING SICKNESS KILLS
WOMAN, 40 OTHERS ILL
Louisville, Ky.. Feb. 14. The
' number of recent deaths caused by
sleeping sickness was brought to
three yesterday, when Mrs. Anna
Matthews, 53 years old, succumbed
a the City Hospital. She contract
ed the Illness several days after aha
was admitted to the hospital suffer
ing from nervousness.
Dr. Ellis Owen, City Health Offi
cer, estimated that there are forty
cases of sleeping sickness In Louis
Hie at present. He said that two
of the three deaths were out-of-town
residents, who were broaght
here for treatment.
GO TO FRANKFORT.
County Judge Mack Cook and
'Representative I. 8. Mason went to
Frankfort, Monday to meet with the
Stat Highway Commission for the
purpose of securing aid to complete
the grading and other work on the
Uartford-Owensboro road.
NEW LINOTYPE SCHOOL .
As soon as necessary arranger
menta can be perfected, a school for
' Linotype. Instruction will be opened
at tub office. '
SHERIFFS MUST RE- '
PORT ALL FIRES
Sheriffs of every county In the
state and chiefs of Are departments
have been instructed by J. A. Stel
tenkamp, chief deputy auditor in
charge of the state department of
Are prevention and rates, that they
must report all fires that occur
within their Jurisdiction. .,
The notification, which has Just
gone out in the form, of a letter,
calls attention to a law passed by
the 1920 legislature making It the
duty of sheriffs and chiefs of Are
departments to make such reports.
The state bureau, according 'to
I Mr. Steltenkamp, never has been
! able H list accurately all fires In
the state and for this reason the
law was passed. A report within
ten days Is compulsory, and an al
lowance of twenty-five cents for
each fire reported Is made. '
BLOODHOUNDS LOCATE
RUNAWAY COLLEGE GIRL
Lexington, Ky., Feb. 14. Put
ting bloodhounds on the trail of a
missing girl may not be customary,
but It was the method ' of search
adopted by Lexington paretns when
Miss Louise Butner, 17 years old,
disappeared from the Cardone Visi
tation Academy near Georgetown.
Mrs. Will Butner, Lexington, call
ed Saturday night at the school for
her daughter, having been tipped to
a possible elopement. The daugh
ter left the room and never came
back.
Captain Milllgan's bloodhounds
were ordered from Lexington. They
trailed the girl to Georgetown,
where she was found in a store.
She had spent the night with
Georgetown friends.
$70,000 VERDICT
FOR ATTORNEYS
Louisville, Feb. 12. A verdict
for $70,000 was returned by the
Jury late today in the suit for a
$125,000 fee for special counsel in
the Bingham Inheritance tax litiga
tion against the state.
The decision was reached after
two hours and fifteen minutes of
deliberation. The case had been In
progress for an entire ' week. The
sum Is subject to a $10,000 retainer
fee. The case decided today was on
an appeal taken last July after a
Jury in county court returned a ver
dict for $125,000.
Special counsel Hite Huffaker,
James Garnett and Robert Gordon
were appointed In October, 1917 by
Governor Stanley and discharged
April 6, 1920 by Governor Morrow.
WELL KNOWN CITIZEN DEAD
Death claimed William Brown,
aged 74 years, 11 months and 17
days,, at his home near Hartford
last Thursday night Feb. 10. He
had been ill of diseases incident to
old age for some time. Mr. Brown
was born in Nelson county, Ky.,
Feb. 24, 1846 but had been living
In Ohio County many years. In
early manhood he professed faith In
Christ and Joined the Methodist
church remaining a faithful mem
ber until death. He was one of the
county's most respected citizens.
His wife and two children pre
ceded him to the grave,, but he has
one son, 'John Brown, and one
daughter, Mrs. McDowell, still
living. He is also survived by three
brothers and three sisters.
Funeral services were conducted
Saturday at Hamlin's Chapel . by
Rev, Harper, of Hartford. The body
was laid to rest In the Milton Tay
lor burying grounds.
ASKINS STORE DESTROYED
Mr.- George Clark's general store
at Askius was recently destroyed by
Are. The entire stock of goods as
well as the building were consumed.
The property was Insured but we
are not Informed as to the amount.
, INFANT DEAD
Louise Rlggs, Infant daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Hipsley Rlggs, of near
Heflln, died Feb. 7. Death was
caused by hydrostatic pneumonia.
She was 11 months and IS days
old. Burial occurred at Wood
ward's Valley Feb. I.
The Landls Singing Orchestra
will appear at the school auditorium
here, February 22. This, is said to(
ds one or the best numbers on the,
IleUpulb Lyttiuu course.
$5,000 PAYROLL SIOIEN
J FROM TRUCK Hi CORBIN
I .
'Taken From Station Platform
Wlie on Way to Wiscon
sin Steel Co. Mines
Corbin, Ky., Feb. 11. A pouch
of registered mail, said to have con
tained $50,000 In cash consigned by
a Cincinnati bank to the Wisconsin
Steel Company at Benham, Ky., was
stolen from a truck on the station
platform In Corbin, Ky., last night.
Postofftce Inspector W. E. Green
away confirmed the report that the
pouch of mall had been stolen, but
declared that he did not know Just
what mail or what sum of money,
If any, was missing. He had been
notified by Pbsoffice Inspector
Thomas Dlskln at Cincinnati, in
whose territory the robbery oc
curred. Payments In ComIi
Mail from the Cincinnati-Atlanta
through train is transfered to the
Cumberland VaJIey Division at Cor
bin. A banker at Pinevllle, where the
money for the Wisconsin Steel Com
pany is transferred to the Clover
Fork branch train to be sent to
P.enham, said that, the money tor
the big coal operators' payrolls was
usually received on' Friday morning.
All the company's payments are
made in cash. The company has a
big force of men at work at its
mines in Benham, which is in Har
lan County beyond Lynch. . The
mines have been working a full
force all winter because the com
pany consumes Us own products at
Its mills in the North.
First news in Plneville and Mid
dlesboro of the robbery came from
a conductor on the Cumberland Val
ley train, who told passengers of the
theft.
It was reported from Middles
boro that three bags of mail were
ripped open and that suspect had
been arrested at Jellico, Ky.
COOLIDGE RAISE VOT
ED BY SENATE
Salary Increase of $;l,OO0 May Mwt
Objections In House, However
Washington, Feb. 12. A salary
Increase of $3,000 a year from
$12,000 to $15,000 was voted for
Vice President Coolidge by the Sen
ate, which at the same time reduc
ed his already small patronage roll
by striking out a provision for a
private telegraph operator at $1,
500 a year.
Elimination of the provision for
a telegraph operator was made at
the request of Vice President Mar
shall who said the Vice President
had no need for a private operator.
He urged that the Senate accept an
amendment providing tor a private
messenger for the Vice President at
$1,000 a year, instead of a page at
$600.
FORMER OHIO COUNTY CITI-
ZEN DIES IN KANSAS CITY
Mrs. Sarah Isabel Rhodes, 76
years old, died at the home of her
son, O. E. Rhodes, 6615 Lee street,
Kansas City, Mo.. Tuesday Feb. 8.
Among relatives known here are a
brother, J. P. Gilmore, of Fords
vllle; niece, Mrs. J. H. Roberts, of
Fordsvllle, three nephews, Cal P.
Keown and Sam Keown, of Hart
ford, and. John Keown, of Evans
ville, Ind.
Mrs. Rhodes was reared near
Fordsvllle, and has many friends in
this county.
FIRE DESTROYS BARN
Mr. C. H. Walker, of Patttevllle,
this county, lost s good barn by fire
recently. The blase , originated ,
from a Are used by men stripping
tobacco In the barn. Besides the
barn, 5000 lbs. of tobacco, some'
oats a lot of baled hay and straw j
and quite a bit or Harness was
burned. . . :
MRS. WARRINER DEAD
Word has been received her of
the death of Mrs. Laura Warriner,
which recently occurred in Newark,
N, J. Mrs. Warriner was the moth
er of Mrs. D. Ellis Thomas and re
sided with Mr. and Mrs. Thomas, at
this place t number, of years, and
hud many appreciative frluuds here.
TWO HORSES DROWNED;
MEN NARROWLY ESCAPE
Drive Into Washout While
Crossing Backwater Near
South Panther
While passing through backwat
er from Lower Panther between
Magan and Whitesville, last Thurs
day night, Messrs. Almond Duke
ana Ernest Midkiff accidentally
i1 rove into a washout overturning
liieir wagon, downing a horse and
mule and themselves narrowly es
caping 3 watery death.
They were returning from Owens
boro tfhere they had taken a four
horse load of tobacco and not know
ing of the washout believed the
road to be safe. The off wheel
horse and off mule of the front
team were thrown Into the deep
water and could not be saved. The
other mule of the front team kick
ed . loose from the' stretchers and
wai resued after he swam a con
siderable distance. The lead wheel
hor was released and although
badlf bruised Is recovering.
There was no insurance on the
teams. The mule that was downed
belonged to Mr. Puke and cost $300
The horse which belonger to Mr. J.
R. JlU'.kiff cost $175.
The drivers and those who as-
sisted In the rescue were in the
water several hours. Messrs. Earl
ani Carl Maden were Just behind
the other parties but seeing the ac
cident were able to turn their team
and po back before reaching the
dangerous road.
TALK MALADY GRIPS GIRL;
CAN'T STOP EVEN ASLEEP
Waukegan. 111., Feb. 14. Miriam
Rubiiul, 8 years old, has been talk
ing constantly since Saturday, Feb.
5, rnd all efforts by specialists to
' stop her have failed.
A wept neo the cirl complained
of f?ahis in her arms and shoulders.
The next day she started talking
and since that time has slept only
two hours. She continued to talk
while asleep.
Physicians say that she apparent
ly Is normal in every respect except
for the continued talking, which con
tinus even while she is asleep.
WOLF WHICH KILLED 1,000
DEER TO BE SEEN IN ZOO
Washington, Feb. 11. A mighty
deer-slayer with a side line taste for
sheep, is to be exhibited soon at the
National Zoo here.
It Is a timber wolf trapped by a
a Government hunter In the Cas
cade Mountains In the Pacific
Northwest after having killed 1,
000 deer.
With Its mate the deer-slayer Is
credited with having killed twenty
seven sheep In a single night.
WITH SEVEN WIVES, HE LOST
COUNT; HAD TWO AT ONCE
Atlanta, Ga fFeb. 14. "Uncle"
Newt Liming, 80, told a Judge
though he bad wed seven times, he
never Intentionally had more than
one wife at a time. An erroneous
report that No. 6 was dead caused
him to marry No. 7, the aged man
said. So the court reduced ball
from $300 to $200. "Uncle" Newt
went back to bis peddling business
and his seventeen children. He is
a confederate veteran.
93,250 AWARD TO GIRL
FOR MASHED HAND UPHELD
Frankfort, Ky., Feb. 14. Al
though Fay McRoy, 18 years old,
employe of the Capital Laundry
Company Louisville, admitted that
her attention was distracted from
her work for a moment Just before
her hand was caught in the man
gle, the Court of Appeals affirmed a
verdict of $5,250 In ber favor
against the company.
GOVERNOR AND WIFE ON
TRIP TO NEW YORK
Frankfort, Ky., Feb. 14. Gov
ernor Morrow and Mrs. Morrow
left for New York to spend ten days.
During the trip, Governor Morrow
hopes to interest members of th
Kentucky Society of New York in
the Old Kentucky Home, the Fds-,
ter Memorial, and obtain contribu
tions for the fund to purchase Fed-!
rui am:
LEAVES DEI) FOR
DEATH IV SPRING
Owensboro, Feb. 12. Leaving her
huband sleeping in bed, Mrs. T. 8.
Cook, of Llvia, stole out of her
home at an early hour and making
her way to a spring on the farm of
T. C. Coke, a neighbor, ended her
life In Its chilly waters.
When Mr. Cook awoke about 5
o'clock and missed his wife, he call
ed neighbors who foand the body
after a short search.
Mrs. Cook was 30 years old and
had been despondent since the death
of her mother, which occurred
about f.ve months ago. She was
said to have been mentally derang
ed. Coroner Gillison was notified, but
no inquest was held. Dr. Hard
wick, of Livia, in making out the
burial certificate, certified that Mrs.
Cook came to her death by suicidal
drowning, brought on by mental
derangement.
Mrs. Cook was formerly Miss
Fannie Foor. daughter of J. Foor,
of Butler county.
No funeral arrangements will be
made until a son of Mr. Cook by
first wife, now residing in
Florida, can arrive. O'boro In
quirer. BAKER SAYS CROOKS
MASK AS EX-SERVICE MEN
Washington, Feb. 14. An ap
peal to the newspapers of the coun
try to guard against designating as
"ex-service men" burglars hold up
men and other criminals without
proper investigation wa3 issued by
Secretary Baker. He declared that
the expression was becoming in
creasingly common and that in
many cases investigation would
prove that the persons referred to
had never been identified with the
nations' armed forces.
"It is popular Just now for crimi
nals to plead that they served in
the army or navy in the war in the
hope of gaining sympathy," Mr.
Baker said.
HOOSIKK CHARGED WITH
C REMATION OF PARENTS
Chicago, Feb. 14. Ralph Davis
arrested here on a charge of em
bezzling funds of the Farm Bureau
of Newton county, Indiana, also
faces charges of having murdered
his aged father and mother, accord
ing to a long distance telephone
message received from the sheriff
at Kentland, Ind.
Davis was rushed out of Chicago
and taken to the Jail at Rensselaer,
Ind.
The parents of the prisoner were
buVned to death when fire destroyed
their farm home near Revere, Ind.,
January 21.
INVENTS NEW METHODS
FOR ROCKPORT SCHOOLS,
Rockport, Ind., Feb. 14. Prof. A.
H. Kennedy returned from Chicago
where he delivered a lecture on the
visualization of numbers, at the
University of Chicago. Prof. Ken
nedy invented the geometrical
blocks which are used in the schools
throughout the United States and
Europe. The visualization of num
bers Is a new method he has invent
ed to teach the primary department
arithmetic.
BOY WALKS TWENTY
MILES TO FIND MOTHER
Winchester, Ky., Feb. 14
Through tunnels and over a seventy-five-foot
railroad trestle, 9-year-old
Earl Newell, leaving home os
tensibly for school, walked the
twenty miles between Clay City and
Winchester to find his mother, who
was visiting her sister, Mrs. Hood
Curtis, here.
ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE
All persons having claims against
the estate of A. J. Carter, deceased,
will file same properly proven with
me by May 1, 1921. or they will be
barred, and those owing said estate
will please call and settle.
This Feb. 12. 1921.
7-3tp. J. W. CARTER, Adm'r.
LOUDEN DECLINED
NAVY POST, REPORT
Washington, Feb. 14. Former
Governor Lowden of Illinois has
been offered and has declined the
post of Secretary of the Navy under
President Harding, according to
some of his fi loads note.
MANY OEAO IN PATH
OF flEBCE TOsffiO
Two White Persons and Thirty
Negroes Victims in Giorgia;
Buildings Wrecked
Oconee, Ga., Feb. H. A tornado
that struck the Gardner settlement,
one, mile from here, shortly after
the noon hour last Thusday,
brought death to two white per
sons and nearly 30 negroes, aud
serious injury to five white persons
und more than a score of negroes.
A stretch of land extending from
Oconee almowt to Toomsboro, in
Washington County, nearly five
miles long and about a half mile
wide, is as barren as a prairie, not
a building nor a tree being left
standing.
Youth Decapitated
Anion? t!:; dead is Benjamin
Franklin Orr, 14-year-old youth,
who was decapitated. His head
had not been found at a late hour.
The only other white person who
met death in the tornado is the
thrje-year-old daughter of E. L.
Minor, ni:nar ;f Shepherd cum
lui.ary at t!i riant of !)'? (I'vo-lar.d-Ucone.i
Lumber Company.
Eiihty-two children and three
seichers '..ire In a school building
on the edg of the Gardner settle
ment when the tornado struck. The
building was literally twUted to
pieces and the fragments scattered
for miles around. The children
were picked up by the wind and
carried for some distance, but it is
Dtf i ially announced that only nno
child was seriously bruised.
Approximately 40 houses were
blown down in the Gardner settle
ment. The Shepherd Bros', com
missary at the big lumber plant was
reduced to kindling wood, Orr and
four negroes meeting death there.
Ten feet away from the omni mry
was the general otTue of t.i- t'bve-land-Oconee
Lumber Company,
which was untouched by the storm.
The 15-acre plant of the luinlmr
company, which practically owns
the settlement site of Gardner, was
not seriously damaged by the wind,
although millions of feet of lumber
piled in the yards was scattered.
The tornado spent its force local
ly immediately beyond the plant of
the lumber company, in the settle
ment of 40 houses and four stores.
Most of the people residing In this
section were negroe3, the white peo
ple of the town living on higher
ground a short distance away.
POPULAR NEWSPAPER MAN
DIES IN LOUISVILLE
Louisville, Ky., Feb. 12. James
R. Keller, one of the best known
newspaper men In Louisville, died
at 6 o'clock last Wednesday at the
residence of his mother, 1109 South
Brook street.
Though he had been in poor
health tor five years, the death of
Mr. Keller came as a great shock
to his friends, as he was able to bo
at his desk with the Times the even
ing before. He was weak when be
returned home that night and re
tired early. He was taken with a
severe illness soon after, and at
midnight became unconscious.
NEW YORKERS WASTE
MILLION LOAVES WEEKLY
New York, Feb. 14. New York
ers eat 2,500,000 loaves of bread
dally- and waste 1,000,000 loaves
weekly, declared Mrs. Louis Reed
Welzmiller, Deputy Market Com
missioner, at a meeting of house
wives and wholesale bakers. This
Is one reason, she said, why the
price of bread does not decrease.
She added, however, that a recent
survey showed that reductions in
materials have not been reflected In
prices to household consumers.
MORROW APPOINTS NEGRO
MAGISTRATE IN CHRISTIAN
Hiram Smith, oue of the leading
colored citizens of this city, has
been appointed as magistrate by
Governor Morrow to fill out the un
expired term of T. II. Moore, whose
mental condition has been such for
the past few months that ha has
been unable to discharge the duties
of the office. Magistrate Smith met
with the fiscal court last Tuesday
for the first Ume. Hopklnsrllls
News Era.

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