OCR Interpretation


The Denison review. [volume] (Denison, Iowa) 1867-current, November 23, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038095/1904-11-23/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

-11
.. -T, v.A-
i£.*n*
rav
N
,Start:
I
1
•A- «,
r'
s\
?V.
"f
«*SV
Si

&-
9
f'i?
#"••4
hv,
THE COURT GRIND
s/White-capping Case From Bo
yer Township Now On.
COURT THANKRGIVING.
tfA Large Number of Unimportant
Equity Cases Disposed Of. Libel
.Case Against Bulletin is Heard.
Since our last issue the district
court has disposed of quite a number
'?of equity cases. The case of Knight vs
"^Hess, which was on trial at the time of
our going to press last week, was
ive ded by the jury in favor of the de,
7' fendant. This was the second trial of
the case, the jury haying disagree
at the session of court last term after
itwo or thres da'h' session, It was a
ca9a for the recovery of commission in
a real estate transaction and created
quite a litt'e interest.
IQ
4
'MM
in
the case of Walker and Davis vs
Da* which was a 9uit for payment for
a cement walk made by the plaintiff
*_for the defendant, judgement was ren
3idered in favor of the plaintiffs in the
sum of $116 00.
A number of the unimportant cases
'. were continued, while in several the
defendants made no appearance and
judgment was rendered for the plain
,' tiffs as prayed.
Tni? week the libel suit brought by
Mr. Ward Ellis of Carroll against the
•t\ Bulletin was taken up Mr.
••Ellis claims damages for a
statement which the Bulletin
made last June in which the plaint,iff
ft.- was accused of stealing thirty cents
from the home of Mrs. Seymour while
canvassing- for a nursery house. After
the! publication of the article mention
ed Mr. Ellis denied taking tne money
And the next week a re tractor state
ment was published in the Bulletin,
which, however, did not prove satis
factory to the plaintiff, and he at once
commenced suit (or the recovery of
damages.
The whole caoe was fought out over
the question as to whether Mr. Ellis
Actually took the money, the instruc
lions of the court being, that if the
charges made In the article were not
true, then the statement was libellous
and the plaintiff is entitled to recover
damages. Tne jury returned a verdijt
for the defendant, but on special in
terrogatory propounded to them by the
plaintiff, they said that -Mr. Ellis did
not, in their oppinion, take th? money
In the face of this contradictory verdict
the court may use its own discretion in
rendering judgement for the plaintiff
or in ordering anew trial.
yesterday and today the white cap
ping case' from Boyer township wan on
trial. On the night of October 10,
Jacob Schaupp of Boyer township was
-called out of his bed and was severely
whipped and beaten by a number of
men wearing handkerchiefs over their
faces. The beating was witnessed by
hie children, who claim that they rec
ognized some of the men by their voices
and others by reason of their maslcn
falling oft'. The evidence of the plain
tiff will be in the»hands of the jury
some time today.
Court will take a vacation during
Thanksgiving when Judge Church will
go home to visit with his newly ar
rived grand-daughter.
JURORS SEE POOR FARM
IN/lake Their Regular Report on its
Condition. Recommend More
Room and Better Heating.
Last Thursday the Grand Jury made
.their regular visit to the poor farm,
Tiiey found it kept in good condition
by the present manager, Marian Cole,
but suggested some, improvements, in
the following report to the court:
We, the members of the grand jury
of Crawford County, Iowa, November
term 1904, upon investigation of the.
poor farm found same kept in good con
dition by the present manager,
Marian Cole, but found same badly in
need of better beating faciltles, also
in
rather
Ik
'i
V.
fit-
II« ia
Lrn
crowded condition, there be­
ing at times three and four inmates
obliged to occupv the same sleeping
apartments, The Grand Jurors also
recommended some means of fire pro
tection. (Signed) PETER ATZEN,
Foreman.
The report was referred by the court
to the board of supervisors for action
Barred Plymouth Rock
Cockerels for Sale
I have a few fine Barred Plymouth Kock
•Cockrels for sale at 51.50 each ihey are
.good ones. Q. A. SLEEPER
mSbSim
,$7 ^'0kf H'f,
K-'
lJ
v«,
ODD FELLOWS HEAR CHURCH
The Judge Gives an Interesting Ad
dress to the Odd Fellows and Re
si' bekahs of This City.
The Odd Felloes and -bekahs held
a most interesting tnser.ing Tuesday
eve.iiug, vhen tht?y listened 10 an ad
dress by Hon. Z. A. Church of Jeffer
son. Jud"e Church was a grand re
presentative to the Sovereign Grand
Lodge that, convened at San Francisco
last September and his address was a
description of his trip to and from that
meeting. He first, went to St. Louis to
vi-it the fair, ami said that wit.h the
exception of the Philippine exhibit and
tbs electrical uUji .iy. the Columbian
Exposition at Chicago far excelled the
show at 3t. Louis, although he said
there were severAl foivign exhibits
which were, exceedingly fine
From St. Louis the Oid Fellows had
a special train to-Sitn Francisco. They
stopped at Kansas City. Denver, Salt
'.ke City, and o-'n cities interven
ing, and at each place they were es
corted about t.he city in observation
cars, which were incuouipapied by a
lecturer to explain the different points
of interest.
The judge dwelt at some length on
the magnificent di«nla\a and parades
Held 11) coo.-lection with the meeting of
Uift Grand Lodge.
He closed his address with a glorious
tribute to old Iowa as the best state in
the Union. Judge Cnurch is one of
the leading Odd.-Fc'.lows of the state.
H.: w.i-t Grand Ma-tor of Uiis state at
the time of t,tie ei
L'tion
of the Orphan­
age Horn" at MH.-on City and was one
of the leaders who o'^hed the enter
prise to successful :i Riplt tion.
ha o.:i:ah- •. present and at
the osa of t.he aruiresH wrvs-ii fine re
freshment*.
OFFICIAL C0UNT0F THE VOTE
Showing the Total Vote Received by
Each Candidate and the Pluralities
of Winners.
The board of supervisors finished
counting the returns of the recent
election last week, but for unavoidable
reasons we are unable to publish the
table in this issue. The totals as shown
by the official count are as Hows:
Rooseveli
Parker
Swallow
Hobs
Wutsou
Tncubald
Collins
l'ahl
Kaul
Houliliiui
McKlm
KliaUer
0'Conuer
Maynard
Ilollaud
For Kicnntal Eid-cion
ARfinst
For C'oart House
Against Court, llouse. ... ..
Foot or Orftun Ciriuiler.
"I sometimes feel," bitterly confided
the wife of the great poet to her sis
ter. "that I would have been happier
with an organ grinder. Then we could
tl least pass the hat around unabasli
§d. The pride that goes with great
gifts too often walks hand in hand
with starvation to satisfy an ordinary
woman."—New Orleans Times-Demo
crat.
Hla C«e Hopeless.
"There are at least a thousand good
reasons why 1 should marry li«r."
"Well, what are they?"
"First, because I want to, and she
herself la the othar 999."—'Town Top
lea. -.
INo Faltb In the Old Aiage.
"Do you believe that practice
ways, makes perfect?"
"No. it hasn't made anything but
row ever since that Idiot upetalis
commenced with bis flute."
i^«rf'
25
,#-£!«
SOU
78
51
1ft
•J28i—4I
2230
22H3-2B
223!)
:J3."i!i-:X2
21511
2."i«r 5m
ISG7
2:«lH-2til
2iat
1S24
11)34-110
"T
174,-i
Glrln and the Old School*.
A ruliujr Cor a New Haven school
made in 1684 reads, "And all girls be
excluded as improper and inconsistent
with such a grammar school as ye law
injoins and is the designe of this set
tlement." One Benjamin Mudge. a
New England schoolmaster of many
years' service, has left the following
interesting memorandum: "I11 all my
school days, which ended In 1801, I
never saw but three females In public
schools In my life, and they were only
in the afternoon to learn to write."
Mr. Mudge neglects to say, however,
that the girls were permitted not only
to the writing lessons, but tliey were
also privileged to attend the general
annual eateHiis'uig.
al-
Aqneiluoln.
The carrying capaciiy of aqueducts
through which fresh water runs In
large volume is-often reduced from 10
to 13 per cent by slime and growflis'
tf
various kinds on the surface of the(
masonry or metal.
DENISON
Many Things For Which
Should Be Grateful.
UNION SERVICES AT CHURCH
Usual Fund for the Poor will Be On
Hand and All Will Have Occasion to
be Thankful for the Day's Blessings.
All Denison aDd community will have
occus onon next Thursday morning to
lay aside their regular duties and to re
turn thanks to Almighty God for the
blessings which tie has poured out dur
ing the past year.
The seison just closing marks the
garnering of one of the bast crops in
years. At one time the hardly matured
corn crop lay at the mercy of the bit
ing frosts of winter, but the hand of
Gud, as it were, swept them back until
the golden grain should ripen, and now
our barns are "bursting with pKnty."'
Every one should avail themselevs
of the opportunity of attending the un
ion Thanksgiving services to be held
at the Piesbyttrian church in the morn
ing at 10.30 o'clock. Special music for
the occasion will be rendered by the
choir, and the sermon will be preached
by Rev. Dr. Miller of the Methodist
church.
Owing to the scarcity and exceeding
ly high price of turkeys this year a
large numoer will forego the. pleasure
of feasting on his turkeyship, but chick
ens, geese and ducks, are selling at
reasonable prices, as well as other
Thanksgiving delicacies.
In the antitne the city's poor are
not being fjrg^tu-n. There will be on
hand the usual fund which will be
placed in the hands of the committee.
This fund is made up of cash contribu
tions from the churches and school.
Provisions and articles of wearing ap
parel are also accepted, and these are
given out by the committee to the fam
ilies which are in need. Heretofore
contributions have been accepted by
Mrs. McClellan, but since she has
moved away, those de&iriqg to contri
bute^ should see Mrs. ^Gullck. The
pupils of the public schools have always
contributed largely to this futd. Thif*
year, however, they have adopted a
new rule whereby the pupils are expect
ed to contribute only money which they
have earned for that especial purpose.
Th gives all the pupiis an cqua
chance to rive something, and also
gives them a persona! interest in the
cause.
Mo-t of the business houses will be
closed for a part of the day, at least
iind ail will neimvii an oppornunity to
enjoy the ttay and thankful.
PROVERBS ABOUT CZARS.
A czar iu the desert is only a man.
The czar himself can get muddy if
he steps in the mud.
Ereu the crown of the caar cannot
cure headache.
The czar's crows cannot have more
than two horns.
A drop of water in the eye of the
czar costs the country a great many
handkerchiefs.
When the czar makes you a present
of an egg he expects of you a hen.
The czar can disturb the earth, but
he cannot move it from its axis.
The czar knows not misery because
lie does not live iu a cabin.
The arm of the czar is long, but It
cannot reacli to the sky.
The voice of the czar has an echo
even when there are no mountains.
The ukases of the czar are worth
nothing if Cod says not "Amen."
The horse which has once been
mounted by the czar neighs continu
ally.
Dretts In Jh}HU.
S
Between the sexes I11 Japan there is
very little difference in the main fea
tures of dress, and little children are
only beautiful little miniatures of their
parents, more gayly and richly dressed.
Under his kimono a man of the upper
class wears a sort of kilted divided
•kirt, something approaching the na­|
ture of trousers. This is called the
"hakaina" and is always made of Btiff
silk. A woman wears instead an un
der kimono. Both sexes wear two lit
tle aprons round the lolus, called
'%Mbi-niaklt" aikl a '"rt of shirt called
Uie "anao-yoko." The uarrow sash
won
by a n:an Is not an item of great
Importance, for, alil.ough it Is always
made of rich sMU, nor so much for
as for use. to keep the kimono In
Nntmelly.
"What do you do when your hxm
band stays up late?"
"I call him down."—Houston Poet.
Tbe Wall of tbe Householder.
I do not know, I do not oare.
What others' bills may be,
But he who'll pay my monthly rent
May come and board with me.
—Baltimore American.
-\'h
a,-.
DENISON, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1904
«sl
7 V\
I
$i£ir
ALL TRIMMED HATS
INCLUDING SOME BEAUTIFUL
PATTERNS, MARKED DOWN
To Close Out This Month, at
His Platform.
"Wli:. platform does that political
speaker favor?"
"The lecture platform chiefly."--De
trolt Free Press.
Bites Always In Season.
"As soon as the insects leave ofl
biting," remarked the observer
oi
events and things, "the wind begins."
—Yonkers Statesman.
Oh, tio not boast your pedigree
Or put on airs, milady!
Ulu-. other trees a family tree
Is often very shady.
—Catholic Standard and Time*,
JJn
-agyr-
S
1% :r
Ui.'• W
7
\v'e know what all good doc
tors think of Ayer's Cherry
Pectoral. Ask your own doc
tor and find out. He will tell
Cherry
Pectoral
you how it quiets the tickling
throat, heals the inflamed
lungs, and controls the
hardest of coughs.
"Ayer'ft rUerrv ivctor&l is well knowu lu
our fumity. We "thlitU it thelwat uiediciu«
in the world lor coughs and colds/'
KATIK I'ttTuustoN, I'eUlumiv,Cal.
Alldrvtitiists.
for
.1. '. AYKK CO.,
Lowell, Mass.
Hard Coughs
One of Ayer's Pills at bedtime will
hasten recovery. Gently laxative.
Our car of New York Apples
are very fancy. Get a barrel
I
before the price advances.
Our Wizzard Flour is still
theJeadingbrand. Tryasack
Every sack guaranteed.
Get one of our ''Faultless"
Ranges or Peninsular heaters
before cold weather starts in
for good.
In our Diamond "S" canned
goods you'll find the highest
quality. Once used, always
used.
Don let your feet get cold
aslongas we sell shoes and
overshoes. They are the best
you can get any place for the
money.
Killed Them OIT.
Mrs. Grumpps—No some lying para-
grapher started the story that big hats
Bachelor.
An old fellow whetted his knife nt®n have
And growled, "You can bet your sweet trict, Geor
kltfo,
While .some things may be said
Of the way I cut braid.
It Is better than having a kwife."
—Houston Post.
le6B.lh:,n 40'000
c^atic
were the cheapest.—Boston Herald. opposition. The state leg
I ture is unanimously Democi
A
1
Renters Attention!
\Miy pay rent when yon can purchase good improved
in Iowa at from S45 to $85 per acre, with payments a
more than yon are now paying for rent5
1 he following can be purchased with from
eighty per first payment, balance to suit purchaser, at 6 pt
cent.
1000 acres in tracts of from 80 to 320 acres at, per
acre
1600 acres in tracts of from 80 to 320 acr^s at, pet"
a re
24OO acrcs in tr.x ts of from So to
acre
John Rollins,
Call or Write.
800
....„ KJS.
NO. 47
mm*
8!Si
a-
•tS:?-
5V?fr
Saraolion
Mr. Grumpps—1 notice that big hats I ,. South Carolina.
are not worn so much at the theaters 1 Columbia, b. C., Isov. 9. Pa?
as formerly
tas carried
&»>
South Carolina by
Plurality. The D-
state ticket has been ele
The following Democratic cong
acres at, per
Other tracts at from $55 to $65 per acre.
These lands are all improved on'tv about twenty miles fi'om
Denison, in a good farming district, and are located from One
to five or six miles from good farming towns.
Denison, Iowa.
Review Office,
Vfc'
'4
been elected: First
S. Lego.ro Second,
Patterson: Third, Wyatt Ait
Fourth, Joseph T. Johnson Fifth,
vid Fm ley Sixth, J. E. Ellf
Seventh, As bury F. Lever.
-ff
J:.-
1 arir
tritl
$800
to
1
»•'.
1
$1,000
pi
-A
is
'bL
tl
a
if—
a
N
it
•0*

xml | txt