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The Denison review. [volume] (Denison, Iowa) 1867-current, May 05, 1915, Image 9

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ANOTHER SUCCESS
FOR DEN FIRM
Saveiry & Mitchell Appointed Sale
Distributing Agents for Widely
Advertised Soft Drink
"PARFAY" BECOMING POPULAR
•Will Mean Profitable Addition to the
Bottling Works' Line of Drinks
—Read Their Large Ad.
Messrs. Savery and Mitchell, own
ers of the Denison Bottling Works
liave scored another success in bring
ing to Denison the sole distribuing
rights for the new and widely adver
tised drink, "Parfay." By the deal
vliiclv they have just made, Denison
'jwril be the distributing center from
•''•which, a large number of towns and
cities in western Iowa will be supplied
with this new baveridge. Before the
Dcnisofi' Bottling Works was given
the valuable rights to "Parfay," a
searching investigation was made by
Ihe Parfay Co., and Denison was se
lected and Denison Bottling Works
was given the exclusive distributing
rights strictly on the merits of the
town as a shipping center and upon
the ability of Messers. Savery & Mit
chell to handle the volume of busi
ness that will be built up by "Parfay's"
aggressive newspaper advertising
campaign. The Parfay Co., lias select
ed the Heview as the newspaper
through which this new drink will b«
advertised in Cr/twford county and
fiurrouuding territory and the first." of
the series of advertisements appears
in this week's issue.
In speaking of the merits of Parfay
and the value of its distributing rights
Mr. .Tames Mitchell said: "From the
very start 1 have been impressed with
the. value of Parfay. 1 have found
that it is more than a mighty' good
drink and I believe it will prove popu
lar with the people in: this territory.
I found that it possessed qualities that
I had never been able to find in any
other soi't drink naturally this made
me interested in securing the bottling
and distributing rights for this section
of Iowa.
•'But it was only after the J'arfay
Co., took me into their confidence and
showed me what would be done to
popularize tins drink in this section
of the country that I became determin
ed to handle it. I have always been
a linn believer in advertising, es
pecially newspaper advertising, and
when the Parfay Co., showed me the
extent of the newspaper campaign,
us '.veil as supi limentary advertising,
that would be put behind this new
drink, I realised that it was an oppor
tunity that wj could not afford to miss.
In this da.1' and age it is not enough
merely to handle a superior product,
because th--: is very much and adver
tising age ami the people hav.T learn
ed that thev can put iheir dependence
ill-Oil 'he prc iuci.fi which they s^e a«i
Vfc.*r5sed
i.i
hc-ir
'H
S A
«. wr» home papai &.
IV-.ihput --11 couficenco creating
$$•
"i ai
.. J,
Young ladies' Baby Dolls,
patent and gun metal,
sizes 2l/t to 6, all this
week
Young ladies' Baby Dolls,
patent and gun metal,
sizes 2 /t to 6, all this
week
9
SIS'N
S
Methods, it would bo hard indeed fls
take any product, however good, ami
swing it into the public favor but with
the advertising such as is being put
bafck of Parfay, the people are going
to try the driivk, and once they have
tried it, by sheer merit, it will win a
Dig place in their lives.
For these reasons, I am looking
forward to a phenomenal growth for
the Denison Bottling Works and from
what I know has been accomplished
other cities, there is no doubt in
my mind but what our plant will be
come one of the real worth-while in
dustries of this city."
The Denison Bottling Works is be
ing put into condition to handle the
volume of business that is sure to
come as a result of the salesrighls
that it has just secured, and the open
ing of the season will find it in shape
to take care of, in the best possible
manner, the local and outlying trade.
Already several hundred cases of the
new drink have been bottled and this
Aveek are being shipped to the different
dealer^ throughout western Iowa.
Messrs^. Savery & Mitchell are to
be congratulated on their work in
bringin this important industry' to
Denison and for securing such a val
uable business asset.
Weekly Crop Bulletin.
For the week ending May 1915.
The first half of the week was warm
and dry, but the latter half gave gen
eral and copious showers and about
normal temperatures. Rapid progress
was made in preparing ground for
corn and consudersvbie planting was
done, especially in tiie southern coun
ties. The rains will be of great bene
fit to small grain, pastures, meadows,
and truck fields. Small grains and
grass made rapid growth and are now
in excellent condition generally. A
large acreage of potatoes lias been
planted in the eastern counties and
the crop is doing well. Favorable
weather prevailed for the pollination
of fruits, most varieties having been
pollinated before the recent rains, and
the indications are still favorable for
an excellent crop.—Geo. M. Chappel,
Director, Des Moines, Iowa.
The scientific agriculture bulletins
are rcgurded highly by the farmers
unless they are so bold as to conflict
with the instructions they received
from their fathers.
The ladies of the Current Events
club are hereby notified that, the next
meeting will be held at the club room
on Friday afternoon, May "th, at I!: 00
o'clock.
Our last meeting was made a not
able one of the year by a most enter
taining and instructive lecture on as
tronomy from Pres. Van Ness, of the
D. N. C., and by delightful music ren
dered by the college quartet. At Fri
day's meeting, Prof. Knowlton,.of the
high school, will address the club on,
"The School as a Social Center," and
the sophomore class of the high school
under the direction of Miss Hayes,
will present, "A Study of Lincoln."
A rare treat is in store. Come and
bring your guests.
Emma W. Hawk,
Pres. C. E. Club.
a
Children's slippers, all
Children's slippers, all
sizes
sizes
v~--
$1.98
$1.98
89 cts.
89 cts.
•H /.•
•H /.•
LOSES A MOST
RESPECTED MAN
Henry Schoenjahn, of West Side, Who
Came to Crawford County in
An Early Day, Dead
WAS ILL ONLY A FEW DAYS
Was 68 Years of Age and Leaves Five
Sons to Mourn His Death—Wife
Died Seven Years Ago.
West Side, la., May 4, .11)15.—(Spec
ial to the Review.)—On last Saturday
afternoon at five o'clock occurred the
deatli of one of West Side's most hon
ored and respected citizend. Henry
Schoenjahn. Mr. Schoeiijalm had been
iH unusually excellent lioalth until
.Monday, when a bad cold which ho
had incurred, developed into pneu
monia, and lie passed away at-thc age
of sixty-eight years, ten months and
twelve days.
Mi-. Schoenjahn had been a resident
of West Side since 1!)12, when he and
his son, Harold, purchased a beauti
ful home in the southwestern part of
our little* city. He made his regular
visits to the homes of lws other child
ren, all of whom live in this vicinity.
Henry Scroenjahn was born on the
12th day of June, 1846, at Cettorf,
Siiileswig-Holstein, Germany. In the
spring of the year 1870. lie cajne to
America and settled in Bryant, Clinton
county, Iowa, where he liad many
friends living at that time. Here he
followed the trade of a mason. In that
city, lie was united in marriage to
Miss i'aulino Graderl on January™' !•,
187::.
In 1S78, he, with his. family, came
west and moved onto a farm near Wall
Lake. Three years later they pur
chased a farm near West Side, where
lie lived until he moved into town
three years ago.'
The deceased leaves to .mourn his
death, five sons, Adolph, Carl, Theo
dore, Lafayette, with their families,
and Harold, ten grand-children, one
sister and a step-brother, John Ilorn
hoi't, three sons,-John, Harry and Wal
ter having passed into the great be
yond several years ago.
Seven years ago, the beloved wife
and mother passed away, leaving
great sorrow with the children and
husband. Although Mr. Scroenjahn
possessed everything which this world
could give him, he felt a keen pang
of lonliness for the woman who had
been such a loving help-mate.
The funeral services were held at
the German l'tvangelical church on
Monday afternoon, after which the
remains were laid to rest in the AVest
Side cemetery. The pall Wearers were
Messrs. J.- H. Moeller, limil Evers,
Peter Sievers, E. J. Booek, Chris
Boock and S. B. McGarvey.
Those who attended the funeral
from a distance were as follows: Mr.
and Mrs. Gus .Gradert, of Lyons Mr.
and Mrs. Eng. Hansen, of Dewitt Mr.
and Mrs. Louie Gradert, Mr. Otto
Gradert, Mr. Carl Gradert and Mr.
Chris_ Naeve, of Bryant, and Mr. and
is com]
rr
Ladies' suede and velvet
pumps, a big line of them
$1.48
", ''1
THE DENISON REVIEW, WEDNESDAY, MAY S, 1915
•Mrs. P. Lamp,and daughter, Harriett,
of Mapleton.
The entire community wishes to
join with the sorrowing relatives in
extending sympathy in this hour of
sadness.
MOVING PICTURES FOR SCHOOLS
Consulting Engineer Gives Help In
Buying Apparatus.
Because there is a good deal of
truth in the old saying of a wise school
master that "You can feed more into
a man's ears with a teaspoon than
into his ears with a scoop shovel," the
engineering extension department of
Iowa State college is encouraging pub
lic schools in the purchase of moving
picture apparatus. One of the mem
bers of the department has been made
a "consulting engineer" on moving pic
ture equipment and is giving assist
ance to all schools that ask for help.
Already educational films have been
demonstrated in Des Moines, Cedar
Falls, Marshaltown, Fayette, Eldora,
Waverly, Ottumwa, Ked Oak, Fort
Dodge, Oskaloosa and Burlington.
Several of these cities are already
arranging to buy machines.
in the purchase of moving picture
apparatus, attention must be given to
its proposed uses. The school with
a large auditorium, seating 000 or 1,000
people, needs a rpachine of a different
type from that adapted to use in class
rooms or small library rooms. Some
schools desire a machine that may be
carried from building to building and
such machines are of another type
There is still a smaller machine suit­.removed
able for story hours in libraries, show
in'g a picture 4 feet square. Other
questions involved concern the type of
screen, the darkening of rooms and
comjiliance with fire regulations. Upon
all of these questions the engineering
extension department will be glad to
give advice.
The population of Des Moines in
'1851 for tiie most part were dwellers
in the cabins 'which were once occu
pied by tho soldiers. There were two
rows of these cabins, one built west
ward fronl the junctions of the rivers,
called Coon Bow. The other, extend
ing north along the Des -Moines river,
was called the Des Moines Iiow. In
dependent of these, there were two
small hotels, two one-story brick res
idences, a few small frame houses,
several cabins built after the soldiers'
barracks, several small stores and of
fices and one small frame church
capable, by packing, of sheltering
some hundred persons, and belonging
to the Methodists. Also a small brick
court house, two stories high, used
for court house purposes, for meet
ings on' Sunday and for political and
othei» lectures during the week* and
sometimes for school. The houses
were scattered, and the people, dis
carding right angles, instead of fol
lowing the streets, by constrant tramp
ing made diagonal paths all over the
town.—From the autobiography of
John A. Nash in the April number of
"The Iowa Journal of History and
Politics," published by The State His
torical .Society of Io^%
I
We have everything iifew that's good in footwear for ladies,
Blisses and children, men's, boys' and youth's wear
Special Inducements Next Saturday, May 8th
Ladies' lap slippers, all
sizes, fine for house wear
98 cts.
Immense line of ventilated oxford* and barefoot sandals for men,
ladies, misses & children. Extremely low prices Friday & Sat'd'y.
The Boys' Store for
.•
Read these prices that we know can not be equaled--for price and quality. We
have all sizes and plenty of them. We can fit you whether you come early or late
Ladie3* strap slippers,
vfcery comfortable
$1.39
It pays to buy your shoes and slippers at The Boys,' where you always get your money's worth.
Come early Saturday. We can give you much better attention and service.
DEATH OF FORMER
DENISON HAN
Tlieron T. Barrett, One Time in Part
nership With M. J. Casman,
Dies in Cedar Rapids.
PROPRIETOR OF GABLE HOTEL
Possessed of Noted Ancestry Who
Were Numbered Among Old Co
lonials Away Back in 1630
"Mention was made in the columns
o,f the Review recently of the death
of Mr. Theron T. Barrett, a former res
ident of Denison, whi^i occurred at
his homo in Cedar Kapids on Tues
day, April 20th. A copy of the Cedar
Kapids Gazette giving the particu
lars of his death, has been received
at this oltice, which will be of inter
est to Denison people who will re
member Mr. Barrett when he was en
gaged in the mercantile business with
Mr. Cosnian here. The article is as
follows:
"Theron T. Barrett, for nearly a
quarter of a century a successful ho
tel proprietor of the city, died at.
10:10 a. m. today at tiie liojne o'f his
daughter, Mrs. Edna Barrett-Jackson,
12:57 First avenue. Death was due to
hemorrhage of the brain, which began
one week ago last Monday.
"Mr. Barrett was boni in Duchess
county, New York state, in 1852. He
with his parents while lie*
was a boy to Geneseo, N. Y., and after
a short period of residence there the
family removed to Clinton cvounty,
•Iowa, and engaged in fanning near
Camanche. April 11, 1S74, Mr. Bar
rett was married t.o Miss Georgia
ltood and removed shortly after to
Crawford county, Iowa, where they
lived on a farm, later moving to Den
ison, where Air. Barrett, was engaged
in the mercantile business, in 18112
ho came with his family to Cedar
Rapids and was at Various times pro
prietor of the Arcade hotel and I he
Globe hotel. At the time of his deatii
he was proprietor of the Globe, in
tiie management of which lie was very
successful.
Had Noted Ancestry.
"Rome noted names in American
colonial history were numbered among
Mr. Barrett's ancestors. His matern
al grandmother was in direct line of
descent from John Benham, who came
to Massachusetts Bay colony in 1C30
and was a passenger to this country ].
in the 'Mary and John.' John Ben
ham in 1U39 went with a party of col
onists to found New Haven colony
and was afterward prominent in co
lonial affairs.
"Mr. Barrett is survived by his
Wife and his daughter, „Mrs. Edna
Barrett-Jackson, prominent in music
circles in Cedar Rapids, and editor of
the music department of the Evening
Gazette two brothers, Earl, of Ida
Grove, and Homer, of Illinois, a*4 one
sister, Mrs. Ida Ileilman, of South
Dakota.
"Funeral services were held from
the home of his daughter on Thursday,
April 22d. The large attendance ot
triends and relatives of Mr. Barrett
gave evidence ot the esteem in which
he was held. The Rev. E. J. Lock
wood, D. D., and the Rev. Walter M.
White were in charge of the services
and botli paid tribute to Mr. Barrett's
superior qualities. Relatives present
from out of the city included Mr. and
Mrs. William Strahan and tine Misses
Willetta and Jenna Strahan, all of
Denison Oscar Strahan, of Perry
Mr. and Mrs. G. Comstoclc, of Waver
ly Charles Judd, of Camanche Geo.
Chalker, of Clinton V. R. Benham."
Trans-Atlantic steamship owners fig
ure that the 'European war will save
$278,000,000 to tlfe American people
by shutting off tourist travel. The
tourist will enjoy superior scenery and
get the benefit of moro healthful out
ings without carrying to foreign coun
tries a quarter of a billion dollars of
money needed by American enterpris
es. In effect, it is an application of
the principle laid down by Abraham
Lincoln in his discussion of the tariff
—that if we buy goods abroad, wo get
the goods and the foreigner gets the
money, while if wo buy at home, we
have both tiie goods and the money.
American tourists will get both health
and pleasure, and America will keep
the $275,00ii,000.
When a man ceases to rise ill' the
night and respond to fire alarms, lie
may as well admit to himself that he
is growing old.
'r v-.
i' ti'h
rt if :t »i
Ladies' vici kid oxfords
t-
$1.98
We canrv the famous Martha Washington Caafwl Shoes. Ask for then.
cars in Denison and surrounding territory
The following sales have been
made since last Wednesday.
Fritz Miller, Overland
Aug. Giermann, Overland
Hans Thies, Chevrolet
W. H. Gibson, Chevrolet
tK-1
Missesr patent baby dolls
or Mary Janes also 2
strap pumps, 11 to2
Misses patent baby dolls
or Mary Janes also 2
strap pumps, 11 to2
$1.89
$1.89
Big line of boys' shoes
and oxfords, very special
low prices Saturday
Big line of boys' shoes
and oxfords, very special
low prices Saturday
$1.48
$1.48
mm*
4
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"i
Who says that President Wilson Is
not performing the duties of his of
fice when he was on hand to throw
out the first ball of the season for the
Washington team?
If You're Engaged
You'll want some really good por
traits made— get the l?est—gel our
PHOTOGRAPHY
No finer work can be seen than our su
perior portrait#—ttley represent the ad
vanced ideas and effects in skilfulv down
to-date expert photography.
Flora Robertson
Photographer Denison, Iowa
Over Fjred Berg's Jewelry Store
Agents for the
'"t •?/"•£.•
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