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The Denison review. [volume] (Denison, Iowa) 1867-current, September 13, 1916, Image 8

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TABLES
IT. W. TIKE CABS.
GOING EAST
8* Overland Limited ....10:61 pm
,. 7:04
,. 3:13 pm
,,12:13am
,. 3:1$ am
9:21 am
9:37 am
No.
No. 4 Local Passenger
No. 6 Atlantic Express ..
No. 8 Los Angeles Limited
No. 10* San Francisco Lim.
No. 32 Local
No. 18 Hawkeye Express
No. 18 Ore. & Wash. Limited.10:32
No. 22 Chicago Special 8:23 pm
No. 26» Fast Mail and Ex. ...10:08pm
No. 22 Chicago Special 8:21pm
No. 46 Way Freight 2:50 pm
•Don't stop at Denison.
No. 46 carries' passengers between
Missouri Valley and Carroll.
GOING WEST
No. 1* Overland Limited
No. S Chicago & Japan
No. S Local Passenger ..
No. 7 Los Angeles Limited
No. 9* Fast Mall
No. 11 Denver Special
5:27 am
Ex.. 1:01pm
7:26 am
3:06 am
7:32 am
6:10 am
.10:05
.11:35 am
8:13am
3:00
.10:55 am
No. 13 Hawkeye Express
No. 15* Fast Mail
No. 17* San Francisco Lim..
No. 33 Local Passenger ..
No. 47 Way Freight
•Don't stop at Denison.
No. 47 carries passengers between
Carroll and Missouri Valley.
No. 15 don't stop at Denison and car
ries no passengers.
aona mm »iv., o.
Daily Except Sunday.
Nk 64 Accommodation leaves 5:30 am
No. 52 Passenger, leaves 12:05pni
No. 59 Accommodation, arr. .. 9:05 pm
No. 53 Accommodation, arr. ... 2:30pm
No. 55 Accommodation, arr. ..10:45am
nuxon esirauL
GOING EAST.
No. 12* Chicago Limited 7:05 pm
No. 92 Local Freight 10:25 am
No. 14* Chi. Special, dally ...11:59am
GOING WEST
No. 91 Local Freight 1:00 pm
No. 11 Chi. Oma. Ex.. dally.. 5:53am
No. IS St. Paul-Oma. Ex., daily 1:40 in
•Make all stops.
O. X. St. P. at ABIOJT.
WESTBOUND
No. *11 Dally Passenger 5:48am
No. 83 Dail Local Passenger ..6:Slam
No. 91 Daily Except Sun., .Frt. ,8:42am
No. 3 Daily Local Passenger ,1:40 pm
•Takes passengers for Mapleton, Sioux
'City north and west.
EASTBOUND
No. 4 Daily Local Passenger .8:42 am
No. 92 Daily Except Sun., Frt..3:50 pm
No. 6 Daily Local Passonger .7:35pm
Kfo. *20 Daily Passenger 8:57 pm
Vtops at Mapleton and Arion for pas
(jgengers Manilla east or west.
"the Denison Re view
Published every Wednesday at Denison,
Iowa.
Review Publishing Company
(Incorporated)
B. P. CONVEB, Manager.
Entered at Denison
(second class matter.
post office as
Advertising rates furnished on request.
Official paper of City of Denison and
Crawford County.
TelephoneH: Bus. Office, 23 Compos
ing Room, 23%.
TXBXS or nTBscBiPziozr
One year .. $1.50
Ktx months
Paper sent, to foreign country
.75
2.00
couEsroioncE
•Communications relating to news and
editorial matter should be addressed
Denison Revlevy, Denison, Iowa.
ANCESTRY OF OUR SHAME.
f*We have repeatedly declared that
the humiliations which have come up
on this country in our negotiations
•with the belligerents of. Europe are the
direct result of the vacillating policy
which the Wilson administration pur
sued in Mexico during the seventeen
j^onths of its rule prior "to the outbreak
ot the European war. We must now
thank Senator Fall of New Mexico for
giving to us the direct and unmistak
able lineage of this child of shame.
In his brief and effective reply to
the mock heroics of Senator Lewis, of
Illinois, the New Mexico senator point
ed out tyow, in August, 1913, the Wil
son administration instructed the
American consular officers in Mexico
to inform the local authorities in their
several consular districts that this
government would hold them "strictly
responsible" for any harm that might
he done to Americans or for any dam
age that might be inflicted upon
American property. This notice was
given wide publicity in Mexico. The
Mexicans knew of it the foreigners
resident there and the foreign diplo
qifets, especially, knew of it. Yet the
bandits of Mexico did much harm to
Americans and they did much damage
16i American property—and escaped
scot-free.
^•Accordingly, when, in the winder of
lfl5, the administration addressed its
npte to the German government warn
ill: the Wilhelmstrasse of the "strict
ajKountability," which would be exact
eq from -violators of our rights as neu
trals upon the high seas, the kaiser's
ministers had been, of course, inform
ed by their alert diplomatic represent
stives in Mexico of the note of "strict
responsibility" of the August preced
ing. They knew that "strict account
ability" was the illegitimate offspring
of "strictly responsible"—and they
knew, too, that it was an impotent
child of feeble loins. The Lusitania
and other horror of the sea followed
as a matter of course. Here we have,
then, the ancestry net only of a shame
but of a phrase. The literary geneal
ogist of the day should be grateful to
Senator Fall.
TALKING TARIFF.
^WASHINGTON, Sept. 12—(Special
Correspondence)—When the democrat
Ic-national committee met at Washing
ton last December the president gave
them a'luncehon at the white house—
and made a speech to them. In it he
sftid that the republicans had no issue
for this year's campaign except the
tariff.
'..The assertion is not true—hut, ev&a
if it wore, we need no other issue.
The tariff if the one question in Jthiat
campaign which affects every voter, in
which every voter displays an inter
est and to which every voter responds.
This has been amply demonstrated
by the manner in which Mr. Hughe/
speeches in the west have been re
ceived by his audiences, and likewise
by the experiences of every other re
publican campaign orator.
When Hughes talked about Mexico,
or about efficient government, or about
the problems which will arise after the
war, or about the ravishing of the civ
il service by "deserving democrats,"
a
or about the necessity and his inten
Hon to put none but competent and
experienced men in posts of diplomat-
fssfef
ic resonsibility, or about the need for
a budget system in handling the na
tional finances, or .about any other of
the numerous topics with which he en
gaged his hearers' attention—he found
a section of his audience interested
informed and responsive.
But when he talked about the tariff
he found all of his hearers reacting
unmistakably and favorably to his
words. The tariff is the universal
question in American politics, it
forms the central line of demarcation
between parties now, as it has for
years. Upon the manner in which our
tariff laws are drawn depends the pros
perity of the country. These facts are
fundamental and axiomatic to the
great bulk of American voters—and
they like to find candidates and po
litical speakers who talk tariff.
When Wilson told his national com
mittee that the republicans had no is
sue but the tariff, ho thought he was
summing up the political bankruptcy
of the republican party. In truth,
however, he was naming our greatest
asset.
RAILROAD iRATES AND
C. Of L."
n.
THE "H
The president came into office on a
platform pledging him to reduce the
high cost of living. He intends to quit
office after having attempted to in
crease it.
He has given an impetuous—though
politically calculated—endorsement of
the proposition to increase the pay of
railroad men and to grant the rail
roads higher rates in order to meet
the enlarged pay roll.
Higher freight rates will increase
the cost of all commodities. Every
merchant "will find his dry goods, his
groceries, his hardware, his every item
of stock costing more because it will
take more money to get it out of the
freight station. This increased cost
he will be compelled to hand on to his
customers. The people who trade, at
the stores of the country will provide
the money to carry Mr. Wilson's
scheme through.
This means an adidtion to the high
cost of living—wh\ich }A^ilsor 'was
pledged to reduce.
That it involves the direct repudia
tion of one of his campaign planks is
probably the least of the president's
concerns. He. has already shattered
so many of the planks of the Baltimore
platform that he is doubtless by this
time inured to the sight of splinters,
even if he does not delight to see
them.
But the millions of housekeepers
who will be put under tribute may
have other and quite different emO'
tions when they look at the bills which
the butcher, the baker and the candle
stick maker will present.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 12—(Special
Correspondence) —Secretary McAdoo's
tour of the country with the farm loan
board is bringing him some first hand
information regarding the manner in
which the people look upon this scheme
The north has no use for it. Banks
doing business under state charters,
banks which pay taxes, banks whose
resources are made out of the savings
of the prudent and the thrifty, banks
whose management is in the hands of
their depositors, banks whose opera^
tions are safeguarded by wise laws
and supervised by experienced officers
—there are banks like this all through
the north. And these banks can and
do lend money to farmers at as low
rates and on as good terms as tlic fed
eral government can possibly do it—
unless the plan is to take the taxpay
ers' funds and make a direct gift of
them to the borrowing farmer. Down
south, of course, where enterprise and
thrift have lagged somewhat and
where usurious interest rates have
been found to prevail, the land credit
schemes may be helpful. In fact, it
was probably devised to be helpful to
the south—which is most distinctly in
the saddle nowadays.
Time to Watch Your Milk Man.
The milk supply of smaller towns
usually has a lower bacterial count
than the milk supplied large cities.
That is the conclusion presented in a
recent bulletin on "Studies of the
Market Milk of Iowa," issued by the
dairy section of the Iowa experiment
station at Ames. This is undoubtedly
due to the fact that less time elapses
between the production and delivery of
milk than in the larger cities.
Large numbers of bacteria in milk
are caused by dirt and sediment get
ting in the milk and from a failure to
cool milk quickly and keep it cool. A
few hours is sufficient for the develop
ment of exceedingly large numbers,
which may cause disease. In the sum
mer time this is often the cause of ill
ness in infants. Customers should get
in the habit of examining the milk
bottles for sediment and raise objec
tions to large amounts.
To Know Perfect Loaf.
How to know a perfect loaf of bread
when it is seen is explained by the
home economics experts at Iowa State
college:
The points considered are: shape
and size, lightness, flavor, grain -.nd
texture, crust, as to color, depth and
texture and crumb as to color and
moisture.
•The loaf should be shapely and
small enough to be thoroughly cooked,
10 inches long, 4 inches wide, and 5
inches high.
Lightness is determined by relation
of size to volume. The bread should
be neither over nor under-liglit.
Bread should have the good, nutty,
sweet flavor of grain. A sour, or
yeasty smell or taste is not allowable.'
Grain and texture are determined by
the fineness and tenderness of the
V»fv Hfcere should be an even.distrl
tiOn -of the gas, making fine and
•uniform holes. No heavy streaks
should occur.
The crust should be an even, yel
lowish brown in color about in.
deep apd should be crisp.
The crumbs should be creamy in
color, neither excessively dry and
crumbly nor doughy.
Many men say that it is more econ
omical to trade off their automobiles
each yeais but proably they save no
thing except the humiliation of ap
pearing with a last year's car.
So far Mexico has taken no stepp
to intervene find end the anarchy of
labor disputes In this country, but It'.s
about time.
THRIFT IS
Built Panama Canal Out of Cur
rent Revenues, Patriotically
Hoarding Bonds in Treasury
Which Democrats Filch
to Hide a Deficit.
CARNIVAL OF DEBAUCHERY
IN PUBLIC EXPENDITURE
Senator Penrose Bellevee the Looted
Condition of the Treasury Will
Necessitate the Withholding of
Contracts for Battleships and De
lay the Whole Scheme of Prepared
ness Nation's Money Frittered
Away to Finance Hare-Bralned and
III Advised Projects.
William R. Wlllcox, Chairman of
(he Republican National Committee,
lias received from Senator Penrose a
brief but positive summing up of the
extravagances of the Wilson Adminis
tration during the session of Congress
just about to close. The Senator
finys:
"When the country realizes what
this Congress has done In the way of
Appropriations it will be dumfounded.
Already, It lias been shown that over
a billion, seven or eight hundred mil
lion dollars have been appropriated—
more money than was ever appropri
ated in any one year in the history
of the American government. The to
tal will reach nearly two billion dol
lars before the end of this carnival
of debauchery In public expenditures
is reached, because no account has
been taken of the twenty-five millions
for the Danish islnnds, the thirty mll
Ilpns which the government will prob
ably have to refund as a result of
the five per cent rebate allowed on:
Importations brought across the seas
In American bottoms, and other mat
ters which are likely to come up.
"It Is only two evident that this bill
which is expected to bring in some
two hundred million dollars will ab
solutely fall to meet even the require
ments for tlic 111-advlsed and certainly
not urgent projects authorized by the
present Congress.
"It Is now claimed that these pro
jects are to be financed by the issu
ance of Panama Canal bonds. The
American people will regard such a
proceeding as a very queer one be
cause the issuing of bonds by the
Cleveland Administration largely help
ed to bring about the downfall of the
Democratic party in 1896. A bond
issue has ever since been viewed with
jibhorrence by the Democracy now,
we finfl the party leaders compelled,
by reason of their extravagance and
Inefficiency, to resort to it.
"To defray the expenses of a nitrate
plant and of a shipping board and
many other needless projects by the
issuing of Panama bonds will be in
the last analysis'equivalent to paying
lor them by bond Issues. These bonds
are lying in the treasury unissued as
the result of the thrift and economy
and wise administration of the Repub
lican party.
"Only about $130,000,000 of bonds
were put out in the construction of the
Panama Canal. The balance ot the
cost of that stupendous undertaking
Was paid out of current revenues
and now, to advance the novel doc
trine that these bonds which repre
sent the thrift of preceding years
shall be issued for these questionable
projects is, to my mind, preposterous.
In fact, it was expressly provided In
the Spooner Act that Panama Canal
bonds should not be Issued for any
other purpose than that of the con
struction of the Canal, and the in
genious theory that they can be is
sued now to r^iny the ^treasury and
that then the money can be squan
dered by the party in power to finance
doubtful projects and to make good a
deficit will not alter, the fact that
such a deceit'exists.
"N/ amount of reasoning on the
part of the Chairman of the Commit
tee on Finance will alter the fact
that outside of preparedness there lias
been at least $200,000,000 of wasteful
appropriations and expenditures by
the present Congress. That condition
if the treasury will absolutely neces
sitate the withholding of contracts
for battleships and delay the whole
scheme of preparedness.
"The figures of the Secretary of
the Treasury may be juggled as they
may, but when the Secretary is up
against the brute fact of not having
money to pay for these projects he
will then find that figures will not
make a surplus in the treasury,"
SACRIFICED COUNTRY'S
HONOR AND INTEREST
Mr. Wiisdn'a defender* say he
"hat kept us out/of war." As
a matter of fact his policy In
Mexico has combined all' the
evils of feeble peace with all the
evils of feeble war. He haa se
cured none of the benefits of
war but he has not avoided
war. He hae sacrificed the hon
or and the interests of the coun
try but he has not received the
thirty pieces of silver.—From
the speech of Col. Theodore
Roosevelt, delivered at Lewiston,
Maine, in behalf of Charles E.
Hughes.
THE DENISON REVIEW, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 13,' 1916.
WIL80N KISSED THE HAND
RED WITH AMERICAN
BLOOD.
President Wilson explicitly
shows that the Carranzlstas, not
once but repeatedly, made at
tacks on American towns, and
killed American citizens, and
mutilated them in September,
1915. Yet on October 10th, 3915,
less than a month later, this
same President Wilson, through
his some Secretary of State,
formally announced to Carran
za's agent that It was his "ple?S
ure" to take the opportunity "of
extending recognition to the' de
facto government of Mexico, of
which General Venustlano Car
ranza Is the chief executive.".
President Wilson thus recog
nized the government which, Ills
own Secretary/of State declares,
had been less than a month pre
viously engaged in repeated
assaults upon Americans, and In
the invasion of American soil,
the government at whose head
was General Carranza, who, less
than two months previously, on
August 2nd, 1915, had contempt
uously refused to pay any heed
to any representations of Presi
dent Wilson on behalf of media
tion, saying that "under no
consideration would I permit in
terference in the Internnl affairs
of Mexico." President Wilson
did not merely kiss the hand
that slapped him in the face. He
kissed that hand when it was
red with ihe blood of American
men, women and children, who
-had been murdered and mutilat
ed with, as President Wilson,
through his Secretary of State
says, "ruthless brutality."—From
the speech of Col. Theodorte
Roosevelt, delivered at Lewis
ton, 'Maine, in behalf of Charles
E. Hughes.
(N. Y.) SUN STROKES.
Roger Sullivan steps aside.—News
paper headline.
Students of Democratic politics
know what a thin line divides step
ping aside and sidestepping.
The Democrats seem to realize, to
their dismay, that if they can't per
suade Mr. Hughes to change from
plaintiff to defendant t?ie case is lost.
The President "will not take the
stump," but "will accept Invitations
to speak at different places." Chalr
taan Vance McCornilck is as Machia
vellian as a muskmelon.
It is not what Wilson has kept us
out of but what he's got us lnto^that
counts at present.
VILLA AIDED BY WILSON'8
FAVOR AND BACKING.
In March last. Villa made a
raid into American territory. He
was a bandit leader whose
career of succeslful infamy had
been greatly aided by Mr. Wil
son's favor and backing. He
was at the head of Mexican sol
diets, whose arms and munitions
had been supplied to them in
consequence of Mr. Wilson's re
versing Mr. Taft's policy and
lifting the embargo against arms
and munitions Into Mexico. They
attacked Columbus, New Mexico,
and killed a number of civilians
and a number of United States
troops. On the next day the
president Issued an announce
ment that adequate forces would
be sent in pursuit of Villa "with
the single object of capturing
him." On April 8th, the an
nouncement was made from the
White House that the troops
would remain In Mexico until
Villa was captured. It was
furthermore announced In the
press despatches from Washing
ton that he was to be taken
"dead or alive." Fine words!
Only—they meant nothing. He
Is not dead. He has not beeq,
taken allve.-^rom speech .-of,'
Col. Theodore Roosevelt^ deliv
ered at Lewiston, Maine, itf be
half of Charles E. Hughes.
Mr. Wilson during the past few days
jirs
-become such a life-long opponent
of the pork barrel that he is almost
sorry now he didn't veto some of those
bills.
Secretary McAdoo warns Treasury
employes against too much political
activity, and If they doii't disobey the
order they are likely to be bounced.
A HEARTLESS
ADMINISTRATION
This Admlnlstratipn his dis
played no mere feeling of re
sponsibility for the' Amer'lpan
women who have been raped,
and for the American me^ wo
men and children who haw-been
killed in Mexico/ than a farmer
shows for the rate kTHed hjf hie
dogs when the hay Is taken from
a barn. And now the American
people are asked to sanction
thie policy in the name of peace,
righteousness and humanity!—
From the speech of Col. Theo
dore Roosevelt, delivered at
Lewiston, Maine, In behalf of
Charles E. Hughes.
1 iI it 1 I'. -fl A I i.J .' V. *.
I £-i_ I *.A i'f *4 *. i\'.
4J.J H''£1 ?''tf
mot**
Slow QILL
HtWw
Tp€ MORS.
HftL PAY
IfSftC^SC.
r°R(N
STAKCO
DOWN
TO
KiiEP THE
MILL OIOH
CkOINQ UP. ~2
Editorial Comments.
The Democrat^ continue to ignore
Mr. Hughes' speeches to the extent
that all they do Is to sputter and gasp.
Let it be conceded there are really
strong grounds for tike opinion that
President Wilson may carry Texas
next November.' If these indications
are taken at their full worth, some
enthusiasts will soon be going out to
be't that the tide will sweep on until
Mississippi and Alabama-are also en
rolled in the Democratic column.
Many big' Democrat's willing and
ready to'? speak .for Wilson ore care
ful that their mpney shall not say any
thing
son
his side.
President Wilson says he is utter
ly indifferent ns to his, .re-election.
Perhaps that explains a good many,
things nobody has heretofore been.
able to understand.'
_____
"Help me, Cassius, or I sink!'' -For
"Casslus" read "Congress."
The notion seems-to be that the
Democratic national chairman is Claim
ing more than he will get, but'not any'
more than he will need.
t«t v'A«^.w^rw v-' 7fjjr Webster jtht ', "z^- -r^'VS
SUPPLY'"™*) AND DEttAND™« BY BART.
FOB
PAPER
1
As further evidence that he Is warm-.
hearted and Intensely human, Mr.
Hughes likes apple pie.
No man Is going to be elected—or
re-elected-—to high office by votes
gained from States' rights declara
tions this late in the game. The
States' rights question was settled
some fifty years ago to the evident
satisfaction of a considerable major
ity.—Kansas City Star.
I
,.i,
i.:... .- V. J.
-.-a/.
jn T? if
I
SURPIV
Low.
Price
High
^o EASY,
n'fiii
INT
PAPER
IV
"Are we Americans a nation of
biinglers?" asks ^hp New/ 'prk Sun.
It would' be very' harsh to answer
this In the affirmative—and anyway,
we elect a Democratic pifesident' Only
every one# in a' while.
Charles E. Hughes cannot get so far
awuy from Washington that the men
In charge of the chariot of government
there do not feel the jolting of his
criticisms. In fact, the Democratic
lenders at the capital city show symp
toms of sea-sickness from the way In
which the ex-justice of the Supreme
csurt has shaken tliem up. Mr.
Hughes Is pursuing the only proper
method, which is first to take the
deadwood out of the way so that the
path to righteous and propitious gov
ernment may be made clenr.'
THE NEUTRALITY
OF PONTIUS PILfTE.
But' as .soon as the need for
deeds arose, Mr. Wilson forgot
all about "the prlnclple he held
dear." He- promptly announced
-that we should be "neutral In
fact as well avin name, In'thought
as well as in action/' between
th6 small, weak, uhoffendlng na
tion and the,large, strong nation
which was robbing it of its sov
ereignty and independence. Such
neutrality has been compared to
the neutrality of Pontius Pilate.
This is unjust to'Pontius Pilate,
who at leust gently urged mod
eration on the wrongdoer.—
From the speech of Col. Theo
dore Roosevelt, delivered at
Lewiston, Maine, in behalf of
Charles E. Hughes.
-I V,
.U'-i !. 'l:»M
WHEN YOU WANT
SUPERIOR
PRINTING
OF ANY KIND BRING
YOUR
1
WORK TO
-MU
IK it *v* *».!
-"t 'Mii!
The Review
9RPP
.« '.,V.
p*INT«Me*
output, q/f*
.'I ii'-j I -.1 •.••••••' __•}
ONE QOSt WILL' CON VINCF.
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Apply to the undersigned
B. PHILBROOK
PHYSICIANS
C. W. Carr: P. J. BrannQ.n
—®r- -.i
CARR A BRANNON
*!f Physicians -and Surgeonr
(Office in -McCarthy Buiiaing
Telephone—Crawford Couilty 85
*+.
V. K. GRAHAM
Physician and* &urg«on
Tbones: Resj 2&-1 'Office 25-K
Druk' Store !G-A
Delott .. y. Iowa

C.
4
Phones: Residence, 24 Office, 326
Offices and Treatment Rooms
Over the Racket Store.
J. J. MEEHAN
1
Physi'cfan ,'an'd Surgeon
Office in OpCTa House Black
Phbhe^: "Office 249 Res. 248
*t
DENTISTS
J. C. ROBINSON, D.' D. S.
Office In Opera House Block
Spocial Attention Given to Bridge
and Plate Work.
R. W. BLOMBERG, D. B. 8.
—o—
Offices in the Laub Block.
Denison Iowa
R. O. McCONNAUGHEY, D. D. 8.
•Office In New McCarthy Bldg.
Phone—259
ATTORNEYS
*.
*.* *.'*
J. 81ms Carl F. Kushnle
8IM8 A KUEHNLE
Attorneys and Counsellors
Office with 'Bank of Denison
J. P. Conner Leon Powers
CONNER & POWERS
Attorneys at- Law
Offices Over C. C. State Bank *.
Phones: Office 16 Res. 125
C&BAHlXa AID BTB1HO
has become a necessity, not only
from a standpoint of economy but
from a
ei-
R, P. PLIMPTON •*«..
Homeopathist Physician
Office in Residence, Broadway
W. T. WRIGHT
Physician and 8urgeon
I
SAHZTAST ITARDTOnR.
Save your clothes by having them
cleaned often by
iMitwir Bros. Saildriaff Co*
5
French Dry Cleaners
Denison, Iowa:
IRON MERCHANT'
G. KAPLAN, Denison, Iswa
I am In the market for coun
try mixed iron, bfdfes and furs,
rubbers and metals. I am pay-.
Ing the highest prices,
Architectural Electrical
RENFRO A LEWIS.
Consulting 'Engineers
Contractors
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