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The Denison review. [volume] (Denison, Iowa) 1867-current, August 27, 1919, Image 2

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SECTION 1—PAGE TWO
RAILWAY TIME TABLES.
O. fc IT. W. TIME CABS
GOING EAST
2* Overland Limited
*1 Local' Passenger ..
6 Atlantlo Express ..
No.
J'- No.
V:'', No.
,•- No. S3
ir.ii pp iiwtty wwej
.11:55
7:04pm
3:13pm
9:21am
.10:00am
8:16 pm
.11:24
Local
Hawkeye Express
Chicago Special
Fast Mail and Ex..
at Denison.
except Sunday.
No. 12
I'- No. 2ft* Fas
fey™- '|iEKf •Pon't stop
GOING WEST
1* Overland Limited .... 6:58am
3 Chicago & Japan Ex. ,12:50 pm
No. 5! Local Passenger
1 N0. Fast Mail
No. 11 Denver Special ..
6.24 a
8:24 am
5:40 a
10:42
11:48 am
3:00
No. 19' ••Pacific Limited, ..
No. 15* Fast Haili.,... ..
No. 33 Local Passenger
•Don't Btop at Denison.
tDattjr.except Sunday.
Np: Jb don stop at Denison and
pies-no passengers.
BQYER VAIilET BIT., C. &
.•t. .i i' Daily lixcept, Sunday.
No. 51 Accommodation, leaves 5:30 am
No, 52 Passenger, leaves ....12:05pm
NO 62 Accommodation, arr. ... 2:30
Nv. 6o Accommodation, arr. ..11:00pm
3UXHOXS CENTRAL
N.
0. 11 Chi, Omaha Ex., daily.
.. No, 13 St.
•life
Paul-Oma. Ex., daily
pie- Nliij. 4 Daily .....
ejSj-' Nto. 92" Mon., Wed., Friday
No. 6 Daily Local .... ..
2:02
C. M. & St. P. at ARION
GOING WEST
No. 11 Daily, Dak. Con. ..
N». 91 Tu«s., Thure., Sat.
Jfo, 3 Daily Local
i|$:' GOING EAST
6:15am
7:20am
2:02
9,04 am
3:00pm
8:05pm
The Denison Review
Published Every Wednesday by
Review Publishing Co
(Incorporated)
*. COXITES, *MUger
tend at Denison post office as second
{flass rn^er.
Advertising rates furnished on request
Official paper of City
rCrawfordCounty.
•'V 1
of Denison and
TBBKS OF BUBSCMPTIOX
Ofce year
•?. Pfcpejf suit to forfeigri'countiV 2.50
Telephone No. 23.
..$2.00
SJjc months 1.0.0
COBBBSFOmDBHCB
.Communications relating to news and
k: editorial matter should' be addressed to
s• p*-' Denison Review, Denison, Iowa.
JACK LEARNS ABOUT THE RAIL
ROADS
ifrom all appearances Jack had just
'bfeiv dipped in a coal bin. From his
h$kd to his feet he was one mass of
l|i dfet, anl a# he rail in the front door
•felm for supper Uncle Ted called to
"Well, w'here has my little,1 street
uifpWn ibeeu tiiis time?"
KiJ j'Tve been down to the round house
i4'tbe railroad yards and I'm going to
an
engineer too," answered Jack
great pride.
$»• "So," emiled IJncle Ted, "you're go
f$f iW to be a railroad man? I suppose
SiKitlwy have told you lots of things about
•'•Uroads down there and what
»r© trying to do witb them."
f}' 'v*Well" said Jack, "Mr. Jones, that
y" ib« fat engineer, told me I'd -better
-jf l^lrn all about railroads and trains be
'V. cdkMitlto men who run the trains'ame
gqfc».4a-4t»it»«)on so. that they uriU
jgxes and do just as they
.as I thought," answered Uncle
-T^l. 'Wow run along and wash your
f»4e and 'hands, get your sister and
'back iere and while you're eat
,t .i^g. supper I'll tell you the true story
Jf
the railroads."
1• Jack wasted little time in washing
$$$"' an^'
a^er
calling Ruth, the two chil-
-Wt- quietty, eagerly waiting for
1$?"^ 'the^atory.
»,
/. "Ntow children." began Uncle Ted,
ffs^V "'first of all 1 must-explain sometiiing
ajsoHt th« clubs that the railroad men
Vi tSl/'belong to before telling you about their
Pjan to own and run the railroads. Yon
sf»,e the engineers who run the engines,
"tui firemen who keep the fires $oing
in4tlie furnace^ under the big engines,
tb^ft conductors who take'your tickets,
brakomen who take care of the
JfV' rg|i flpgs and lights and let the engi
njisrsjknow what is going on in the
& a an a he
in L'he railroad shops, fixing brok-
I*''
en3W*toea
and fears, -belong to a club
a ad he
brotherhoods or clubs are divided into
one of the engineers, one
f*4 f^rfrho firemen, and so on."
*P^t why do they have Clubs?"
aslped Jack.
"Tiicy liave clubs so that they can
,. decide just how much money they will
Pf get and how many hours they will
work. You see the railroad men are
'Paid by railroad companies who have
li"to pay all expenses of the roads. These
Sft* companies aro headed by presidents
Vh
and bodies of men called boards of di
rectors.
:Tliey
.'i
VlV
are. responsible' for'w'uat
..
THOSE SUDDEN TWINGE8
Bring Suffering to Many a Denison
Reader
'Bain is naturete signal of distress.
A warning not to be ignored.
1fhos& sharp twinges in the back—
Those sudden, stab-like pains when
stooping
•S&'!
signs of kidney
Afe frequent
'trouble.
'tfc' to remove kidney pains, you must
I? asfiftft'tttcrlEidneys.
-tested' and- proven kidney
remedy.
$$one more highly endorsed than
DqanVKIdney fills.'
gr Endorsed abroad—endorsed at home
Bead Denison testimony.
i/jra., C, Frank, 214 E. Railroad
1
SL, eays: "I kqow of nothing better
for kidney complaint than Doa.n's Kid
ney Pills. They have done me more
good than any other medicine. Some
times my back hurts so I get almost
past, going. When I stoop I get sharp
twinges acrdss .my loins and I am
very dizzy. Doan's Kidney Pills pro
cured at the Lamborn Drug Co., have
always relieved these ailments."
Price 60c, at all dealers. Don't
simply ask for a'kidney remedy—get
Doan's Kidney Pills—the same that
Mrs. Frank had. Foster-Mllburn Oo.,
Mfcrs., Buffalo, N.
the railroads do. Whenever the men
'belonging to the railroad brotherhoods
'want more money or shorter hours
ithey tell the railroad heads. If they
idon't get what they want they have
iwhat is called a strike. That is, they
aH refuse to work until they get what
they are asking for. Sometimes men
from the heads of the railroads and
'men from the railroad brotherhoods
'get together and make a plan that
'suits everybody and then the men go
back to work."
"Caddy says these railroad heads
didn't have much to say during the
(war," interrupted Jack.
"No, during the war the government
ran the railroads and will continue to
run them ior some time or until the
president says otherwise. \Vlie,n the
igovernment first started running the
the roads President Wilson put Mr.
'McAdoo, whq was secretary of the
treasury, at the' head of all the rail
roads of the country. That is one
reason there is trouble now. You see,
during the War we had to move our
soldiers and food just as fast as pos
sible. President Wilson thought the
best way was to have the government
do it. Mr. McAdoo had so mucli to do
already that he couldn't worry much
about the railroads. Whenever the
railroad workers wanted more money
he let them have it without any ques
tion. He didn't want any strikes be
cause it would look bad for him. But
because he let them have their way
during the war, whether It was right
or wrong, these men now want the
government to buy the railroads for
them so they can get all they want
and just kick' the railroad heads out
without asking them whether they
want to go or not."
"I don' think that's nice,' said Ruth.
"Not very,'replied Uncel Ted. "Now
here's what the railroad men want our
congress in Washington to do. They
want a law passed that was written by
one of their own men, a man named
Oleen E. Plumb, that would cause a
new company to be formed to run all
the railroads in the United States. It
is called the Plumb plan because Mr.
Plumb wrote it. They want the gov
ernment to buy the' railroads and then
turn them over to the railroad men to
run. They say that half of the money
made by running the roads under this
new plan would go into the treasury
at Washington, which means it would
'go to the people of the country and
the other half wouKr go to the railroad
men themselves. Just think of that!
'There are 100,000,000 people in the
United States and if such a law were
passed one-half of the profits from the
railroads would have to be divided
among 100','000,000 people while the
other half would go to the railroad
men, and there are only about 5,000,
O'OO of them, even when you count each
railroad man as representing a family
ot, five people."
•'You mean," said Jack, "that the
railroad men would run the railroads
with government money and that they
would get half of the money made and
that all the people of the country
whose money would help buy the
'roads would have to divide up the oth
er half?"
"That's exactly it. And because
there are one hundred million people
in the United States and' only five
million railroad people you see how
unfair the plan is. Why, if such a plan
were allowed to exist each man be
longing to the railroad brotherhoods
jvould get twenty-times more of the
net earnings than any other citizen be
sides getting fifs' share as one of the
100,000,000 citizens. The railroad-metf
might have some excuse for such a
plan if they were paying for the roads
but they demand that the government
buy them at once and let each one of
them make twenty times more money
out of them than -any other citizen.
W.
GOING EAST
Nib. 12* Chicago Limited ....
No. 92 Local Freight
NO. 14* Chi. Special, daily ....
7:15 pin
10:25 a
11:59 a
GOING WEST
Nf. 91 Locals Freight
1:0fi
5:53 a
HEADACHE
90 per cent are caused by eye
trouble and some of the many forms
of catarrh.
Curable by Special Treatment
In this I specialize. Harm Danials
of Woden, Iowa, had such severe paias
in the head he was incapacitated.
Dr. Weber treated his nose and eyes
and he feels like a new person.
Wm. Burrman, Cashier of N. W. Sav
ings Bank of Davenport, had such se
vere pains in the eyes and head he
could not go to the bank.. He says,
"Dr. A. H. Weber treated my eyes and
cur^sd me: after two other doctors had
failed. I. ain thankful I_ found the
right doctor." .V.
'VP"'-
"v
GALL ANID SEE
Dr. A. H. WEBER
OF DES. MOINES
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT
•SPECIALIST
AT
Hotel Denison
from 9 a. m. to 2 p. m. on
Thursday, Aug. 28
GLASSES PERFECTLY FITTED
EXAMINATION FREE ..
And they say that if congress doesn't
pass this law they will stop work and
fix it so the trains can't run at all."
"Do you think our congress will let
such a thing happen?" aqked Jack.
"No," answered Uncle Ted. "Mr.
Plumb has been telling many of the
men in Washington about his plan, but
none of them thinks it fair and I don't
'believe they will let the law pass. If
such a law were passed it would start
the same kind of things in this coun
ry that are happening in Russia where
that dreaded monster, bolshevism,
runs the country. The plan of the
railroad brotherhoods is not fair and
American, so if I were you, Jack, I'd
wait and see if these men are going to
act like patriotic citizens before decid
ing to be a railroad man."
"I guess I will wait," answered Jack,
"because I don't think these railroad
men should act that •way."
MORE TIME NEEDED
The Paris peace conference had the
peace treaty before them for seven
months, with unlimited information at
their command. They permitted Mr.
Wilson to stitch into that treaty the
league of nations, a proposal which, if
ratified by us, would involve the very
life of this nation, subjecting it to
super state government.' The commit
tee on foreign relations of the senate
must study the treaty with but meager
information, to determine its effect
on this nation. They are entitled to
as much time as the conferees had.
THE ATTACK ON /MARRIAGE
at is one of the laws of life that if
you dance, you must pay the piper.
The fool does not fare as well as'the
wise man.
The people who -become so bitten
against the .institution of jnarrigge, air^
usually the ones who have' comiftitted'i
acts of stupid folly, and then kick be
jcause society says they mu4t accept'
.the results anil pay the price- lt is
not commonly.wfee .to relieve people
of the natural consequences of their
Proceedings.
!•, '.V
When peojplq marry they take pp
ertain responfetbilitife and jincur• a
uty: to the community. They expect
to ibring children into the world, a&d
usually do so. ,But if they ibreak up
their home and tarn those children
loose, their untarined and uncontrolled
offspring are likely to .become a men
ace to the community. Consequently
the community has some right to fix
the conditions under which the con
tracts of marriage ca£ be broken and
its responsibilities evaded.
If people would not lrtterly leave
their brains irehind them, when-they
consider the matter of marriage and
sex union, unhappy marriages would
be very few. It is certainly amazing
bow people 'can .be tooledi 'Business
men with keep, $9^ miAdg are com
pletely upset by a' dofrfacie aflid the
seductive manner^ of empty headed
women who will not retain their mor
al or Intellectual respect for isix
•A
1780
v^w:
.'! '.--*»f»!8»»
THE DENISON RfcVIEW, WEDNESDAY, AUG. 27, 1916
months. Women will take, at their
face value the promises and attentions
of men who are not worthy to enter
the same room with them.
Young people should take note of all
the existing marital misery, and real
ize that their entire future happiness
and success is at stake when they en
ter the marriage relation. If they do
not know their future partner from
long personal acquaintance, they
should make careful inquiry.
When people show common sense
and ordinary prudence in entering into
this most vital of all relations, friction
in the married state will largely disap
pear.
DON'T SEEK GOVERNMENT JOB
One Aaron Loeb, of Washington, D.
C., has a kick coming for treatment
received from the -post office depart
ment of Washington, presided over by
that genius for creating strife. A1 Bur
leson. Loeb says he resigned his po
sition in the department to volunteer
in the military service. He put in
nearly two years abroad, was returned,
discharged and sought his old job, but
it was refused him. Then he tried to
get into the laibor department and was
turned down there on the ground that
he had "left the post office department
for a better paying position with a
private firm," which seems not to have
been.the case. Apparently Loeb's po
sition was speedily,filled by a Burle
son bomb proofer who may have been
in on the deal to tangle hopelessly the
swiped wires. There have been other
instances similar to Loeib's and not
confined to the post office department.
The boys who left the departments to
bash in the 'boche were given to* un
derstand that their jobs would wait
ljor them, but what is an administra
tion promise worth? However, de
spite ifhe doable dealing of the admin-*
listratlim these boys are better off,
did Uiey hut know it. There is a job
wajfipj? somewhere for every chap who
went-ove!- and came back and one with
a "private firm" which seems to make,
him Undesirable for the labor depart-!
ment. And the chap who works for
a private'firm after the experiences*
this war has brought him, is goipg to
be a valuable asset to the 'firm' and an
employee who will not /be obliged to
crook the servile knee to a govern
ment martinet. He can do better for
himself and fpr the country in the
achievements of private enterprise.
I DELp.IT ITEMS
..
Miss Eunice 'Dobson returned home
Mojfqgayjfionj her pleasant visit in Da
fcota. tier mother went to Arion to
imt
.W. T. lHuckstep and Milt Childress
were Kiron visitors Monday.
Isaac Newton spent a few day^at
owns a motor
it a big, luxurious limousine or only
a little fliyvgr, has at command the
means of satisfying one of his most prim
itive instincts, a desire to fare forth like
a triie adventurer and enjoy the freedom
of the open country.
Accompanied by his family or his friends,
he, lik^ the Argdnauts Can staft a |ittl§.
journey into unfamiliar places
He need have no fear of coiisequences.
this it goes*-i»f
^t
ror
wn ^W!tnoui
The wayside brook, or the well on a
friendly farm supplies the water, while
gasoline arid oil may be had anywhere
from the Service Stations of the Standard
Oil Company (Indiana).
ized and maintained by the Standard Oil
Company (Indiana) covers every city,
town, and hamlet, and in many cases
there is a tank and pump beside the
ljittle store at the'fork of the roadfe.
ITtijLS. Complete distribution of its products
is one pf the chfef services rendered by
^e Sj^arJ OU Company (Indiana) to
the motorists of America, yet it represents
but one of the many benefits derived by
the public at large from the operation of
the Standard Oil Company (Indian^) as
seryant.
Standard Oil Company
„.„{Jndiona)
910 So. Michigan Ave., Chicago
$
^-••HP^i7*' vmnr^i^wf:"
if i»ik ki »A x.A vi»t
i}?.ttH±rU.t'-* e&hii
he Richard Lilleliolm home doing the
chores while Mr. Lilleholm and family
went on an outing to Sioux City.
Miss Ella Weber returned Monday
from the lake where she with friends
3pent the past week.
Mr. and Mrs. James McKim and
Mesdames Beaman and Wilkinson
vere 'Denison shoppers Monday.
Mrs. Dick McKim and daughter, of
Tda Grove, are spending a few days
visiting relatives in Deloit.
Rev. Oreen and family* spent last
Thursday at Lakewood.
Dr. Merriam and wife were Denison
Jailers Thursday.
Mr. and Mrs. Pr Carstensen arriv
ed ip Deloit from 1 0 northern part of
he sta,te for a few days' visit.
Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Newton enter
tained their immediate relatives in
lonor of Isaac Newton's birthday.
Mrs. Geo. Newcom, of Denison, spent
Thursday at the home of her parents.
Mrs. Graham and daughters were
Denison shoppers Thursday.
Prof. Kuhn and wife left Thursday
in their auto to visit friends- at Wash
ington, Iowa.
Mr. and Mrs. 'Dobert Graham and
sons, of Epworth, near Ida Gtfove, were
pleasant callers at the Rev. Green
home Sunday afternoon.
Ardath Cose, of 'Dunlap, has been
visiting friends in town.
Bessie Pilcher returned to her home
this week after a pleasant visit with
relatives. -She will be greatly missed.
Arden Newcom and Russell Newcom
are driving Fords these days.
J. M. and R. -H. Childress will visit
the state fair and also their brother
in Missouri.
Mre. B. S. Green attended the sil
ver medal contest of the W. C. T. U.
at Denison Friday evening. She was
t^e guest of Mr3, Win- Strahan over
nigljt.,'
Miste Lucy Flint, of Long Beach,
Calif., arrived in pejjefit Sunday.
James Mc^Kim was an Arion visitor
Suo4»y. .... ...
Mrs S Oreen visited at the
Chiidress home Saturday
The ne«r l^aVb«»r .has arrived, who
recently piir hased the shop here.
mdm
Uuwtt,000,000.00
ulMlaHw*
Ulaad la «al«
•ruchaac*
mmm
tU'DENISON
j~ Eyesight Specialist, M. Blank
Office at HOTEL DENISON, TtarsL, Aug.
8 A. M, to 6 P. M.
TO EXAMINE EYES AND FIT GLASSES
ftfy 20 years experience in Scientific Eyesight Testing and the
fitting of correct glasses ior the relief of eyestrain is at your
disposal. This experience has been of immense, value in my
continued success. I have been successful in some of the most
complicated cases of eyestrain on record. Remember your
eyes are thoroughly examined when you come to me. If glass
es are found necessary they are fitted to you in perfect man
ner, and at a reasonable cost. Special attention given to chil
dren's eyesight. For your own sake it will be to your advant
age to see me. Consultation free.
Home Office and Factory, 412 Neb. St., Sioux City, Iowa.
.^. Scnd u$ your brok# lensep for repair. Send the broken
i.l piepes only. Our sgrvice is prompt.
Will be in Dunlap at Hptel Friday, Aug- 29, 8 A. M. to 3 P. M.
W. A. MoHENRY, Preaident li
t.QEORGE McHENRY, Vice President
first
f^»-«ij{l«jj| f*H?
EIGHTH GRADE GRADUATION
(Continued from Page 1)
ITlaliiifttiotnr Township
District No. 3: Sears Poleske. Eliza
beth McGinn, Teacher.
District No. 4: Leo McSorley, Clare
McSorley. Dlrdlo Metcalf, Teacher.
District No. 8: Adella Williams. Ruth
Hayes, Teacher.
District No. 9: Edwin Olson. Myrtle
Barber, Teacher.
WMbinffton Township
District No. 1: Viola Hast. Minnie
Giss, Teacher.
District No, 2: Walter Collins. Mae
Cfollins, Teacher.
District No, 4: Bernice McBrlde, Will
lam Hast, Katie Didier. Stella Stallor
and Hazel I-Iulsebus, Teachers.
Borer Township
District No. 4: Alfred Weber. Mary
Honz, Teacher.
District No. 9: Ethel Rethmeler. Helen
M. Malone, Tcacher.
AiplnwaU Bohool
Julia Lamp, Milda Wagner, Lillian
Jensen. Helen Dethlefs, Teacher.
Klron School
Bernice Claijson, 'Ralph Norelius, Dav
id Lundberg, Elizabeth Norelius Grace
Norelius, Margaret Nordell, Quintou
Norelius. Ru,th Tucker, Teacher
Deloit School
Kathryn Vennink, Edith Darling, GeO.
Moeller, Garnett Campbell, John Allen
Anderson, Lyle Darling. W. H. Kuhn,
Teacher.
X.uth»ris School, Baaison
Dorthea Christiansen, Ella Christian
sen, Ella Marie Denkor. W. H. Nagel,
Teacher.
Arion School
Chas. Ccclt TaJcott, W. Everett Car
son, Lola Argotsinger. Irene Welch,
Teacher.
How's This?
We offer One Hundred Dollars Reward
for any case of Catarrh, that cannot be
cured-by Stall's Catarrh Medicine.
Hall's Catarrh Medicine has been taken
by catarrh sufferers for the past thirty
live yearsL and has become known as the.
most xeliable remedy tor Catarrh. Hall's
Catarrh Medl Jne acts thru the Blood on
the Mucous surfaces, expelling the Pol
son from the Blood and healing the dis
eased portions.
After you have taken Hall's Catarrh
Medicine for a short time you will see a
great, improvement In your general
h&kl'tri. Start taking Hairs' Catarrh MeM
cine at once, and get rid of catarrh. Send
for testimonials, free.
F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, Ohio.
8old bf-all Druggists. 75c.
SEARS McWENRY, Cashier
L. SEEMANN, Asst. Cashier.
IRational fianh
DENISON IOWA
Capital1, Surplus and Profits $140,000
A«(eta|$ 1,138,^57.78
Interest Paid on Time Oeposita. Loans Made on Commercial Paper.
Time Loans Made on Improved iPar^ at Current R,3tes.
Wo have a complete set of abstract books ot Crawford county
I«w}s .»n4..l9t», .and wake abstracts of title.
We solicit your account on a reciprocal basis. We make five pub
lished reports of
qup
RESPON8IBI LITY $1,000,000
General Banking Business Conducted. Exchange Bought and Sold.
Long and Short Time Loans, Lowest Rates. Interest Paid on Time De
posits. Abstracts at Title Made. We Own a Complete Set of Abstract
Books. Real Estate Loans at Lowest Rates. Fire Insurance Written.
SIMS & KUEHNLE, Lawyers
Deposits $1,000,000.00
condition annually to the Comptroller of Cur-
rency and are examined by the National bank examiner twice a year.
CARL F. KUEHNLE, President C. L. VOSS, Cashier
A. B. LORENZEN, Asjrt. Cashier
Sanb of Denison,
TP*
Bliesman Land Co.
Citr fra»«nr
Laans louruet
Owun, |fn
I
tiU'f tir.-iaiuii
J*
Hi
CONDENSED GRAVEL WASTE
Waterloo Courier: Mr. Pierce of the
Homestead has declared this perma
nent roads proposition is an attempt
on the part of cities and towns to "put
something over" on tho country peo
ple. Others have said the same thing,
in Greene county, with its 300 miles
of gravel roads, eight townships that
are without town or village, cast a
vote of more than two to one for paved
roads. Let not this fact escape atten
tion: After a dozen years of gravel
roads—300 miles o£ themes-Greene*,
county, purely agricultural, votes three
to one for paving.
Highest Cash Prices
paid for
Economy Meat Market
Wilbur Robcrtt, Prop.
Professional Directory
PHYSICIANS
.i
4
WINIFRED M. MILLER, D. C.
CHIROPRACTOR
Office Hours: 10 to 12 and 1 to 4,
and by appointment
Phones: Office 19,6 Home 74 4"
Over Bartcher's Florist Shop
Denison, Iowa
LOUIS M. COOM, M. P.
Stomach Specialist 4
—,—
Hubbell Block, Denison, Iowa 4
J. J. MEEHAN
Physician and Surgeon 4
4 Office in Opera House Block
4 Phones: Office 56 Res. 218 t»
C. W. Carr P. 4. Brannon
CARR & BRANNON
Physicians and Surgeons
4
28
Offioe In |fEarthy Building
4 Telephqne—Crawford County 85 *,.t:
DENTISTS
4 MELVIN (ROMANS, O. O. 8.
Office In Miller Block
Main Street, Denison 4
Special Attention to Bridge and
Plate Work
4 J. C. ROBINSON, D. D. 8,
Office in Opera House Block 4
Special Attention Given to Bridge
and Plate Work 4
4
4
4R. O. McCONNAUGHEY, D. D. 8
4 Office in New McCarthy Building 4*
Phone—259
ATTORNEYS
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
4 J. P. Conner Leon' Powers 4
4
CONNER A POWERS 4
4 A a 4
4
4 Offices Over C. C. State Bank 4
4 Phones: Office 16 Res. 125 4
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
ARCHITECTS
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 •4 4 4 4
4
4 E. L. BARBER 4
4 ARCHITECT 4
4 Plans and Specifications and 4
4 General Superintendence 4
4 Office Over Bank of Denison 4
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
4 CHARLESBARTCHER 4
4 Funeral Director 4
4 Charles Bartcher, Licensed Em- 4
4 balmer 1297. 4
4 Herbert Fuller, Licensed Em- 4
balmer 1887
4 Funeral Chapel on Corner of 4
4 Broadway and Sweet Streets. 4
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
INSURANCE
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
PAULSEN A ATZEN
Life, Fire, Auto, Tornado 4
INSURANCE
Orora TTv.:r Rlonlf. Dsnison 4
1
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1
1
4
4* J. Sims Carl F. Kuehnie
SIMS & KUEHNLE 4
4 Attorneys and Counsellors 4
4 Office with Bank of Denison 4
4 4
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
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