OCR Interpretation


Delaware State journal and statesman. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1855-1870, June 18, 1867, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038112/1867-06-18/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

%
Published Semi-Weekly and Weekly by Henry Eckel, Editor and Proprietor, at the Mammoth Steam Printing Establishment, S. E. corner ol Fifth and Market Streets.
WILMINGTON. TUESDAY. JUNE IS, 1867.
NO. 49.
VOL. XXXV.
WARNER'S
PHILADELPHIA AND WILMINGTON
STEAM PROPELLER LINE.
STEAMER LEAVES
S1RST WHARF BELOW CHESTNUT ST., PHILAD'A,
DAILY AT r> P. JVL,
AND MARKET STREET WHARF, WlLMlNGTOtf,
DAILY, AT (> V. M.
Freight will he received from 1 A. M., to tlie Hour of Sailing.
»-STTIIB EXPRESS ARRANGEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH
THIS LINS FORM THE MOST DESIRABLE; MODE FOR TRANS
PORTINO FREIGHT BETWEEN THE TWO CITIES.
PHILADELPHIA AND WILMINGTON
STEAM BOAT LINE.
ON AND AFTER MONDAY, APRIL 8th, 1807,
THE FINE STEAMER ARIEL,
Will Leave Wilmington at 7.00 A.M.
Returning, Leave Philadelphia at 2.30 P.M.
Cheater at 8.15 A.M
er going to <
, (Steamer Ariel)»
by tbe Wllmlngto
freight rece
FREIGHT NOTICE.—All
Sfb l?n?w»ke k lMhe / f 1 u'SSit
hi»' Ï Mv"g'ofY wKlVkVoUK f TIMK*'tSumjtblppe
tor «Ä to com. by this Hue. If left a. tbe ottW. too
«"■TAGGARrS EXPRESS ruu. In c
I
tranaporMng freight.^
ladel
,*rdeJ by i
JOHNSON,'ia"
be
' Kit
II
8AMUI
JAMES F. WOOD.
JAMES WILSON.
KRÖNT STREET STOVE STORE
South-East Corner of Front anti Orange.
WILSON & WOOD.
DEALERS IN
STOVES, HEATERS AND RANGKS, TIN AND SHEET IRON WARE.
METALÏC RtlOFlNU, AND UUTTEHINU AND SI'OUIINO
Y ATTRNDEI»
»♦y
irda of
Jol> W.
paid to Tin
»ST Partlflular alten
»U rIv*
.11.1«
, they feel
L. P. HAW DON
WM. W. HOOPES & CO.,
WU W. H0OPR8.
No. 603 Market Street, 3 doors above Sixth Street,
id well selected utook of
largo
Oall and examine
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS.
■ahhmkkkttb and jeans,
AND PLAIN FLANNELS,
I'l.AID FLANNELS,
BTK1PKD FLANNELS.
TABLE LINEN AND 'FOWLING,
»VK8 AND HOSIERY
MOURNING GOODS.
CLOAKS AND CLOTHS,
BLANKETS,
WOOLEN GOODS,
And all kind»of
DOMESTIC GOODS,
ALSO, OPERA FLANNELS.
W. W. HOOPES & CO., No. 603 Market Street.
MOHAIRS,
ULKS,
PLAIN BLACK BILE,
CORDED " "
riQURKU <•
fOU DB SOIR "
PLAlVsUKMALL OOI.OKS.)
PIOURRD BILKS, (FANCY COLORlJLACR
UHBIHOKS. giïSÏÏ
PLAIN AND PLAID CAHSIMKRS,
CLOTHS AND SATIN BITS,
TWILL
COIIOUUUH,
CASHMERES,
ALL WOOL DE LAINKf,
FANCY PLAID
LACES AND EDO ES,
VARIETY.
BUCK BBS CLOTH,
LBS SI ANGES,
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
sept2G
BANKING INSTITUTIONS.
PUNS AND PENCILS.
'•mi^PIN'TeTMIGHTTBR THAN TUB 8WORD."
THE GOLD PEN,
SKIT AND OHBAPE1T.OF PKNS.
MORTON'S GOLD TENS,
THE BEST PENS IN THE WORLD
SOB BAI.K AT
No. 25 Maiden Lane, New York,
î by every duly appointed Ageut at I
THE
,,U 1 . prie«.
Norton makes no Pens stamped with the
Name or Trade-mark of any other ; therefore,
where an Agency is established, the public will
he best suited, and at the same prices, by calling
• on the Agent. In all other places those wishing
the Morton Pen, must send to Headquarters,
where their orders will receive prompt attention,
if accompanied with the oaab.
A catalogue of all sizes and prices sent,
ceipt of letter postage.
febltf-tf
r
A. MORTON.
Kin
LEAD PENCIL COMPANY,
NEW YORK.
FACTORY, HUDSON CITY, N. J.
WHOLESALE SALKS ROOM,
No. 34 JOHN STREET,
NEW YORK.
l
Lead Poo
IVIM
» I1D PENCIL
and o
vlted to give
ie AMERICAN
Ittieprlueipal Stationers
' I
I ha
Aik fo, Ihv -AMERICAN I.KA
TESTIMONIAL. *
SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. J
!Bnoin»«hino Dbpahtmbnt, Yalk Cou.fd*. .
r IS, IHtiO.
polygrade
N
I
I'Otumanded
I. .ii,

l
ii, j
d Pend!» m
U ■
î
î Fa
• olVltoglUh
U hi
rlo
.belt
La
:
•>

SSlM
pencil«
LOUIS MAIL,
Pr
American LM Pencil Co., N. Y .
nut tha exact
IjJOK TO IT.
»of thellrm
■ >■!
QUANTITY vs. QUALITY.—HELMBOL
> large qua ntity
iXTRACT
I
Blown'« Jamaloa Ginger,
• Brown Wladior Soap, and a variaty of Perfumery
Toilet articles foreale at Wilaoa'« Diug and Medici*
tore, SOB Market Bt. July 18
W OOL CARDS CAN BE HAD AT THE HARD
WARE Slur# ot |J. A. ROBINSON A CO..
*piTÄT®|irft5i0*Rr P OÖkW , 'PÏÏLPIT , - À N
T »«Ully .Bible«, »ad every variety ol Hyou Book
. »t J. B. PORTER'S, 409 Market «t
be
R.
BANKING INSTITUTIONS.
LfiltST NATIONAL BANK,
OF WILMINGTON.
Depositary of tub Public Moneys,
AND
United Stats«.
Tinanoial Aoknt
EDWARD BETTB, Pbkbidknt,
G. D. ARMSTRONG, Cashibb.
$400,000
CAPITAL,
THE COLLECTING AND EXCHANGING OF UOVBKN
MF.NT SKCDRITIKS ATTKNDKD TO
A SMALL COMMISSION.!
I.ADELPltlA AND NEfl 1'ORK EXCHANGE
Fl'RNlSItED TO REOULAR DEPOSITORS
WITHOUT CHARGE.
BY
MKKT ON MONDAYS AND TIIUR8DAYS
■ FOR DISCOUNT. _
10 Atll'IHANH' SAVINGS BANK,
No. »0? MARKST 8TKKKT,
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE.
DIRKCTO
r
I
* P
Opet
id Saturday
i.f the Da
the
'Y 1
lly Iu April
Din
in«
»I
ny
1HÖI
uK
ded a* Deposits, an
lvldei
fund«
itltled
ay of
II«
anted
AN Ai
,a W. Day,
it F. Dima,
uw W. -
I. Jack
Je
.
î
J
■ î
OK.IK S.
M. L. Lie
HILLES, l'BKBi
ORGC W. Fu/w, vit e Preaid
Jon* P.
HOOK BINDING.
e Rook Bill
ha«ed
CO. Wllnilugtou,
ROUGH MAN, THO
Ill coutluuo tho
BOOK BINDING
AND
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURING
No- 420 Shlploy Street*
BLANK BOOKS
M A 1) K T O O R DER.
, BILL HEADS, 4c., RULED TO ANY PAT
BOOKS CAREFULLY RK-BOUND.
MAGAZINES, MUSIC. PAMPHLETS
AND NEWSPAPERS BOUND
AT REASONABLE RATES.
„used a« follow« will meet with
PAP
TERN,
.
ipt
JOHNSTON & BOGIA.
.t? WILMINGTON. PEL.
I'KMON * SORB,
miN
,1
Medici*
18
Bill Posters and Bell Ringers
No. 6 West Fitth Street,
WILMINGTON. DEL. _
gut 4-___
Children to Indenture
'/ u %
N
MEDICAL.
SMITH & DIXON,
CHEMISTS AN1> DRUGGISTS,
IV. W. Cor. market aim ills Ht h.
DEALERS IN
DRUGS,
DRUGS,
DRUGS,
CHEMICALS,
CHEMICALS,
Oil EM ICALS,
PERFUMERY.
PERFUMERY
PERFUMERY.
TOILET ARTICLES,
TOILET ARTICLES,
TOILET ARTICLES,
FANCY ARTICLES,
FANCY ARTICLES,
FANCY ARTICLES,
AND
AND
\ N I '
RELIABLE MEDICINES,
RELIABLE M EÜI01NES,
RELIABLE MEDICINES.
-ly-rj.us
INJURIOUS
Y ODNü LAD1KB BEWARE OF
effect« of Face Powder« aud Was
tii
SStSS
«b.
ii«e He
»Id'i
and youthful appear»
healthy
tract Bar
Wß- HALL'S
VEGETABLE SICILIAN
Wj' HAIR
■kq Henewer .
Vegetable Sicilian Hair Renewer
Has stood the test of »even years
before the public ; «ml no p
tlon for the hair has yet bt
covered Huit will produce the same
beneficial results. It is an entirely
scientific discovery, combining
many of the most powerful and
storative agents in the VEGETABLE
KINGDOM. It restores CRAY HAIR
TO ITS ORIGINAL YOUTHFUL
COLOR. It makes the scalp white
and clean; cures dandruff and
humors, ami foiling out of the
linir ; and will make it grow upon
bald heads, except in very ageel
persons, as it furnishes the *m#H
tive principle by which the, hair is
nourished and supported. It makes
the hair moist, soft, and glossy,
and is unsurpa seed as a HAIR
DRESSING,
preparation ever offered to the pub
lic, as one bottle will accomplish
more and last longer than th
bottles of any other preparation.
It is recommended and used by
the First Medical Authority.
The wonderful results produced
Sicilian Hair Renewer have
induced many to manufacture pre
parations for the Hair, under
rious names ; and, in order to in
duce the trade and the public to
urchase their compounds, they
>fl resorted to falsehood,
claiming they were former part
hatl soins connection with
. Hall, and their prépara
is similar to ours. l>o not
be deceived by them . Purchase the
original : it has never yet been
equalled. Our Treatise on the Hair,
with certificates, sent free by mail.
See that each bottle has our private
Revenue Stamp over the toji of the
bottle. All others are imitations.
dis
It is the cheapest
by
by
tiers,
Mr
Ol
R. P. Hall & Co.. Prop's, Nashua, N.H.
Solil bn all Drugi/Hi on J Utalon in Aftdwin«.
f.bla-ty _
MEDICAL ELECTRICITY.
by
DR. C. H. LAWTON,
rk and Philadelphia, w»
ende and
may «till be found
ale of New
public that he
hie I
At 913 Market Street,
Where he ie treating
NERVOUS AND CHRONIC DI8EASES
8 r N K W C fa Y ST k\T O F M K D [°C A fK !. 2 c/i IICI T Y !
eutlfli' principle«;
or #v>
BY HIS
which I«
ibti
di

»ppllc
rli
peclnlly adapte
tbe opt!
rhlc
»ly«
blind!
iptlo
* P o°e n » S 8t U $ l
nr g
J bande, era
•I'
JB
hi
«I.
G
kia
«».pile», palny, rh»uu>
»ti
ills
I
I
»ted. I*i
red
hicrédïbîy 1 «
time.
ally.
RBFKUKNCKB
ire of referring
let»
th î
ally.
.
.iÄffÄVw:"
[ward L. Klee, GDI Shipley M
î ■
I
rnBliiugton at*.
, g i m î
. II. Jon.
L. R
M ^
u.Jpti,... — —
gton KukhoII, Oh
r F. Sonlbgato.
el.
CLEANS
H RLMBOLD'S EXTRACT BAK8AFAR1LI
InL. (Ue*«y*to- . ..
Uo huuioru
OSTER'S DRUG STORE,
CORNER
FRONT AND WEST STREETS,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
F
III). D H. FOSTER
I
Anuoi..
■be ha»
Weal Bt
A-aWi
lull eupply Of
PURE AND FRESH DRUGS,
noil reliable bou«ei
dtr
I

mlenceJ Drunniht,
acy, of Pbtladelpbi
PRESCRIPTIONS, at »II
tide», Chemical«,
d Tooth Bruahe«.
I ha
the Collez# ol Pharm
POUNDING 0 OF " ^
r night.
hu
Medi
na» of F
pa
te, Coiogn
er v till Die usually
will alway» be I
elphla pi le
_ »rally, wll
. lue at tha above location, v
uot yrofeaelonelly engaged.
RKMBD1BS »Oll THE HORSE,
able medicine«
kept it
Bx
..»alated Drug
nd, an.l »old at the
î
»pt
Pe
r. F.
:
wham »b
A full
tutly on hi
apr23 l y
laondon Hair Restorer
i
FERTILIZERS.
MliKIEKK LOOK
F
YOUR IN
TURK NTS.
in subei-rlber« w>ulJ »*y to the public Ihej
FARM EE'S DEPOT AND COAL YARD,
HOUTII
MARKET STREET BRIDGE,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
Wb«re tbey luteud keeping a large »«(nrlmenl nf FARM
INU IMPLEMENTS, FERTILIZERS AND COAL, euch
»s Ball'« Ohio Combined
REAPING A MOWING MACHINE,
(With Self IUko I
.)
Jiubliit
ad.
K1CYSTONE <£• UNION MO WEHS,
Both auBiirpansed Maclila««.
To
'fliïKÏ
II a
». I'utei
Mill«
, Pin
by I
atli
all
Shovel«, Spa
M.ntO PHILLIPS', IIAUUIl'.S nod WIIANN',
SUPER-PHOSTHATES
1
Aud as
A SUPERIOR QUALITY
ole of HAW BONE, A
Ac.
-, (
fro
the
bl
■y ■
ipt I
«*-TI1K REST HUIIU Yl.l
iuav2l-1 v
LI. COAL by I lid CARGO
Il G P II 1 L L I PS'
GENUINE IMPROVED
M
SUPER-PH OS Pll ATE
OF
LIME.
STANDARD GUARANTEED.
Fori
No. 27 NORTH FRONT STREET,
PHILADELPHIA,
AND
. 95XSOUTII
.BALTIMORE,
No
STREET,
And by dealer« in i
bihI
lrooitliouf.tLe .
The material
MORO PHILLIPS' PHOSPHATE
lUlUH I
plia
llu
It
«Heure Im« pr

•ulv
MORO PHILLIPS,
janll-ly
I)'
I, NIIAKI'I,KSS
B O N E
SUPER PHOSPHATE OF LIME
môle MANURE for all
Our PHOSPHATE I« nun
chi« fly
Ua K s
A LIBERAL DISCOUNT TO DEALERS.
GENUINE A. PERUVIAN GUANO,
whlct
J*ve »! way »nu
BONE DUST AND GROUND HONES,
id ran supply the Trade with the beet
a
of
Poudrette, Land Plaster, &c.
DIXON, HIIAHPLES8 ~
No. 40 SOUTH WHARVES,
EARLY VEGETABLES.
PeitUleaoa, To
HEADY FOR MARKET
Ft am
ra to three we«
AMMONIATED FERTILIZER.
lin
appllc-a
y TRUCK
ailing Ii I m -
by Market Gard
eta mrly in the
BUST 1'RICEd.
City
PRICE, $2.62 PER DAG.
rde
W.i
ALLEN & NEEDLES,
t'A South Ma
ivenuf, j PHILADELPHIA.
to
feb8-wl3t
L,
ATF PLANTING.
that uio»t reliable
be «upplled wl
and old «établi
BAUGH'S
RAW RONE PHOSPHATE,
»tlty,
tb«
ACTIVE AND PERMANENT EFFECT
if»
dard î
LYSLK.
WILSON,
Wilmingto n.
BEAUTIFUL
ayUS
A CLEAR, SMOOTH SKIN
K» ss*ir " ^ ...
rill«
Hkiu.
aplk
JJYDRAULIC CEMENT,
aoo LBS.
A
CEMENT COMPANY
pointed
•Ir
«apply the î
superior arii.-ie, *
al LOW KATES.
.punlity required.
ALLEN A NEEDLES,
42 South Del. Avenue ,
41 " Water Street ,
"
elthe
rk*. accordi
PHILADELPHIA.
IlKSH AND «DAT MAR
i)
DRESSES AND COATS CUT AND FITTED
SHORTEST NOTICE,
THE MOST REASONABLE TERMS,
AT No. 8« TATNAI.L STREET.

desirable »tyl
All Hie late«
LADIES AND CHILDREN'S SUITS,
Constantly on haud.
fcf PERFECT SATISFACTION GUARANTEED, -fc*
, PLAIN SEWING
NEATLY AND PROMPTLY DONE.
F. J. BENNETT
immediately at th«
the
^Apprentice*
- it.
SALtfC— 1 THE OL
I*?"
HALL" PRO
PERT Y In
It]
It i» ii
oily, aud will b
200. Apply to
WM.
icCAULLEY,
ONKY WANTED
M
LOAN
of $600, tl
$6,000, 4c. Any pernon having
$l.i
$'2.U
aid «afely.wo
W. MeOAtJLI.
A CO.,
«WÖ Market itra
ap3
U« RlrU —
following »boat
uikijS.
tbo girls,
'I'll K
that
a
As
iu
He
of
i>i«
I Id
«ud with oi
They li
live».

Or Natl
I-,
»J
ng an Hi»
The
glil«. aud
ibiult lb«
'•lowing :—
111)It WIVES.
Uod blet» ou
They Oil
ho
Wit
Il I tie b«a
»bo.k.
They
aud I
When w
They h«
yet thiy cry,
Aud place to
Of roguish g'.rl«.
With auuuy ourla,
We may Iu :
cy
1
Hi
Are everything the
[('HIGH.
\VI
A IIooeieh Lawyer's Maiden Speech.— The
following is from a Western lawyer: 1
horte lawyer away out West, tlo'iDg
huBiuess '
formerly a youug
of promiso—from the country—in faot, I
•elevated' from oliiidbood by benevolent
of the most obscure districts of
that Hue.' 1
parents ii
the 'Hoosier' State.
defend
called upon
various and sundry individuals who had violated
the law. At the specified time I
usual, like a har
monie days ago 1

The old Squire
iuches long. He looked
aud domestic liquor dealer. His old lady took
the trial and bear tbe
a bench about fourteen
as modest as a foreign
whore she could
•argamiuts.'
After imbibing a small quantity of double
distilled quintcsseuoe of blue luin, wbiob a jug
under tlio beucb contained, tbe Squire went to a
darf closet and abstracted therefrom a huge book
that looked like Shakespeare's
Blaokstone'e
's book.
page (the first he
to)
Ho perusod
aud looked up and said :
•Accordin'
two ways of start
. One is to
law, there
in' into tbo merits of this bore
pussekuto aud t'other to lookin' arter tbe prison
er's defense.'
1 immediately assumed a perpendicular atti.
tilde and informed tbe highly eduoated Squire
to trouble himself about the defeuae, fot I
tbe veritable Lycurgus employed and edu
catfJ regardless of expense.
When tbe trial
supposed to be in full
a point of order, and, with a
nothingness, I pro
blast, I
sarcastic look of marvel
coeded iu tbo following manner :
'May it please tbe Court, tbe young scions of
diminutive intellect stand here in your putrid
presence victimized and made afraid. Now, sir,
according to tbe magnanimous and fantastio
fundamental institutions of forensio law, I de.
clore these culprits ignominously at liberty to
mock your intrepid course. Your feeble and
pusillanimous proBeoution
pluuktafied from the
lions by tbe reflection of modem sentiment for
be externally
of high proolivita
a momeut.
'Go back to tbe perpendicular antipodes of
prosaic language, sir, and you will find tbe old
pod aDger system vanishing info
of dark oblivion or rayless night.
orlby culprits
tistic impunity, and you
pandemonium vengeanoe upon the afflioted
porosity of tbe great community without sti
aud with huge superstition.
the blue tlame
models of
•These
ready to shed your

unworthy posterity
log daggers into your lacerated heart. Y
wile—the wife of your incarnate boBom—stands
ready to disfranchise you ! And your hetero
geneous cbildreu detest your foul proboscis with
immortal vengeance» If the
evouing your fate 1 b final aud finished. Ueqines
cat in j)ace.'
1 cleared tbe young devils, of course.
•The eyes of
-
this
cat j)ace.'
1 cleared tbe young devils, of course.
Tell a Gsod Teachbb.—A gentleman
telling how many different
How
from Swampville
occupations bo had attempted. Among others ho
had tried sohool teaching.
'How long did you teach ?' asked a bystander.
•Wal, 1 didn't teach long; that is, 1 only went
to teach.'
•Did you hire
'Wal, I didn't hire out ; I only went
hire
nutber.
•Wal, I giv it up for some reason
I traveled into a district and inquired,
for the trustees. Somebody said Mr. SnickleB
found Mr.
You
1 wantod to
». So
the
Snickles—named my object interduoing myself
—and asked him what be thought about letting
try my luok with the big boys and unruly
gals in the diatriot. He wanted to know if I raaly
considered myself capable ; and I told him 1
wouldn't mind hiB asking mo a few easy ques
tions iu 'rithmetio and jograpby, or Bhowing my
hand writing. He said
toll a good teacher by his gait.'
you walk off a little ways,' says
tell jis's well's I'd heard you
miml, he oould
•Let
he, 'aud 1
amined,' says he.
'He sot iu the door
lie spoke, ami I thought
consider
be looked a little skittish ; but l
able frustrated, and didn't miud muob;
turned about and walked
how. Ho said he'd tell
kep'
s'pected « thing
Wat, tho door
•Did you go baok V
'Wat, no,—I didu't go baok.'
'Did you apply for another school V
■Wnl, no—I didn't apply for another sohool, 1
said tho gentleman from tiwampville. '1 rather
judged my appearance
I
smartaslknow'd
1
when to stop,
tell 1 thought I'd gone far enough—then
pay and looked round,
shot and Sniokles
g< î 11
Mrs. Darlington oannot understand either Mr
Uladutoue
bo anxious
Mr. Disraily, that they should be
pass a Bill in Parliament to give
the people universal suffering. For her part,
ehe thinku there is suffering enough among tho
poor people without making it universal. Re.
form indeed ! they should reform themselves
first, without thinking to reform the people.
•Do you publish matrimonial notices for the
subsarihers to your paper ?' said a gentlemanly
looking youth, stepping into our ofiioe the other
morning. 'Certainly, sir.' 'Well, then, I'll go
d get married ; for f don't
of getting my
have rejeoted all my poetical effusions.'
any other way
in your paper, einos you
•Am I uot a little pale ?' inquired a lady who
short and corpulent, of a crusty old baobe
like a big tub,'
lor. *Y
'■
tbe
blauk reply.
TIIUILL.INU KNCUIINTKK W1TI
SNA KICK.
OICN OK HI, A Cl
of
Lake
the
his
The Boonsboro' Odd Fellow relates the
following adventure of Prof. J. Mitchell, of
that town:
Prof. J. Mitchell, the celebrated "South
Mountain Wizard," while out gunning last
Friday, had a most thrilling adventure with
a den of black snakes, known ns racers, from
which he narrowly escaped with his life.
As is his habit, the Professor had taken his
iavoritc carbine, and gone into the mountain
after squirrels. The best part of the fore
noon had been spent in beatiug through the
brush and over the rocks, without meeting
with any adventure,and but ordinary success
iu procuring game, &e. Suddenly, how
, he came to a ledge of rocks, about a
mile from the South Mountain House. Stop
ping a moment to take a survey of the sur
roundings, he saw a large black snake
stretched out on a rock sunning himself.
He at once took up a couple of stones and
threw one at his suakeship, but, unfortu
nately, missed him. This aroused the snake
and in an instant he uncoiled himself, and
stood with his head erect, ns it indignant at
this intrusion—and at the same time gave a
loud, shrill hiss, or, rather, a whistle. The
Professor delivered his second stone with
such precision as to mortally wound his
enemy. No sooner, however, had he thrown
the stone, when he heard a fearlul rustling
among the brush to his left, and another
whistle, louder and shriller than the first.
Turning his eye in the direction from whence
the noise, he saw a monstrous black
suake (a racer) comiug directly toward him
with his head erected about five feet from
the ground, and his forked tongue darting
from his distended .jaws, as if bent on fight.
The Prolessor, (who is an acknowledged
crack shot,) immediately raised his carbine,
fired, and had the proud satisfaction of seeing
the monster snake roll over iu the agonies
of death—having split his head open with
the hall. This proved but the commence
ment of the battle—for, before the Professor
had time to congratulate himself upon his
success in vanquishing two of his foes, a
third
in
but
nate
aud
like
ly
than
had
Mrs.
the
The
was
left
four
to
of
and
ters
the
a
, measuring about seven feet in
length, and thick in proportion, bad ap
proached to witlim a few feet of him—bis
bead erect—liissiug, and darting his tongue
iu a inauuor to appal the stoutest heart.
To retreat was out of the question; a fight
the only alternative, and quick
thought he leveled his carhiue at the suakes
head, but, unfortunately, missed it, at the
time dropping his carbine upon the
ground. With the rapidity of lightning, the
snake attacked the Professor, aud winding
his slimy coils around lus legs and body—
higher and tighter at every coil of his loath
some form, until the Professor was unable
to move a foot. His cflortB to extricate
himself lrom the "coils of death"—as they
seemed to him—were unavailing, for with
every eflort the fold tightened, and the work
of respiration became difficult. Death and
the snake stared him in the face, and made
the cold chills of horror and agony creep
over his body. It was a fearful moment—a
moment of tbe most intense horror and
I
a
agony, that made the flesh creep, the blood
cud
chill, and the lmir literally to "stand
like quills upon a fretful porcupine." Noth
ing but bis great presence of mind saved
him from strangulation and a loathsome
death. Recollecting that his bunting knile
bung by bis side, he seized if, and with his
nerves braced by despair, drew it across tbe
body ol tbe snake,
of
mg it In two at one
stroke. The coils relaxed—the suake drop
ped dead at his feet, aud the professor
free again, liy this time he heard a great
rustling in the bushes, and the dry bark
cracking in every direction, accompanied by
loud, shrill, angry hisses and whistling, as
if the whole surrounding woods was filled
with snakes.
Deeming discretion the better part of valor,
lie hastily grabbed us bis carbine, girthed
his bunting-knife and beat a precipitate re
treat. The Professor
black snakes for
a burry he lmd
count the numbers. He says that had they
at a time he would not have
treated; but to attack him by companies,
brigades aud divisions, was enough to frigh
ten any
We have endeavored to give tlie fact
narrated, by the Professor himself. Mr
Mitchell is well known in this community
and wo have
have been exaggerated. We have since
been informed that this species of snake is
very plenty in the mountains, and have fre
quently been known to attack person j who
intruded in their dens.
s pursued by tbe
e distance, but being in
time to look back and
1
ho
reason to believe Ibc facts
Kemarkarli
T he Nashville Dispatch says: Oue of tbe
most remarkable combats that 1ms come to
notice for
Comhat
a Crow.—
1
my
time, occurred yesterday
On the roof of a building on Dcnderick Street,
between Cherry and College. A lank,
gainly
and hungry beak
, with tlie
sombre plumage
celebrated iu
the
having sat with bis mate upon a
tree, cogitating upon the prospects of a dis
tant dinner, alighted upon a chimney, near
where a workman w
verse
thumping with
sheets oi ti
mallet upon the bright
which had been spread upon the roof. Ap
parently unaware ol the presence of any
one, tbe sable bird sat complacently upon
bis perch, while the workman at ouce Ret
bis wits at work to devise n plan of capture.
After meditating a few moments, lie began
cautiously creeping up behind his intended
coining within reach, laid a
its back, and
it should fall.
1
I
1
victim, aud
quick, glancing blow ae
stretched his band to catch it
The crow, however, did not fall, and
shout went up from the spectators,
turned upon its assailant furiously, and dart
ing into bis face, compelled him to beat a
lmsty retreat. Then resuming its place, it
threw up its head and awaited a second onset,
could uot
it
Mr
be
give
part,
tho
Re.
The i
such
think of giving up
contest, and in a few minutes was
again advancing toward the bold bird, who,
seeing bis approach, a second lime darted
making vigorous sweeps
adroitly dodg
at him, the
with bis mallet, and tlie
ing them, meanwhile making decided head
way upon the hat and countenance of its
persistent foe, who was at last compelled to
again slide back. Again tnkiug courage,
however, he advanced a third time, when a
series of attacks and repulses followed, re
sulting in a complete victory for the crow,
who, as the battle closed, perched defiantly
in its first position, where it remained for
about half
tho Hitting white clouds that
in tbe sky.
the
other
go
way
you
who
hour, and then flew toward
floatiug
tbe
A SAD STORY.
The Watertown iüe/ome/' gives the details
of a sad chapter in the recent disaster
Lake Ontario. Among the passengers of
the steamer Wisconsin, burned near Cape
Vincent, was a Mr. Chisholm, from Canada,
liis way to Missouri, in company with
his wife and six children. He was a
the
he
as
and
fan,
pew
and
about fifty-five years old, had bought a farm
in the State to which ho
traveling, and
moving with his family and goods.
deck,
but his wife and children had retired for the
night. He called them up hurriedly and
sought to save their lives in a most unfortu
nate way. One of the small boats
down to about a foot of the water, and about
tweuty passengers leaped into it, and Mr
Chisholm assisted ins wile, three daughters
aud a son to get in. One ot the frightened
crowd cut with a knife the rope which
nected the bow ot the small boat with the
davit, and the loosened end dropped down
like a spoon, and at once filled with water.
The passengers were thrown out and near
ly all drowned. This happened not more
than a minute and a hall before the steamer
struck the shore on Grenadier Island, and
had all remained on hoard, as the captain
ordered, not a life would have been lost.
Mrs. Chisholm, the three daughters, aged
respectively twenty-seven and fifteen, and
the boy of eleven years, were all drowned.
The father and the two elder sons, who
stuck to the steamer, were saved. Mr. Chis
holm had $4,000 in greenbacks, his only
fortune, which was In his wife's satchel, and
was destroyed by the flames. Thus he was
left in a strange land, a widower, bereft of
four children, without money
with this great griot resting upon his soul,
to commence the world anew. The bodies
of his wife aud children were recovered,
and have been interred in the grave yard at
Cape Vincent, and the sad, heart broken
husband and father, with his two remaining
, will go on to his homeless home iu the
West. Few life dreams have sadder chap
ters than this!
When the fire broke out he was
I
we
red
ed
lad
his
property,
it,
Prating Fon a Husband.—A correspon
dent ol the Rochelle (111.) liegieter , locates
the following near that place. Though the
story i9 considerably gjder than the corres
pondent, it is worth reading:—A young lady
heard that if she would go out and pray
three successive mght9, the Lord would tell
her who she would marry. Now, it hap
pened that her father had a young man in
hia employ who had considerable wit and
good humor about him. One evening he
out in an apple tree after fruit, when he
heard some one praying something like
this: "O, Lord, who will I marry?" The
idea popped into Doyle's (that being the
young man's name,) mind that he would
have a little sport at her expense. So he
spoke in a changed voice,and said, "Doyle."
"No, Lord, not Doyle, cried the astonished
young lady. "Yes, Doyle or no one," again
sounded from the tree-top in a sober, hollow
voice. She arose and entered the house,
resolved to try again the next evening. Of
course Doyle did not wish to spoil the fun,
and so the next evening found him seated
in the tree top. He did not have long to
wait before the young husband-seeker
id commenced praying in the same way
that she did tbe preceding evening, and re
ceived tbe same answer. Tbe next evening
also found her under tbe tree, pleading to
know her future husband's name, aud again
slie beard tbe answer, "Doyle or no one."
She arose, feeling satisfied that she must
marry Doyle. The next morning she met
him and asked him why he did not dress up
aud put on better clothes. He said he was
not able. "Well," said she, "father is
rich, and be will let you have money." He
took that for a pretty good bint, and bought
a suit of new clothes. In a short time be
to
to
offered his heart and hand, and was accept
ed. Alter their marriage he told her how
her prayers
fair readers of this story should think of
praying for a husband do not go under a tree,
if you do, be
is
answered. If any of tbe
and examine it closely
and see if there is any one to answer it.
American Manners.—D r. Potter says:
1 am a little afraid that a great many
people in this country are rather too prone
to undervalue this part of education. Cer
tainly we have no admiration for anything
fluical or affected in manners. We do not
want tbe manners ol a village dancing
school. But genuine good breeding, gentle
manners, ease, modesty and propriety of
bearing, we do exceedingly value. When
shall wc ceuse to be described as a spitting
nation? as a lounging people? When shall
we cease to bo known by our slovenly
speech, by our sitting with our feet higher
than our beads? During an excursion o^
several months in Europe last year, I met
hundreds of English, at home and on tbe
continent, in every situation. I never
spit. I cannot remember that I ever
any oue, however tatigued, lounging or
sitting in an unbecoming manner.
So long as tbe State shall feel itself obliged
to provide "spittoons" for its legislative
balls—so long as tbe directors of our rail
roads shall find occasion to put inside of
their carriages printed requests to the pas'
angers to "use tbe spittoons aud not tbe
floor, and not to put their feet upon tbe
scats"—so long as we shall continue to fill
conversation and our political harangues
with tbe slang ot the fish market, let u^ not
be surprised or angry if foreigners some
times make themselves witty at our expense.
And in tbe meantime, let all those who
intrusted with tbe care of the young
their utmost endeavors tc correct these
to
iu
a
Ret
a
fall.
national barbarisms, and to form tbe
uers ot the rising generation after a model
refined.
a
it
elevated aud
it
The editor of The Ttdioute (Pa.) Journal
comes down
a giggling woman of that
locality in the following racy manner: "Fair.
The lady (!) who yesterday called the atten
tion of another to
up
was
patched breeches,
heartily, is
whereat they both laughed
informed that a new pair will be purchased
when her husband's 'little bill' is settled.
nearly a year. 'Note».'
First: When you speak disparagingly of a
passer-by, and do not.wish to be beard, talk
low. Second: Don't criticise the printer's
dress too closely, while wearing silks pur
chased with money due him. Third: Tell
your husband to send us $23.70 at once, and
save costs of
its
to
a
re
for
It has beeu due
entire tuit.'
A Massachusetts youth recently passed a
counterfeit note on tbe minister who married
him, aud afterwards stole the minister's um
brella.
SLEBPINO
NEKTINQ.
Here is a picture that might have been
painted by the pen of Dickens:
"In what other painful event of life has a
when over
good man so little sympathy
come with sleep in meeting time? Against
the insidious seduction he arrays every con
ceivable resistance. He stands up awhile;
he pinches himself, he pricks himself with
pins. He looks up hopelessly to the pulpit,
as if some some succor might possibly come
thence. He crosses his legs uncomfortably
and attempts to recite chatecliism
multiplication table. He seizes a languid
fan, which treacherously leaves him in a
calm. He tries to reason, to notice the
phenomena. Oh, that one could carry his
pew to bed with him! What tossing wake"
fulness there! what fiery chase after somno
lency! In his lawful bed a man cannot sleep,
and iu hie pew he cannot keep awake. Happy
who does not sleep in church! Deacon
Towbridge was not that man. Deacon Tow
bridge was not that man. Deacon Marble
was!

"Deacon Marble witnessed the conflict
we have sketched above, and when good Mr.
Towbridge gave his next lurch, recovered
himself with a snort, and then drew out a
red handkerchief aud blew his nose with a
loud intoualiou, as if to let the boys know
that he had been asleep, poor Deacon Marble
was brought to a sore straight. But, I have
reason to think that he would have weather
ed the stress if it had not been for a sweet
faced little boy in front of the gallery. The
lad had been innocently watching the
scene, and at its climax laughed out loud,
with a frank and musical explosion, and
then suddenly disappeared backward into
his mother's lap. That laugh
much, and Deacon Marble could no
help laughing than could Deacon Towbridge
help sleeping. Nor could lie conceal it.
Though he coughed, and put up his hand
kerchief and hemmed—i
iUBt tOO
a laugh—
Deacon! and every boy in the house knew
it, and liked you better for it—so inexperi
enced were they!"— Beecher't Norwood.
Eating in Franck.—T be Paris corres
pondent of the London Star says: It appears
to me that the French especially since the
last few years, attach much more importance
to eating and drinking than do the English.
Most of the finest establishments
boulevards are cafes
restaurants, and at
the exhibition the whole exterior circle is
occupied by eating houses, wherein fifty
thousand pairs of jaws absorb daily about
three hundred and fifty thousand francs'
worth of meat, vegetables, and drinks of
various sorts. A Frenchman does not eat
much, but be is fond of tit-bits. He cats
more for tbe sake of tasting than through
greediness. He bas tbe appetite, but his
constitution does not permit of bis satisfy
ing it as his forefathers
they knew bow to eat ! Who among us
would deserve tbe appellation of gurges
given by Cicero to a good eater? Who
could perform the feat accomplished by
Milo, who, having killed
ot bis fist, devoured it in less than twenty
lour hours? Who could imitate the noble
example Bet by Pbagon, who, having beeu
asked to dinner by tbe Emperor Aurelian,
afforded bis Majesty tbe curious spectacle of
devouring u wild boar, a sheep, a sucking
pig, and drinking, meanwhile,
wine? No, certainly,
our forefathers; and therefore it is absurd
to accuse the present generation of being
gourmands. When one recalls tbe three
hundred dining rooms of Lucullus, tbe Salon
d'Appollo, where each repast cost the pur
chase money of a province; when
members the six hundred ostrich heads eaten
e able to do. Ah,
ox with a blow
■■I
not worthy of
at a single meal by Heliogabulu9, or that
huge dish of bird's livers which eight slaves
could scarcely carry, oue feel9 a certain com.
passion for the eating capabilities of the
î. The vast belt of restaurants
present
that encircle tbe Exhibition only appear as a
series of establishments worthy of a race of
Liliputians.
A Gallant Affair.-A letter from Athens,
Greece, in the London Times, speaking of
the Insurrection in Thessaly, incidently re
lates the following circumstance, regretting
that it will require a long senes of such vic
tories to force the Sultan to purchase peace
by the cession of Thessaly:
One of those brilliant victories lias been
of
o^
or
of
tbe
tbe
fill
not
, which is announced
glories of Marathon. Seventy-five Greeks
put to flight two thousand Turks, and burned
a Greek villiage before their eyes. The
battle
rivalling the
fought in tbe plain, within musket
shot of tbe Greek frontier, and lasted three
hours. Seventy-five heroes routed two thou
sand coward supported by cavalry and
tillery. They fired away all their ammuni
tion, drew their swords, swore to sup iu
Hades, killed
rest—infantry, cavalry, and artillery—to
flight, and marched off to Vrysina, which is
the road to Hades. A
hundred Turks, put tbe
probably a station
letter from Surpi, dated tbe 16th April, re
cords this act of heroism, and concludes with
these words: "Don't believe this is exag
geration; it is tbe naked truth. 1
with my
a bill, near tbe frontier line, overlooking tbe
field of battle."
eyes while I
standing
Toe Angel of Sorrow.— Tbe iniuistra.
tion of sorrow is often that ol an angel. We
know her not as she stands before us—her
brow veiled, her celestial form clothed iu
tbe garments ol mourning. Tbe majesty of
her presence only heaven will disclose. Our
hearts shrink. We would keep her from
tbe sweetness
of her glance, could we know bow of our
chastened tears she makes pearls to striug
upon tbe hem of our spiritual garments, how
she cleanses the spotted purity ot our 9oul» t
and, bearing our sighs to heaven, changes
them lor songs of gladuess, we should
longer tremble at her name; we should not
burden her ministrations with vexed sighs,
but greet her with holy patience. Every
she came to us we should receive special
honors, and grow beautilul daily iu the sight
of men an d angels. _
A Southern widow, the niece of a forme
Northern President of the United States,
and at one time a resident of the Whito
House, has lately received from a benevolent
gentleman of Boston the means to keep ker
sclt and children lrom absolute starvation.
All means of support, her personal labor in
cluded, bad failed, and seeing an account of
bis virtues in a newspaper, Bbe applied to
him, an utter stranger, not unworthily
unsuccessfully. _
Mrs. Lincoln has sold her furniture at
Chicago, preparatory to removing to Racine,
Wisconsin.
circle. But could
that
is
a
talk
pur
Tell
and
a
um-

xml | txt