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Delaware State journal and statesman. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1855-1870, April 19, 1870, Image 1

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Delaware State Journal
IttÄflL
Published Semi-Weekly and Weekly by Henry Eckel, Editor and Proprietor, at the Journal Building, No. 51 O iMai-kct Strect, adjoin 1 ug t 1 ( 1 1 ty Hall.
NO. 31.
WILMINGTON. TUESDAY. AP1UL li). 1870
VOL. XXXVIII.
professional Caros.
"dentistry;
WM. I). SOLEN, DENTIST,
No 210 West Fourth Street,
#
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P
(8
to that
tbe put:
bla friends
•tie» bis pre
irai cl»sa Op
Re 'F
Pi
Phil«
pbla. wb
Dr. VAN DEVENTER,
DENTAL SURGEON §
70G MARKET STREET.
pnleuce In extracting toeth wl
') I : I
iid«
T. H . FUEL,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE,
Notary Publio and General Agent,
OITico, 306 King St., Odd Fellow» Hull,
WILMINGTON, DE LAWARE- _
WM . G. WHXTELEY,
Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law
921 MARKET STREET,
WILMINGTON» P B»»
J M. BARR,
attorney-at-law.
JOOliNAIi BCIliDlNO,
Ho. 610 Market Street, Wilmington, Pel.
WM. S. McCAULLEY,
attorney-at-law,
OFFICE, 60G MARKET STREET,
WILMINGTON, DE1» _
r. haurington,
SAMUEL
ATTORNEY AT I, aw
AND
SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY,
Exchange Building, 8th and Market Sta.
WILMINGTON. DBL
s
KVI O. I11KD,
ATTORNEY AT I. AW,
SÏTTH AND KINO STREETS,
WILMINGTON. DEL
I
OlflTl-J-tf
i LBB1IT W. SBK1TII,
CONVEYANCER AND NOTARY PUBLIC,
No. 730 Market St, Wilmington, Del
i Deed»,Bond*. Mortgagee, Wille end other Legs
Dr
eel Estate, and invests
the Penn Mutual Life Iesuran
lonejr on
if
safe and reliable Company.
er. he takes Acknowledge
Phlladutpbl
Oon
. Maryland, Pe
Rigan, Wlflco»
Umpehlr«, Kfa
1 U
Ohio, I
jyii


»a,
entitles or
I call at hi»
shins
°%i
8. IC.corner 8tta fc Market <f
Ccflfll JïotirflK. _
ECISTKR'S ORDBB.
i;
Hell!«y, Ex
tJy.'laU ot Wllmingt
U I» ORDERED and
the
A
gton City, In !
id directed by
giro notice of
is Rente
goods
be
of
'III
of Letter. .
»soil, with the
. by
forty days from the
>ost public plactsof
C
L
tlio E
mbly
ate tb» I
i i « 111.. i.
I
8U
»bed
end Sea
"it... ■ :
i£l!
, In Now
n»y, af.
■tie
B. GIBBS, Register.
NOTICE.
tic
.of the
Or
i»y
*
En
patric'Î^rbFllry',
ably
•pi
ree», Wilmington, Dut.
EOISTER'S OllUKR.
i:
B. Nisw C
10 application
Up-m
idr
'
1» ORDERED
that
of
ritt)
r
i.v
Un

ty
c pl
ht
'.t;
aty
provided.
ibly 1 1
by I
period Id
Wilmington, j
• publkhe
3e»l of Office ofthe
Castle
uderthe bi
I
'
B. GIBUS, Regie
NOTICB.
claims age
net thee»
duly
eof the
XV
■ted to
r abide
ovlded.
Bbly
GEOr.OE U. BATK1
WILMINGTON. DELAWAKK.
Addre
KGI8TK.lt
CIIDKU.
R
b, New Cab
:h. C l870? T '}
of 'be city

e application o
ngtou, Administr
I
u City, deceased
I
6?
ii.
••■ 1
cu of the
the
by.
nforly
in...
it public pl
nfthu
II
»'tlu
iy
or abide by
rotlded. A
id ale
»bly
rithli
■ ii
h P Ä
published in Wllmiugl
two month«
Saal
ceof the
der the hand
iresttld, at N
in New C
r ', BsgUb
C
,tb
"
NOTICE.
te ofthe de
Ry «t
1811,
aletr
OWEN PALMKH,
\S in In. I* n
EGISTER'8 OUUKlli
R
Cabtlb Courti,
i
Red
I
, Adml
lon of IUbecc
Upou the appllo
Pe
Ul I U I
1
nt
T.
1
nth
.11
be posted
h y
h Luttera, In*
tu th
I utl
ubtlc pl
Ki 11 ,■
ihly In
alu
by 1
ipr
I
tho Dulawa
■paper publlxhed

I
i
I or Office ol
e in New C
thi
' County 1
5. 0HJ8«, Régi*
NOTICE.
eof
1 ha
13
1811, 01 a
il provided
rix C. T. A
1
REBECCA BUTTON,
ewark. Del.
ADVERTISEMENT
the MISSES - ROBERTSON,
OPEN
W Ilili
A Boarding and Day School
FOB GIRLS,
at 888 MARKET STREET,
WILMINGTON.
. Mr. Ltttell, S35 Market
mhJWtt
APRIXi 91at.
For particular*, apply
Street.
J. 35L. HOLT,
WALL PAPF-R
Window Ctilo Dopst,
CIB MARKET STREET,
Wilmington, Del.
#
H
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P
(8
Pi
IS
id
§
Ü
-ÔTn f~JiX
'H

AND MARKET STREETS,
JOHN R. HOLT',
WALL AND WINDOW DECORATOR.
All the Latest Styles of Wall Papers and Window Shades
3 d
PRICES LOWER THAN BEFORE THE WAR.
JOHN E. FROCK,
509 MARKET STREET,
HA 8 ADDED TO HIS STOCK, THE
CHEAPEST LOT
—OF—
HAMBURG EDGINGS AND INSERTIONS,
WHITE PLAID ANL) STRIPED MUSLINS.
EVER OFFERED IN THIS STATE.
HOSIERY, TRIMMINGS, SASH RIBBONS AND HANDKERCHIEFS
AT GOLD PRICES.
JOHN E. FROCK,
509 MARKET STREET.
•p9 ly
R. L. HAYK8,
filer County.
. W. HARLAN.
J. M. Uurlan.
01
Let* w
JS. 3NT
C*? tï
&
Successors to Enoch L. Harlan,
or
■S'
DEALERS IN
FINE GROCERIES. PROVISIONS,
OITNNTNO MATERIAL
FISHING TACKLE,
WOODEN WARE, fico., Ac
FOREIGN FRUITS.
DOMESTIC FftUIT.
SALT, OILS, TEAS,
of th
We would especially inrite the atteo
goods usually kept In a First n -
be surpassed.
rally to "nr
confident that we oj
on of <
sr-vss'
Our Stock of TEAS have been chosen with great care,
of
indlf one
SPORTING MATERIAL,
FOR BOTH GUNNING AND FISHING.
I is complete!
i, will need no other recommendation.
i.
I
:
iitlna
■pectfnlly solicit a .
s«, we hope, by etrl
HARLAN & HAYES,
221 Market Street, Wilmington, Del.
s28 ly
rid I
Our stock of Fir
ablle
tic
N. B.—Orders from the Country solicited.
Is
Country
>*
e
EDWARD MOORE
5
MARKET STREET.
228
228
n
CLOTHING.
1870.
SPRING AND SUMMER.
FINE READY-MADE CLOTHING,
FOR GENTS, YOUTHS AND BOYS.
AT PRICES LOWER THAN EVER.
MADE IN SUPERIOR MANNER,
BY WILMINGTON ARTISTS
AND SODD AT
LESS THAN PHILADELPHIA PRICES.
FULL LINE OF
CHEVIOTS, CLOTHS,
CASSIMERES AND VESTINGS,
For Order Work,
1870.
tnh22-3m
THE DELAWARE
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.
i
$100,000.00.
GUARANTEE FAPITALj
HOME OFFICE"-'"Exchange Building" cor. 7th and Market Sts,, Wilmington, Del
Atncrioun experience
The Pioneer Mutual Company in adopting Rates of Premi
of Mortality and Interest.
Premiums lower than any other Mutual Company.
Purely Mutual. All the profits divided among the Policy-Holders. There
in this Company.
All Policies non-forfeiting. Not after
All kinds of Policies issued. Ordinary Li Te. Tan Year Plan. Single Payment and Instsl
All kinda of Endowment Tables. Return Premium Table. Joint Life Table Children's
,■
In
1 Stockholders
years, but after tbe first annual payment.
thi
Endowment Table.
Premiums Payable in one Payment, in Five, Ten, Fifteen or Twenty Instalments, or during
Life. Payments received Annually, 8emi-Auoually, or Quarterly. All pnyments required in cash.
Dividends on tbe •• Contribution Plan." It will be observed that tho rednotion of
equivalent to a Dividend in advance of at least thibtt-thbbb and cnk-thibd
Tbe noan feature is entirely original with this Company—for full explanation, send for the
Company's publications.
oi n r.
TABIiE OF RATES;
30 Hon
1 Office, or I
D., Chief Medical lx*'
aptly furnished on application to
ind any tn'ormatlon repaired pr
D. W. MAULL,
JOHN r. McLEAR, Prnideit. M. M. CHILD, Secretary.
0X0. W. STONE, Vice President. BKNJ. NIELDS, Counsel and
ROUT. C. FB1IM, (
office) Gen'i A-'fit lor Delaware.
ntüRBXS
Bush, M. D.'
r'ngb
Wm. 0. Gibbon«.
Jita« P. Met
H-ld
aby.
I
am 8. HtUe
Cl*
n V.
DIRECTORS.
. BKINGIlURbT. Jr.,
WM. ».GIBBONS,
GEO. W. bTONK,
JOHN V. UIOF,
WM. II. SWIFT,
SAM'L BANCROFT, Jr.
WILLIAM CABBY.
GEORGE W.BUSH,
WILLIAM ß. HILLES,
JOHN P McLEAR,
WILLIAM
I THOMAS D. WEBB,
aulO ly
finest Clothing^
ot^ng
atom diork
m
SILK LIKED READY-MADE CLOTHING
IjfEIGHT of the $TYLE.
i
<EIEGANTly
iXpTUP b
ßuPEF(BLY fipigHRD.
READY TO PUT RIGHT ON.
Tb, object of theCheetnnt Street Clothing Estab
of Raady-nude Clothing
boa heretofore been off
finer
o furnish a c
superior to anything
I« Ut. public. Only
xuinga, and
Untie cu
»boratu
styles. A
la store, and being sol
stock of such clothing Is
e price*.
I he estebliihment, affords rare
^letjplcd (Ijoods,
^ljoict ^tirles,
lit in
No fluer work I» done Iu any Merchant Tailoring
the lund. No better etyl
renowned cu
tbe
Joed,
J
jUßgc*
V
Nl
V
YOUNG GENTS AND LADS.
Beautiful and Serviceable Garments.
LARGEST VARIETY.
As Elogint Aaicrtmut cf
GENT'S FURNISHING GOODS,
Mr
818 &.820 CHESTNUT STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
Special Non —By <
oy
ho?
■ample» ■
ing,
river
next
at
and,
long,
and
tunes,
cial
build,
their
•goteis.
pilBLIC HOUSE.
THOMAS MURRAY
They
!«s opened A Publie Ho
Wood Street, Middletown. Del.
DEPOT.
OPPOSITE
moderate rates.
BOARD AND LODGING furnle
Is Bar will be furnkbed w
CHOICE LIQUORS And
rkftt cad «fiord,
the public.
.be beet tb
>* talilu supplied
e invitee th* pat
and
who
rior.
AKD LIQUOR STORE.
MIDDLETOWN, DEL.
method of notifying
ned a WINE and LIQUOR ST<
ment
their
let».
Thu nnd
public
d take» this
r,Ä
GBl
n Mlddletow
WOOD STREET.
Opposite the Dep
A LIQUORS,
advantageou:
WINES
next,
light
for
3d
stall.
of choice TOBACCO a
CIGARS.
THOMAS MURRAY.
Alloua fin
PAPER HANGING.
LEWIS LIST
sees
all

that be U
itvj
ALL KINDS OF PAPER HANGING,
DECORATIONS*
AND PANEL WORK,
With Neatness and Dispatch , at City Prices,
And will keep con*
a
of
and
gle
for
iDtly rn hand
. I
WALL AND CURTAIN PAPERS,
fh£k hoard patterns,
WINDOW SHADES AND FIXTURES,
m the plainest to the geyoet pattorn
Give him a call, at
No. 211 West Seventh Street, between
Orange and Tatnall Streets.
LKWIB LIST.
febäi
up
tol
jj^ISAAC K. STAUFFER, A
WATCHES AND JEWELRY
?
No. 148 North Second St., cor. of Quarry,
PHILADELPHIA.
ruled
'
to
old cs.nutb.irint.r..i. by I»«». !
Fire Bricks, Tile and Cement at b. i
ty strut. Agent toe the '
udêiphu price«. Thu
oUy.M tt «ill not crack
"Jg"*
itment or
etantly on ha
atchee, Jewelry, Silver a
Repairing ol Wa
■ and Jtwelry picirjlly a

pSiELY FINISHED
PHOTOGRAPHS
the
TAKEN
E. & M. GARRETT'S
NEW GALLERIES,
Mo. 720; Marlxot Stroet,
WILMINGTON, DEL.
lx*'
OLLINGSkVOIt'
1*8
11
Fire Bricks, Tile and Cement.
D.'
Peale
MORRISON'S, No. 403 Ship'
nbûve Company, as tb
fiv
out Tbe Fir« ..., U o ..... ...
superior to anything nude.
n 1
FATHER'S <J1<OWIV<1 OLI>
util.
tin!

x
Lull',
' mt light
lie used
... .,ur porridge by the
■;k!ed down bis
■ heard we bint e
Jr l.ls toil might
Tb
r.
Upa
I solid ki
Aud
II
SÄ B to
ll

e pluiigh
Or .hip, tut.
h
ïetliiooM
ad Biul
I
I li
And he'I
ud It, J
dnysofBri
1 beard you «peek of moth«
•Tin gospel what you
ibr
rned her head
r.;,
■I" - • h.
Yet, Jol
.„1,1.
dfike
A glean
Her lips »er« i t
Aud like a ripe:
11 light
.John!
II
A .
I leaf
Met step
ffth
I
ey I
a buxor
I b
Wb
,, I
remote our yield!)
ightdowu the lean
ry
Hr
uhn !
ut tb
Aud
I •>!
Ä
8

■ I
1.01
We
Job
oft ly
■P*
lot, for why «Louldat thou
! day will lighter be
hide
The
wing old, John

ftly down
11
I
.1
>
.i .
ing
I
I
From the Boston Jourr
PARIS.
French Klghle mnl Manner«.
Baron Haussmanu has destroyed much of
tbe charm of Paris panoramas by making
eveiy street look like its neighbor. But he
has made them all charming, and you see
nothing incongruous in the inhabiting of a
by a Dryad, or the diaport
the waters ol the great
never hot and
oi beautiful shade
Boulevard
ing of a Satyr i
fountains. The streets
duBty, because great
trees and the profusion of fresh water keep
them in spleudid condition, and in most
the floors of a

quarters they are
palace all the time. A great army of Btreet
sweepers is constantly at work. All these
Germans, and are uniformed in
ruga and evidences of
Sleepers
blue. There
misery. They wear Lage wooden shoes,
two to their height,
&Dd swing brooms which reach almost from
side to side ol the street. They
est figures
ing, aud from the hydrants they shower the
walks and windows. The
the newspaper
inch
which add
the earll
all the avenueB iu the
river water
next figures usually
merchants, who establish their little stands
at the coiners of the prominent avenues,
and, impervious to cold or beat, Bit all day
long, dispensing their eagerly-sought wares.
moBlly the wives of workingmen,
and during any excitement make small for
tunes, so great is the demand of the superfi
cial Parisians for sensational reports. The
light structures, of a Turkish
build, perbapB twelve feet high, and with
their walls covered with gaily fainted adver
tisements. Inside sits a venerable dame,
used-up old soldier, who sells journals also,
his neighbor,
infe
They
"kiosks"
and looks with contempt
who bas only a table at a corner,
rior. The newspaper sellers in the kiosks do
immence tiade, and when the Govern
disagreeable
kiosk, the main circulation ol the
ment lorbids the sale of
journal
journal is gone- Many ol these kiosks
rented by bouquet sellers, rosy girls, with
piquant faces, who look ravishing when
their beauty is set off iu a frame work of vio
let».
The people come out early in the day, and
next, about niue o'clock, come the street
peddlers, who are a perpetual source of de
light to a foreigner. Hardly one in ten has
for sale anything of any value, but each lias
invented an ingenious method of gaining a
living. A very common traffic Is in live
the dainty little dogs
the hares
poached iu Fountainbleau forest.
, with
animals, such
sees in cariiages at the Bots,
which
Nearly every peddler has a little
all his or her merchandise piled artistically
before them, and with
ranged that the smartest shower will i ot
catch them unprepared. A very common
gray-haired woman
like the dogs iu Bel
umbrella
sight is to see
harnessed to her cart
gium, and wearily dragging the heavy
weight along. Women do much work iu the
streets here which in America is done
tirely by
They drive teams, and it is
a common sight to Bee a huge laundry wa
, as large as a country meeting-house,
te epankiug down the streets with a
young country girl guiding the flisky pair
of stallions. Bbe manages tbe team entirely,
and when her equipage is caught in the tan
gle of vehicles, she can use the whip and ob
jurgate as well as any man. It is a French
proverb that ''the only real men in France
tbe women," and there 1 b some grounJ
for the remark.
The cartB that
and the styles of dress of the cartmea and
women
. I D
in from the country
very cutious. All draft wagons
built enormously high, with wheels tall
tban the tallest
up l'ar above the horse's back
long lasb, which
tol shot is considered requisite. The
mous and stately Normaa horses, with feet
draft
,and with seats away
far that a
crack as loud as a pis
those of
harnessed with a sort of un
and limbs twice as large
animals,
' couth taste, and decorated with red and blue
aud green fringes, and foxes' tails
harness. Very pretty and quite imposing
tbe long trains of poweil'ul horses, which
to tbe sound of tinkling hells, slowly drag
forward the enormous blocks of
go into the wallB of Paris houses. One
markable leature in the teams ot the city is
the great number ol wagous built in fantas
tic 8liapes, drawn by blooded horses, aud
with liveried footmen behind them. These
are advertising wagons; and every
commercial house manages to buy
to parade lor a Bhort lime. Often they
diiveu at break-neck pace through
crowded thoroughfares; to convince the pub
lic that the new house is full of business.—
Artillery trains are always rumbling
through the city Irom point to point,
whether simply to exhibit the empires'
strength or to keep the soldiers occupied is
,
Don't be invidious in criticism when I
say that housemaids are one ol tbe principal
curiosities of Paris streets. As a geueial
! rule, I may say, they are pretty; item, taste
b. i fully dresBed; item, bare-headed. A trench
the ' housemaid does not wear a bonnet once iu a
Thu year; in fact, never, except when she goes
crack to be married, or to a funeral. You should
seethe regiments of them that go troopiDg
a
11
which
Lire
up and down the streets, from the butcher's
and baker«, between ten o'clock aud
tbe hours when breakfast is in the air.— I
They carry tbe huge rolls of bread, some of
which are actually six feet long, with ail
much grace as If they were scepters. The !
bakei's is a very importaut institution iu '
Paris, and the young Indies who attend on |
bedecked with no end ol
tbe customers
ribbons and laces. One thing which reflects
a trifle
which the bakers have of stauding these
the sidewalk, before
their doors. During the recent riot a bak*
visited, and the infuriated
weapons,
French cleanliness is the custom
long rolls of bread
's shop
crowd grasped these hard rolls
aud could have made formidable weapons of
them.
The common terms of endearment be
busband and wife, terms used in so
"my fiieml," "my real treasure,''
tw
cicty,
"my little dove." One sometimes hears a
wife call her husband
owl,"
"innocent old
a "stupid, good-natured sheep;"
while, du revanche , the husband playfully
adraonisbeB tbe wile
dove,
cat. These expressions sound very
queerly translated iuto Saxon. The custom
t f using the names of animals
fjmiliarity, is not likely
a mouse,
terms of
a fleet ion
per in English. There i
bad taste in its adoption, viz. : that of the
radical papers in calling the Prince Imperial
a "young monkey"—since Eugenie brought
Jocko back from the East with ber. I saw
this phrase recently in a revolutionary sheet :
"The young jackanapes must learn to get
up and dust away, because he will have to
cut stick when be least expects it I"
Nadar, the famous photographer,
of much literary character, aud a sort of
tradesman Dumas, was described in a gos
sipy paper here the other day as ''possess
ing cheek enough to punch the Lord him
self with his cane." 1 translate literally,
and you must pass lightly over the éccen
tiicity. You must allow something for the
difference in
Avery virtuous Yankee once expressed
his extreme indignation because all
tbe French women swore so dreadfully l I
inquired the exact cause of his anger.—
"Why," said he, "they all say 'Damu !'
every other breath !" So they do; but
"Damn" in French is not our rough Saxon
"damn;" no indeed; it is the pious ejacula
tion brought down from nobler, even if
material times—tbe sacred oatb—"By
Lady !"
pros
of rather

e'fl shade and color.
IIiitrulo and Wolves.
with
teen
IIiitrulo and Wolves.
occasion, while hunting, I oblain
excellent opportunity of witnessing
of these encounters. At the distance of
old bull going
• 'i,
id
hall a mile I perceived
through a variety ol eccentric movements,
ot the moment perfectly incomprehensible.
To know what might be the cause, as well
perhaps to learn something new regard
ing this species, I left my horse, and made a
most careful stalk without oncej exposing
myself, retaining the advantage ol wind till
within a hundred yards of the old gentle
. The ground in the vicinity was much
broken, and before attempting to obtain a
survey of the situation I csconced myself
behind a boulder. I bad been eminently
successful the first glance told me. There
the bull pretending to feed, while four
prairie wolves were lying around him on the
sparsely covered soil, tongues out, and evi
dently short of breath from some excessive
exertion. None of the dramatia persona
had seen me, and I chuckled in my shoes
I grasped more firmly my double-barrel,
knowing how soon I could turn the tide of
battle. In a few mlnuteBtbe apparent ring
leader of tbe quartett got up and shook him
self. This wus the signal fo
get upon their plus. Prairie wolf number
walked quietly toward the bull,
sionally stopping (T believe after tbe
ot dogB) to pluck grass; then, with a
sudden spring, made a feint at the persecu
ted buffalo's bead. The buffalo iu bis turn
lowered bis os frontis, and rushed a few
steps to meet him; but this was unneces
sary. Now the rest of the fraternity ruBh
ed up. Another took the post of teaser,
while our friend number one dropped in the
; and when a second feint at the head
mado by Lis comrade, number oue
watching his chance, left a deep scar over
the bull's hock. Again and again this game
played, the same wolf always retaining
bis rear position. Is not tbe insliuct of ani
mals most similar to tiie
Here eacli wolf had his allotted work
doubtless that which was best suited for his
capacity.
The rear assault was the most dangerous,
for a kick well directed would unquestiona
bly have caused instaut death to the adven
turous assailant; but the most experienced
and expert had selected the post of danger
and houor- The flashing eyes and foaming
mouth of the bull told plainly tbe result;
I stepped from my place of concealment.
However, all were so occupied that until I
awakened the echoes with a loud "
whoop" I was unseen; but man's voice al
ways has an effect in cusea of this kind. Tho
vermin, with startled stare, plainly asking
what right I had to interfere, sulkily trotted
ofl ns I advanced; while the persecuted, in
return for my kindness, lowered his head,
and pushed rapidly for me, compelling
to seek safety in flight. Buch conduct in
the buffalo was scarcely commendable, and
very uuueual. I accounted for it by tho
harassing his temper Lad suffered, as well
his feeling how inadequate his strength
was for escape. Poor old creature, his days
were numbered, for as soon as my back was
turned, and a safe distance intervened be
tween us, the wolves returned; and
rode homeward, occasionally turning and
hailing to watch the gradually
tinct belligerents, the victim
ployed iu battliug for life. After all,
he not paying tbs debt ot uature, and dying
bis ancestors for generations had died be
fore lilm? Man yields his spirit to the
source from whence it emanates on a luxur
ious couch or humble straw bed, after fre
quently suffeiing from protracted aud pain
ful illness. The veterau buffalo, efiete from
age, alter a long aud happy file, when una
ble to keep with bis companions dies in a
gallant and short struggle, overpowered by
bis too numerous enemies, a death worthy
of a hero.
coat
and
half
light
the
the
vet.
and
A
It
in
little
flat,
with
tie
the
vet,
the others to
of man?—
a
to

Still
nearly six feet high,
imposing stature.—
He possessed a
Qkn. Thomas
of large frame, and
His limbs
firm mouth, a square law, and a steady, blue
habitually grave. He was
to smile. Yet, though serious
s mild and kind
mu- Mvr.
eye. He
seldom known
and undemonstrative, be
and amiable in his actions. He often
ed cold and impassive, but certainly as care
less about his
vious to those ol others. After the battle of
Cbicamanga, and when he mu9t have been
perfectly conscious that he had saved Rose
crans' army and the whole region, he sat
hour drinking coffee, and did not
allude to the fight. No one would
have known that there bad been any. In
battle be eat like a statue, with scarcely a
motion, heedless of bullets, occasionally
roused to enthusiasm by tbe success of
of his mancetivers, but blushing if his feelings
. seldom moved
frightful.
impre
lie
is
t „ -, , T
„„„no nreacher in the We^t nrcaeh
is « ° K« 'ovo of money%Si
, MÎJSm br VrU« - ™And V 'finally my
I Jj ® * vou^an^udge what God thinks
J» 1E *' :y b _ , Uc class of'people he rives it
« money, by tue class ot ueoplo be fiiyes it
101
■— •—
a A •Wisconsin farmer wants a divorce on
lho groUnd t i, Rt t, i3 wi f e tB n't split half the !
| amounl 0 f wood she boasted she could be
f 0re their warriftge,
bait
discovered,
to anger, but when ft
An infantry colonel stole a horse from a
Union farmer in Kentucky, who
Thomas and complained. He poured out a
torrent ot invective upon the officer, pulled
him from the horse, tore the epaulets from
his shoulders, mado him return the horse,
and pay the farmer for his troubles .—Detroit
Post.
!!.
it

Suits for Children.
I The costumes
y ea * are exceedingly becoming,
Boys from five to twelve years of age
! the jacket known as the Veite Anglais; the
' Hussiau blouse is no longer fashionable.—
| The trowsers are fastened below the knee
w ith three buttons, and red or brown stock
ings. Tbe coiffure may be the helmet cap,
tbe Highland bonnet aud feathers or the
round hat of black felt.
For a boy of four or five years of age, a
jacket of gray cashmere soulached with
black. Vest of tbe 9-ime, closed with four
mother-of-pearl buttous. Trowsers
fastened at the knee with similar buttons.—
Sailor's hat of black leather, with band of
blue ribbon.
For a boy between seven and eight years
of age, jacket a I'Angelaise of brown cloth.
Trowsers of the same, fastened like those
above described. Brown stockings and
black toots. Hat of black felt, with raven's
plume.
Paletots of scarlet cashmere, with bood9
fashionable for little girls
by little boys this
A
old
the
of
of
of
in
of the
-door wear.
Among the short walking dresses there
is a piquancy and freshness that la very
pleasant to see. The pauier is a decided
favorite.
An exceedingly pretty
arranging tbe drcBS iuto deep fiou
the knee. When Hie stufi is heavy, like
cloth, instead of letting the top
flounce surrouad the dress, it Is brought up
apron in front, aud the
flounce, which is scolloped round instead of
peaked, is bordered with velvet. This fash
ion is especially adopted for corded black
silk.
eflect is created in
thick silk
in the form of
For tunic, a sort of shawl of China
color, ornamented with a slender lily, the
point of which fulls before; it is raised high
the hipB, and knotted behind like a scarf.
ornamented with
to
The raised sides
bunches of elgiantine, left to full lightly
down like wreaths on the flounces of the
dress. The body Is arranged the same; the
neck is uncovered, and round before aud
behind. A point of China rose crape, form
ing a breastplate on tbe front aud shoulders
of bunches of eglantine, then the lappets of
tbe shawl re-united in the back covering
half to the waist.
Costume ol a boy from ten to thirteen -
English gray cloth, with little pockets
the Iront, and all ornamented with sable.—
Gray trousers, with braids of black velvet
namenled with pearl buttons. Boots
mented at the top with sable. Gray felt hat,
with cocks' feathers fastened behind.
Costume lor a young girl of eight to thir
teen years—Double red antique cashmere
dress, with threo lurbclows to the bottom ol
Great
petticoat; body adjusted,
in velvet, bordered with
coat
and sash of velvet, and little plastrou
Iront. Flat collar and cuffs, maize gloves,
half boots in black kid.
For little girl from six to ten years—Skirt,
Louise blue English velvet. Mantle in a
light colored cloth La Valliere, pockets in
the front; body tied by a sash; half pointed
sleeves and double tippet falling down to
the elbow, ornamented will» slants of vel
vet. Tbe pockets, tbe back of tho sleeves,
and round the jacket, is ornamented with
slants of velvet. Flat collar, cufis to match.
For a young girl from eleven to thirteeu—
A skirt of light colored corded silk, orna
mented at the bottom with velvet of the
same color; corded silk tunics, puffs behind.
It is open in front, to form a pointed apron
in velvet buttons, of a deeper color,
waist, Body half low, with back of velvet,
making a bertbe, cut on tbe shoulders,
little plastron of velvet in front. Sleeves
flat, ornamented with slants ot velvet to the
waist; sash of velvet. Muslin chimisctte,
with little tucks ornamented to tho neck
with embroidery. Little velvet necktie, tied
With a little knot in the front.
For a little girl from eight to eleven—
Skirt In bright blue poplin, with a deep
flounce surmounted by a deeper
tie of gray velvet, with long tippets and flat
sleeves. The tippet, the wrist of the sleeves,
the border and the front of the mantte,
ornamented with slants ot bright blue vel
vet, the
'a down,
iin
. Man
, ..fu
tile dress.
From the Buffalo Adre
A STARTLING DREAM.
THE QH08T OF A MURDERED SOLDIER
SISTER,
PEAR8 TO
ABOUT IT—T
APPLE TREE.
TELLS ALL
BURIED UNDER
of
lor
to
up
the
she
ed
bert
The
nnd
the
the
at
cold
and
Our good friend Folice JuttiGO Vauder
poel, who is ever ready to oblige the
bersof the reportlug fraternity, iu answer to
urgent appeal Ibr "news" this morning,
said he would tell us a "semaiion" story,
which he did, aud the gist of which i«
follows ;
On Monday last there
a young
sister, aud demanded his serious attention
a tale she felt impelled to unfold. A night
two previous to the time of her visit—the
elder sister proceeded to state—she had a
most strange aud startling dream iu regard
to a lost brother. This brother was a sol
dier in the late war oi the rebellion, and in
company with a comrade (who now lives
near the residence of tbe dreamer,) started
for home some time during the year I860.—
He never reached home, however, and has
been mourned as dead or lost since the time
mentioned.
On the night la question while locked in
slumber, there came to her the "ghost"
vision of her brother, and stood beside her
bed. The spectre Bpoke, telling who he for
merly was, and then went
alter his arrival in Buflalo
from the
family, be was robbed and murdered by his
comrade, (whose name he gave, but which
we suppress,) and bis body buried beueath
apple tree on the premises of the murder
! Having made this extraordinary disclo
sure, tbo spirit "shrunk in ba6te away and
vanished from her sight."
The lady went on to say, iu her relation
to the 'Squire, that the person accused by
the ghost as his murderer, had been seen by
her on several occasions to hover about and
pause beneath the apple tree where she be.
lievea the body of her brother to be bur
led. It is rumored that au examination of
the spot will be made by the proper authori
ties.
to the 'Squire*
ied lady, accompanied by a
to
state that
his return
, and before he could visit hi9
a
The Police Justice listened patiently to
story ol the lady, but he informed her
that he did not feel authorized to issue a
warrant for tbe apprehension of the suspect
ed paity on a single dream I He advised her
to go home and endeavor to dream more,
assuring her that, when she should have
dreamed the dream thrice, he would issue
a "search warrant," which would probably
result in a satisfactory solution of the pain
ful mystery—whereat she departed express
ing perfect satisfaction with the arrange
ment, and promising to dream her very
best.

he
a
peared determined to
the room which contained all that
U1 of bis best f.iend ; sod it was will, diffl
colly tbst tbe animal could be kept mit. He
P erBi8teJ iu remaining at the door, and
it "1°"»^' lliere u b |U » member of the family
it rcm01j|!( | lUe 0nb8ppy ft .i ine 10 s department
ol tbe cellar, and fastened him there. On
entering the cellar to give poor Tom
on food, he was tound "stretched out, stark aud
the ! dead I" How i
be- counted lur ? Ills
—Dayton, (Ohio) Journal,
A Cat that Died of Grief.—O ne of
those Btrange events transpired in this city
tho other day which puzzle the most intel
ligent, though they furnish an interesting
topic for conversaticn. The late venerable
John Childs, who died a lew days ago, had
col which be had petted and fed
since it was a small kitten, and they
had become inseparable companions and
much attached to each other. Duriug the
last Bickuess of Mr. Childs, the cat remained
m his room nearly ail the lime, aud refused
to partake of any food toward the last. On
the morning after his death, "Old Tom" sp
end remain in
a
a
• 1 1
tbe death ot the cat ac
interesting question. \
MAI» ENDING OF A RONANt'K.
A Private Noliller
Hubnined
for lulling in I.ove.
Death
To-day, just
with solemt
is at meridian, just
und tire great bell of the
old Bt. Louis Cathedral tolls forth tbe hour
, a soldier will pay tbe penalty of a
crime for which military justice knows but
one expiation. The United States barracks,
below the city, has been the place selected
where the execution is to take place, and tbe
green sward of the parade ground will ere
many hours be stained with the life-blood ol
the unfortunate
the
of
a member of
of United Slates troops stationed
of tbe interior parishes of Louisi
ana. Near the camp of the company waa
the plantation of a wealthy gentleman who
had sympathized with the Union cause dur
ing the war, and who, therefore, was the
object of special attention on tbe part of tbe
officers of the command then performing
provost duty. The planter had a large fam
ily, among whom was a daughter who pos
sessed in a remarkable degree that rare type
of beauty for which the women of the South
noted. She had imbibed the sentiment of
father, and therefore took great pleasure
in eutcrtalning the olficera who frequently
visited the house.
The First Lieutenant of the company,
Ambrose Black, at once conceived a warm
attachment for the beautiful young creole,
aud endeavored in every way to induce her
to share his feelings. Strange to say, how
, the lady treated him in a peculiarly
polite but formal mauner, that proved her
Ice toward him. This
of the companies
a vll
Inge of
heart
shock to his vanity, and he
understand it.
came, when
a great
at a loss to
planation
Finally the
of his companions, playful
ly rallying him upon his ill success, stated
that he had discovered why the lady refused
to smile upon biro. He had accidentally
witnessed
private Allred Blake, the soldier who had
been detailed
view which proved conclusively that the
heart of the young creole
aud
interview between herself and
guard the house
inter
the private's
the officer's.
This intelligence
Black. His pride
vital point. He had^been forestalled where
his heart
too much for Lieut,
vounded in its most
most'enlisted, and by
Seeking private
, he poured out the vials of
Of
subordinates.
Blake at
his wrath upou him, taunted him with bis
position, and declared he would send him
where he should have no opportunities of
dallying with a shameless girl while on
duty. Alfred Blake had borne much, but
this coarse allusion to the woman whom be
loved better than life fired heart and brain,
and with
träte upon the ground in the presence of his
company.
followed tbo trial which was ren
dered inexpressible touching by tbe pres
of the woman who had dared to love a
private soldier—the sentence ol death, to
bo preceded by imprisonment at Ship Is
land.
blow he struck hi9 officer pros
I
An Orange Ulopement—A Young Lady of
Sixteen Rnns
Father's
With and Marries her
t-CoAchinnn.
That "love levels all ranks," would seem
to be true as holy writ, at all events in Bomo
instances, and in none more so than in a
the results of which have considerably
agitated for weeks past certain circles in the
pleasant town of Orange, N. J. About two
years ago, in tho employ of Mr. Elijah D.
Burnet, a highly respectable merchant, was
a young man of rather pleasing exterior and
address named ffm. Culbert. His
lion wa9 that of coachman.
A daughter of his employer, Miss Annie
V. Burnet, then about iu her fourteenth
fllteentb year, but large and womanly for
her age, took a decided liking for the good
looking coachman, which penchant, after
time, ripened into genuine affection.—
of coui-80 delighted with the
state of affairs, though some considerable
time elapsed before be realized the exact
state of tbe damsel's feelings toward him.—
This discovered, on the principle, doubt
less, that love begets a lull reciprocity ofthe
tender feeling followed, In the meanwhile
the attachment was jealously guarded by the
lovers, so that the parents of the girl never
dreamed of tho matter. Some business re
verses necessitated the partial breaking up
of Mr. Burnet's domestic establishment, and
young Culbert left, as bis employer thought,
lor pails unknown. By means only known
to lovers under similar circumstances, Miss
Burnet and young Culbert managed to keep
up their Intimacy and to meet occasloually.
Fiually, the young lady fouud it difficult to
conceal the affair, and between anxiety
the one hand and true love on the other,
she managed to work herself into a severe
illness. Alter some lime she imparted the
sucret to lier physiciun, who in turn, inform
ed the parents, who, as might bo expected,
tried to disabuse (lie girl of her notion, but
purpose. As to a marriage with Cul
bert they would uot listen to such a thing.
The upshot was that within a few weeks
since Miss Annie surreptitiously left home,
nnd iu company with her lover, drove off to
Moutclair, where they
united iutho bonds of holy matrimony by
the Rev. Mr. I. L. Maxwell.
The sequel to this romance in real life is
the beBi of all. The iudignant parents
at hrBt disposed to give the young people the
cold shoulder, but finding that William waB
really far above his iormer position and
about to take a responsible situation in u
Newark dry goods house, they relented, and
perlect harmony reigns in the Burnet
and Culbert domestic circles.
William
to
a
in
in
a
to
indissolubly
From the Milwaukee Wisconsin.
An Extiavngant Railroad Story.
Certainly tbe most Blugular escape from
accident the Wisconsin has
upon to record took place at the Union de
pot yard,
been called
Greenwich street. A train ol
taken from the
tbe rate of five
, loaded with
moving out
yard,
mites per hour. A German, upon whose
hands time hung heavily, and who had no
doubt been drinking, came down Greenbush
street, smokiug a cigar. He saw the train,
and the idea struck him that he would taka
a ride. Selecting the fifth
from the end,
he made a jump and landed—flat on the rail
fairly across it, between the fourth and fifth
Tbe wheels struck his head and
pushed it off agRinsl the
that his head
, but turning
tbe track.
, struck tbe bead,
throwing that of! and turning the feet
again, aud so on uolil every set ol wheels
under the cars had spun the body around,
throwing first the head and then the feet of
the unloitunate man upon the track and into
danger.
Captain Callaway nnd his brother, who
the spot at the time, saw the af
fair, and say that the
The wheels of the
*s body, by the
action oi the wheels, kept going about like a
top. They got to the spot
could, expecting to find the
pieces. Lifting him up,
their surprise to find that he
verely bruised. Curryiug him to a saloon,
the German soon came to himself, and only
complaiued ot feeling sore uud bruised.—
How he escaped death is certainly a miracle
and cannot be explained. All the time, and
until he was taken to the saloon ami recov
ered, the man clung to his cigar. When
fully recovered aud questioned as to his
leeling8 while in so dangerous a place, the
suid he realized it fully, and expected
the next paii ol wheels that reached him
would cut off his bead
little while he got
lieved
thought he
quarters of
they
to
may imagine
onl
I
his legs, but after a
>touted to it, aud be
dangen He said he
under the train about three
hour, aud would scarcely be
lieve that the whole thing occupied but a few
seconds. However, sboit as was tbe time,
\ he does not care to be placed in the samt]
situation agMn,

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