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The Morning herald. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1875-1880, September 09, 1876, Image 1

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ONE CENT. ?
WILMINGTON. DEL., SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9,1876.
2. NO- 16.
WANTS.
r A T HOME- Agent* wanted,
md terms free. TRUE ACT).
lour large life-like Steel En
gravings of the Presidents
Candidates sell rapidly. Send
For circular. N. Y. Engraving
freet. Box 3236. N. Y. aug31tf
ie,
for sale.
Work Horses. Apply at
aug.-tf
rang
NOTICES.
<1
RTENNIAn PARADE.
E if Lodges and Encampments,
re requested to meet at the
ngton, Wednesday morning.
7-7(0 o'clock, to participate if
n Philadelphia. Dress-Dark
rat and while gloves.
■ the Oominitteo.
man D. Lincoln, Chairman.
tfoki), Secretary.
F OF DELAWARE LODGE
lal' notice to each member ol
due- brothers, you are urgent
ami expecteu to attend your
outlay evening next, at 7:3u
bsiness of the utmost Import
[luember will be finally acted
b of the Lodge.
[ John Boddy, Secretary.
HP
to the Ladies.
jjty of
ifHNG MACHINE OIL,
of sewing Machine Needles
Office, No. 615 Market Street.
A. J. VA N DUZEE, Agt.
H
COAL.
REDUCED
$1.00 PER TON.
LEY RUN LEHIGH COAL,
ive is a very superior article, pre
higreat care for
FAMILY USE.
you will always want it.
r
ADAM GRUBB & SON,
ntletli and Market, 9th Ward.
tb our Patent Dump Wagon we
it directly Into cellars.
COAL.
FOUT
ic»d the price of his ENTERPRISE
E DOLLAR PER TON.
JOSEPH FOUT,
West aud Water,
and
Orange and Water Sts,
!
L
twnee Coal
-
THE
RESULT
I; OF THE CRASH
IN THE COAL COMB1N
B"N IS A REDUCTION IN
P OF THE AO "OWI EDGED
ItE S H A VV JV h; e C O A L TO
p PElt TON OF 2210 POUN DS
Biveked at YOUR RESI
BENCE FREE FROM
8LATE AND IMPUR
1T1ES FOR
CASH, '
< HAS. WARNER A VO.
COAL,
AW NEE,
IVorite
everywhere. Secure your
c" 1 , l | r winter use. Schute wagons
f cellars without dirt.
,CHAS- WARNER A CO,.
_ Market Street Wharf.
I
m
h'
k:«Mn 1 J otl ! d be taken at this season
^"feeding children. All dan
kls« b L tbe us ® o1 Hldge'*
Lino ol, tlle weakest stomach,
[Jl?® "".the blood, bone and flesh
ed I? » nts- *t is the standardprepa
abroJd" 0mmen ded by P^fcUns
pCElPT OF FOUR
[^ e will send to any address
r NICKEL-PLATED
pft Shot Revolver,
P A B °X OF CARTRIDGES.
JAMES A BROTHER,
»rket Street, Wilmington, Dei.
DOLLARS
AMUSEMENTS.
RAND OPERA HOUSE.
MONDAY AND TUESDAY EVENINGS
SEPTEMBER 11 AND 12,1876.
G
The Coleman Sisters
*
JAMES F. SHERRY,
- Manager.
Comedy and Musical Company, sparkling
with theatrical, vocal ana instrumental
festivities.
The Coleman Sisters elegant comedy ot
THE LIITLE SENTINEL.
COLEMAN SISTERS GRAND MUSICAL
CARNIVAL,
Consisting of Beautiful Solos and Duets on
the Cornet, Clarionet, BaDjo, Guitar and
Harmonica. In their specialties the Sisters
surpass all others before the public.
Musical, Director, Prof. Henry Feh
liLNG.
To conclude with the Musical Burlesque,
operatic, ludicrous, tragical extravaganza,
entitled
NICK-NACKS.
Change of bill second night.
Price of admission, 25 and 50 cents. Re
served Seats can be secured at the Book
store of boughman, Thomas & So., 421
Market street,
sept 8,9,11
REGISTER'S ORDERS.
EGISTER'S ORDER.
it
Register's Office. !
New Castle County, August ,'SO, 1876. (
Upon the application ol Maria Newell,
Administratrix of PATRICK NEWELL,
late ol Wilmington Hundred in the said
County, deceased; it is ordered aud direct
ed by the Register that the Admistratrix
aforesaid, give notice of the granting ol
Letters of Administration upon the estate
of the deceased, with the date of granting
thereof, by causing advertisements to la:
posted within lorty days from the date ol
such letters, in six of the most public place.-,
of the County of New Castle, requiring all
icrsons having demaLds against the its
ate to present the same or abide by an acl
of Assembly in such case made and pro
vided. And also cause the same to be in
serted within the same period in tin
Morning Herald, a newspaper published
In Wilmington, and to be continued there
in three weeks, (E. O. D.)
Given under the hand and seal of oflh
of the Register aforesaid, at New Castle, ii
New Castle County, aforesaid, the day ami
year above written.
S. C. BIGGS, Register.
NOTICE!
All persons having claims against the
Estate of the deceased must present the
same, duly attested, to the Administratrix
on or before August 30th, 1877, or abide the
Act of Assembly in such case made and
provided.
MARIA NEWELL,
Administratrix.
Address, Wilmington, Pel. aug80-3weod
JOHN F. BETZ,
Gaul's Brewery,
PORTER, ALE, BROWN STOUT,
Brewer and dealer In
BARLEY, MALT AND HOPS,
Cor Callowhlll and New Market S tree is
Philadelphia, Pa.
marl7-Ly
TUST OPENED;
" A VERY CHOICE ASSORTMENT OF
HOSIERY, GLOVES, AND GAUZE
MERINO UNDERWEAR.
RUFFLINGS, LACES, TIES. CORSETS
AND NOTIONS, IN GREAT VARIETY
S. H. STAATS,
No. 417 Market Stroel
myl
BUTTER
UTTER! BUTTER!
B
C. MESSIC£.
Stalls Nos. 47,48 and 49 Tnird Street Mai
ket House.
Having made arrangements to receive
regular shipments ol butter from the Wes
will canstantly have at his stal Is a larg
supply of Prime Print, Roll and Tub Butt*
at very low prices. ml5-3m
'
he
EWS PAPERS, MAGAZINES AND
STATIONARY,
BLANK BOOKS,
POCKET BOOKS,
MEMORANDUM BOOKS,
PENS, INK, SLATES,
NOTE .LETTER,
CAP ANb BOX PAPER
N
of all a £ YAN , B news store,
607 Market, street.
Jyl5-tl
UNKEL'S MAGIC
£
HAIR RESTORER,
stores gray-mixed, red, light or faded
heads of hair, beards or moustaches, too
beautiful brown or black, in from one to
tour applications. It Is free from sulphur,
lead, acids, mercury, silver, or anything In
iurlous to either hair or beam.
IT DOES NOT FADE OB BUB OFF.
Expressed to all parts on :receiptortone
dollar, or six bottles for five dollars. At the
wholesale aud retail depot. No. $16 VINE
STREET, PHILADELPHIA. deo24t'5-ly
JUST RECEIVED.
Another cace of those celebrated
BLACK ALPACAS,
whirh we will continue to sell at the very
tow price of TWENTY-FIVE CENTS.
ftTTPERB QUALITY BLACK CA8H
MERESWOM 75 CENTS TO $1.50.
BLACK AND COLORED SILKS in great
variety from 7S seats to . 3 * 01 ).
An elegant assortmenttof
DR ESS GOOD AT LOW PRICES.
P. CAMPBELL,
MO MARKET sT.
Jel2-3
JOHN H. J1UHLHAUSEN,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
NO. 415 KING STREET.
«ug23-iy
to
ald
the
and
a
by
to
of
is
EDUCATIONAL.
M ISS BROWN WILL RIC-OPEN HER
SCHOOL for girls, at No. 4, Wilmlng
ton Institute, Heptmbeer 11th. Residence,
aug30-taepll 611 KING STREET.
188 KOliFHT.NO VN BOARDING
AND DAY SCHOOL,
FOR YOUNG LADIES AND CHILDREN,
839 Market Street,
Will re-open September 14th.
M
aug21-6w
M aplewood music seminary
for Young Ladies, established 1864. A
thorough graduate course; the finest loca
tiou.on the Connecticut River. Pupils can
enter at any lime. For catalogues address
Prof D. 8. BABCOCK,
au g21-lm
E8LYAN FEMALE COLLEGE,
East Iladdam, Conn.
w
WILMINGTON, DEL.
The next session Will begin
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,1876,
JOHN WILSON, Pres.
augSO-tsepll
NIVEKN1TY OF VIRGINIA.
u
Opens October 1; continues through nine
months It is organized in schools on the
elective system with full courses in Classics,
Literature. Science (with practice in Chem
ical and Phystoal Laboratories), in Law.
Medicine, Engineering, Teaching and Agri
culture. Apply for Catalogues to
JAMES F. HARRISON, Chairman,
P. O. University of Virginia,
Albemarle Co., V»
augl6-lmeod
ILMINGTON MODEL (SCHOOL,
(SAVILLE BUILDING.)
A SELECT PRIMARY SCHOOL FOR
BOTH SEXES.
RATKS OF TUITION:
$5, $10, $14aud $18 per term of 21 weeks.
This useful institution will open MON
DAY, September 4th. Prof. F. Henry Lou
bignac.A. M., has been engaged to teaeli
the French language. Drawing by an ac
complished teacher. The principal can be
consulted every day at the rooms, from 9
A. M. to 5 P. M. Especial care of small
children. Send for circular of course of
JAMES II. CRABB,
Principal.
w
study.
aug.28
PENING OF THE SECOND YEAR
0
OF
F. BECHKR'S MUSIC SCHOOL.
The term consists of ten months, begin
ning with first Monday of September, end
ing with the last day of June.
Terms for beginners, 10 months, $30; five
months $15, Advanced scholars (whole
term) 10 months, $40; half term, 5 months,
$20. All the necessary music furnished
gratis by the school.
All scholars entering the school meet for
classification at the music room, MeClary's
building. No. 606 Shipley street,on first and
secoud day of September, from I to 4
o'clock. augl6-lm
UGBY ACADEMY,
R
A. Collegiate School for Boys,
In three departments.
PRIMARY, JUNIOR AND SENIOR.
MASONIC TEMPLE, Wilmington, Del.
DR.SAM'LW. MURPHY, A.M.,
PRINCIPAL.
Assisted by [faithful and experienced
teachers.
The Fall Term will begin MONDAY, Sep
tember 4th. Catalogues and circulars can
be obtained from Messrs. Boughman,
Thomas &Co., No. 421 Market street, or on
application to the Principal, at the school
rooms, from 8 to 11 o'clock, a. in., every
day. __ Jy25-Dn
EL A WARE COLLEGE.
The next collegiate year will commence
on WEDNESDAY evening, September 6th.
There are three courses of study ;—
I. The Classical.
II. The Scientific aud Agricultural.
III. The Literary.
A selection ol studies, however, may be
made, but a regular course is strongly re
commended.
D
ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES.
Board for the collegiate year of 38 weeks,
at $3 per week, $114; tuition. $60; room rent
and incidental expenses, $20. Total, $191.
Students are required to provide their own
books, and fuel for tneir private rooms will
be furnished at cost. Students who receive
scholarshipappointmenls are relieved from
the charge for tuition, and the above esli
mate is thereby reduced from $191 to $131.
Scholarships may be obtained by applying
to members ol the Delaware Legislature.
Both sexes are admitted to the class rooms.
The time-table of the P. W.4B. Kallroad
and Its connections is now such that stu
dents residing within a convenient distauce
ly attend the daily sessions of the College
d return home at night. Weekly car fare
from Wilmington to Newark *1.
Catalogues and further Information may be
had by addressing the President.
WILLIAM H. PURNELL, LL. D.
au!2-lm
ma
an
06
NkwARK, Del.. Aug. 10,1876.
ILLANOVA COLLEGE,DELAW ARE
COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.
This Institution, chartered with Univer
sity Privileges, Is under the charge of the
Amrustlnian Fathers, and offers superior
advantages to students, whodeslre to make
a thorough Classical, Scientific or Commer
cial course. It Is situated on the Pennsyl
vania Central Railroad eleven miles from
Philadelphia. Railroad Station and Post
Oflfice on t he College grounds.
Terms: Per session of five months, (In ad
vance,
Fori
Y
ulLpartlculars, send for a catalogue,
Very Rev. T. GALBREY,
President.
dee. 1-lyr.
T' JOSEPH'S ACADEMY,
s
CHESTNUT HILL, PHILADELPHIA,
Under the oare ol the Sisters ot St, Joseph
The course of Instruction Includes all the
branches of a useful and Christian educa
U Annual pension for Board and Tuition
$200. For further particulars, address,
MOTHER MARY JOHN
sepl-ly
4heoldcarpethtand j of yrneS)
No 35 South Second Street, above Chestnut
Street, Philadelphia.
REM O DELED i REFITTED I RENEWED
I take pleasure in notifying my eusto
Wllmlngton, and vicinity that the
alterations In my place of businessare now
completed, and I am now ready to offer
MatUngs, §11 Cloths, ^fafli^S
tU $X- CaU * ud b J0HN JJBYRNES.
T
!
mers In

P.
THE Fit ONT STREET NUISANCE.
Something for the Mayor's Notice.
The residents and store keepeis of Front
street are beginning to complain numerously
to the city authorities, of a nuisance on that
street, which was mentioned in The Heu
ald of yesterday. Those who create the
disturbances were mentioned as tramps.
This, Captain Buckingham, who conducts
business at the corner of Front and Shipley
streets, states is not so; that while there are
tramps among ttfbrn, the rulers are Wil
mington roughs who live in that section of
the cityXleader of whom is called "Reedy,"
and a notorious character.
During the day it is bad enough, the resi
dents say, to have them about swearing and
drinking, but at nights it is much worse,
when the numbers are re-enforced by young
prostitutes, who are neither modest in their
behavior or strictly moral in their language,
a particular exhibition of which is made
when persons are passing. These poor
creatures are said to come from the different
places of prostitution in this street, and are
many of them young, hardly past their
eighteenth year, sent out to entice these men
into their hovels, and others too, that are
less depraved, as has already been instanced
by the robbing of an old gentleman of con
siderable money in one of these places sev
eral nights since.
On Thursday night the police made their
appearance, and observed a strict watch in
that quarter of the city which had a very
wholesome effect, as the presence of the
roughest of these characters were not to be
seen yesterday. At the corner of Front and
Shipley streets, a cheap eating house is kept
and this is where the most of them take
their meals being accommodated at ex
tremely low figures. It was here on Thurs
day night that a former member of the
School Board from the First Ward entered
for supper, and after partaking declared
that he had no money. The proprietor in
sisted that he shonid pay; whereupon the
ex-member of the School Board adjourned
to the street and proposed selling the build
ing with a lotof loose bricks, but was put to
flight by the pioprietor who made his ap
pearance armed with a club. The residents
of Front and Shipley streets state that such
scenes are of frequent occurrence and it is
hoped that the Mayor will have special of
ficers detailed for that quarter of the city,
is he does not they will be overrun with
tramps and roughs.
9
4
Domestic Markets .
Yesterday afternoon the street market
was large and well attended. Every thing
that the human appetite could crave was
there to he dealt out to those who might
want It. Prices did not differ very much
from those obtained on Wednesday.
The following prices were obtained io
market yesterday:
Butter, 20 25, per pound; eggs, 25c
per doz ; pears, [email protected] per half peck;
do.; white potatoes, [email protected] cents per
half peck; do.; sweet potatoes,
15(5)30 do; onions, 12al5c l / 2 peck: beans,
10c per half peckcabbagc, [email protected] per head:
dried fruits, 8®12c per pound, do. pared,
15(5)20 do; honey,25(5)35 per lb; oranges,50®
75c per doz.: lemons, [email protected] do; cante
loupes [email protected] apiece, [email protected]$1 25 per basket;
cucumbers, 15(5)25 cents per doz ;
2(5)5c apiece; currants, [email protected] per quart;
radishes, [email protected] per bunch; string beans,
10c per half peck; squashes, [email protected] each;
beets, [email protected] per bunch; tomatoes, [email protected]
half peck; doqcorn, 12(0)15 per doz. peaches,
[email protected] per half peck; 75(5,$1.50 per basket
watermelons, 15®40c apiece; egg plants,
[email protected]; plums, 10(5)12 per quart: crab apples,
[email protected] per half peek; grapes, [email protected] per
pound; apples [email protected] per half peck; oats
35c per bushels; grapes, [email protected] per quart.
Moats as follows :
Stewing pieces, [email protected] per pound; round
steak, 14c do; roast, [email protected]; sirloin, 16®
18c; best cutlets, [email protected]; mutton chops, 14
@18c; leg of mutton, [email protected]; roast of
veal, [email protected]; lamb, [email protected]; ham, [email protected];
shoulder, [email protected]; lard, 16c; chipped beef,
[email protected]; liver, 10c per pound.
The fish market is well supplied, and but
little difference in the prices from that
a6ked last week.
He'd Been to the Centennial.
be
They marched him into the station house,
yesterday afternoon, propelled by ^ police
man on each 6ide, and one in the rear. He
looked weary and footsore; he didn't seem
to care whether he stood up or laid down,
but the preference seemed to be greatly Id
favor of reclining. "Come, sir," said the
chief, "what's happened to youi" "Been
to the zen—ten—uial—great—est e—vent of
any world on top of (hie) the earth."
"Search the prisoner," said the chief, "see
if he has money?" The officer went down
iuto a capacious pocket in the side of the
man's coat until nothing was seen of him
but his legs and the tip end of a coat tail.
Finally, he emerged, with something black,
aud the chief reached for the supposed lu
but to his astonishment It was a black
bottle and held about a quart. Out of the
6ame pocket came a shaving brush and a
shoe brush. But of money there was none.
He was shown the Inner chamber and two
minutes afterward there were heard deep
sonorous tones that told the hero of the
bottle and brushes didn't care a cent.
ere
To the Citizens of Wilmington.
The Fall and Winter are approaching,and
therefore, individuals will have to prepare
for the season, as it is usual for people to
shop before they go to purchase. Remem
ber that V. E. Holmes opened business
three years; the house is known as the Bos
ton One Price Clothing store. Mr. Holmes,
by his attention to business, has been forced
to enlarge his present store very much. He
is now about to remove to the new building
of Dr. Tantum, which has an entrance on
both Market and Shipley streets, and will be
the finest house of its kind ever before
opened in this city. Mr. Holmes deserves
every encouragement for his enterprising
spirit; the fact of there being such an estab
lishment, will induce the people to leave
the money here, not to Spend it in other
cities. We say, buy here and encourage
home enterprise. Mr. Holmes will remove
about the 20th of the month.
Academy of Visitation.
Tills institution of learning, situated on
Delaware avenue, has re-opened for the re
ception of young lady students for the scholl
lastie year. The management is under
Mother Mary Magdalene, and yeung ladies
entrusted to the care of this academy will
receive every possible attention.
the
the
!

RELIGIOUS INFORMATION.
The Churches To- Morrow.
West Presbyterian Church.—Rev. J. M.
P. Otts, D. D., pastor. The Lord's Supper
will be administered to-morrow at 10 % A.
M. Preacbing at T% P. M., by the pastor.
Subject, "The New Century and the New
Era in Religious Life and Activity."
There will be preaching in the Delaware
Avenue Baptist Church, morning and even
ing, by the pastor, Rev. I. N. Haldeman.
Rev. Fielder Israel will preach in his
church morning and evening.
There will be preachtug in Asbury M. E.
church morning and evening by the pastor,
George R. Kramer.
Preaching In the First Presbyterian church
to-morrow morning and evening, by the
pastor, Frederick B. Duval.
by
the
iy
the
of
of
or
the
the
the
ed
of
of
of
of
Stopping Work on the Streets.
Yesterday about noon the Street Com
missioner received from the clerk of Coun
cil the orders contained In the resolutions,
mssad by that body to have all work under
)is supervision stopped. Mr. McClosky
immediately carried, out the request in all
cases except that of P. Murphy the Walnut
street contractor, whom he could not find
up to la3t evening, but stated that as soon
he could see him he would serve the or
der to discontinue work on that street.
as
Justices' Courts.
Before Squire Brady,B.Fraim was charged
with threatening assault on T.D. Gibson;
held in the sum of $100 to keep the peace.
Charles Robinson was fined $1 and costs
fordisorderly conduct.
Cerrclla Long, complaint was made before
Squire Haganey against Samuel Maxwell,
for abusive language. He was hold to keep
the peace.
James Ride stled by Wesley Coge, for
abusive language; held to keep the peace.
A Scene in the Care.
Among the prisoners that Chief O'Toole
conveyed to New Castle jail yesterday was
the man Davis, who the evening previous
knocked an old German down on Market
street. He was fined ten debars and costs;
in default of which he was committed to
jail. While in the cars his wife made her
appearance, and falling upon his neck sob
bing as though her heart would break. "I
nover thought this of one I loved, she ex
claimed in her grief, and when the whistle
blew and the Chief told her she must leave,
she did so with great reluctance.
;
Dwelling Burned,
[From the Milford News.]
The dwelling occupied by J. Hews, on the
old Dr. H. Whiteley farm, at Whiteleysburg
was burned on Sunday morning last. Mr.
Hews and wife left home on that morning
about 8 o'clock, and about 9 o'clock the fire
was discovered in the unoccupied west end
of the buildings, where no fire had been
used, the buildings being the same that old
Dr. Whiteley had lived in, and were larger
than necessary for the tenant. The neigh
bors discovered the fire, and got there in
time to save the most of the furniture, but
the large bulldtogs were a total loss, whieli
falls on Mr. Benjamin Whiteley, of Balti
more. Suspicion points to a colored girl,
who was living with Mr. Hews and was left
in charge of the place, haying set fire to
the building cither by accident or design
edly.
Milford and Vicinity.
| From Dr. Pretty man's Paper.]
Dr. Pretty man shows Fisher up as a fraud
in three columns and a half.
The inspector of weights and measures is
making a tour of Kent county.
The total shipments of peaches thus far
have been two thousand car loads.
John M. Lofland, is held in $200 bail for
stealing wheat from Wm. H. Marvel.
The tomato worm is committing exten
sive ravages upon the Tines in this vicinity.
If Tilden is made President, Senator Bay
ard, it is believed, will be invited to a seat
in the cabinet.
Special Revenue Agent J. B. Morris
now on duty at Lewes, has been retained
in the service.
Henry Marvel, liviDg on the Harrington
road a few miles from Milford, lost a horse
by an accident.
The Democrats of Milford Hundred on
Saturday last, nominated John Davis for
Assessorand John W. Sapp for Inspector of
elections for this hundred.
a
Minor Locale.
Wilmington firemen have good horses.
Twenty-five cent day at the Centennial.
Republican Nomination election to-day.
Miss Brown's school for girls opens on the
11th.
A fishing excursion goes down the bay this
afternoon.
The boys look into every store to see the
circus pictures.
The Coleman Sisters at tho Opera House
on Monday night.
The Tilden & Hendricks olub meets to
night at 7 o'clock.
The Republicans will hold an election to -
night at Griffith's
To-day the Western club play the West
Chester's on the latters grounds.
Quickstep Jr., vs Red Stocking on the
Professional grounds this afternoon.
Twenty-two car loads of peaches passed
over the Delaware Railroad on Thursday,
The Weccacoe Fire Company is looking
for a horse to match the one they already
have.
The Directors of the Delaware Institute
of Mechanic Art s meet this evening at Third
and King.
The Diamond State club of Wilmington
are desirous of playing another game with
the Brandywine club at West Chester on
Thursday next.
At the 72d monthly meeting of Citizens'
LoanAs 60 clation,Thursday evening,the sales
were as follows: 5th series, $200 at 25
per cent, premium; 1st series $2000 at 11-7
and $1500 at 11.
The Famo Hose Company have put an or
gan In the parlor of their engine house, and
organized a singing club. They expect soon
to reciprocate thekind reception given them
by the South Penn Hose, of Philadelphia,
upon their recent visit to that city.
be
on
re
flour store.
t
A WHITE MAN'S GOVERNMENT.
Resolutions of the State Democratic Con*
vention—The Topics of the Campaign
Discussed.
The Committee on Resolution of the State
Democratic Convention, held at Dover on
Thursday, offered the following resolutions,
which were adopted.
The.Democracy of Delaware, represented
by the delegates in this Convention,reaffirm
the attachment of the party to the princi
rles of republican government. Established
iy the men who framed the Federal Consti
tution, and insist that only by a faithful ob
servance of those principles can the just
powers of the General and State Govern
ments be maintained and the rights of all
the people be assured.
1. Resolved, That all attempts on the part
of the Executive Department of the Federal
Government to interfere with elect tens in the
States is a usurpation of power, subversive
of the rights of the States and the liberties
or the people. We therefore denounce the
recent military order of the Secretary of
War directing the General of the Army to
distribute soldiers in the Southern States as
indicative of a purpose on the part of the
Administration and its supporters to pre
vent if possible, a fair and free exercises of
the elective franchises la those States.
2. Resolved, That the late circular of the
Attorney General of the United States to
the United States Marshals is an attempt to
usurp the authority of the governments of
the States and to place the control of the
elections in the hands of unscrupulous
United States Marshals, and thereby to
force the election of a Republican Executive
against the will of the people.
3. Resolved, That the extravagant and
wasteful expenditure of the public money
siuee the termination of the war has entail
ed oppressive taxation and brought financial
distress upon the country, and demaud, no
less than the corruptions that have existed
under Republican rule, a change in the
management of public affairs.
4. Resolved, That we charge that much
of tlie embarrassment under which the bus
iness and industries of the country are suffer
ing is attributable to the exhaustive drain
of federal taxation upon the resources
of the people, and that much of the money
extorted by taxation from the people of the
country has been squandered in political
jobs and not appropriated to advance the
interest of the country.
5. Resolved, That the administration of
President Grant has been marked by a dis
regard and contempt for constitutional and
legal obligations and the rights and inter
ests of the people. That the prolongation
of Republican rule would be a continuation
of the oppression, corruption and extrava
gance which have existed for the last eleven
years,
0, Resolved, That the true interest of the
American people demand a change in the
the administration of public affairs, which
can only be effected by a defeat of the party
controling the government. That the elec
tion of Mr. Hayes, influenced as he would
be by the men wbo have surrounded Presi
dent Grant and shaped hi6 administration,
would fail to secure purity or economy
in the administration of the government.
7. Resolved, That in the candidates for
President and Vice President, nominated by
the National Democratic Convention at 8t.
Louis, and the platform of principles enun
ciated by said convention, as well as the let
ters of acceptance both of Mr. Tilden and
Mr. Hendricks, we have the assurance,
pledge and guarantee that the success of the
Democratic party in the present canvass,
will insure reform in the civil service of the
country, purity in the administration of the
government, economy in the expenditures of
the public money, reduction in taxation,
prosperity to the country, and happiness to
the people of every section of our common
country.
THE DOWNET TRAGEDT.
Fhillipe in Other Quarters.
The Downey mystery has not ceased to
be the subject of conversation in the neigh
borhood of Christiana, nor the attendant
circumstances, which have been fully
venMlated in these and other news
paper prints
Phillips was in Wilmington yesterday, and
stated to a representative of The Herald,
that he had never entertained any other
thought than the one that he was right,and
this he meant to defend by remaining in
New Castle county, no matter at what risk
of personal safety it might be. He further
stated that at the solicitation of Mrs.Dowaey
and her daughter, he had concluded
not to remain at home during the night.
This was to prevent a repetition of the at
tack on the house, which was made not
long since, more for the safety of the lady
occupants than for himself, as his own
safety was a matter of very little concern to
him. The son living in Philadelphia has
not been arrested yet, and he thinks that
not being under any bail be is plotting
against his life again, as he has been seen
in the neighborhood since the night of the
shooting.
of this city.
-
or
CENTENNIAL IN THE PULPIT.
Sermons by Bev. Dr. Otis.
Rev. J. M. Otts, D.D., pastor of the West
Presbyterian Church, will preach a series of
sermons on Centennial topics, in which ho
designs to bring out and develop the lessons
taught in the great American Centennial
Exposition, as bearing upon Christianity
and church work. These sermons will be
preached in the West Church, on Sabbath
evenings, at 7J4 o'clock, and will be Intro
duced to-morrow eveulug by a sermon on
"The New Century and the New Era in
religious life and activity.
n
Personal.
Alexander Chandler and Henry C. Mc
Lear have returned from their summer so
journ at Rehoboth.
Wm. F. Brick has just returned home
from a trip through the West and North
west, aud is highly pleased with that
country.
John Barton, of this city, who went out
to Nevada, in the early part of July, to put
up a boat built by the H. &H. Co., fora
lake club in that State, returned yesterday.
Jacob Mynich, of the firm of Charlea
Stewart & Co., plumbers of this city, re
turned on Tuesday night from a two months
visit to Europe. He canto over op the
steamship Lord Olive.

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