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The Morning herald. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1875-1880, October 17, 1876, Image 2

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THE HERALD.
> ,1s pub]
id
1 .(Sunt
In
__„.jif pHtaes for six cents per Week,
peysblMo the carriers. Mall subscriptions,
postage free, three dollars per annum In
advance.
O'Bybhb Bbob., Publishers,
No. 509 Shipley Street,
Wilmington, Del.
WILMINGTON, OCTOBER 17,1876.
FOB PRESIDENT,
SAMUEL J. TILDEN.
FOB VICE PRESIDENT,
THOMAS A. HENDRICKS
presidential electors.':
JOHN H. RODNEY, New Castle Co.
JOHN W. SHARP, Kent Co.
GEO. W. WILLEN, Sussex Co.
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS.
Hon. JAMES WILLIAMS.
FOR SHERIFF,
ISAAC GRUBB.;
FOR CORONER,
DAVID C. ROSE.
for state senator,
HABBY SHAKPLEY, Brandywine Hd.
FOR REPRESENTATIVES.
JAMEB W. WARE, Wilmington.
JOHN W. R. KILLGORE, Christiana.
JOHN E. BARTHOLOMEW, Mill Creek.
THOMAS HOLCOMB, New Castle.
THOMAS BIRD, Red Lion.
' JAMES NICHOLSON, Pencader.
EDWIN R. COCHRAN, St. Georges,
FOR LEVY COURT.
WILLIAM P. LODGE, Brandywine.
JAMES CARSWELL, Wilmington.
ADOLPHUS HUSBANDS, Christiana.
ALBERT H. SILVER. New Castle.
ALEXANDER WILSON, Pencader.
Democratic Committee Rooms,
No. 005 Market Street,
October 16, 1876.
order no. 3.
The clubs now being organized under
various names, under the auspices of the
Democratic party, are congratulated upon
their energy, discipline and patriotism,and
as part of the militia of the great party of
freedom, must set such an example of
good order and civic conduct, as befits free
men combatting for the preservation of
their rights.
To this end we look to the officers of
the various clubs; rigid discipline, and
prompt dismissal of any member guilty of
Its slightest breach. The contest we are
engaged in, is one in which we rely upon
the power of thought alone, and hence
deprecate the slightest evidence of force on
our part. The custom of the "Bird Guards,"
"Boys in Blue," and.other organized clubs
of the Republican party, carrying arms
while parading through the streets of a
community where law is absolutely su
incentive to disorder and
preme, is an
breaches of the peace, which cannot be too
strongly censured. It is therefore ordered
that no member of any Democratic club be
permitted to carry fire-arms of any kind,
while on dutjq and any member offending
against this order, is to be summarily dis
missed from the ranks, for disobedience.
We invoke, and demand from the masses
of our party their accustomed tolerant for
bearance, of even offensive Republican
demonstrations, always bearing in mind,
that HE WHO COMMITS ANY CRIME GIVES
STRENGTH TO THE ENEMY. We look to
you, and expect that while you are the sol
diers of liberty—you will at the same time
be magistrates of order.
God save the Republic.
John O'Byrne, Chairman.
J. Henry Puhl, Sec'y.
DON'T LEAVE THE CHILDREN BE
, HIND.
"Suffer little children to come unto me
\ 'lor of such is the Kingdom of God."
\ Let there be a determined effort on the
\ irt of our people, to have every child in
Delaware at "our day" in the exposition.
\he very many wealthy, and philantrophic
Vizens in our State, have an opportunity
this instance to well, and worthily, give
tjratical operation to their commendable
feelings.
In after years when the fathers and
mothers of to-day will have gone to rest
"the little children" will preserve a recol
lection of the great exposition, which wa,
commemorative of the centennial declar
ation of our liberties. How much such
memories may influence, the future rulers
of the State, and of the United States, no
tell:—certij^n it is that they
must be conducive to an ardent love of
country, which is the surest safe guard of
freedom.
Let steps be taken, to show our children
bow a great Union of Republics celebrates
its centennial. _
Mr. Green, a candidate for Mayor of New
York, laid before the city his ideas of what
Jt n eed * ta the way of improvement*.
man can

of
in
Bret Harte lain Baltimore.
Anna Dickinson Is In Cincinnati.
Stokes the murderer of Pi»k wll| be re
leased from prison on the 28th Inst.
Mrs. Llppincott (Grace Greenwood) and
daughter have arrived from Europe.
The handsomest woman in Europe is the
Countess de Castlglione, who belonged to
the late Napoleon's court.
Edinonia Lewis, the colored sculptress,
whose works are attracting much attention,
was born in a wig-wam In Greenbush, N
Y. Her mother was an Indian and her
father a negro.
A Welsh widow, as she was turning away
from her dead husband's open grave, re
ceived a whispered offer of marriage ; but
she softly replied that she had already' ac*
cepted another offer as she was going into
the church.
Governor Grover, United States Senator
elect lrora Oregon, Is a native from Maine,
fifty-three years old, and has been in Ore
gon twenty-five years. He was the first
Congressman from Ithat State, and has
twice been elected Governor and Is an old
time Democrat.
a
of
to
to
Political Notes. ^ , -
The democrats of the First' Congressional
district, in convention at Jamaica, Long
Island, nominated James W. Covert, of
Flushing, Queens county, ou the third for
mal (ballot.
The republicans of the Tenth district of
New York, have nominated Amasa Norcross
of Fitchburg, on the thirty-first ballot, for
Congress.
Ex-Governor Gaston, of Massachusetts
who was nominated for Congress by the
Democrats of the Fourth district, positively
declines to accept.
The Hon. John O. Whitehouse has de
clined the nomination lor Congress on the
democratic ticket in the Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
district. The Convention will meet on
Wednesday to nominate a candidate in his
place.
If
D.
of
It
OI'R NEW YORK LETTER.
Why they Oppose Tlldeu—The Brook
lyn AriEOH—The Victorious Democ
racy—New York the Battle Field
West Virginia—A Telling Fact about
Morgan.
New York, Oct. 14,1876.
There are a few—a very few—people who
profess to be Democrats, although their fits
of Democracy are few and far between, who
oppose Governor Tilden. Among them is a
patent medicine manufacturer, a proprietor
of a paper in Brooklyn, in this State. There
has been much curiosity as to the reason for
his position, but it appears that the reason
is, the old story of self interest. In fact, the
opposition of the journal owned by this gen
tleman, is of the same nature as that of the
New York Graphic. The Graphic is opposed
to Tilden because it got the fat contract for
printing all the internal revenue stamps.
The Brooklyn Argus is opposed to Tilden
because, as Is understood, its proprietor has
certain business relations with the internal
revenue service which would make it very
inconvenient for him to be in opposition to
the party now in power. There never was
such perfect unanimity among the Democ
racy in a Presidential contest as there is in
New York this year, and, whenever an ex
ception is found, the cause is sure to exist
in some transactions with government offi
cials. When people arc in the power of the
internal revenue cormorants they are not
their own masters, and are obliged to take
whatever extraordinary course may he laid
out for them. These instances are simply
the exceptions that prove the rule of the
unanimous and hearty support given to
Gov. Tilden in this State. These men are
not Democrats, and dare not advocate the
election of a Democratic President, because
it would put an end to their opportunities
for money-making through the laxity of
Republican officials.
The proprietor of the Argus, who circu
lates documents announcing himself as a
Democrat, but opposed to Tilden, has been
opposed to the Democratic ticket for the
last four or five years; in fact ever 6ince he
failed to obtain a renomination for Con
gress, but his hostility was intensified when
he failed to get the nomination for Mayor.
His venom was further aroused by the re
fusal of Governor Tilden to appoint a friend
of his to a place requested for him. Disap
pointed ambition and personal interest are
the keys to all opposition of individuals to
the regular Democratic nominations this
in
no
of
of
t
year.
The Democrats of New York are exultant
beyond all precedent, and the facts justify
their exultation. Indiana Democratic by a
decisive majority, after the most tremen
dous and unequal contest ever waged in our
national politics; West Virginia electing a
Democratic Governor by over 13,000; 47
electoral votes already secured, and 36 elec
toral votes gained by the Democracy over
the vote of 1872 in States whose total vote
is only 69; While Georgia, which gave then
only 1,600, now gives 80,000,are facts which
jusMfy any degree of political enthusiasm.
The Democrats of Ohio share the honors of
their neighbors, beeauee they have made
such a magnificent, contest against terrible
odds, and pushed the enemy in IlayeB' own
State so close to the wall, that their efforts
will give 22 of the votes of Ohio to Tilden
and Hendricks in November.
The Republicans have chosen New York
for their baffle field, and the Democrats re
joice that they have done so. They will find
their Blaines, Ingersolls and Kilpatricks
sadly out of place In Tilden's own home,
and the magnificent service done by Hen
dricks in Indiana will be an Inducement to a
generous emulation ou the part of the

... V. -
I
IHrtds 0 ^ TDdeita Nifr Tori. thrf lar
gest popular majority evif. obtained in the
State of New York was by Lueltts Robin
son, the present Democratic candidate for
Governor; and the Democrats this year are
determined to exceed even that record, and
allow no majority in the past tmequal thjt,
of the Centennial year of 1876.
The result In West Virginsa Is peculiarly
significant. Of all the States heretofore
constituting portions of the 8outh, she Is
the one most naturally opposed to slavery
and Southern ideas. The separation be
tween Old Virginia and West Virginia was
in fact made for the purpose of securing a
Republican State, and It did secure it for a
,
time, as long as Republicanism meant the
extreme hostility to secession and slavery.
The people of West Virginia are
Northern than Southern in their character
istics, and nearer akin to Ohio than to East
ern Virginia,
which separates them from old Virginia is
formidable barrier than the thin line
more
The range of mountains
a more
of water dividing them from the North.
The Republicans had counted confidently on
this State, and the great majority that it
has given to the Democracy is a severe shock
to the Radical leaders, because it demon
strates a geueral change in the sentiment of
the ]>eople on national affairs, as distin
guished from local Interests.
The Republican candidate for Governor of
the State of New York is interested in the
ownership of negro slaves in the Island of
Cuba. The interest is not held In Morgan's
name, hut the ownership is actually his in
shares with other parties, who hold the title
to the human property. That this is the
is ascertained beyond all question, and
case
If any one chooses to question that F.dwln
D. Morgan is reaping the benefit of the la
bor of the negro slaves in the Island of
Cuba, the proof will be forthcoming at, any
time. He is not merely receiving the avails
of slave labor, but is an owner of slaves to
the full extent that, if he will, he can at
any moment set them free from bondage.
It seems scarcely possibly that the Republi
partyof the State of New York will con
tinue to advocate aB chief executive a man
interested in such business now, and who in
can
the past found a ready market for bis ves
sels among the slave-traders, the transac
tions being made under circumstances
which rendered it impossible that he should
not have known that these ships were to be
used in that vile and piratical traffic in hu
man ttesh and blood. Tt is not merely a
case of proposing to elect, a slaveholder
Governor of this great and free State, but to
elect him under the pretense of being the
constant advocate and fit representative* of
the party which proclaims itself the part)
of virtue, freedom and progress.
There arj^everal Republican lights in this
State, whine names are more or less mixed
up with slave holding transactions. Stewart
L. Woodford, formerly Lieutenant-Gover
nor, and now leading radical orator through
out the country, is the same man who was
connected with the Oaksmlth affair, and
suffered so much from the ill-repute it
entailed. Gen. Woodford is a distinguished
light among the Radical soldiers who make
their military career subservient in personal
and political advancement, but his distinc
tion has been mainly acquired since the
war, because there is no record of his ever
having participated in any engagement, or
in any operation more sanguinary than the
"bucking and gagging" of Federal soldiers.
In 186G, Woodford made a speecli at De
posit, New York, and tried to trade npon
his connection with the army. lie was
waited upon by a committe of the soldiers
of that regiment, who expressed in very
plain terms their profound contempt for
him as a coward and a tyrant. It appears
that he caused to be bucked and gaged, for
a slight offense, a private soldier, who died
under the operation. Woodford knew the
man to he sick and unfit to stand the pun
isiiment, but insisted upon inilicting it to
the end—even to the extent of causing the
death of his helpless victim. The particu
lars of this transaction will he found in the
New York World of November 5,1S0G. If
Colonel Woodford, or General Woodford, as
he is now called, will show that t.lrie state
ment is false, or that he ever deported him
self gallantly in any action with the enemy,
it will do me pleasure to make him all rea
sonable amends.
in
of
a
Harder Will Ont.
[Salt Lake Herald, Oct. 7.]
Many moDt.ks ago an old man named
LuDd, a member of a gang of horse thieves,
with headquarters at Bingham, mysterious
ly disappeared. At one time he was an in
timate associate oi the notorious Ben Tas
ker, but after numerous arrests and trials
the twain became sworn enemies. Luna
had loaned some money to Ben, and subse
quently sued the latter for its recovery.
Before the suit for the money was deter
mined, or immediately thereafter, Lund
disappeared. He told several persons that
Tasker had threatened to kill him, and lie
feared that the threat would be carried Into
execution. Recently Tasker was arreBted
on the charge of having murdered Lund,
and was Indicted by the grand jury, some
evidence having been found which impli
cated him. It appears that when Ben was
confined in the county jail last summer he
told a fellow prisoner that Lund's body was
t In a well near the month of Bingham canon,
Since then diligeut search has been made
for the remains, but not until yesterday was
the body found. The well, which is ninety
feet deep, was searched, and in the bottom,
covered with earth and stones, was found
the body of the long-lost Lund. It was
badly decayed, but was readily Identiii^Aby
the clothing and other evidences. w
a
a
47
of
re
a
E IANOSANDORGANS
New and sepond band, at all prices
io a large stook of COVERS and STilOIH
AT
BOBIiEN 8b BROTHER,
710 MARKET STREET.

IN AND
m
august H.5
Trains will leave Wilmt
O
.an follows
for
Philadelphia and Intermediate statlens
6 40, 7 , 810 ,8 20,930,9 52, 1U 37, 10 45, a nr
2 80,6 06.7 20.9 54, 11 14 pm.
Philadelphia and New York
1217,646.
Baltimore and Intermediate Stations 12 5)
880am. 520,pm.
Baltimore and Washington 12 52,155,
am. 1250,1 18, 128,620,841. 7 10pm.
Trains for Delaware-Di vision leave for
New Castle 12 56,« », H 85, U 46 am. 125, • 80,
217am. 1214
p m.
8 88
. m.
_ and Intermediate Stations 1255,
, f 85 a m. 6 80, p m.
Delnuur and Intermediate
Stations 1256,
985, am.flSOpm.
The 8 80 P. M. train, on Monday. Wednes
day and Saturday, will make close con
nection at Delmar, with train for Ocean
City.
SUNDAY TRAIN*.
Philadelphia and Intermediate Stations,
810 am. 5 00, 6 30, pm.
Philadelphia and New York, 217 a m.
Baltimore and Washington, 12 62,165 a m
For further Information passengers ar<
referred to the timetables posted at the
depot.
Janl-ly
H. F. KENNEY, Bapt.
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD.
on and after September I9th, 1876
Trains leave Depot, Thirty-second and
Market streets.
MAIN LINE) WESTWARD.
Bryn Mawr Acoom. 8 30 a ra and 8 30 p m
Paoll Accom. 6 20,9, and 10 a m„ 110,4 80,6
It 30,7,8 30, and 1130 p m. on Sunday, 10
111 1, 4 8 and 10 30 p m.
Downlngtown Accom. 1100a m, and 1081
p m. On Sunday at 6 30 a m.
Limited Fast Mall dally,
Niagara Express daily, except
Sunday,
Renova and Kane Express dally
except Sunday,
York and Hanover Express, ex
cept Sunday,
Loc < Haven Mail,
of
a
7 20 a n
7 20 a it
7.20 a m
7 20 a ft
except Sunday, 8 00 a no
York Mail daily, except Sunday, 8 00 a nr
Mail Train dally, (on Sunday
leaves at 8 30 a m and runs only to
Harrisburg.) 8 00 a m
Fast Line and Buffalo Exp. except
Sunday, 1255 p m
Elmira A L. Haven Exp., except
Snnday,
York, Hanover and Fred'k Accom.
except Sunday,
Harrisburg Accom. dally, oxcept
Sunday,
Columbia and York Accom. except
Sunday,
Lancaster and York Express ex
cept Sunda
Parkesburg
Sunday,
Harrisburg Express, except Sunday 545 p no
Erie A Buffalo Express, except
Sunday,
Pittsburg Express dally, except
Sunday,
Cincinnati Express daily,
Pacific Express dally,
Fast Line for Williamsport, Elmira,
Rochester, Buffalo, and Niagara
Falls daily (on Saturday runs only
to Williamsport.) 1155 pm
Emigrant Express, 1205 am, daily excepl
Monday, for which tickets must be pro
cured and baggage delivered at, 116 Market
street, by 5p in.
NEW YORK DIVISION.
Express for New York, 3 20, 3 80, 7 20. 8 3
and 9 and 11 a m, (Limited Expresi 1 35 p
m.) J2 45,140, 310,3 45, 4 45,5 30, 7, and < 35
p m , and 12 midnight.. On Sunday 3 20,
3 30 7 20,8 30 a ra., 3 45,7, 7 35 p m. and 12
night. Mail Train 7 am. Emigrant Train
1140 pm.
Express for Boston, 9 a m and 7 00 p
Sound Line Express 12 05 p m (leave C
tennial Depot 100 p m) for all New Eng
land points.
Express for Bnltlmore and Washington,
12 45 and 7 25 a m, 12 15 and 5 40 p rn Lim
ited Express 12 10 p m.
Accommodation for Trenton, 2 30 p m.
Express for Long Brancb and Squan, '.7 2
am, and 140 pm.
For Fox Chase. 8 40 a in, 3,5 40, and 8 20 p m
Trains leave Centennial Depot for Ni
York at 7 25a in, 1,3 30, 4 45. 5 30,6. and 7 05
p m. On Sunday, 7 20 a m and 7 p in. Ac
commodation connecting with Express
Trains at Germantown Junction 7 la, 815
and 10 50 a ni, 115, 3, and 6 50 p m.
FROM KENSINGTON DEPOT
Bustleton, 6 35 am, 12 noon, 5 ana 7 30 p m
Way Train for Bristol 6 15 p m. For Tacony
7 45 am.
Trenton, 855 and 10 15 a m, 2, 05,3 40,4 15. 5 If
and 8 20 pm. On Sunday 9 15 a m and S 05
p m.
For Centennial Depot, stopping at Cumber
land street, Clearfield street, FranSford
Rond, Dummy Crossing, North Penn.
Junction, Germantown Junction, and
Ridge Avenue, at 0 15, 8 40, 9 30,10,10 45,
1145 a m, 1 and 0 lOp in. Returning leave
Centennial Depot at 8 15, 9 25, JO 50, II 26 a
m, 12 110011 .4 55,5 20,5 59, 0 20 und 050
BELVIDERE DIVISION.
FKOMTHIBI V-SKU JNT) a.nuMarkkt strets,
—Express for Lambertville. Flemlngton
Pmtlipsburg,Easton,Water Gap,Scranton
&c.. 11 a. in. and 4.45 p. m.
For Pennington, Hopewell, Ac., 11 a. m.
From Kensington Depot.—E xpress loi
Trenton, Lambertville, Phlfllpsburg
Easton, Water Cap, Scranton, Ac., 6 56
and 1015 a ua and 115 p m.
For Lambertville,340 pm. For Belvldert,
515 p m.
For Pennington and Hopewell 1015 am
and 5 15 p m.
For ITcmingtou 6 55 and 10 15 a m, and 515
p m.
12 55 p TO
12 55 p K
2 30 p ns
\4 00 p m
5 00a nr
fealn
daily, except
5 30 p TO
5 45 p m
6 20 p no
9 10 p lb
11 55 p rr
m
en
ew
P m
of
AMBOY DIVISION.
FROM MARKET STREET FERRY.
Accom. for New York., via Penn Amboi
and Jamesburg and Monmouth Junction
6 30 a m and 2 pm, connecting for Loni
Branch and Hq uau.
Accom. for Tient-m, connecting with Ex
press 5 rains for New York, 6 30, 8 and 1C
a m, 12 noon, 2,4 30 and 6 30 p m.
Accom. for New York, via Trenton, 330
pur
Way Train for Burlington 8 00p m. Sun
day Trains 9 30a m. and 1 and 6 OOp m.
Way Train for Bordeutown, 1180 p in. On
Sunday at 000 )i m.
For Klnkora Branch 630 a m. 2 und 4 SO p m
For HlgUistowu 6, 6 30, a m., 2, 5 45 and 5 3f
p m.
For Long Branch and New York 8 30 a m
115 p in.
For Tuekertown 8 30 a m and 5 pm.
For Medford 6 and H15 a in, 815, 5 10 and
,lil i) in, ' v
For Mt. Holly and Pemberton 6, and III,
a m. 1 15, 5, 6 30 aiid u 30 p m. For n<
Holly, 8 30 a in,315 and 9 p m,
Sunday Trains for Mt. Holly 10 a m 1 ■
and 8 pm.
Trains arrive Thirty-sesond and Mar
kat sikketl:—F rom Pittsburg. 3.19.7.35
a. m , 7.20 p. m. dully, 7.(19 q. m. and 8.3(1
p - except Monday. From Erie
and Williamsport, 7.00 a. m. dally, exeept
Monday, and 9.2.i a. m dally, except Sun
day. I> roin Buffalo and Niagara Fails
7.36 a. m. and 3.39 p. in. daily,except Mon,
day. from Kane, He nova Watkins'
Elmira, and Williamsport,'/ 20 D.m.dallv
except Sunday. Fro'« New Vork 12 is!
4 88, V) 115 ,10 55 a. ID , 12 05.12 45, 8 60,6, 6 k
7 35,7 50,8 50, 10 40, and li 40 p. m. On Hun
day, 12 45, I9 60 a. m., 7 59.8 69,10 10, 11 40
p. in. from Easton, Phlllipsburg, and
Lambertville 10 15 11 , m. and foffu m
also arrive Kensington Depot 9 63a.m
I 4 55 p. m Sleeping-car Tickets can
hail at Broad and Chestnut Streets
Streets^ 01 ' Thirt y- rtecoQ d and Market
The Union Transfer Compaav will n&n
£*£«?Y«n 'i, hee T, ha 88"«c fr«m hotels and
Residences. Time cards and full lntorma
tion can be obtained at the Depots and
(SARtSsrSf®***
*'Sf W ?, T 5 OMW,0,f ' I>- X. BOYD, JR
Him'l Manager, Sm'l,
at
one
be

&& IV.I
LOOKf
CHEAPER THAN
THE RED TEA STORE, I
No. 8 ^vV. Third St, ^Vilmington
Eu made great reductions In COFFEES and TEAS. Good Routud I
good Ground Coffee only 18 cent*, a very superior Bio at 28. Sand »tSS® for 22 wna
calbo, Laeuayra and Java of rery suierlor quality. The cheapest nlse* ?^ aB(l Sut
BlaoOapen and Green Teas at the low price ot 40 and fi*)centa P M?n^,^ 7
siftings 85 cents. Great reduotlon made on goods to suit the hard t imes und ' * D<1 *004
LOOK!
EVERi
JAMEB CBIPPEN SuDerlnt^
Great Canion and Janan & ndent *
No. 8 West Third ■tree"wil£fovm^? 8,, 7. '
^•Handsome Glassware and Chromoe given with Tea and Coffee ^* tSjJR®*** 1 *.
Seeds for sale In season. ee ' Turnl P»»dotli*
sepi 2
HOTELS.
gT. STEPHEN'S HOTEL.
CHESTNUT ABOVE TENTH ST,
Philadelphia,
Your attention Is respectfully called to
this new and elegant hotel, centrally loca
ted, convenient to all public offices, places
of amusement and Interest.
Furnished throughout in the most elabo
rate manner. No pains will be spared to
make this a model hotel, pleasant and
agreeable to those who flavor ns with a
vlsjt. Transient rates from 83 to 85 per
day. Special rates to flunllles and perma
nent gnests.
apl-ly
THOS; ASHTON, Prop'r.
pRIME NEW
TIMOTHY SEED,
CABBAGE, SPINACH, KALE AND
LETTUCE,
SEEDS FOR FALL PLANTING,
CANARY, HEMP, RAPE, MAW AND
MILLET SEEDS,
Recleaned and at greatly reduced prices, at
SMITH A BREEN'S,
fonth and 8h1pley Sts
82
J^OYAL HAVANA LOTTERY, .
57.50,000 Drawn every 15 Days.
*200,000
100,000
50,'00
25,000
1(1.'iOO
lO.OUO
.32,000
3-3,000
I Prize of
1 Prize of
1 Prize of
1 Prize of
1 Prize of
2 Prizes of *5,000
32 Prizes of *1,009
646 Prizes of *500
085 Prizes amounting to *750,000
Circulars of information furnished Free.
Orders filled. Prizes cashed. Spanish Bank
Bills and Governments purchased.
TAYLOR A CO , Bankers.
11 Wall St.. New York
oct7
J'HE HARE' CORNER HOTEL,
JOSEPH YARNALL,
Proprietor.
There will be found at this hotel an ex
cellent yard for the accommo lation of all
kind-' of cattle. It Is a station of one of
the best cattle markets in this section.
sept29-3m
Yyn- O'CONNER,
Merchant Tailor
No 2 WEST THIRD STREET,
(One door from Market*)
Would announce to his friends and the
public at large that he liaslaid In a full line
of
CLOTHS CASSiMERES and VENTINGS
FOR FALL AND WINTER WEAR,
And ts making the same up into stylish
and good fitting garments at prices to suit
the times. Good fit and workmanship
guaranteed or money refunded.
<9*Pants a specialty.
mar3I
QOBBINS' STARCH POLISH.
A GKEAT DiL^O /EF-.Y.
F.y tr.e use of which every lamtlv may
give tiieir Linen that brilliant polish pe
euilni to fine laundry work. Having time
and labor in ironing, more than its entire
cost, bold by Groeers.or will be sent postage
paid ou receipt of 25 cents.
DOBBINS, BRO. A CO.,
No. 18 N. Fourth St., Phila,
aug11-3m
MELCHIOR, 214 KING STREET,
manufacturer and importer of
SHOT GUNS,
N*
RJFLES, I'lHTOLS,
Gunsi lim,BBt0n 8nd ° ther HreechJLoadlng
Amnnltlcn of ail
at the impest urines,
Repat. ni"-at t!
nd-i always on band
. nortest notice.
214 KING STREET.
Sept,l/; m
G
RAY'S FERRY
PRINTING INK WORKS,
»Q. 8 SPRUCE STREET. NEW YOB
i*
7
__ WIMES & LIQUORS,
F
Hannlsvllle Pure Rye, 1878,
A. Overholt A Co.'s Pure Kn m..
JWBSSSS'fi^'SJ'SSf
Without any advanoe In price W U
FRANCIS gur-T iT
ang 28-tf No. Km Markka,
O UR SELECTIONS
OF
OLD RYE WHISKIES ARE mm.
PASSED.
on
Priot
k* told
We have In stock:
MOORE'S 1886, 1668.
SHERWOOD, 1868, 1864,
DOUGHERTY, 1869,
HANNiavn.r.g i B
JOHNSON A SON, (BOURBON) UR
Champagnes, Sherrie* and
dnoed price*.
P. PLUNKETT A CO.
_ IM Market Street,
anetR-tf-4
PLUMBERS.
QHAS. STF.WART * Co7,
NO. 215 WE8T FOURTH STREET,
Has constantly on hand an assertmestaf
GAS FIXTURES,CHA NHELIERS. STORE
PENDANTS, PORTABLES and BRACK
ETS.
By close and personal attention to bad
ness, and the lowest possible profit, w»
hope to receive a share oi the public pat
ronage. , aufll-Sm
^yN.8. WAtT,
No. 1009 Market Street,
Plumber, Gas and Steam
Fitter.
All materials In my line of business con
stantly on hand. augl2-lyeod
JAMES F, TRAYNOR,
PLUMBER RiS AND ST1
FI TEB, »
No. 204 E. SIXTH STREET,
dealer im
LEAD AND IRON PIPE, SINKS, JATfl
TUBS, BOILERS, CHANDE
LIERS, BRACKETS
PENDANTS,
READING LIGHTS,
MURDOCK'S ANTI-FREEZING HY
DRANTS AND FULLEB'8
PATENT FAUCETS.
Jobbing promptly attended to.
l
fWMy
BOOTS & SHOES
OF ALL
MAKES
AND
STYLES
SOLD BY,
JOHN K. BABOO®
BOOT AND 8HOR EMPORIUM,
W ilmin gton, D** -
S. W. COR. REFUND AND
augzr-u
JOHN
H. SCHAAF A SON,
MERCHANT TAILORS.
No. 20_NOKTH ELEVENTH STB®®'
PHILADELPHIA,
A Splendid Assortment of
CLOTHS, CASSIMERES AND
ALWAYS ON HAND.
Del -Km
HOWARD SIIPSOS,
Merchant Tailor,
No. 2 EAST THIRD STR®®E
(Over Dobell's Hot Store.
A splendid assortme«t Jof new goods to*
fall and winter.
, f PANTALOON GOODS
Mi great variety.
/gone but U»e (BIST

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