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Bozeman avant courier. [volume] (Bozeman, Mont.) 1872-1882, October 31, 1873, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038123/1873-10-31/ed-1/seq-1/

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I.Time. i11 $ I 4 $ 7 $, "2. $ 8 [
$ Climes. 3 5 6 10 15 2 do
t Times. 4 6 8 1S 17 4
. a Yaoth. | " 4 14 1$ 8 .5 .
II Monthe 7 1.' 18 2. 40 Go 90
ooths! P 18 80 4a: ( 80 140
1 ' tr. 16. 2 40 5.; 751 l. S21F,
Le at notices 15 ceuts per line for the first inser
tion and 10 cents for each additional inertiom.
W t ransient advertisements nntst be paid for
i eliavance and all Job Printung when the work
is delivered.
NEW5PAPE]IR DEC]I4IONS.
1. Any one who takes a paper rerulnrly from the
Poaioflice-whether direeted to his name or anoth
er'e-or whether he has subscribed or not-is te
-pensiable for the payment.
:. I a person oderds hisi paper discontined, ,he
uast pay all a rrearages, or tue publi.her m: v con
tinue to sead it unil payinent is m:iade, and collect
the whole amount, wa ether the paper is taken irome
the odice or not.
3. The courts have dcclded that rer'fusing to take
the nawspapers or ,erio';ic ls from the Postofice,
-.removinx and ie:tvin" them nacalled .or, is
pria.nfacia evidcuce of itnttional ruand.
RIEGULATING LEGAL PUBLICATIONS.
AN ACT to emend an Act entitle'I. "An Actio
provide for and regulate the rates of ch';rges fort
the pa'blicallioi of legal doculment.." approved
January 9lth. ls.2.
Be it enacied by the Leb°islatlie AMeaably of the Te,'
rityU of Monte:a:
SECTION 1. PPi'bishers of newsnapers in this Ter
litlr'v siiBall be entliltle to ibe following fees l"nr
publzicaiic l o i' leý.ll ad(!vertisements: Fo the
tirst insi. 'ion oi" euch iolio of on. hundred wol(ds,
th.ee doll;as; lor ea h sutteeuent ins'rtioa, Iwo
dollars.
SEc. 3. Ithe printer of such legal adve; i*aemenls
,lhuI bie enlitledkio pa0iueet of his it'll ,i's before
being ieqt'ii"d to "ibaish a certificate of tLe publi
ca v.d, Dece
'Approved, December 23, 1S7S.
IIRECTORY OF FKEDbEAL OFFICERS
OF MONTANA.
*r1T 4 1 I ANxK. arSIDENCl .
Governor.......... RsNJ. F. PorTT. Virginia City
Secretary ......... J. E. CALLAWAY. " "
Chief Justice..... D. S. WADE...... Helena.
Associate JUstices F. G. SEUvtsK..... Virginia City
A it 1IRA KNOWLES. Deer Lodge.
U. S. Dist. Att'y. ,M. C. PAe....... Ruadersburg.
Surveyor General. Jolts E. BLAINE.. ! Helena.
Rgister of Lands. SOL. ST ........ u He
U. S. Marshal.... Wx.;F. WnsslT,+.He-ena.
Collector int. LRv i. P. FULi.. :.....l Helena.
Collecltr CGttomns r. A: CcusltiN( Helena.
UNITED STATES EXAMINING 6URLGONS.
H(OMAS REECE, Helena.
CEARLES MUS8lGRlOD, B eo:emsn.
J. H. McKEE, MI-suul ..
DIIrEC'ORY OF COUNTY OFFCEIB.
ProbateJude ....................S. W. LANGSO.INE
P. W. McADOW
Eoar(of Conuty Commissionersl L. P. CoWAN,,
- DuxEc.
Sheriff...............................JonN C. Guy
Deputy Sheriff............... ....C. P. BLAKlLb:Y
Clerk and Recorder.............ARnCH tr A.s
Treasurer............. ........W*W. H. BAILIY
Superatendedent Public Instruction.... Z. L. .TONE
Surveyor ...... .................S. M. RI.eD
Coroner...... .............A. D. Mc]PaasoeN
SFirst Disrict. .....G.o. W. DiCK~a~
.Asseaors, Second Distrie .......ItotUo T hELLER
A. F * A. 1M.
,LStated comm nications of Gallatin Lodge No. "
A F A A M. neld at their hall on the irst Satur
day evening on or before the full moon of each
Month.
Visiting brethren are invited to atend.
TUOSK.I. EDWADS, W. M.
.. P. MENEFEE. Sec.
Tiae asn Milase for Holdlng' Coels In
tho Territorl of montIam.
SUPIrEME COURT.
At Virgmn Ucty, first Monday in Ja unry and sec
end Monday in August.
UNITISD STATES DISTRICT COURTS.
First 4itrict-At Virginia City first M ,ndaoy in
April, seoe id Monday in July, and second Mon
day in November.
se.,. Di trct-A Deer Lodge, third _onday in
Aprl, ,at *Monday in sptmbet ,and first Mon
play in December.
:AsirS DJais5-At Helena, .first Mondtsay in March,
flat Monday in July, and fourth Monday in Oc
tober.
TERITOBIL OOItT•s.
first District- In Madison aCounty, at Virgiia City,
first Monday in April, ,ond Monday in July,
and second Monday in November.
In Ga.laAia outy t, at lozeLm.n, first Monday i
March and fourth Monday in October.
In Jefferson County, at tadershui econ Man
day in May, and first Monday In uctober.
acesa mt trict-Deer Lodge County, at Deer Lodge
City, third Monday in April, first Monday iner.
Septomber, and first Monday in December.
,n Misoula County. at Missouia, fourth Monday
in Juno sad secoed Monday m. vembeor.
aer lead County B onnack, irat Monday in
June, and thi Monad a- n October.
7f rd District--ln Lewis and Clark County, at Hel
ena, Sirt Monday ino Marh, lrat yonday in
July, and fourth Mondsy In Otpber.
In Meagher Count1, fourth Monday in May and
efourth M-'i-. a mber.
JAMES £. FINCH,
Practical c c:rb~ii~
Ihe~tb ito the p° ining tactorilp eg`·teddeM vrmt ca
CH b";% nIItt4) n
pioka, to wk b b ' c li th e' ýaBL i [fn, ~p;$toe.i
At the .pP¶E l $u
HORSS J .r im . DyOD?
matt,~; -
I0
Wll praetie S alzeurts of lretrd 00 ontai .
OaTe In Coury Horse. uluing. foneman "t. M.
ro JOHNI POTTER,
s Attorney and Counselor at Law,
HAMILTON, MONTANA.
r- Will practice In all the ceurts of Montana
Territory.
". GORGE F. COWAN,
Attorney at Law,
e Oace, Lower story of the Court Hounse Building,
SRA DERSIBURG, M. T.
T U. EDWADS, . P. VITION.
&Attorneys and Counselors at Law,
BOZEMAN, I. T. r
Will practice In all the Courts of the Territory..
r/ Collections promptly attended to . JL 4
H F. WILLIAMS, a
a
attorney and Cournselor at Law 9
BOZEMAN, MONTANA, tl
Will practice in all Courts of the Territory. 8
A. G. P. GEORGE,
ATTORNEY AT LA-Y,lN
RADERISBURG, M. T. dl
SAMUEL WORD, w
la
AttorneyaridCounseleratLaw
VIRGINIA CITY, M. T. Ot
Will practice in all courts of Montana Territorr. it
J J. DAVIS, t
BOZEMAN, MONTANA. cli
Will Dractlee in all court. of Montana Territory.
RAGE & COLEMAN, ot
1l(
AITTORNEYS AT LA týV.
BOZEMAN AND RADERDBURG. M. T 811
-Will Dractice in all Co'trts of Montana.
PHYSICIANS.
DR. J. T. CURTISS,
Physician and Surgeon,
Oilers his professlonal services so the people ot
Bozem;n and the 4.alatin Vallev.
May ije tfound either .at tihe store of A. Lamnm,
Co.. or his:residence at all ho. rs day'or night. wh.n
uot prieriteonally elgieged.
C. MUSSIGBROD, M. D.,
Physician and Surge:;n,
Office at the Metrobolitar flotel,
BOZEMA V, MONTA NA.
DR. . CREPIN,
Physician and 'Surgeon,
OFFICE:
Up stairs in Perkint' brick building,
MAIN STREET, - BOZEMAN, M. T.
"2 Tenders his professional services to the people
of the Gallatin Valley.
R. G. W. MONROE,
HYTSICIAMN AND iUT.GEON,
csee st Osborne's Drug Store, Meace building,
Main Street, BOZEMAEI , M. T.,
Ofers his prfesslondal serices to the people of
Bosemn sund the Gle.lali vatley.
----- ---------
DON L, BYAM
aECLECTIrC PffYsbi C:IAN.
At his residence ei Middle Cipkr
D . ;.THOMAS R E CE,
Physician and Surgeo'.,
Office, Me. 4, At. jt.i ~Btel,.
HELMNA ................... ...... WOWMAANA.
w R. BULLARD, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon,
HELENA. M.. T..
.Ofice 4a LbraryrP a~dtiijflng Re6 lsecond
door sbro the briC.k .hlrtic, ýr namdvy.
.- mn in .,
0.ili We FLARDURII,
Xlaocat1actr 6fP
S-IIGLIS V IDII LATII
3ates ()S33Am '* T.
crrt
-I-~
4. ,~I;*~g? l~- ·:
had been a respectable mechanic, but
died after about two years of illness,
which bitterly impoverished the fami
ly. Eva had, however--she being the
eldest-received a good plain educa
tion before the great calamity came
upon then*, and noble hearted and un
selfish, began her work of assisting in
the support.
The last week previous to the holi
day vacation she had been boarding
with a Mrs. Carpenter, wvho was mak
inug gigantic preparations to entertain I
guests she was expecting from New
York.
" You never met my brothers, Eva,"
she said, and then began to give the
pretty young teacher a description of
them: "There's Sam, and George, and
Johnny, the youngest, and such times
as they have when they get out here
and rusticate, as they call it. But,
me, I don't get much rest or peace, for
they are like a lot of boys let out of
school. Such tricks and pranks no one
ever saw. The last time they all visit
ed me together John and Sam actual
ly cut a pane of glass from the win
dow and pelted George out of my best
room with snow. You see there is al
ways a regular strife for that particu
lar room, for the bed is a spring one,
and they say they don't sleep on any
other in the city. But they don't get
it this time, that's certain, for I intend
to keep you in that room and so end
the controversy. I am so afraid they
iyt ' hiUdn- that Lam .hiut
check a little."
"I had just as soon occupy some
other rioorm, Mrs. Carpenter, and I do
not wish to disconmmode your brothers
--in fact, I have no right to do so,"
said Eva.
"'No, you shan't. Eva," peremptorily
exclaimed her hostess; "and what is
the use of your going home vacation
week You can stay'here just as well
and do up your sewing on my ma
chine. Your mother will have enough
mouths to feed, I guess, and won't
miss yours."
The subject was dropped, and the
entire household retired early, for on
the morrow the brothers, young and
full of life, were to be there. But
without sending any word of their in
tention they had concluded to takethe
evening train, which would land them
atiHollythorn about bedtime. George
and John did so, and when seated in
the cars, began to speculate about the
absence of Sam.
"No reason on earth, why he should
not have been along with us," said
George.
"None, for he told me this morning
he would certainiy be on hand," said
John.
"I can't make it out, unless he has
kew" the five o'clock train by mis
take."
"Not a bit of it," laughed John, who
fancied he understood the entire pro
gramme. "It is more likely he took
that train on purpose to get into Han
nah's spare bed room, and by so doing
make us take up with straw ticks and'
feathers."
"I didn't think'of that, but I reckon
you are right. We must contrive to
get him out somehow."
"Bet your life on that."
The brothers put their heads togeth
er and laughed merrily over some
scheme for outwittinfg Sam, and ae
cordingly, when the train reached
Hollytborn about eleven o'lock, they
approached the house in a very steal
thy mannes.*
ty the aince in theremr, they
sofy i d a window and obtaS~ed
asees the pantry, where they de-i
m 4 "Pe W &pie4d a. quantity of
do-.~ l Tea with appetites ap.
h -. t h# .f
ýb , x gbli~
au then,
3hm= spd
the middle of at
"Good heaven nl exclained George,
"it isn't Sam, but some womarn, and as
I'm a sinner, she has fainted. Run and
call Hanilhi."
With adminable presence of mind he
lifted the limp formi of Eva Stanley
- and carried her into the house. But
her cry had already been heard, and
the inmates came rushingi nto the
I hall as he appeared.
"George! John! for goodness' sake
what does this mean, and who have
you there'" asked Mrs. Carpenter in a
, brett Ith.
"Blessed if I know," said George, :`I
thought it was Sanm, so we coiclutded
to give him a dose of snow for get i iag
into the best bed and trying to euchre
us. Here! Quick! I believe she has
fainted."
"Just like you," scolded Hannah as
she assisted in again depositing Eva 1
upon the bed from whichI she had been
so unceremoniously shaken; begimning
your tricks upon each other before you
fairly get into the house. Clear out,
now."
Long before she had done with her i
tirade her diseotmited brothers had t
betaken themselves down stairs where
they almost went into hysterics over t
the joke.
"A pretty kettle of fish," said
George, rolling onl:te flooranud let i ing
a xt. te _after ueal of his . o.,
"I should rather t hinkf i s," -
plied John, holding his sides. "But
what the dickens is to be done about i
it,, andl who do you suppose she is,
George ?"
"Some guest of Hannah's of course, a
and young and pretty at that. I
don't know how it is with you, but I t
feel p)articidarly small and extremely
cheap. I would sell myself at a low
price." t
"Cheap," roared John, "cheap! I
would actually give myself away this I
blessed minute, and throw something 1
to boot. What we are to do, I can't
say, but I believe I shall dig out of t
this place and get back to the city be- 1
fore morning. I bhain't got the courage 1
to face tile music, so I'll get up and t
get."
He began hastily putting on his 3
boots, and would have put his threat t
into execution but for the appearance i
of Hannah, who at once asssrted her ,
authority.
"1You are not going a single step,"
said she, "but I don't wonder that
you s ae ashaed of yourselves. What
on earth possessed you is more than I
can tell."
"That's right, Han., pitch in and
scold away. Ill take any amount just
now, for I am as meek as a lamb. 1tit
who was it we played so shabby a
trick on?" replied George.
Tricks! I should think it was. Why
it is Eva Stanleygjust as nice a young
thing as ever lived. She is our school
teacher, and this is,her week to board
here, and I knew you boys would be
squabbling over the best bed room as
u.ual, so I put her in there, not think
ing you would come home ina stealthy
manner."
"Eva Stanley? Whew ! A pretty
school teacher!" and repeating his
sister's words, he gave a lugubrious
"Has : she recovered?" questioned
John, vainly endeavoring to restiain
his laughtd at the wry faces his a.bro
tier was making.
"Y'ea,. ason brought her too, but I
don't believe the poor girl will ever get
over he r ight she aid tatle.
thing hiat he knew was being lifted
oa and "grg out and Sbi was s
tu l rid cif` she ,'was
S haQ sL gitirt)ieI
Y Xhi~~iS
at la &inew drift in that disgratiefnl
Sfa>ien Sr X wondcif shle cried, poor
4h1ug
"Oriod$i sho' kpeated George,
"vhol thin did I us t o
Ibehazty argp~andh #&'fwe her
tocry oatewaS &fto her how
I she happoed tfle en for' a
#u4 beom$z $!*h< of your ,rzt
> pranks.L *
& 18-446 %,4. 1'ml
rm--pon boner! der Oh
ttear! * ck h anld ashes
ard and for
'George, with anoter
dismal groat :i
"And how on .earth do you etat
us to stay and take the consequences?
asked John, beginning to look serious.
"I am for taking myself off instantly.
I had rather face a masked battery
thtan this pretty teacher, after making
such fools of ourselves as we have
done."
"I don't care if you had," answered
his sister, indignantly. "The only way
[is to brave it out, both of you, and
apologize for your rudeness. She is
Inot a bit stupid, but pleasant and
merry and no doubt you will have a
jolly laugh over the affair."
"But Sam? How the deuce are we
to get along with him? You know well
enough, Han, we shall never hear the
last of it from him; and that it will
be brought up at all times and all pla
ces."
'"If you two can keep the secret, I'll
find a way to silence Bridget, it is not
a subject Eva will care to have dis
cussed, and fortunately, my husband
is away. So go to bed and rest con
tented."
She showed them the room she in
tended them to occupy, and soon all
was quiet again.
Meanwhile their brother Sam had
roached the depot a few minutes too
other train started two hours later, so 1
decided to take it. He figured to him
self as he impatiently crowded into an
empty seat and was being whirled 1
along at a rapid rate, how snugly his
brothers had ensconced themselves in 1
the best. room, which by right belong
ed to him, he being the eldest, and con
sunmmated a plan to get even with i
them.
Sometime after midnight he was de
posited at Hollythorn, and reaching1
his sister's house he scouted around 1
until he found a way of entrance to
the kitchen, where he deposited his
luggage and removed his boots. Then
he quietly stole up stairs and opened
the door of the best room. "Sure
enough," thought he, "my fine fellows,
you are in-clover," for there were not
to be mistaken signs of the room be
ing occupied. Garments were lying on
chairs and the bed was pressed by
shlunbering forms.
To think of coping with their united
strength by dragging them forth, was
not practicable, but there stood the
pitcher of water, and he knew that a
good dousing with the icy fluid would
bring them out of their nest in quick
time.
"If I can't have possession of my
old quarters," he ehuckled, "you shall
not. So here,goes"
He lifted the pitcher, approached
the bed, raised it high, and suddenly
dashed the entire contents upon the
sleeper.
Such a torrent of screams as he had
never before heard rang through the
house, and before Sam could collectliis
scattered senses, door after door open
ed, and Hannah,. John and. George
rushedin-in scaatyapparel-Hannah
with a frightened look on her face and
a lamp in herhand, that revealed the
entire scene.
There, sitting up in bed, with her
hair dripping like. a mermaid, her
night dress deluged, her face colorless
and looking terriAe* , was the young
school mistress, and there stood Sam,
with the empty pitcher in his hand,
the picture of imbeoiity, stariig like
an ididt at Mis EvZa and the havo~ he
o4 mde..
UanashrWeBrge and John inwtantly
Mqueeaa _eh : ui and sou
S ,the mana d their *in'st
"nawhile da
teadi ~xo girlftodry
WOW ýrt Wit:w~tiifiie~iBui
il "L fi you with mow, my
Im o;ldal e s thongh ti th difficulty
keelpin back her linigliter. "Thohme
·boaeitst lt any
_atef if} i t or your having
Sb'rigrisI g , and the
r . w; n't `re. not hi when
Sout here. But rest eisy, you are
sae u*.'"
Hannah kissed her ehar~ iad then
wentfilown to see al)oet the boys, who,
*8 o.o6,iK) toem were fairly shut up ina
tre region below, began:to thoroughly
ap~precite th" joke; and now that
Sam, was as deep in the md as they
wet in the mire,. they gave him no
q uarter.
' I1l be blamed if€ I know what it all
means," said Sam, looking ia confusion
at his brothers, who were rolling and
kicking in convulsions of laughter.
"Wait," replied George, "until Han.
comes, and see if you don't fand out."
And he gave way to another peal.
Sam had not smiled, but sat looking
the picture of discomfort and perplexi
ty, but pnswered:
,"For heaven's sake hold on, boys-
I'm willing to admit that I am badly
sold--going dog cheap to the highest
bidder; but hold on long enough to
tell a fellow what it all means."
"Means. Of course I will," replied
George. "It means that you have sto
len like a thief into Miss Eva Stan
ley's bed chamber-who is the lady
teacher 'boarding ai rnd'-athat this is
her week here) and tlinking it was
your humble servant and Johnny snug
in bed, you attempted to , drown us
out, and made a grand mistake. How
do you like it, Sam,"
"I confess I see the point, but can't
see the joke. It is 4 most outrageous
shame."
by letting' oi~ de v o4
Sam's turn then to laugh. 'Hie strug
gled manfilly to retain his gravity,
but the whole thing was so supremely
ludicrous that he was compelled to
join his brothers.
Miss Eva was not visible at the
breakfast table next morning, and
Hannah announced that she was sick
with a severe cold; whereupon.George
groaned and wanted a handiul of peas
to put in Sam's shoes, while that gen
tleman looked very contrite, and John.
declared he wanted to shoot himself.-
But Hannah had the unruly crew un
der her thumb for onle in her lfe, and
had the satisfaction also of seeing
them behave with something of digni
ty. They appeared to nevei' forget
that there was an invalid in the house
and went on tiptoe about, and Sam,
who seemed to take the entire respon
sibility upon his shoulders, sent off to
New York for cloice fruit and flowers,
which he induced his sister to convey
to the young lady, with the most ab
ject apologies and regrets.
In a couple of days Eva was able to
come down stairs. She was looking
quite pale, but lovely, and of course,
divinely, when presented by Mrs. Car
penter to her three'brothers, who be
havyed qite== edlidkering the un
pleasmtness of their situation.
But Sam, who had broken the ice by
means of his presents, was most at his
ease, and by virtue of his age and ex
perience constituted himself the pro.
pitiator, and was constantly on hand
to offer Miss Eva a thousand nameless
attentions, and before the week was
out John declared in confidence to
nh his opinion that "Sam was
done for.
"Gone under completely," echoed
George, with one of his dismal groans.
"Just think of it, THan.. if it had not
been for that pitcher George would be
heart-whole this minute. The fellow
meets lots of girls prettier than she is
every d4--wiit lots of stamps too.-
They say pity is twin sister to love,
and I believe it."
"Sour grapes!" whispered John,
puckering un hima.nouth
Haunnes vgt rases and se
eretl eam choice. SAe
irec ligi to al of teem
phq byUigra
Slnrtb eru Pactf c Rairo4;..
We fild the followi ng in an exhange
in regard to the aoverimnt tu aiding
this r ad;
Int i1 sog by some of the lýead
3 in 1tc b hE ast that pirobalpN
the GTv n til take upot itself
oth e Coll . and managenent of
t4ra roe A.. to tahe probalit of
h giv ouninaion a i st Present; o
tot re)tf liihthat is iobeng
them, oo? There certainly is nothiUe.
more Wreign to thb principlei of our
Government in building and owniug a
railroad, than there is in-building one
and allowing some one elso to own it,
as is the cd with the Union and Cen
tral :Paifle roads, as well as the one
nm"`.uander 'consideration. For the
Goveoui tto build roads'is certainly
no wao c y than fbr her to stand
suety ant guarantee the bonds, and
become the mortgagee of some com
pa thAt rolpose building a road. In
the e Uhe Union Pacific there is
a possibl, at least, that the Gov
ernment will become the owner of the
road. Wei therefore, cannot see that
it would bie a great innovation, -and
ce.tainly' not a hurtful one, for her to
build, antibwn, and control the North.
ern Pacific railroad. By such a step
the people would be re-ass~lre, and
settlemeiitsalong its line would rapidly
be made. Emigrants would . ave re
liance in the good faith of the Govern
ment and would .inot hesitate to settle
on the lands along its line, which they
dare not now touch. By such a meas
ure there would be thrown open to set
tlement the whole of the magnificent
land grant now held by the company,
sufficient in itself to constitute an em
pire, and hundreds of .thousands of
settlers would find homes where they
do not now dare to settle.
If the great change that is now look
ed forward to, is to be made in relaiion
to the railroads throughout the United
States, the Northern Pacific railroad
is certainly a suitable one upon which
to make the experiment, and inaugu
rate the reform. No work of the kind
than its construction.
Government does take the matter in
hand, its construction must be delayed
for years, if not forever.
IN the report-until recently sup
pressed-lnade by the Commissioners,
sent out soue two years ago by Ger
man bankers for the purpose of in
specting the country along the route
of the Northern Pacific railroad, it ap
pears these experts did not report fa
vorably as to Mr. Cooke's financial
policy for constructing the road; but
in other respects very favorably, as the
following extract from the report of
Herr Hans, a Government Director in
Prussian railways, will show:
"I must first of all, contradict an
opinion which has been widely circu
lated, representing the regions tray
ersed by the Northern Pacific railway,
as unfavorable to civilization, agrcicul
ture and industry. The experience I
have acquired by personal inspection,
as well as the most trustworthy infor
mation from official sources, I have ev.
erywhere gathered on the spot, has
convinced me that the region through
which the Northern Pacific railway
passes is one of the most fertile on the
American continent, and is in every
respect suitable for colonization. Min
nesota and Dakota belong to the grain
growin'g regioui; Montana and Idaho
are rich in minerals and pastures, and
Oregon and Washington Territory be
long to the region of minerals, furs,
timbner and agriculture."
He also estimates the value of the
land grant. of 50,000,000 acres at the
rate at which the Illinoia Central sold
its land at $550,000,000; at the rate at
which Minnesotadisposed of her school
land $350,000,000; at the rateat which
the Kansas Pacific realized it would
amount to $165,000,000; and at the
minimum government price $2 50 per
acre, the land grant of the Company
is worth $125,000,000.
THE Salt Lake Herald says that
there resides in that city a lady, just
25 years old, who is about to marry her
fifth husband, the other four being
stitl alive. The first one is an Ameri
can, living in Washington, D. C.; No.
2 is an Italian living in Chicago, IlL;
No. 3 is a native of Switzeuland, living
in Baltimore Md; Nd.; 4 a German re
sidiiig in Utaih and the intended No.
5 a natve of Pola d.
oply p
all in e r mi. zthe tci .. 1 .ohf: hyi.

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