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Bozeman avant courier. [volume] (Bozeman, Mont.) 1872-1882, October 31, 1873, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038123/1873-10-31/ed-1/seq-4/

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lmes 4Tar* s a__ lusts..
SFrm the Gcuage tribune.
S-.otOst every week in the year heavy
itda of buffalo hides may seen pass
Ing through the streets of Chicago,
a p. z ipped hence for all points East
and .for Europe. Few people know
whence they come, whither they go,
or for what uses they are destined; yet
they form a not inconsiderable item of
the infant commerce of the great plains
of the West.
It is estimated that some 200,000
buffalo were shot last year (up to the
end of the year). For some years pre
viounsly the supply of skins had beeh
small, very littie more, in fact, than
those of animals slaughtered by In
dians and white hunters for subsist
ence. The price was, tlorefore,'re
munerative, ranging from $4 ~to for
a cow skin, and $6 to $7 ~ab
skin. Many reasens contib ut& to
an increased supply. Hunters found
it profitable to kill the ,animals as a
means of livelihood at these prices;
the herds, confined by railroads to a
comparatively small ranging ground,
became easier of access, a.d the-de
mand was at all times greater than the1
supply. Hence buf.alo-hunting ;
came a pursuit of considerable valub,
and hunters formed sp~ties, or limited
companies, and we`a forth in regular
hunting expeditious of .~ua h greater
mognitude thanh ~ been con
ceued before. Thik a,-nesa became
the theme of the newttins that e
gan to dot and fringe the plai.s, mgre
hunters joined in.the enirprise, and
the work of slaughte ri iftoblfor
the sake of their skins became an es
tablished business. The fladers are
familiar with the plaint that came
from the plains over the wires last
spring of the frightful destruction that
had been accomplished, and the de
mand that was .-made on Congress to
pass alaw prohibiting the killing of
buffaloes, except at stated seasons and
" under regulations. The fact that more
than two hundred thousand animals
were sacrificed in less than twelve
mnonths,,for so small a sum of money
as their skins produced, created no
little excitement and indignation in the
cities of the plains, and in the hide
markets of this country and Europe
it necessarily led to the cheapening of
the article; and at present the hide
that the hunter could have obtained
$5 for a year ago, he would be glad to
sell at $1 50. The markets everywhere
are glutted, and it will be some months,
at least until the faIl, before the stocks
on hand are worked off.
Several European Governments,
taking advantage of the low price of
these skins, are manufacturing them
into knapsacks for soldiers. They are
largely used in the French and Belgian
armies, and army contractors every
where are large buyers for the purpose,
of making them up into all kinds of
regimental material, such as straps,
cords, harness, &c. They are used, in
this country, principally for making a
cheap sort of boot, and for horse col
lars; but their introduction in connec
tion with machinery and general work
shops is only a matter of time. The
tanned skin is said to turn out but in
ferior leather, in consequence of its
porous character; but dealers who pro
fess to know "say that the fault is not
with the hide, but 'with the hunters
and tanners. The hunters sometimes
kill the buffalo at a Season when his
hide is almost valueless for manufact
uring purposes, and make no attempt
at preparing, or even preserving it.
AlA that is done, as a general rule, is
to wash and dry the blood-wet skin,
and in that state it is brought to the
nearest railroad station and shipped
off by the agents to Chicago and else
where. The tanners, as a rule, have
never experimented on buffalo hides,
and they follow the same treatment as
for the bidse of the farm bull and cow.
There is no doubt whatever that buffa
lo skins can be used for almost all pur
poses to which dressed leather is ap
plied, and that improvements can and
will be made in their preparation that
must lead to their becoming a valuable
article of commerce.
Most of the skins shipped to Chica
go are consigned to WolfT. & Epstein,
Kinzie street, acid by themi forwarded
to their enustomers East and in Europe,
They come chiefly from Sargent, a sta
tion on the .Kansas Paocife Railroad.
The balance df the hides are priici.
pally h ndled a Leaveuworth,Ksanas,
and are sent thence by local dealers to
the different markets. The ordinary
weight of a dried cowskin is from eigh
teen to twenty pounds, and of a dried
bullskin forty to ffty pounds. Of
course the price vat$e b tit averages
two dollars and Offty cents for a bull
skin, -delivered in Ohio Aftern
costs of shipment and transport, com
mission, a4 all ef .Pbiah iag
have been taken out, the banter ay
a~a the sh ev of thApp4:
bmy i 'pS e been f re
an chtasepto
long mtie; and a ts wpi.
the sinuoan la d, bdnAgiu r t ..
star to t earmI th t e heaidt f th
wild career. Cbayhetakesmaerr.
an Wtiai thia bld odl soklaodi
rai: lodgetsb laead4i of
death in the brain of lte lassoed brte.
Leaping ightly from his steed, the
hunter thoen advances canutiously, with
knife in hand, ard the bie.n~s ahert
has scarcely ceased to beat ere the
lnuscious tuak t pe ig coal.
And so h air so on, until
maining h beelt h 6i& a
tree or buried, to be come >*r at an
other time, and the ani aldtdy flayed
and the skin 01a o dry in the sn.d
Fodir °ia gil b og
ifond of rmwae, iTyho had theoli d
out all c itx
reality is someticks n raethae gri af
fair,+ The bison run in herds of from
two to four thousand headi and when
they are alarmed theyscaper oft and
when they scamperi off, God help the
hunter or score af hunters who are
luckless enough toatand in their way.
-A hundred hunters would tbe w ep o
the earth into atomi th , i ertainly as
though they we to.appose with their
bodiesa moco-inoe engine. The bold
huntersno not chase the bounding
bison inthway. They have learned
wisdom and tricks since they shot bi
son for the, Easteri markets. They
adopt all kinds of strategems, the
most successful of which is the dig
ging of little pits, or hiding in natural
holes, where the buffalo are pretty
sure to pass. Here they wait many
weary hours before the herd takes up
such a position that they can be safely
scared from the rear with the certainty
of advancing in the direction of the
hunters. Once seared, they will come
tearing on like the wind, and the hun
ter can pop at them in front out of the
pits, while those in the rear pop at
them behind and on the sides from
their saddles. A bison will always
jump a hole, but if he turns and means
fight, most hunters prefer not to abide
the issue. It is a risky business, and
only fit for Indians and whites of the
most unsettled habits.
RETRIBtTTION.-There is an old lady
living in the city of Louisville who, in
1825, succeeded in gaining the affec
tioaasof a ma d;mana,. who got a di
vorce from his wife and married the
lady above referred to. By his divorced
wife he bad one son, who is now living
in Cincinnati, and is wealthy. By. the
preferred lady he had seven boys. The
father died sometime ago, and the first
son by his second marriage was
drowned at sea, being a sea Captain;
the second son was drowned in the Ohio
river opposite this city; the third son
was hung as a deserter fromg the Uni
ted States arms; the fourth was shot
in Louisville while settling up some
business with his partner;. : the. fifth
was struck by lightning; the sixth had
his neck broken by a runaway horse,
and the last died anatural death after'
barely having escaped the penitentiaay
for stealing.
COMING OF THE IRo$.--The brig
Orient, loaded with iron for the North
ern Pacific railroad, was towed up the
Columbia by the Emma Hayward on
Monday. By a gentleman, who came
from Kalama yesterday, we getiinfoi
mation of the arrival in the river of a
second vessel similarly freighted. The
Idaho's cargo is lying at Kalama, and
the brig Perpetna and barkentine Me
lanethon and Webfoot are-looked for
daily, all bringing iron. With these
vessels in,- there will be suflicient- ron
to complete the road into Tacoma, and
track-laying will be resumed at once.
--[Tacoma Tribune.
THE pluck of the Graphic managers
cannot fail to win the admiration even
from their enemies. They are con
structing a large silk balloon, and if it
fails, they say they will build another,
and continue fitting out balloons until
they succeed in sen ing one across the
Atlantic.
" M. SI~xPns, we have not enough
chairs for our company," aid a gay
wife to her frugal husband. "Plenty
of chairs, dear, but too pmuch com
pany," replied Mr. Simpkins, with a
A wmow said to her daughter:
"When you are of my age, it .will be
time to dream of a husbanud. "yes,
mampsreppUed the thog a girl,
"of aesecopdne? The mother te.
ab j~g~
on the floor, fiP~t te di~ s ti -
adtor, oee to to nwho e shee
ing t apn, anei threw the sees
a iewooe bwere , t nrnaldn ta
therd pistol ian toto t. e
S n wand
bwhdiertm wh hib t o. po
tins of hardy-gu rd bl
igtys, but I never r l9
tld hielp going0o u the fmemdsaw
orslc at a sanon-e twith orboote a
dac wheamver s' tw headl.
h :satd matl1, sort of a half
Sloxin ip and half miner, who had a
o bhi bilose to town, and who seemed
to take a 4pecial, interest in these bat
dtie. e.Ie was known as "Long Dan,
atwas carried a pistol,and tooksa pride
in getting into trouble. A gambler,
called from his grand look and mpanner,
"The Prince," warned him that he
would die, with his boots on. "Now,
see if you don't, if you keep on sling
ing your sizx-shooter rotmd loose in
this way; you will go up the flume as
slick as a salmon-die with your boots
on before you knowl it." Dan blandly
stniled as he tapped his ivory pistol
butt and said: "Bet you the cigars I
don't. Whenever my man comes to
the cent&rT'll call him, see if I don't;
and get away with it, too." Soon af
ter this conversation, pistolshots were
heard at the howlin' Wilderness, and
Prince rushing thither learned it was
"Long Dan." As a friend and ielgh
bor of the wounded man, room was
made for him at the monte-table, and
Dan whispered to him a request to
take off his boots. "The Prince" hast
ened to comply, and again Dan whis
pered to him, "Prince, Prince, old
boy, I've won the cigars! i've won
'em by the holy poker." And so he
died.
yVi8RAnl a znwI nts isE.
MEAcHAx has been. lecturing on
the Modoc war in San Francisco. He
is the man who killed Sconchin, who
was torn to pieces by a shell in the
lava beds, and was also last Friday
hung at Fort Klamath.
A. SPLENDID necktie on a wizened
throat only calls attention to the la-.
4entable loss of eharme for, which
:ewels cannot atone; and, as a rule, at/
public parties the ugliest women wear
the most diamonds.
niuat eourag iseiol and calm. The
bravest men have the least of brutal,
bullying . usoleuce, asd- in the very
timef'of danger are fomind most serene
and free.
" GINx's BABY" Jenkins has been
solaced for his late defeat in Dundee,
Scotland, with a piece "of plate and
£1,000 presented by admirers in the
town.:
BLONDE hair is worth more than its
weight in gold. The metal costs about
eighteen dollars an ounce, while the
hair sells for from twenty to thirty
dollars.
ýýfl77 unmran n€ WitTmivn 71M-0 (fl4 '
THa women of Wyoming are going
to nominate two women bfor the Legia
lature, and promise strong support to
.the party that ratifies the nomination.
A BUFFALO man hasi pia t of water
brought ~rom the Red sea, and he has
several times ontered to trade it for the
same quantity of old J tmaica.
PORxSMOU.rH, N. ' ,, produces an.
nually, in addition to the numerous
temperance orators, 120,000 barrels of
ale and 90,000 gallons of rum.
A TEX. woman has arrived at St.
Louis with one thousand head of cat
tie, helt own property, which she assis
ted in driving from Texas.
THE Governor of Vermont receives
a iemary of $1,000 per year, and the
honor of the office costs him $3,000
over and above.
YOU You want a new -shoe to ft aS
e asilyas an old one put on two pair of
stockings before your measure is taken.
(IE BAI~ R jBRAGG is cAivassing
the cities of Gergia as agent for a
patent wetole water-pipe.
WxA lid the wlie ha
s .. s taadieneive at Du
EAsh RU @LL hw ia 0" 1
' th ignatednan
ii"P
AND RO .-TO ARIVI;I
Every Depr~ ent
COMPLETE!
t. ý Y
Ev1r Brouht t·th"Mountain
AND N" TO RRITR
trlP DepartmentR~';:
EVERYTHING
NEEDED IN A
NEW COUNTRY
At Lower Prices than Ever Be
fere Offered in this Market.
DRY GOODS,
*ROCmIRIM,
CLOTWNIG,
IARDWARKE,
QUEN.SWAR8,
TINWARl.
BOOTS AND B1O0S,
RATS AND CAPS.
F'urnishing Good _
CARPETINGS,
Out fitting Goods
OF EVERT DESCRIPTION.
THE RANCHMAN
Will always Andl a fall upply of
FARMINC IMPLEMENTS.
THE MINER
Will at all times And evert desription of
RMININC TOOLS.
THE LADIES
Are mavIted t ol and eamlue our full lias of
LADfES=
DRESS
POTDS,
MINDOMTI
GOODS, Ec.. ETC
THE GENTLEMEN
Will Sad a couplt.w assortment "i
GENTLEJIEN'S WIEA,
OLOITW
Cras8tME1Us,
fA*4 the vry latest Utyl*f
Reeady-Mad. CIothing.
O~uutu7 roduce
TAKES ~ 4Ago,
Attb
ER I
STER WAO0K
Fo FAi. PLiANTATION AND FRlEIGT.
ALU80 SPR* t .0 DEMOCRAT WAGOIIL
Where we have no Agents
we will sell direct to parties
desiring them. Price and
des cpiptn furnishedon ap
plication. The Whitewater
costs a trifle more than ordi
nary wagons, but is the
cheapest in the long run.
SEMPLE, B1RGE&CO.
13 80UTH MAIN 8T., 8T. LOUI8.
Parties writing us, will
please mention in what pa
per they read our advertise
mnen as we w:sh to give
*e ·= where it is due.
c8Iar PATENT
POST HOLE AUGER.
wýoa~raso y
SEMPIE. R8BE A M,
13a a. Na ft, S LI "
HAY RAKE.
It disc e itself, and thus
aes lmos, the entire labor of
the operatr, Ite ian ivalua
Deu "iption wil be Sent to
staeln whtpawhowile plese
the advertee a o
Bemple, Birge & Co.,
18 80UTH MAIN ST., ST. LOUI&
WHEELER'S PATENT
THREHERs AND, CLEANERI
THMiiEOHER AND SEPARATORS,
RAILWAY POWERS,
Msma dbyw the W heder
. &M.icolk ,. New York.
For tsnvemeinoo and oh
Hnas of tdel_ to
Weatihan Td e k stIoos k kept
8EMPLE, BROE & C00.,
18 8OUTH MAIN 8TiEET, ST. LOUIS,
T ws.m e.e.m .dMne M. edgusme.
THE HO8SER DRILL.
Ks' TW
C - i za
T1 hOTEIL,
WrP roprip r,
;d .Improed!
hY t! C0UIttt
s snow turning out the finest Printing ever den. ia the Territory and a Ioewer rates,.
Ob:.;e .osters
land every descriptnes of
-fancy ord.
3007T &ES 1701.
HI GBIISTOIN, BIKR C& C.,
' OULD annonne" to the peuople of Gallstin
county that they have just opened in lPerkins'
,Iw brick building, adjoining the CouRnrt oilee,
MAIN STREET, BOZEMAN, M. T.,
A full assortment of
OOTS & SHOES,
Consisting of
Ladie' millelnf's u CbthCIa's Wear.
the store at Bozeman is in charge of Mr. C. B.
VAUCE T£, an experienced workman, who wll
Manufacture Boots to Order, and Guarautee
a Perfect Fit.
Keep constantly on hands a fll Use of
GraIn ]EOOt1s,
for the Farmer and Miner.
Making this businesaa specialty, we are enabled to
Keep a Better Stock and Sej at Lower Pylees
thaa an Other Huce, in Bou:ea ..
MOUND CITY
[Formerly called Ie A Stew~a t'e]
190s. SI ami d1Northt 4th Stree.t,
ST. LOUIS. MISSOURI.
2 O.S. 4.. ICA, FreeGd, I.
Full Cotmmmreacil Cerue, S..e.
[email protected]
BOOK-KEEPING,
COW. ARITHMETIC,
PENMANSHIP,
. ... COR ES TLIS) GRAMMAR,
BUS. CORR
REP'ARAT6 ERCIAL LAW,
- thorough Book-keeper.
Quick an accurate in Figures.
An Elegant and Rapid Peama.
An Fluent bpeaker and Writer.
Conversant with the Laws of Business.
Posted in Commerce. Trade and Finamee,
and in general a thoroUgh, wide-awake business
man.
Every farmer and merchant should it his soa hr
successful life by sending him for a few months to
our instItution.
We have tuequalled heilllties for imparting a
thorough.busiese edueation. Our teachers are all
experiencpd aco Wpqisats. Webaves Oorsee of lee-'
ltares on busine,; aias an t nics z:I ed in
the United States. We f
introducing our students lpto'ctiu business oper
ations in St. Lohis. Stnets cnn be piaced ifthe
family of ons ef ik ftus sing under hs I
Youg Ae e. Ipoyimk.t
We have pe·rteteede aewng e .ts by manus of
comtract, to thoN.a nihing the Seourltat la1sily
I
a "- a ...
PIBETH & KERUG,
BOZEMAN, MONTANA.
Keep constantly on hand a boantif.l supply of
LAGER BEER
For Bale in
Quantities to suit Purchasers.
THE TRADE SUPPLIED
on reas.aable ter.s.
vi e would especially call the attention of famiih.
and others to the unrivalled lacilities at out
GRIST MILL,
For furnishing all kinds of
MA.SH, etc.,
At Prices to Suit the Times.
SPIETIi & EKUO.
-#9455000
iLN C ASH .GI"T$,
.To be diJ tribated by tse
Iercaitile Prize Associ a t on
OF NEW YORK,
Daily Drawings!!
A PRIZ1 FOR1 EVUR TIOKIT.
I Cash Gift $100,0(0 75 Cash Gifts ea. $1,00C
SCash Giftere. 50,0(01 0 " ' , , .0o
10 " ' 56,000 00 100 oo
'" " +" 5,000 1560 " " " 100
) Gold Wa4 es.......................... 1 7E5o 300
27a Sewing Machnes....... ............ 60 to 150
75 Elegant Pisaos .............. ea. 50 to 700
80 " Melodeons ............. " 5010 200
Cash Gifts, Sliver Ware, etc. valued at I1,500,000
A chance to draw any of he above primes for X
cents. Tiekets describlng prizes are SUALbD in en
0eiopes and .ell mixed. On) e eeptof 1 ecnts a
assr1,Z ri.x> r is drawn without $olce and sent
by 4mall to any address. Tbh prize namem d upon it
will be delivered to the ticket holder on paymenl of
sa l..tLAa Priesare Immedllatlly nt to san
adtdress by express or return ial l.
You Wll knowwhat youear prize is before you pay
for It. Any prie exchangaed bfor another of the
same value No blanks. Our patrons can depend
on fair dealing.
OruSaons in TS. Pa..s:-J'air dealing can be re
lied ou.-0. Y. I.arld, Aug ..o A genuneUdistrl
bution.-World, Sept. 9. Nat one of the day.
Wrrrek 2Wbune, July 7. They rive general satitS
Non.-,pUmscs;-..y kind permission w refer to
the ollowing :-Franklln 8. Lane, drew $13 000
e aT. isks, St. Paul, Plans, $700. Samuel V.
Raymond, Boston, 55.500. Euene P, Braokett,
mtteburg Watch, e300. Miss ale Ops od Now
0ei60, S.,000. Emery L. Pratt. Com u, Ohio,
Oitn a CAS Girr In every package of 150 tickets
_gusrsntee; tlckets for-i 00; 1. foro5 00; 25 for
l 30 ror *5 00; i 10 for I15 uD).
. . s ra. ted, to whom we oS lhbetal indae
m•enanu gtnrstee satisfaletio.
-anL - ,', A. J. JACKSON 1 Co,
No, • 3Na4sans Street, New York.
lee M.agee. E i a.as.,
MlU EE & Co.,
WHOLESgA.
..BAiR LAss WARE,

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