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The new North-west. (Deer Lodge, Mont.) 1869-1897, July 27, 1888, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038125/1888-07-27/ed-1/seq-4/

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FOR CHOLERIC PEOPLE.
A CHAPTER ON THE ADVANTAGES
OF SERENITY.
Uncontrolled Passion Opposed to Lon
gevity of LIfe-Health of Mind and Body
Co-Dependent - Facts for the Hot
Blooded to Ponder Over.
Regarding the matter merely from the
hygienicutandpoint,.effort can be expanded
for the obtainment of few more valuablepos
seselons than a calm and even temperament.
Such a temperament does not rush to ex
tremes; It is not swept by whirlwinds of
feeling; ender almost any circumstances it
secures content. Few things can present a
more insurmountable barrier, not only to
mental ills, but even to physical ailment.
and infirmitlese or yield a better grounded
hope of longevity.
Sir Isaac Newton, for instance, led the
placid and uneventful if toilsome existence
of a student and brain worker. The serenity
of his days seems only to have been
disturbed by the controversy with Leib
nits regarding the invention of the fluxional
methods, and the quarrel with Flamateed,
the astronomer royal How great his equa
nimity was-in other words, how thoroughly
reason was the controlling element in his
composition, to the subjection of the pas.
slons-appears in the well known story with
regard to his dog Diamond. And what was
the result? His health was vigorous and re
mained unimpaired to within a few.years of
his death. He lost but one tooth in all his
life. He never wore glasses. He never grew
bald, and he lived to the ripe old age of 85
years John Milton, again, lived in troubled
times, in which he bore his full part. He
was given, too, to polemical writing, which
is apt to excite warm feeling. Yet in his
personal habits he was austere and grave,
holding himself sternly aloof from the prof
ligate rabble around him, and inflexibly
steadfast amidst domestic infelicity, obloquy
and misfortune. He could scarcely be called
a hot blooded man, and, after a life whose
sole physical affliction was the loss of his
eyesight, he died at the age of 60.
orase NOTABLE INSTANCES.
Contrast with his the brief career of another
famous English poet, Lord Byron. Torn as
he was by every passion, and the victim of
that most wearing emotion, chronic hate, a
spirit that furnished the arena in quick auc
cession for the most intense and extreme re
vulsions of feeling allowed its possessor an
earthly existence of but thirty-six short
years. Our own calm Emerson, than whom,
probably, no] man that ever lived was less
te prey of gusts of feeling, reached the age
of 7%. Edgar Poe, who was a sort of emo
tional shuttlecock, was miserable all his life,
and died at 40. Edmund Kean, not only in
his professional capacity, was an actor-and
an actor is frequently obliged to feign the
most vehement passions, which is commonly
supposed to be the next worst thing to
actually feeling them-but in his private life
was a man of most erratic and fiery temper
ament Keean himself was a stage for the
drama of the passions, and the consequence
was he was frequently ill, and survived but
a few years beyond 40.
Passion has been not Inaptly defined as any
emotion of the soul which affects the body
and is affected by It Such is the sympathy
existing betweep the mind and the body, the
moral feelings exercise a potent influence on
the physical organs, while the latter in turn
affect the former. The effect of mental
emotions is manifested in the vital functions,
and certain states of these functions serve in
a like manner to awaken the different pas.
slons. The passions founded on pleasure
seem to act as a universal stimulant to all
vital action. Circulation is quickened, the
blood distends the vessels of its system, the
face urightens, the skin assumes a ruddy
tint, the muscles grow stronger and Invite
activity. The whole body is reanimated-in
short, every function responds to the vitaliz
ing Influence of the happy moral, condition.
As Haller says: "Love, hope and joy promote
perspiration, quicken the pulse, promote cir
culation, increase the appetite and facilitate
the cure of diseases." While joyand idndred
emotions thus contribute to health by induc
ing a more active performance of all the
vital functions, as with all other stimulants,
the pleasurable feelings become painful if
the bounds of moderation are exceeded.
On the nervous system the effect of the
painful emotions is manifested by depression,
derangement and, possibly, destruction of
the vital energies. The same agencies influ
ence the various secretions by increasing,
diminishing or vitigting them. When the
mind is severely and unpleasantly agitated,
dryness of the mouth testifies to the suppres
sion of the salivary secretion. This is proved
"by the well known test, often resorted to in
India for the discovery of a thief among the
servants of a family, that of compelling nill
the parties to hold a certain quantity of rice
in the month during a few minutes, the of.
fender being generally distinguished by the
PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTa.
Under the influence of disturbing passions
certain secretions become corrupted and
even acquire poisonous properties It is a
known fact that the bite of an animal goaded
to desperation heals less rapidly, and is at
tended with greater inflammation than one
administered when the system is uninfluenced
by the excited passion. Great mental dis
turbance in the mother diminishes or vitiates
the secretion of her milk, and it becomes
hurtful to the nursing child. The contrast
between the physiological effects of the
pleasurable and painful emotions, and their
influence upon health, are obvious to all. In
the faces of the happy and confident is seen
the bright glow of natural vigor, while the
drawn, careworn and pallid features of the
sad and despondent testify to inward suffer
ing.
In habitual irritability or fretfulness of
temper, hatred, revenge, envy and jealously,
and, in fact, in all dispositions of the mind
characterized by bitter feelings toward
others, a measure of anger is almost necessa
rily blended. The effect upon the bodily
health of the mind harassed by passions of
this nature is to propagate derangements and
infirmities The appetite lessens, digestion
is impaired, and then follow other functional
disorders. The nervous system suffers from
continued metal irritability, and hysteria,
headache, and other painful affections often
owe their origin to this prejudicial influence.
Physicians well know that when the system
Is laboring under disease a temper amiable
and tranquil under the little ills and crosses
of life encourages recovery, while one easily
inflamed by the base passions obstruct it.
While the malevolent feelings with which
anger is blended are the promptingsof an ill.
conditioned mind or uncontrolled temper
aroused by external influences they may be
excited by unhealthy states oi the organs,
and thus originate within the body. In cer
tain functional disturbances and diseased
condition,, the mind sometimes become dis
tab and the disposition peevish and irrit
able, Persons nat~arally amiable and patient
under outward annoyances will often me
anxious and fretful when attacked with
bodily infirmities. Disturbances of the
stomach liver or other important organs are
thus active in perverting reason, and in ren
dering the disposition suspicious, peevish and
morose.-Boston Herald.
Mise Cushman's "Meg Merrilies."
The late Miss Charlotte Cushman's Meg
Merrilics was another instance of perfect
"make up." This lady was frequently en
gaged the entire afternoon in preparing her
self for her evening triumph. She had avery
clever theory that, in order to appear old
upon the stage, the wisest thing was to care
fully study the lines indicated by nature on
one's face, which, she very rightlyremarked,
time would deepen only too soon. Anybody
older than 25 may see in a looking glass a
number of lines and wrinkles which will
deepen imperceptibly as time goes on. If
they frown or pretend to cry, these will be
emphasized at once. It is into these that the
darkening material should be introduced
with great skill and care if a realistic picture
of age is to be produced. Most actors paint
lines to indicate ago quite independently of
those which nature traces day by day in
every human countenance, and a double set
of wrinkles is frequently the unsatisfactory
result.-Saturday Review.
The Paper Usager in Japan.
-The Japanese, in making their wall paper,
hammer the sheets together along their mar
gins and thus join them, so that the paper
goes up on the wall as a solid piece. Layers
of paper pulp, as many as seven or eight,
are often beaten together in making em
bossed paper, the thickness of the relief work
depending on the number of layers. The
sheets before joining are about two by three
feet square. The strength of this wallpaper,
as well as the endurance of the colors with
which it is stained or lacquered, is remark
able.-Home Journal.
Maeh Worse Now.
Miss Travis-Oh, what dreadful tortures
they used to practiee in the Middle Agesi
Thinkof breaking a man on the wheell
Do Santh-No wore than nowadays; you
me out on my bicycle, did yeut-
WHY do I have this drowsy life
less feeling? WHY do I have i-ack
ache? WHY Neuralgia and Rheu
matism? WHY does Scrofulous
taiu-t and Erysipelas show itself?
BECAUME your blood is filled
with Poiso:s, which must be Come
pletely Eradicated before you can
regairn health. You must go to the
root of the matter. Put the Kidneys
-the great and only blood purifying
organs-in complete order, which is
complete health, and with
WARNER'S SAFE CURE
and WARNER'S SAFB PILLS your
Cure is Certain.
WHY do we know this?
BE CAUSE tens of thous
ands of grate- ful men and
women in all parts of the
woridhavevol- untarily writ
ten us to this * effect,
There Is no stand-still In dis
ease. You are either growing
Better or Worse. How Is it with
YOU?
WHY not to-day resort to that
medicine which has veritably Cured
Millions, and which will cure you if
you will give it a chance ?
All of Warner's preparations are
Purely Vegetable. They are made
on honor. They are time-tried.
They are No New Discovery, Un
tried and Worthless; on the con
trary, they have stood the test-they
have proved their superiority. They
stand alone in pre eniient merit, and
YOUl KNOW IT.
FOLKS WHO GET FULL
THE QUEER ANTICS OF VARIOUS PER
SONS WHEN FUDDLED.
Comical Items Picked Up by a Chicago
Reporter-Peceliar Delusions of the In
ebriate-Xerry Old Chaps-Seeing the
Elephant-A Scare.
There is sometimes a sort of picturesque.
ness about the peculiar delusions of an ine
briate which reaches beyond the mere dis
gusting and bordeth upon the realms of the
pathetically grotesque, and while we cannot
but regret the weakness of the individuals
we are forced to smile at his idiosyncrasies.
One of these peculiar cases occurred the other
evening at one of the prominent hotels in the
city. The hour was late and the majority of
the sedate and well regulated guests had re
tired. Suddenly the front doors were thrown
open with a bang, and through the aperture
emerged a young gentleman who but a few
hours before had departed in all the glory of
spruce clothes and fine linen. Now his hat
was on the back of his head, his clothing was
disordered, and there was a drunken leer
upon his handsome face. As he staggered to
ward the desk it was noticed that he was
dragging behind him one of those dressed
models which the clothiers ofthe present day
exhibit in the front of their stores. Ap
proaching the clerk with an unsteady gait,
the intoxicated individual called out:
"I shay, hic, ole boy, can't yer take, hic,
care of Harryl He's shoo drunk to shtand.
He wantsh to go to bed."
The clerk obligingly took care of the
"mummy" which the inebriate fondly im
agined to be his friend, and promised to see
him safely to bed, after which the young
gentleman consigned himself to the care of
two stalwart porters who conducted him to
his room.
LIBERAL OLD FELLOWS.
Another of the picturesque drunkards is
the liberal old bachelor who, when he is in
clined to be merry, insists that all his friends
shall join with him in the worship of the
rosy god Bacchus. His importunities become
wearisome, but he is not in the least non
plussed, and when friends fail to respond to
his call he seeks the companionship of the
general loungers about the bar.
One of these generous individuals was seen
the other evening on Clark street. The hour
was late, and the jolly old gentleman was
seated on the sidewalk with a demijohn un
der his arm and a well fluled glass in his right
hand. He was jolly and generous, and
wanted the whole world to enjoy his liquid
hospitality.
"Come, boys," he cried, "let's all take a
drink. Whisky's as free as water, and since
the flood water tastes too much of drowned
sinners. Who wants wateri Lot's all take a
drink."
He was only brought to a realizing sense of
his condition when two guardians of the law
took charge of him and escorted him to his
hovel, after appropriating the demijohn for
sheir own uses.
The other evening the police discovered a
well preserved and well dressed middle aged
individual calmly sleeping in a mortar bed
which stood in front of a half completed
building. The somnolent gentleman had
taken off his hat, but without taking the
trouble to further disrobe had quietly settled
himself for a snooze. Considerable effort
was needed to arouse him, and when he
finally gained his consciousness he looked
helplessly around him and murmured:
"Purty good bed, but the feathers stick to
a fellow's clothes."
SEEING THE ULEPHAXT.
There is a young gentleman in the city
whose fancies, while under the influence of
liquor, are most peculiar. He is an ardent
lover of animals and his pets comprise al
most the entire animal kingdom. He seldom
goes to excess in drinking, but when he does
there is no limit to his bibulations. When in
the last stages his younger days invariably
return to him, and he imagines himself the
small boy at the circus. The elephant ap
pears to be his chief source of delight, and
instead of snakes, and scorpions, and crawl
ing things, his dreams are peopled with the
sportive elephant, and he babbles on as
happy as a child with its first bag of peanuts
beneath the canvas of the peripatetic
menagerie.
Then there is the picturesquely rapid young
man. Bustling and active while sober, his
ruling passion while under the influence of
liquor is to keep things moving. A case of
this kind occurred a few evenings ago when
one of these rapidly inclined inebriates en
tered a railroad depot to wait for a train and
carry him to his suburban home. Be
coming tired of the monotony of the sit
uation, he wandered down the track, and
finding a puffing engine without its usual
occupation of engineer and fireman, he reck
lessly stepped aboard and pulled the throttle
wide open. In an instant the engine began
to move and the rapid young man, in
thorough affright, leaped from the cab, sus
taining serious injuries. The wild engine
sped upon its way, and had it not been for
the coolness and foresight of a switchman
a terrible disaster mnght have occurred. As
it was, the rapid young man was arrested
for his freak, and now in a dungeon cell as
asserts that John Barleycorn and he are
sworn enemies.
"Drunkenness may be picturesque," said
one old stager,"butas for me, I'll take mine in
some other shape. When it comes to ringing
your own door bell and asking your wife to
come down and pick you out of a crowd who
don't know their own names, then its time
to quit, and I don't want any more pictur
esque in mine."
Altogether it may safely be argued that
the safest, pleasantest and easiest way of en
joying life is to discreetly avoid the pictur
esque, the unique or the decidedly unusual
drunk.-Chicago Herald.
Victor Hugo's Artistic Ability.
It is said that if Victor Hugo had devoted
himself to pictorial art he would perhaps
have eclipsed every one past and present who
made black and white a specialty. Ho was
never at a loss for material-a soft quill pen,
with sometimes a hard one to finish up, and
ordinary writing inks washed in with the
feathery end of the pen, with any paper that
he found at hand, were often what he worked
with.. His ink drawings were frequently
finished up with coffee grounds.-New York
Evening World.
"George treated me very coldly last night,
mother," said Ethel, waving her fan at a
vagrant fly.
"Why, Ethel, I'm sarry to hear that. In
what way was his treatment cold i"
"Ice cream."-Harper's Bazar.
There are Two Distinguishing
Characteristics
Which, more than anything else, have contributed to the phenomenal growth of The Chicago.
Daily News, giving it a circulation larger than that of all other Chicago dailies combined. It
seems strange that the first practical, combined application of two such common sense principles in
journalism should have been left to a paper as yet only twelve years old. And yet true it is that in this
)tct lies the real secret of the unparalleled success of The Chicago Daily News. Briefly stated
these principles are:
First. THE DAILY NEWS Second. THE DAILY NEWS
Is a daily paper for busy people. Is an Independent, truth-telling newspaper.
Of all mankind the people of Chicago and the busy north- The reader can count on one hand the known newspapers
west are the busiest. And yet perhaps no equal number of pco- whose statements in matters of politics can always be accepted
ple are to be found who appreciate so keenly the necessity of an as at least intentionally truthful, and commonly so in fact.
intelligent knowledge of the world's daily doings. They recog- On the other hand, it is the all-but-universal rule to praise
nize that they, more than anyone else, are the world's providers one's party and candidate to the skies, and to cry down the
in many of the most important necessaries of life. How ins- opposition party and its candidateto the verge of the disreputabic.
portant, then, that they should have their daily intelligence of So common have such silly and reprehensible methods in jour
every event, the world over, which by any possibility can affect nalism become that they pass unnoticed, and are accepted as a
their diversified commercial holdings. And in all the higher matter of course-as an evil inseparable from practical politics.
interests of life where can be found a like number of people But this is only another mistake of the thoughtless. The Ameri
more keenly appreciative of all that contributes to progress in can people are intelligent enough, thoughtful enough, fair enough
art, literature, science, religion, politics, and the thousand and to appreciate and endorse honest, truth-telling journalism-in
one things which make up modern civilization. truth to prefer it to the misleadingthe truth-discoloring dishonesty
And yet, strange to say, right here in this great, busy north- of the"organ.'
.:st, in its busy metropolis Chicago, there has taken place the The demand is more and more for the fair, impartial, indc
creation and development of that most cumbrous, unserviceable, pendent newspaper which give the reader all the news, and gives
time-destroying thing, the "blanket-sheet" newspaper. With the it absolutely free from the taint of partisan bias. This done, an
blindness of very fatuity this monstrosity of journalism, this breeder expression of opinion, based upon facts, will commend itself to
of mental dyspepsia, has steadfastly imposed its mountain of un- the thoughtful reader even when he may not find himself in
threshed straw to thg demand of the people fnr the winnowed grabi agreemeut with the concluelona deduced from the premises.
of fact. It was out of the very incongruousness of such a condition Disagreements are of small moment if only confidence in honesty
of things that TiE DAILY Naws had its birth. People wanted the of purpose remains. With no mere political ambition to gratify,
News,-all the news-but they demanded it apart from the over- no "ax to grind," the impartial and independent newspaper may
powering mass of the trivial and inconsequential. It is because truly be "guide, philosopher and friend" to honest men holding
THE DAILY NEws satisfactorily meets that demand that its circula- every shade of political faith. And this is why THE DAILY
tion is over " a-million a-week." NEws has to-day a circulation of over "a-million-a-week."
R. M. LAWRENCE, Williamsville, Ill., says: "The 'big daily' is M. WYGANT, Sibley, Iowa, writes: "I am well pleased with
too much for me. Not that a person is obliged to read every- THE DAILY NEws, although I am a ' bred-in-the-bone' Re.
thing printed in the ' blanket-sheets,' but one having anything publican with a carpet bag experience in the South ending in
else to do doesn't have time to hunt through the long-drawn 1872. The extreme fairness of THE DAILY NEWS, giving
twaddle for a few grains of digestible food." credit where due regardless of party, meets my approval."
When to two such comprehensive elements of popularity THE DAILY NEWS
now adds a third in its unparalleled price reduction to One Cent a day, it offers a combination of
attractions at once unique and unapproachable by any other American newspaper, and one which
will surely multiply its friends throughout the Northwest by the thousands.
The Chicago Daily News is for sale by all newsdealers at One Cent per copy, or will be
mailed, postage paid, for $3.oo per year, or 25 cents per month. The farmer and mechanic can now
afford as well as the merchant and professional man to have his metropolitan daily.
Address VICTOR F..LAWSON, Publisher The Daily News, Chicago.
ALBERT KLEINSCHMIDT, President,
ADDISON SMITH. Vice Pres't,
JOHN F. STRAUHAL, General Manager.
C. S. SCHROEDER, Ass't Gen'I Manager.
P. BADER, Sec'y and Treea'r.
ý.BZ CIE NT CO., Limte,
Bacesson to A, Klensclnidt& Co.
DEALERS IN
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING,
OARPE.TS
Ballel6lil'S Frinishlill8000s,
NOTIONS,
BOOTS SHOES,
Hats and Caps,
GROCERIES AND CIGARS.
A SPECIALTY IS MADE OF KEEPING
First-class Coods Only.
p oseERio4j SuPERt
SCIEITISTS MARBLEOR
Havin recei GRANITEh
L
(CilCAG ILliS.
Having received from the
AMERICAN WHITE BRONZE CO.,
OF CHICAGO, ILLS.,
The Agency of the above, I am prepared to furnish
GRAVE YARD MONUMENTS of this material at
the lowest prices, and in any design they manufaci are.
Price Includes Freight and Placing
Monument in Position.
It is one of the most enduring and beautiful mate
rials known to science, and will give entire satisfac
tion. All work warranted as represented.
A full line of designs and samples of materials are
in my hands. For particulars, call on or address
JEFF VAN CUNDY,
993 if DEER LODGE, MONTANA.
Notice of Election.
Dana Lonm, MONTANA, July 16, 1883.
NOTICE Is hereby given that under the provisions
of Section 318, Chapter 22, Fifth Division Gen
eral Laws of Montana, as amended by Section 4 of an
act passed at the extraordinary session of the Fit
teenth Legislative Assembly of Montana, entitled
"An act to amend an act relative to the formation of
municipal corporations," approved September 14,
1887, the first election for officera of the "Town of
Deer Lodge" will be held at the Engine House of the
Deer Lodge Fire Company, situate within the limits
of said corporation, on TUESDAY, AUGUST 21,
A. D. 1888, between the hours of 8 o'clock a. m. and
6 o'clock p. m.
At each election all electors qualified by the general
election lays of the Territory, and who shall have re
sided within the said corporate limits three [1]
months next ing the day of said election, shall
he qualified electors.
The said election shall be conducted in the manner
required by law for the election of county of1cers.
The officers to be elected are as follows : One
Mayor and six Aldermen.
The judges of said election are Peter Valitan, H.
S. Stackpole and Charles Roulean.
The Clerks of said election are O. B. O'Bannon and
W. F. Shanley.
By order of the Board of Commissioners of the
county of Deer Lodge, Montana Territory.
MORGAN BVANS, hairman.
Attest WE. M. Tuoxreox, Clerk. 993 St
3. R. ANDRUS,
lou0se sld 8ill NaitistI ,
Main St., Deer Lodge, M. T.
Fit-class Calsounmi ani ¶ tint Done.
line Pair Hanging and Decorating a ISeialty
SW"Leave Orders at Deer Lodge Drug Co's Store, or
at Shop, junt opposite. 974 if
Dissolution Notice.
Notice is hereby given that the partner
ship heretofore existing between the under
signed under the firm name of Frint & Perry
at Garrison, Montana, is this day dissolved
by mutual consent. The late partnerjhip
business will be conducted by D. C. Print,
who is hereby authorized to collect all ac
counts and will pay all debts of said firm.
D. C. FtINT.
C. A. PERRY.
GARRISON, M. T., July 2,1888. 941 4tpd
FOR SALE.
Will be sold at auction, on the 18th day of July,
1888, nine Mares and Colts, six Mares broke to work
double, two Mares Pembertoe stock; two Allers half
Clyde and Norman, and two saddle horses. The bal. I
saes are AlIles and rolts. Auetion to be held at cer- I
ral next to Engine House. Deer Lodge.
PETER DREzOURDI.
Deer Lodge, Jane 8, 1888. E88 51 pd.
HIGHT & FAIRFIELD
JEWELiRS, - fll!!, KONTANA,
SELL HOWARD, WALTHAM, ELGIN AND
ROCKFORD WATCHES.
Mr"SPECIAL AGENTS FOR THE ROCKFORD.
Carry the Largest Variety of Attractive Gold
Watch Cases in Montana, Deal Extensively
in Diamonds, Gold Jewelry, Sterling Sil
ver, Standard Makes of Plated Wa e,
Fine Cutlery, Musical Merchan
dise, Clocks, &c., &c.
PAY SPECIAL ATTENTION TO WATCH
AND JEWELRY REPAIRING,
Diamond Setting and Matching odd Pieces of Jewelry
Do all Kinds of Engraving-Plain, Fancy and
Monograms. Full Market Value Allowed for
old Watches. Old Gold and Silver in
Exchange for New Goods.
Author sed Watch Repairers of the U P. R'y.
IW atches or Jewelry sent us for repairs by reg
istered mall or express will receive prompt attention
and be returned as directed. Estimates given on
work if desired. Any inquiries answered by return
mail. 977 3m
NEW GOODS! NEW GOODS0 !
P. LANSING'S.I
I have just received a complete line of the best
CALIFORNIA CLOTHING
Direct from M nulacturers.
Men's Worsted Suits and Cassimere Suits.
Youths' Woasted Suits and Cassimere Suits.
Children's Worsted, Cassimere and Corduroy
Suits.
Men's Berlin Office and Cardigan Jackets.
Men's Fall and Winter Overcoats In Latest
Styles and Colors.
Blanket-lined Suits and Overcoats, and a
large assortment of
Caifornia Fluanl Unlesvear al Onerbirti.
A FULL LINE OF
Swiss Condee Celebrated Medicated Under
wear.
White and Scarlet Lamb's Wool Underwear.
Heavy Wool Socks, Merino Socks, and Fine
Camel Hair Socks.
A large line of Blankets and Fine Quilts, and
the best French Calf and Kip
Hand-made Boot Shoe
IN TOWN,
Of which I will warrant EVERY PAIR. So if anything
does not give perfect Satisfaction, bring them back
and I will make it good. 1 also have a complete line
of MOHDELL'S
SOLAR TIP SCHOOL SHOES,
with or without beeT, and High-cat Boys' and Misses'
School Shoes, and an endless variety of Ladies'
French Kid, Pebble Goat and Calf Shoes, of the very
best makes. I have also a tall line of
John B. Stetson's Fine Hats
and Standard Makes of Hand-made Hats, warranted
in colors and quality. Also hive a large line of
CALIFORNIA BUCK AND GOAT GLOVES.
All of the above Goods are bong. direct from the
Manufacturers, are selected with great care for the
needs of my customers. And as I am doing all of my
own work, and thereby saving a large expense of
clerk hire, I am enabled to sell goods lower than any
one else. Call and see me when you need anything in
my line, and I will guarantee you sqaare dealing and
good treatment.
951 if PETER LANSING.
RIFLES AT COST.
Wm. Coleman is clos
ing out his stock of Sharp,
Winchester and Marlin
Rifles AT COST. Now
is the time for Sportsmen
to get a good, reliable
gun almost at their own
price. Call early and get
your choice of the lot.
394 tf.
NOTICE FOR FINAL .POOF.
U. 8. L&ND OFFICE, 1
Hrauia, Mont.. July 12, 1888. f
Notice Is hereby given that the following-named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof In support of his claim, and that said proof will
be made before the Probate Judge of Deer Lodge
county Montana, at Deer Lodge, Montana, on August
28, 1888, via a
JOHN O'NEILL,
Who made Pre-emption Declaratory Statement No.
424 0. . .16, for the NM SEM, NM SW3( Sec. 10,
Tp18N,8 11 W.
He names the following witnesses to prove his can
tinuons residence upon and cultivation of said land,
via:
Henry Helm, James O'Gara, Con Coughlin, Michael
Geary, all of .elmOille Mont.
999.fit S. W.' LANGHOIINB, Rlegister.
SUMMONS.
In the District Court of the Second Judicial District
of the Territory of Montana, in and for the county
of Deer Lodge.
A. P. Winslow, Plaintiff,
vs.
Lucy L. Winslow, Defendant.
The people of the Territory of Montana send
greeting to Lucy L. Winslow, the above named de
fendant.
You are hereby required to appear in an action
brought against you by the above named plaintiff, in
the District Court of the Second Judicial District of
the Territory of Montana, in and for the county of
Deer Lodge, and to answer thecomplaint filed therein
within ten days [exclusive of the day of service]
after the service on you of this summons, if served
in this county; but if served out of this county and
in this Distrct, twenty days; otherwise forty days;
or judgment by default will be taken agairst you,
according to the prayer of said complaint.
The sa'Id action is brought to dissolve the bonds
of matrimony existing between plaintiff and yourself,
and for such other and further relief as to the court
may seem just and equitable. This action is .based
on the alleged willful absenting yourself from plain
tiff, without reasonable cause, on or about July 16,
1887, and on or about July 16, 1887, wilfully deserting
and absenting yourself from plaintiff and departing
from the Territory of Montana without intention of
returning.
And you are hereby notified that, if you fail to ap
pear and answer said complaint, as above required,
the said plaintiff will take a default against you and
apply to the court for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
Given under my hand and Seal of the District Conit,
-'-- in and for the county of Deer Lodge, Terri.
SEAL. tory of Montana, this 1ith day of July,
--in the year of our Lord one thousand eight
hundred and eighty-eight.
F. E. CORBETT, Clerk.
993 4t BY W. NAPTON, Deputy Clerk.
Cole & Whitehill, Plaintiff's Attorneys.
MINING APPLICATION No, 2067.
U. S. LAND OFfICE,
HELENA, M. T., June 30, 1888.
Notice is hereby given that Lewis Davis, whose
postoffice address is Helena, Lewis and Clarke
county, Montana Terrtiory, and Edward Mason,
whose postofflce address is Avon, Deer Lodge
county, Montana Territory, have this day filed
their application for patent for 67.73 acres
of placer mining ground, situated in unorgan
ized Mining District, Deer Lodge county, Mon
tana Territory, and being upon surveyed land, is
described in legal sub-divisions as follows, to
wit:
Lot No. 2, the NEM of SEM of NEI, and the
S¢ of SE2 of NE3( of Section 23, Twp. 10 N.,
R. 8 W. The location of this mine is recorded
at Deer Lodge, in the County Recorder's office
of Deer Lodge county, M. T. The adjoining
claimants are-on the east. Lewis Davis et al,
placer claim: on the south, Adam Gerhauser et
al, placer claim, and on the west, E. W. Knight
et al, placer claim.
Any and all persons claiming adversely any
portion of said placer claim or surface ground,
are required to file their adverse claims with the
Register of the United States Land Office, at
Helena, M. T., during the sixty days' period
of publication hereof. or they will be barred by
virtue of the provisions of the Statute.
S. W. LANGHORNE, Register.
First publication, July 6, 1888. 991 6Od
Notice of Final Accounting and
Distribution.
In the Probate Court of the county of Deer Lodge
and Territory of Montana.
In the matter of the estate of Mary A. McMillan,
deceased.
Notice Is hereby given that D. J. McMillan, the ad
ministrator of the estate of Mary A. McMillan. de
ceased, has rendered and presented for final settle
ment, and filed in said Court his final account of his
administration of said estate and his petition for
distribution; and that Saturday, the 28th day of
July, A. D. 1888 being a day of a term of said Court,
to-wit: of the July term, A. D. 1888, at 10 o'clock
a. in., at the Court room of said Court, in the
Court House, in the town and county of Deer Lodge,
Territory of Montana, has been duly appointed by the
said Court for the settlement of said account and
the distribution of said estate, at which time and
place an, person interested in said estate may appear
and file his exceptions in writing to the said account
or petition for distribution, and contest the same.
992 3t W. H. TaIPPrW, Clerk.
Notice to Co-Owners.
To Walter C. Adams, James Corn, Samuel Maturin,
George W. Carlton and Daniel Boisvert:
You are hereby notified that we, Addison Smith
and Daniel F. McDevitt, and our predecessors in in
terest, being your co-owners, have, in accordance
with Section 2324, Revised Statutes of the United
States, expended in labor and improvements upon
the mining property known as the "Cariboo Stone
Quarry," which embraces the S of Lot 1, S% NE%
11W%. SW% NWM NE3(, NW% SW% NEM, N4
and SWM of SEM 1'NW%, and Lot 2 of Section 18.
in Twp. 6 N., of R. 8 W., containing 181 63-100
acres, more or less, and is located in Ora Fino
mining district, Deer Lodge county, M. T., for the
years 1885, 1886 and 1887, the sum of three hundred
dollars [$300], beir.g $100 for each of said years, the
amount required to hold said mining claim; and you
are further hereby notified that unless you contribute
your proportion of such expenditures, being the
sum of $42.85 each, togetb"r with interest and costs,
within ninety days after the complete service of this
notice by publication, all your right, title and interest
in and to the above described mining ground will be.
come the property of the undersigned, under the pre
visions of said Section 2324, Revised Statutes.
ADDISON SMITH.
DANIEL F. McDEVITT.
Deer Lodge, M. T., July 9, 1V'8. 982 903
Notice of Final Entry.
U. S. LAND OFFICE, I
Helena. I. 1'., July 3, 1888. f
Notice is hereby given that the following named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make final
proof in support of his claim, and that said proof
will be made before the Probate Judge of Deer Lodge
county, M. T., at his office in Deer Lodge, M. T., on
Monday, August 18, A. D. 1888, to-wit
GEORGE H. SWARTZ,
Of Wasblgnton Gulch, Deer Lodge county, M. T.,
who made Homestead Application No 2847, for the
NW} of Section 32, in Township 12 North, of Range
8 West; and he names the following witnesses to
prove his continuous residence upon and cultiva
tion of said tract, to-wit
William Hackney, Robert N. Tibbetts and Silas
Bush, all of Washington Gulch, Deer Lodge county,
M. T., and Henry Curtis, of Avon, Deer Lodge
county, M. T.
S. W. LANGIIORNE, Register.
O. B. O'Bannon* Att'y for Claimant 991 ft
Notice for Final Proof.
U. S. LAND eiFFICE,
Helena. M. T., July 12, 1888. f
Notice is hereby given that the following-named
settler has filed notice of his intention to make
final proof in support of his claim and that said
proof will be made before the Register and Receiver
at Helena, Montana, on August 28, 1888, via
HENRY C. McNALLY,
Who made Homestead Application No. 3323 for the
5% NWM, and Lots 3and 4, Sec. 4,'Tp 14 N, R 12 W.
Hle names the following witnesses to prove his
continuous residence upon and cultivation of said
land. viz
Thomas Jones, Rufus K. Pierson, John Gammon,
Ovando Hoyt, of Ovando Mont.
99361 S. W. LANG HORNE, Register.
Buck Herd.
I will establish a Buck Herd on Freeze Out,
commencIig July 1. Persons having bucks
they wish herded will please apply to me or
at the City Meat Market, Deer Lodge.
N. J. BIaLENJIERO.
June 18,1888. 989 tf
McdP(uy IoisE, - DEER LODq,
AYLESWORTH & McFARLAND, Proprietors.
Board and Room, $2 and $2 50 per Day. Single Meal, 50 Cents.
A Share of the Patrona a of the Trarclini Public is RlcactfuIlly Solicited.
PEOPLE'S
MEAT MARKET,
LODGE & BEAUMONT, Prop'rs.
lain Street, Amouin[ O'Neill's Theatre
HAVING OPENEr,
A General Meat Market,
At tae above stand, we will endeavor
to furnish patrons with
FRESH KILLED 0 GOOD MEATS
of all kinds, including
GAME IN SEASON.
And all articles usually supplied at a
First-class Meat Market.
Kigheat lrg Paid for Felts anl Hides.
A Share of Patronage Solicited.
LODGE & BEAUMONT.
Deer Lodge, Dec. 1, 1880. 908 tf
DEER LODGE BRUG COO,
DE ER LODGE. MONT
DEALERS IN
FURE DRUES AND PERK CIENICALS,
STANDARD PATENT MEDICINES.
PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES DYE
STUFFS, HAIR- AND TOOTH
BRUSHES. IMPROVED TU
BULAR LANTERNS.
SPIRIT THERMOMETERS,
Prof. Tyndall's Celebrated
LUNG PROTECTORS.
Toilet Articles, Peruery, ol, Spanges,
and all varieties of Druggists' Sundries.
CIG-ARS.,
PU14E TV1WIN i t LICjUORM,
for Medical Uses.
1[7Physicians' Prescriptions Carefully Com
pounded and Orders answered with Care and
Dispatch. 810
Western Brewery,
VAN OUNDY & MILLER, Prop's.
Deer Lodge, M Iontana.
Are now Manufacturing a Superior Article of
Putup Expressly for
EXPOR2 AND FAMILY USE.
SWDealers supplied with Keg or Bottled Beer ona
call or by letter. Shipments promptly made.
FINE uQuaOS ANd CIGARS
AT ram BAa.
VAN GUNDY & MILLER.
M. BIEIT,
Upholstery and Furniture,
[Opposite Scott House]
Deer Lodge, - Montana
Parlor Sets aid Bed-roof Sets
An assortment o
Wood and Cane Seat Chairs,
WOVEN WIRE
and all kinds of
SPRING MATTRESSES
A No. 1 Feathers in Bulk
IATTRESSES OF HAIR, WOOL AND IOZB.
o$WUpholatery jobbing promptly attended
to. 659 tf
Blacksmith Shop I
Sign of the iron Hiorse-Formerly
Estili's Livery.
MAIN STREEF, - - DEER LODhE.
GUS ZOSI[l, Prop.
Having leased the above premises I asn now pre.
pared to do
kiNZLM A }LACEflllhII4,
WARuI KAKli aU ?EPAIIIIB,
Io0IU SIISN A SPECIALT'
And respectfully ask a share of public patronage.
984 tt GUS ZOSEL.
Bo ;for Be Flalead Vealley! -
Itagp Lehat3 kulli for 8elish al Ashley
EtERY MONDAY AND WKDNESDAY, J
Ind Returns fro n Ashley for RavallI every Wede.
lay and Friday. LD
960 it D. MCDONALD, Proprietor. ata
THE COLLEGE OF MONTANA.
CLASSICAL.
SCIENTIFIC.
NORMAL
MUSIC and ART.
INSTRUIENTS.
APPARATUS. -
LABORATORY
FURNISHINGS.
New and Complete. - -
OPEx TO BOTH SEXES ON EQUAL TERMS.
FOR TERMS, &c., apply to
Rev. D. J. McMILLAN, D. D.
President of the College.
DEER LODGE, Montana.
896
JOHN O'NEILL
DEER LODGV, MONTANA.
The Fillest hie of llrweioe
STOV1S,
SILVERWARE, ETC., ETC.,
Ever broeght to the City, and is selling at prices that
DEFY COMPETITION. Call and examine Goods
and Prices before purchasing elsewhere. 901
ZNOR A TRACK,
DEER LODGE, MONT.,
Keep the Best Brands
-OF
TiW1are, Quecnswar1, Glassware
Shelf Hardware,
Iron and Steel,
Blacksmith Supplies
Oe.rilitr FIll rliors' oo1s,
TIN, COPPER,
SHEET-IRON WARE.
Iron Pipe Made to Order.
HORSE AND MULE SHOES,
NAILS, WAGON MATERIAL. ETC.
?J. W. GILBERT. W. T. ELLIOTT.
GILBERT & ELLIOTT,
W1101mikill & lish~ithit,
DEE I: LO DG E, 31. T.
Having secured the services of the most competen
workmen in Montana, we feel satisfied that no other
shop in the Territory can excel, or even compete with
na in the way of fine and durable work. All we ask
of the farners and others having occasion to patron
ize a blacksmith shop .ls to give us at trial to verify
the statement.
Carriage Work and Born Shoeing a Specialty,
Niowieg machines, hinders, reaperns and all other
kindso repaired on short notice, and sat
isfaction guaranteed. We respectfully ask a fair
share of the trade.
84 3,m GILBERT & ELLIOTT.
BOTTLING ESTABLISHMENT!
Soda, Sarsaparilla, Orange Lemonade,
GINGER ALE, ETC.,
VAN GUNDY & MILLE3, - Deer Lodge.
LAVING BOUGHT AND PUT UP MACHINERY
for generatlug
Soda, Sarsaparilla, Ginger Ale
AND ALL CARBONATE DRINKS,
with experienced workmen IL charge, we me pre
pared to furnish them
Bottled or in Charges for Fountains,
romptl s n notice, nodt atolow as any House in the
Van Cundy & Miller,
935 tf Deer Lodge. Montana
THE FAVORITE SALOON
THOMAS M. CONNIFF, Prop r.
Main & Second, DEER LODGE.
Thoroughly Overhauled, Repaired an'. Renovated.
All Drinks and Cigars, 12 1-2c Each.
Ph. Best's Milwaukee Beer ON TAP.
ALWAyS PLEASED TO SEE OUR FRIENDS
Metropolitan. Salcon,
HENRY HARRIS, Proprietor.
Johnny Cerber's Old Stand,
DEER LODGE, MONTANA.
I have opened the sbove SALOON AND BIL
LIAJID ROOM, atock~ h a ihtebs iur
and Kiars, andsoici k share oP the hebat notrna
9e.918 tf
RAILROADS.
READY FOR BUSINEgS
Between Great Falls, Fort Benton, As
bolne, Dawes and other Montana point
and Grand Forks, Fergus Falls, Fargo,
Watertown, Aberdeen, Ellendal.,
St. Paul, Minneapolis, and
ALL POINTS EAST AND SOUTH
Through Sleeper between Great
Fa1's and St. Paul.
We are now prepared to handle all
kinds of freight. Stock Yards haveleel
completed at Great Falls, Benton Bi
Sandy, lBeaverton, Poplar, Mo t g
Buford, Towner, Minot, Dakoa nd:
Crookston, Minnesota-contaiing all
the latest *syTmUc imree
me ntsa.G~ 0*** dpoe
watr e ANITD an
Our ex- B*hWA' cndlha
Roadway and Equipment, with li
glades, has made our lowest average
time on stock trains 201 miles per hour
WiiP'ate always as Low as the Lowet
If you are going East or South, send to
our nearest Agent, or the undersigned
for rates and other information, which
will be cheerfully furnished.
A. L. Moniaca, C. H. WARREN
Gen'l Frt. Agent. Gen'i Pass. Agent
W. S. ALEXANDER, A. MANVEL,
Gen'1 Traffic Manager. Geni' Manager.
ST. PAUL. MINN.
GO EAST
-VIA TIlE
Northernl Pacile ailrod.,
THE DINING CAR ROUTE
AND GRERAT 81101! [T 11
TO ALL EASTERN CITIES.
200 MILES
THE SHORTEST ROUTE TO CHICAGO
AND ALL POINS EAST,
-AND THE ONLY
THROUGH CAR LINE
Low Rates, Quick Time,
Pullman Palace Cars!
For full information, address
C. S. FEE, A. L. STOKES,
Gen. Pass Ag't, St. Paul. Gen. Ag't, Helena.
901 4t
hia sots & Id n L, L
-FROM
ST. PAUL OR MINNEAPOLIS
-TO
CHICAGO AND THE EAST,
ST. LOUIS,
KANSAS CITY AND THE WEST,
PEORIA,
COLUMBUS and THE SOUTHEAST.
MORNING AND EVENING
FAS!TThAINS O Ol1l10ahoD0.
SOLID TRAINS THROUGH
Without Change of Cars.
A LL CLASSES OF TICKETS GOOD.
?he in.v Rcad Iunin a haylight Tiain
THROUGH BETWEEN
St. Paul, Minneapolis,
and Chicago, Illinois.
MORNING TRAIN
Leaves Minneapolis 7,00 a. m. Arrives at Chi
" St. Paul 7.30 " l cago 9.30 p. m.
EVENING TRAIN
Leaves Minneapolis 7.00 p. m. Arrives at Chi
St. Paul 7.30 " cago 9.30a. m.
With Parlor Chair Cars and
wann Boudonu and Sleeping Cars Attached.
Ask for Tickets via the Minnesota & Northwestern
R. R., and take no other, thereby insuring yourself a
safe and comfortable journey.
Tickets for sale at all ticket offices.
Any information as to rates, timae, connections,
etc., apply or write to
J. A. HANLEY,
TRAFFIC MANAGER.
Thrce MaISificent Canyons,
PASSES THROUGH THE
UPPER AND LOWER PRICKLY PEAR
AND THE MI8SOURI RIVER. CANTONS,
Where the great convulsions ct Nature have formed
the primitive rocks into the most fantastic shales,
with proportions of such immensity as to he at once
awe-inspiring and heyond the power of language to
describe, equalling in grandeur, it not in area, the
finest scenery on the continent.
TAKE THE SCENIC ROUTE EAST,
Come and go by Nature's Gateway.
Safety. eornfort, Courtesy for
our Patront;.
This is the safest and most delightful Route for the
Traveler to take from Montana to the East. It has
no equal, owing to the absence of danger from the
steep grades, high and dangerous trestles, or sharp
curves along precipitous mountain sides which exist
on other lines.
No other line of hailway in Montana can affori'. its
patrons the same comforts, conveniences, safety and
Economy of time to be had on the
Montana Central and Manitoba Rilways.
A Dally Fast Passenger Train, equipped with lux
urious Sleeping and Dining Cars, will commIelnce run
ning between Helena and St. Paul about April 1, 1st8.
TICKET AND FREIGHT OFFICE,
1170 if 15 NoRTH MAIN ST., HELENA.
Estray Taken Up.
Came to our mill about June 15th'
' 1988, one dark bay or brown maree
shout 7.years old, white strip in
face, s!'od. left fore foot white and
left hind foot white' weight about
1,000 pounds, branded open eight
on r s uested to prove property, pay for ad
Owner is rqetedto rv rpry a o d
vertisement and take the mare away.
BECKSTEAD & IIAhIN,
WI3 4t Elliston. Deer Lodge county, i. T.
STIIAYED.
Caine to my ranch, three miles
from Elliston, June 13, l155$. a
dark hay n are. with one white
hind fo:t, a few white hairs il
forehead, brosuded L on the right
shoulder, weight ahout 1,100 bst
The owner will please prove prop
erty and take the same awUa.
Illiston, Mont., June 20, 1ititt. 1194t

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