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The new North-west. [volume] (Deer Lodge, Mont.) 1869-1897, November 09, 1894, Image 1

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EObe R New L ortbwe t.
VOL. 2i, NO. 18. I)EE R LOI)DGE, MONTANA, FRID)AY, NOVEMBER, 9, 1894. WHOLE NO. 1122.
HELENA T HE WINNER
PRACTICALLY CERTAIN SHE HAS
WON THE CAPITAL RACE.
Ilartnunm and lHunt Lecad itle State Repub
li;cans to Victory---Complexion of tlle
Next Lcgislatme-iUnctrtainlty as to tilhe
Victors in thle Counsty Conltest.
Beyoid reasonable doubt HIelena is
v'ictorious inl the capital race. The count
.of the vote of the state has not been com
p)leted, and, in the absence of any relia
ble figures, it is believed that it will take
the official count to determine the actual
result. The IIelena ieople are claimint g
that they have won by 000, but the Ana
:onda people deny this, and state that the
mnajority will not be more than a hundred
for the winning side.
It is Hartlan lll nd hl t.
IIELENA, Ndv. 8.--{eturns enough are
in hand to tmake certcain the election of a
Ilepublican legislature in both branches.
Hlartman, R epublic'n, is re-elected to
congress and Ilunt for associate justice.
Oflicial figures cannot be had for sev
eral days.
Conplexion of thle Next Legislature.
Ber'TTE, Nov. 8.--Chairman 1antle of
the iRepublican state central committee
,estimates that the nest legislature of the
:state will be made up as follows:
I[ouses-Republicans, 42; Populists, 13;
D)emocrats, 6; total, 61.
Senate-rlepublicans, 14; Populists, 2;
Democrats, 5.
This will give the Republicans a ma
jority of 29 on joint ballot.
The representatives from the counties
will probaby be as follows: Beaverhead,
3 Riepublicans; Cascade, 3 Republicans, 1
Populist, 1 Democrat; Custer, 2 Ilepubli
-cans, 1 Democrat; Choteau, 2 Iepubli
.cans; Deer Lodge, 2 rlepublicans, 2 Pop
ulists, 1 Democrat; Fergns, 2 Republi
-caus; Flathead, 3 Populists; Gallatin, 2
Republicans, 2 i)emocrats; Granite, 3
Rlepublicans; Jefferson, 4 elpublicans;
;Lewis andt Clark, 2 Republicans, 1 Demo
,'rc.t, 6 Populists; Madison, 3 Republi
,cans; Meagher, 1 Republican, 1 Demo
crat, 1 Populist; Missoula, 3 Republicans,
1 Populist; Park, 4 Republicans; IRavalli,
2 Republicans, 1 Populist; Silver Bow, 11
Republicans, 1 Democrat; Teton, 2 Re
publicans; Valley, 1 Democrat; Valley
and Fergus (joint), 1 Republican; Yellow
stone. 2 Reptublicans; Deer Lodge and
Missoula (joint), 1 RIepublican.
THEi COUNTY TICIET.
Inlcomplete Returns IlMaklc Estinmttes a
Mere lMatter or Guesswork.
It is next to impossible at this writing
to form anything like an accurate esti
mate of the result of the county election.
The south precinct of Carroll, which
polled a large Populist vote, was counted
and sealed without any outside record
having been taken of its vote on the
ticket as a whole. It is a close vote in
nearly every instance and the fate of sev
eral candidates depends upon the out
come of the oflicial count in that pre
cinct. Besides this, the precincts of
Blossburg, Avon, Blackfoot City, Sunset,
Gold Creek, Garrison, Mill Creek, Blue
Eyed Nellie, Lost Creek, Biald Butte,
Georgetown, Ontario, Stuart, Silver Lake,
Shields' Store and Woodworth are yet to
hear from. It is apparent, therefore,
that the official count can only determine
the result.
It is believed at this time that John
Fisher (Rep.) for clerk and recorder is
elected by a small plurality; that Geo. S.
Miller (Dem.) is elected auditor; that
John Fitzpatrick (Dem.) is elected sheriff;
that I). F. IIallahan (Pop.) is elected
treasurer; that Jno. Paul Mitchell (Pop.)
is elected surveyor; that J. II. Schwend
(Pop.) is elected assessor; that B. F. Brown
(Dem.) is elected public administrator;
that W. N. Aylesworth (Pop.), A. tI.
Walker (Dem.) and Charles II. Williams
(Pop.) are elected county commissioners;
that J. B. Losee (Rep.), O. Leiser (Rep.),
Wmin. Edwards (Pop.), Joseph Marshall
(Pop.), are elected members of the house
of representatives with a close race be
tweenl Geo. W. Oker (Pop.) and T. S.
Hogan (Pop.) for the fifth place, and that
W'. 1B. Rodgers (Rep.) is elected joint
representative with Missoula county as
against E. D. Matts (Dem.) and A. D.
{oodfellow (Pop.). No estimate can be
made as to the vote on superintendent of
schools, county attorney or coroner.
Full returns will be given next week.
The Capital Vote in the County.
Complete returns, believed to be accu
rate, have been received on the Deer
Lodge county vote on capital location.
They give Anaconda 4,127 and Helena
094 votes-a majority in favor of Aca
conda of 3,138. 1
THE TOWN VOTE. 8
How the Several Candidates Fared in the
Deer Lodge Preeints.
Election day in Deer Lodge was char- c
acterized by the utmost good feeling. h
Not a light, nor scarcely a loud dispute
occurred to mar the serenity of the OccLa
sion, though both sides oil the capital
question worked like Trojans all day.
Following is the vote in full:
FOR THE C (APITAL.
North Sout.h
For Anaconda............... 152 240
For Helena .................. 66 83
sOR COING Re ISSSMAN.
South North
Corbett, dem ................. 56 24
lHartman, rep ................l11 34
Maiden, prohib .............. 2 3
Smith, pop ............ .....113 83
FOil ASSOCIATE JUSTICE.
South North
Hunt,rep ........... .......110 94
Luce, dem ............... ... 75 57
Reeves, pop ................ 98
FOR RE1 l iSENNTATI VI:.
South North
Burke, dem ................. (1 58
Deis, dem ....................122 80S
Edwards, pop ................ .2 '3
Fitzgerald, de .............. 78 57
Flannagan, pop............... 48 31
Hogan, pop .................. a 0 34
Leiser, rep...................111 D9
Losee, rep ................... 90 81
Minshall, dem...............116 86
Mannix, rep .................. 93 81
Marshall, pop ................ 94 70
Oker, pop ....................102 58
Vye, rep.................... 75 70
W alkup, dem ................ i2 53
W hitehill, rep ...............136 114
Goodfellow, pop .............. 41 22
FOR JOINT REPIitESENTATIVE.
South North
Matts, dem. .................. 6 52
Rodgers, rep................177 139
FOR COUNTY COiIMISSOONFI.t.
South North
Aylesworth, pop..............121 80
Hoffman, rep ................185 155
Miller, rep .................. 95 74
McKenzie, rep............... 9- 70
McCormick, pop............. 42 83
Spencer, dem ............... 56 35
Turner, dem .................. 99 84
Walker, dem ................ 53 44
Williams, pop ............... 60 39
FORl CL ERK AND IRECOll)RDER.
South North
Fisher, rep..................205 134
Martin, de ................. 30 19
Spurrier, pop ................. 59 43
FORl COUNTY AUDITOLR.
South North
Jones, rep .................... 75 1
Miller, dem ..................179 123
Sines, pop .................. 26 24
FOIR SI1 ERIFF.
South North
Dunseth, pop ................ 89 82
Fitzpatrick, de ............. 107 91
Linsley, rep................ 82 44
Stebbins, ind ................. 5 1
FOIl TRIEAHURIEt.
South North
-Iallahan, pop ................ 59 31
McMaster, denm..............104o 81
Stackpole, rep ...............120 101
FOR SUPT. OF SCiliOOlS.
South North
Mrs. Mary McGrath, dem..... (it 42
Mrs. Miamile B. Mills, pop.....117 93
Miss Thomson, rep........... 98 81
FO11 COUNTY SUIIVEYOll.
South North
Davis, dem ..................11 88
Mitchell, pop ................10( 77
Mcl)onald, rep..................... 5S 48
FOR ASS ESSORl1.
eSouth North
e- Evans, dem ........ ... .... 114 86
of McFarland, rep .............. 81 73
t, Schwend, pop .. ........... 98 57
- FOR CORONIER.
e, South North
e, Ilien, rep.......... ..........148 105
lardenbrook, dec ........... 76 63
Newman, pop ................ 55 42
F 11OR PUBLIC AI)MINISTRiA'TOlR.
South North
Brown, dem ...............132 90
u Calcott, rep............... l..106 86
is Taylor, pop. ................ 39 33
Ol FoR COUNTY ATTOrxNEYv.
it South North
F; English, rep ........... ..... 57 37
d Napton, pop ................100 74
) Trippet, dem .................131 103
d FOl JuSTrce Il, 'ri Ie r1iACIK.
South North
S Golde,pop................ .. 45 39
S Hartwell, rep.............. .10( 96
S Johnson, dem ..... .......... 96 5
Schroeder....................148 79
i; Shaubut, pop..............106 85
FORl COlNST1All,E.
1 South North
e Curn, pop.................... 41 32
Calvert, pop................. 1 18
Eliasun,rep ................. 9
Reid, dem ...................121 70
Sheffield, rep..............193 163
MONSIGNOR SATOLLI.
Bishop Corrigan Iolhls ta Long Conference
With the Abllegate.
T WAsHIN(TON, Nov. 1.--Monsignor Sa
tolli was asked today concerning the re
port from New York that Bishop Corri
gan had recently called on him. He said
the Archbishop called on him about two
weeks ago, soon after the meeting of
archbishops, and a conference lasting
several hours was held. The Ablegate
would not discuss the nature of the con
ference or the reported unity in the
church in recognizing the delegate's
authority.
When a sentiment is uttered on the
stage that is not complimentary to the 1
character of men, all wives look at their
husbands triumphantly.-Atchison Globe I
MIAKING GOOD TIME.
TWO WEEKS OF FAIR WEATHER WILL
FINISH THE ROYAL ROAD.
The Test Shmllent of Ore Froim the Inde
plendence Altogether Satisfactory--The
Northern Pacifle toust Publish Notice of
Land Selections-Australian Strike.
Two more weeks of favorable weather
and the road will be finislhed!
This is the cheerful word that comes
from the Mathison brothers, who have
the contract and are pushing the work of
building the Royal road.
The road is now completed to a point
above Rock creek falls about a mile be
yond the head of the lake. Four miles
of work yet remain to be done, but the
intervening country is not regarded as
particularly difflicult and the contractors
are confident they can cover it in the
time mentioned if the present good
wea'ther holds out.
Those who have been over the road, so
far as completed, pronounce it an excel
lent piece of work. It is a wide, smooth
road-bed and a light grade all the way.
It opens to easy access a country not only
of inexhlaustible mineral wealth, but of
surpassing grandeur and picturesque
ness. Rock Creek lake and the country
beyond will be a great resort for all time
to come.
TIIIE TNDEPNENDENC,
The Test Shipment of Ore Very Satisfac
tory--A Concentrator in Prospect.
E. If. Irvine & Co., of Butte, who are
working the Independence in Oro Fino
district, recently completed a shipment
of 100 tons of ore to one of the Butte
smelters. The ore carries some silver,
but was worked only for the gold it con
taius. The returns show a gross yield of
$18 per ton, and as this leaves a margin
of prolit the mine will be worked con
tinuously. Another shipment will go
forward in December and the work of
developing the property will be vigor
ously prosecuted all winter. do far, the
ore chute has shown constant improve
ment with depth, there being at this
writing fully three feet of solid ore in
the face of the workings. Does this 1
showing continue, Irvine & Co. intend
putting in a concentrator early in 1
the spring so thatt the silver value, as
well as the gold, can be saved. 1
1 IPOTECTING R.INERAL LANDS.
The Northern Pacific Comlpany tiust Pub
lish Notices of Selections.
SThe Helena land office is in receipt of
3 an important communication from Com
Smissioner Laminaraux, of the general land
oflice, on the subject of the mineral lands
I embraced within the Northern Pacific
grant. The letter says that on October
t 14, 1889, Thomas G. Merrill of Helena
filed in the department numerous atli
davits and maps alleging that the lands
in the Northern Pacilic grant were min
eral in character and should not be pat
ented to the company; also that on March
20, 1893, George W. Irvin of Butte, state
i mineral land commissioner, filed in the
otlice at Washington his notice against
the patenting of the lands until the de
termination of pending legislation. Jan
nary 29, 1890, a report was made to the
department on the Merrill protests, and
August 3, 1893, Commissioner Irvin was
advised that his protests would be con
sidered when the lists came tp for final
action.
"The question of the selection of lands
in railroad and state grants in proximity
to mineral lands," says the commissioner,
"was carefully considered by the depart
ment, and on July 9, 1894, instructions
were issued to this oflice which are
deemied sullicient to secure the mineral
lands from disposition under said grants,
and to protect the interests of miners and
prospectors whose claims are not on rec
ord in this oflice.
"In said instructions it is provided that
the railroad company shall publish for 60
days a notice of its application for all
lands selected which are within a radius
of six miles of mining claims or lands
alleged to be mineral, during which time
all persons claiming adverse interests or
desiring to establish the mineral charac
ter, may appear and submit testimony.
"The lists of selections are now being
examined in conformity to said instruc
tions, and all protests and mineral alle
gations are being considered in connec- E
tion therewith."
1IG STRIKE IN AUSTRALIA.
Gold Find That Equals California In the t
Palmy Days of '49.
SAN FitsuClsco, Oct. 26.-The steamer
Alameda, which arrived today, brought
only three passengers from Australia. a
This was owing largely to the fact that c
nearly everybody was on the rush to the l
gold fields of western Atustralia-Cool
gardie. While the steamer was in Syd
ney harbor over a thousand miners ar
rived from the New Zealand gold fields,
en route for the new Eldorado. Some of
the finds are phenomenal, and in one in
stance four cuts of rock' yielded 555
ounces of gold. The Londinderry mine,
one of the first discovered, was sold to an
English syndicate j ust hefote the steamer
sailed for $1,250,000. One of the passen
gers from Sydney was a miner named
James SlcCormick. lie stopped off at
Ilonolulu, but told the other passengers
that the new gold field was every bit as
rich as it was made out to be, and that it
would rival the dlays of '40 in California.
According to him, the lack of water was
the great drawback. tWheh he was at
Coolgardie a quart of the IFrecious fluid
cost 50 cents, a pound of n)eat 60 cents,
and 100 pounds of flour $25. The ma
jority of the miners were doing well, but
the suffering owing to thei scarcity of
water was very great. Jus; before the
Alameda sailed a camel load of ore,
nearly all gold, was brought into Sydney
from tlhe Wealth of Nations mine. Its
airrival caused great excitement.
As the Law Interprets.
Trees blazed and squared, rock monu
ments and the prospect holei are perma
uent objects, witain the me ining of the
statutes requiring the notice of the loca
tion of a mining claim to describe the
same by reference to some! natural or
permanent monument. The fact that the
calls in such a notice mention stakes
when in fact the monumentes are trees
cut off three feet from the ground, and
blazed and squared, is immaterial. The
fact that the location of a mining claim,
as marked on the ground, is 300 feet too
long and 50 feet too wide--the statute
providing that a cllim may be located
1500 feet by 600 feet-does not render
the location void, where the excess was
included through mistake and in good
faith, and the notice posted oni the claim
stated that only an area of 1500 feet by
600 feet was claimed, and gave the point
of beginning and direction of the boun
dary lines.-Hanson vs. Fletcher, 37
Pacific Reports, 480-Supremie Court of
Utah.
s Will Stay in lButte.
n The Parrot company has decided not
s to remove its smelting plant f:om Butte.
I The company had seriously entertained
a the belief at one time that a removal to
s another locality where water could be
had in abundance would be bineficial to
its interests, and experts during the past
summer have been engaged in looking
over various sites on the Jefferson and
Big HIole rivers. The compimy, after
mature consideration, however, decided
that a change at the present time would
be an ill-advised movement. Now that
this is settled, preparations are being
made for the extension of itd smelting
and concentrating plants.
i General Mining Notesi
It is said that the management of the
Jay Hawk mining company, at Ionsonby,
has recently changed hands.
It is rumored that the Boston & Mon
tana company are about purchulsing the
Anderson mine, in the Ground Squirrel
district.
During the month of Septembler there
were tiled with the clerk and recorder of
Jefferson county the location notices of
220 quartz claims and 19 placer Claims.
A recent week's gold receipts at the
Helena assay offlice broke the record for
all previous weeks in the history of the
office, the amount being a little over
$120,000, representing 130 deposits.
The new shaft of the Mountain Con
solidated No. 2 has reached a depth of
700 feet. Sinking will be continued an
other 100 feet, when the old wordcings of
the iMountain Consolidated No. I will be
connected at the 800 foot level.
The IHecla Consolidated Minipg com
pany of Glendale paid, October 25, divi
dend No. 130 of one per cent., or $15,000.
This makes a total cash dividend paid to
the stockholders during the management
of IIenry Knippenberg of $1,950,000.
A few years ago the Parrot company
was the only company using the Besse
mer converter for copper, but now there
are numberless imitators all over the
world. New refineries worked by this i
process are quite conlmon in the east.
Some men have been at work lon the
new gold diggings on the west fork of 1
Madison for some time past. They seem 1
to be well pleased with the prospect and i
claim that they have some rich ground t
which they propose to open up next (
spring. t
Granite Butte and the Poorman dis- t
tricts abound in rich prospects, the best
developed property in the districts being 1
the Prize of the Murray Bros., which for t
the past year has been a great producer, I
having in that time yielded nearly $100,- 1
000. This mine and the Poorman district e
are on the west side in Deer Lodge v
county. The Marsh creek side pfh the i
mountain is in Lewis and Clark county. I
DEATH OF THE CZAR
THE AUTOCRAT OFALL THE RUSSIAS
PASSES PEACEFULLY AWAY.
Surrounded by the Royal Family He Falls
Asleep in the Arms of the Empress--His
Personal Traits-Nicholas II. Formally
Assumes the IReins of Government.
ST. PETERSiIURG, NOV. 1.-The angel
of death, in the shadow of whose pinions
the autocrat of all Russia has been lying
for many days, today beckoned and the
soul of the man who had in his hands
the lives and destinies of millions, was
borne away.
At 12:15 o'clock this afternoon the sum
mons came and a few hours later the
thunderous booming of cannon at Liva
dia and St. Petersburg announced the
czar was dead, and that he who had been
Grand Duke Nicholas reigned in his
stead.
On lightning wings the news of Rus
sia's loss spread throughout the world,
and it is safe to say everywhere the intel
ligence created sympathy for the family
of him, who by his policy, had main
tained the peace of Europe. From
America came words of sympathy, for
the dead ruler had always been a friend
of the great republic of the west.
On Wednesday the czar was still able
to be taken to the window of the palace,
whence he gazed out upon the country
he loved. Night passed with all the
aggravating symptoms and the dry cough.
Dr. Zaccharin remained in attendance
upon him throughout the night. As the
day advanced the weakness increased so
rapidly that the czar himself recognized
he could only live a few hours.
About noon a convulsive fit of cough
ing was followed by a slight rally.
Thence until the end the czar remained
quiet, seemingly free from pain. At 2:15
o'clock he heaved a deep sigh and
breathed his last in the arms of the em
press, who then broke down with the
weight of her grief,
IIe TVas a Royal Good Fellow.
LONDON, Nov. 1.-A notable obituary
sketch will appear in the Times tomor
row. The author of the sketch of the
dead emperor was on intimate terms of
friendship with the czar, and he says the
czar never had the slightest sympathy
with high culture, adding: "Indeed, the
czar rather gloried in the idea of being
of the same rough texture as the major
ity of his subjects, and if he was some
times disrespectfully referred to as 'the
peasant czar,' he regarded this epithet as
a compliment. His straight-forward,
abrupt manner, savoring sometimes of
gruffness, and his direct, unadorned
method of expression harmonized well
with his rough-hewn, immobile features
and somewhat sluggish movements. The
impression he generally made in conver
sation was that of a good, honest, moder
ately intelligent, strong-willed man, who
might perhaps listen to an explanation,
but who certainly would stand no non
sense from his subordinates nor any
one else.
"Only those who have had the privi
lege of observing him in the unrestrained
intimacy of his family, especially when
romping with his children or amusing
himself with his four-footed pets, could
fully realize what a simpile, kiudlynature
was concealed behind a by no means
sympathetic exterior."
NICHOLAS II.
The Noew Cxar Folnrmailly Assumes the
lejins of Government.
ST. PE'rErsltnSlr, Nov. .--The Official
Messenger this morning published the
first proclamation of Eniperor Nicholas
11., in which, after formally communi
cating to the nation the news of the death
of his father, Alexander III., he says:
"May the knowledge console you that
our grief is the grief of our entire be
loved nation, and may the nation not for
get that the strength and firmness of
Holy Russia lies in its unity and un
bounded devotion to us in this sad and
solemn hour on which we ascend our
ancestral throne of the Russian empire,
the Czardom of Poland, the Grand Duchy
of Finland, indissolubly linked. With
the remembrance of the legacy left us
by our lamented father, and imbued with
it, we, in the presence of the Most High,
take the vow to make our sole aim the
development of the power and glory of
our beloved Russia, and the happiness of
all our faithful subjects."
The manifesto concludes with com
manding that the oath of allegiance be
taken to him, Emperor Nicholas II., and
his heirapparent, the Grand Duke George
Alexandrovich, his brother, who is to be
entitled Czarowitz until God may bless
with a son the union which his majesty
is to enter into with the Princess Alix of
HIesse-Darmstadt.

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