OCR Interpretation


Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, April 05, 1899, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038306/1899-04-05/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ftljc democrat.
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY.
O. E. 8RON8ON. B. M. CARR.
BRONSON A. CARR.
Editors and Proprietors
.. SUBSCRIPTION PRICET
Ye.trly, In advance $1 50
If not paid In advance 9 00
NOTICE.—On tho slip of pnpur upon which
the name la printed, appears tho date to which
too pupor Is paid for, and a renewal is alwavs
rospeotfully solicited.
The writer's name must accompany any arti
cle for publication, as an evidence of jrooa faith
to the editoro
O. W. DUNHAM.
a
.-.•A 11 tin Is oi
yo\» Want a ©amage for trje
•*dOF COURSE YOU D0.l
We KjaVe tlj®
Our line is larger than ever
The variety is infinite,
The workmanship the best,
fhe prices right.
X1EVERY THING FOR THE LITTLE PEOPLE. tx
Cribs in polished oak and rattan. High chairs, fancy little
rockers, jumps, swings and iron beds.
Call and see our stock.
W. S. JO^ES.
Our Business Directory.
ATTORNEY8.
E, U. SULKS W. II. NORHIS
DUNHAM, NORRlS ft STILE8.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AND NOTARIES
Public. Spooial attention given to Collec
tions Insurance, Real Estate and Loan Agts.
Office in City Hall Block, Manchester, la.
C. YOKAN. H. p. ARNOLD M. J, YORAN.
YORAN. ARNOLD ft YORAN
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, and Real Estate
A
Agents. Office in City Hall Blook, Man
chester, Iowa.
0. E. BBOKSON. JJJ. M, CARB.
BRONSON ft CARR.
FRED B. BLAIR.
A TTORNEY AT LAW. Offlco in theCltyHall
Block, Manchester, Iowa.
PHYSICIANS.
A.J, WARD.
pHVSICIAN and Surgeon, will attend to oalla
A promptly at all hours or the day or nl*ht,
l*amont, Iowa.
Staehle's store ou Franklin street. Crown
bridge work a specialty. Will meet patients at
Farley Wednesday of each week 32tf
VETERINARIAN.
DR. J. W. SCOTT,
VETERINARY Surgeon, and Dentist. Office
in H. O. Smith's Drug Storo, Main St. At
night can be found at rooms over Ralph Con
ger's Store.
MANUFACTURING.
MANCHESTER MARBLE WORKS
8 prepared to furnish Granite and Marble
A Monuments and Head Stones of various de
signs. Have the oounty right for Slpe's Pat
ent Grave Cover also dealer in Iron Fenoes,
Will meet all competition. Stf94.
WM. MCINTOSH.
THOMAS GIVEN*'
Oontraotor
and builder. Jobs taken In town
or country. Estimates furnished. First
class work guaranteed. Prioes reasonable.
Shop ou Howard street near Franklin, Man
chester, Iowa. 35tf
U. HBNSBY. FREDERICK BENSBY.
HENSEY ft SON,
jrldge. 14
W. N. BOYNTON. J. F. McEWBN.
BOYNTON ft MoBWEN.
n/ATCHMAKERS, Jewelers and Engravers
dealers in Watohes, Clocks, Silver and
Plated Ware, Fine Jewelry, Spectacles, Cutlery,
Musloal Instruments, eto., Main street.
W. S. JONES.
A LL KINDS OF FURNITURE constantly in
ft. Btook. Undertaking done In all its
dranches. Manohester, Iowa.
M. W. SHELDON. J. p. Foucv
Undertakers and Embalmers.
Ourable.
stock Is new and complete, 1'rloes reason
Opposite K. P. Hall. 40 tf
A.D. BROWN.
ealer In furniture etc., and undertaker,
1
Main Street.
F. WERKMEISTEtt,
flENERAL DEALER IN FURNITURE,
HENRY UOODHILE.
general store. Dry Goods, Millinery, Cloth
VX lng, Cloaks, Boots and Shoes, Hats and
Gaps, Carpets, etc, Munches er, Iowa.
A. THORPE,
PROPRIETOR
der Store and Dealer io Clothing, Boots,
Shoes, Notions, otc. Mas.mii: B.ook, Mauci es
ter. Iowa
G**ASSFIBLD B°OS,
(Successors to ttetli, Urovn.)
"DOOTS AND SJiHRS of all prides and prices.
Custom Work and Ui.tiau'ibg given special
attention. Also agent for the weed Sowing
Machine. .Store In City Hall lilock.
CARHART d* ADAMS.
"PLUMBERS, Tlnnew, acJ dealers in Shelf
•L and Heavy Hardware, Franklin street,
Manohester, Iowa.
miif iMii
ENTERED AT THE POSTOMCJ! AT
HANCHKSTBH, IOWA, AS SBCOND-OLASR MATTER
GEO. S, LISTER.
T.TARDWARE, STOVES, TINWARE, ETO.
jj. Keeps a flrst-olass tinner and does all
kinds of repairing with neatness and dispatch.
Store opposite First National Bank, MainSt.
HOI.LISTER LUMBER CO.
UMBER and all kinds of building materials.
Posts and Coal. Corner of Delaware and
Madison strcots.
MANCHESTER LUMBER CO.
UMBER and Builders Materials, Posts and
Coal. West side near depot
THOS. T. CARKEEK.
A RCHITECT AND BUILDING SUPERIN
TENDENT, S. E. Cor. 8th andMainSt..
Dubuque, Iowa
WM. DENNIS.
pi ARPENTER, CONTRACTOR & BUILDER,
I am now prepared to do all work In my
llneln a good ana workmanlike manner. Satis
faction guaranteed. Plans and estimates fur
nlshed. Work taken In town or country. Shop
the stand tower on West Side of mer.
E.S.COWLBS.
QITY DRAYMAN. Am prepared to do all
v.
H.H.LAWRENCE.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. Special at
A tentlon given diseases of children. Have
also made a special study of Gyneocology,
Obstetrios, and Rootal Diseases. All chronic
diseases successfully treated with the aid of
various Thermal ana Massage treatment. All
ohronlos solicited. Consultation free. Office
over Work's market. All calls promptly at
tended. Residenoe on Main street, the old Dr.
Kelsey property.
DENTISTS.
O. A. DUNHAM. D. D. 3.
PiENTISTS, Offlco over Carhart & Adams'
L/ hardware store, Franklin St. Manohester,
Iowa.
C. W. DORMAN.
pfcENTIST. Office on franklin Street, north
LS of the Globe Hotel, Manohester, Iowa.
Dental Surgery in all its branohes. Makes
.*9Quent visits to neighboring towns. Always
at office on Saturdays.
C. LEIGH. D. D.S.
Dentist.
Ofllce over Ander & Phllipp's Drug
Store Corner Main and Franklin streets,
Manchester Iowa. Telephone 185. I7tf
E. E. NEWCOMB.
DENTIST.
Ofllce over Clark Lawrence &
*k In my line. Moving household goods
and pianos a specialty. All work will receive
prompt attention. A share of your patronage Is
solioiied. Charges right. Give your draylnp
to a man who has come to stay.
J. H.ALLEN.
/CLOTHING and Gents furnishing goods. Cor
ner Main and Franklin streets.
L. R. STOUT,
/"CLOTHING and Gents furnishing goods.
Bradley & Sherman building, Franklin
CLARK ft LAWRENCE.
GOODS, Notions, Carpets, Gents fur
Franklin street.
nlshlng goe'ds, etc"
QUAKER MILL CO.
"COLOUR and Feed, Manufacturers of the ceie
brated White Satin and White Pearl Flour.
GREGG ft WARD.
Druggists
and dealers in Paints, Oils, Wall
Paper, Stationery & o. Atwater's block,
rranklln street.
STORY ft ABBOTT.
Pa 1 0118
PHILIPP & ANDKRS.
Dealers
in Drugs, Wall Paper, Stationery,
Palnts,-01l9, oto. Corner o( Main and
rronklin streets.
PETER BOARDWAY.
D(ealer
in flour, feed, hay, straw, Maquoketa
lime, stucco and oommon and Atlas cement,
xelepltone lis. Lower Franklin Street.
RACKET STORE.
GOODS. Clothing, Hats, Caps, Boots,
et0*
West 8lde
Btreet north of Main.
ICE
Oofflns. Picture Frames, Eto. A complete
ville, Iowa.
R1DDELL CO.,
T\RY GOODS, Carpets, Millinery, Hats and
Caps, Boots and Shoes, eto.. Main St,
Manohester, Iowa.
Franklin
NOBLE ARNOLD.
(71ROOERIES, Provisions, Fruits, eto. First
door north of Delawaro County Bank.
T. F. MOONEY.
to Lee Bowman.)
"DLACKSMITH and W^onmaker, Delhi,
Work
do.r?.e
promptly and in a work­
man!
iko manner. Charges reasonable. Your
patronage solicited. istf
A OUR PROPERTY against cyclones
A and tornadoes In the old reliable Phoenix
Insurance Co.. BRONSON ft CARR, Agents.
A. L. 8EVERTSQN.
T?nLfflISS10 TAYLOR. Shop in Ma
sonic blook, Manchester Iowa.
Chimneys Cleaned.
I have got a patent aevlse for cleaning chim
ueys. If you want yours cleaned leave orders
forme at HethBrown's or Graham ft Son's. I
also do all kinds of mason work and white wash
ing, build chimneys and cisterns and do repairs.
All work warranted to give satisfaction.
8K JOHN TOWSLEK.
DRAYINC
am still in the business and
-J1:- will give tho same prompt at
tentlon to all orders and care
in handling all goods as here
tofore, My effort Is to please
my patrons.
I have a largo supply of clean,
pure ice, which I will supply
in any quantity desired,
promptly and at a fair price.
YOUR PATRON AGE IS E
SPECTFULLY SOLICITED.
J. M. PEARSE.
1
OF "KALAMTTVS" PLUN-
PATENTS
Caveats, and Trade-Marks
obtained and all Pat
ent business conducted for MODERATE FEES.
OuHOrnce IS OPPOSITE U.S.
1
J. J. HAV/LEY.
HBALBR IN HARDWARE, Stores, Tin
A'WIK, etOiittiinliMtw Iovft.
•am
PATENT
OFFICE'
anu we can secure patent in less time than those11
remote from Washington.
Send model, drawing or photo., with descrlp
ition. We advise, if patentable or not, free of1
charge. Our fee not due till patent secured.
|A PAMPHLET, "HOW to Obtain Patents," withi1
|COSt of same in thcU.S.vnd foreign countries1!
sent free. Address,
C.A.SNOW&CO.
I The Egyptians, PluenicaDS and
ancient Irish worshiped the cow, but it
remained for the American "Idolator''
to embalm her.—Catholic Sentinel.
The any thing-toget-there editors of
repuulican papers,who were "pointing
with pride" last year to dollar wheat as
the consequence of McKinleyism, and
Dlngleyism, are maintaining a silence
now, with wheat at 65 cents, that com
mands intense admiration for their dis
cretion.—St. Paul tilobe.
This is the big-heartedest and' most
generous government that ever hap
pened. It has given the Cuban army
$3,000,000 to quit loafing, and it will
soon pay over to Spain nearly seven
times that amount for allowing it to
have the pleasure of lambasting a job
lot of cocoanut-beaded Filipinos.—bt,
Louis Bepublic.
From Maine and from Texas, from
Washington and from Georgia, and
from states between these four corners
of the country comes the same story—
of alarm at the extraordinary multipli
cation of monopolies and of a nearly
unanimous agreement that the inter
vention of both the national and the
state governments is necessary to the
protection of the people.—N. Y. World.
The country boy is early taught the
lesson of self-reliance, which the city
boy is not. The average city parent is
more concerned to give his child a good
education, if possible send bim through
the high school and college, to learn a
trade or read a profession, and thus
brought up generally to always lean for
support and guidance upon his parents
until be is 25 years old.—Dubuque
ITerald.
The duke of Veragua, who visited
this city during the world's fair and
who was the recipient of much atten
tion as a decendent of Christopher
Columbus, is now a ruined nobleman,
his annuity of S'20,000 from the Cuban
government having, of course, been cut
oft'. Numerous speculative and busi
ness enterprises in which he was inter
ested have also come to naught and the
duke is emphatically a busted grandee.
The Dominating Issue,
(From the New York World.)
More industrial truBts and monopo
listic "combines" were formed in 1898
than in the entire quarter of a century
since the Standard Oil Company, parent
and pattern of American monopoly,
laminating oil.
The total of industrial trust stocks
and bonds authorized in the first two
months of this year was $1,106,300,000,
as against a total of $916,170,000 for the
twelve months of 1898.
The Financial Chronicle estimates
that the total authorized 'output of in
dustrial trust" securities 1899 will ex
ceed $0,000,000,000. This is exclusive of
such transportation "combines" as the
Coal Trust.
All of these combinations have as
their objects the creation of a monopoly,
the limiting of production, the control
of prices both for raw material and fin
ished product, the crippling or, if possi
ble, the destruction of competition, and
the payment of dividends on a largely
inflated capitalization.
State iish commissioner Delavan was
in town today, says the Des Moines
News. He visited the state house this
morning and interviewed the governor
on private business. Mr. Delavan is
feeling particularly rejoiced just now
over the substantial recognition his
scheme for stocking the waters of the
state has recently received from the
United states government. During the
month of January the government ap
propriated $4,000 to be used by R. S.
•Johnson, superintendent of the govern
ment trout station at Manchester, Iowa,
in co-operating with the state lish com
missioner of Iowa in his work of stock
ing the waters of the state. One of the
government cars has been put at the
disposal of Superintendent Johnson,
and by August 1, he expects to begin
operations in the territory which has
been assigned bim. He will work from
liellevue, on the Mississippi, thirty
miles above Sabula, where commission
er Delevan has established his field.
It was in 18U7 that State Fish Com
missioner Delevan secured the backing
of the state in his plan to Btock Iowa
waters with lish. During the same
year he was equipped with a car and
began bis work, which was to take from
the Mississippi bayous and overflow
streams the fish which were carried and
left there during high water season, and
which on account of the shallow waters,
would eventually be destroyed when the
cold weather came were they not taken
out and cared for in some way.
Early in the prosecution of his work,
Mr. Delevan carried a supply of flsh
and put in the mill-pond of the Maquo
keta river, at Manchester. They were
left there for several months, when
Superintendent Johnson, at the Govern
ment trout station, asked permission to
Beine a few miles above the pond and
see if any results were apparent. As a
consequence, be discovered thousands
of tiny croppies which had propagated
from the supply left by the flsh com
missioner. Superintendent Johnson
brought this fact before the govern
ment flsh inteiests, with the result that
he has now an appropriation of $4,000
with which to push the work of stock
ing and propagation along. Mr. Del
evan is very enthusiastic over his
Echeme, and thinks one of its greatest
beauties is the fact -that he is taking
from the border rivers, not the fish that
would otherwise thrive there, but those
which would eventually be destroyed.
These he says, are being saved and
given to the pMpl* of tho aUt.
for food.
rriiii- mm-f
The Olil Slave And the New.
IIo promised that ho'd be her slave,
Hut that was lonp ago •.
For lior lied plan and toll and save, -jt\
Hut that was loog ago
He helped her from tho car and he
Would run nnd got lior chair when she
Was twenty and he twenty-three—
nut that was long ago.
He took her gently by the arm-
But that was long ago—
To guide her well away from harm,
But that was long ago.
He bounded at her hock and call
Before her he was fain to fall
And ho put her rubbers on, but all
This happened long ago.
He won the maiden's love and they
Were married long ago
She sometimes sits and sighs, today,
For dear old long ago
She's getting gray at thirty-four
He puts her rubbers on no more,
And all she dnea Is toll and boro
nor slave of long ago.
—S. K. Klsor In the Chicago Nuws.
Breeding and Dairying.
Breeding and dairying go hand in
hand, each largely dependent upon the
other. It is very easy for the average
dairyman to raiBe more young stock
than he needs for active dairy purposes,
and this surplus stock should bring him
aihandsome income.
How the £utch Do.
Dutch dairymen steam the clover
hay until it swells up like noodles, boij
tbeir beets, turnips, potatoes, corn, oats,
rye and other grains, and a Dutchman
would be hooted out of hiB country if he
had such scrubby things as many
American farmers have.
Pure Blood.
The introduction of pure blood and
reaching the stage in the business
where all cattle will be pure bred can
not be consummated in a short time,
but the longer we delay the important
work of building up the herds along
these lines the longer it will be before
we have desirable blood in them. All
stockmen should remember this fact
and begin today to allow notring but
pure bred bulls among their cattle.
Dairy Exports.
The trade in American farm products
is growing in the China seas. Scientific
inquiry into the principles that under
lie the making of One dairy products is
preparing our people to furnish butter
in condition to be exported in airtight
packages, so that it will remain sweet
for long periods in tropical countries,
In order that markets may be opened
up in Japan, China and other countries
of the Pacific ocean, an agent is now in
that region establishing agencies to
which the department will make trial
shipment with a view to ascertaining
all the facts for the benefit of the dairy
col
re?
Food as Affecting Ohurnability.
After years of close observation I am
convinced that it does make a great
difference as to the amount of cream
that will rise and the time required for
it to rise and also as to the time requir
ed to churn butter from the cream and
the amount of butter obtained if the
cows are properly fed. The butter fat
probably will be found in the skim
milk, but it does not alter the fact that
the kind of feed used has an influence
not only on the amount of milk, but in
the amount of butter obtained from any
given amount of milk when handled in
the ordinary way—sit, skimmed and
churned. I believe that a large ma
jority of the women who have given
close attention to the dairy department
of the farm will corroborate my state
ment. I woud not only advise the feed
ing of those feeds that will increase the
flow, but that will also increase the
amount of butter obtained.—A. R. Mer
ril in the Breeder's Gazette.
Creameries Without Oows. gjlll
One of the common mistakes in in
vestment of capital is the building of
creameries in general farming sections
that have few cows, the idea being that
the farmers will become dairymen as
soon as a good market for milk or cream
Is afforded them. The promoters may
know that dairying should pay in the
section or they may merely be interest
ed in selling an outfit to farmers, but
the fact iB not taken into consideration
that most men who have not had a dairy
training do not like the care of cows
and will not burden themselves with it.
Their tastes run along other lines be
cause trained that way, while the true
dairyman enjoys his work, or at least the
profit his skill in that line brings him.
He understands his business and makes
money, but the grain farmer or the gen
eral stockman neither understands nor
likes it, and the creamery usually fails
to change permanently and successfully
his natural lines of farming. National
Stockman. il|^g&g|£| f'W'
Simmsm
May Blook Tests By Injunotion.
About forty members of the Dairy
men'B association held a star chamber
BeBsion in the small court house laBt
night. T. P. Treadwell presided. The
meeting was for the purpose of discuss
ing the tuberculin teBtB now being
made in the dairy herds under the
direction of the state veterinarian.
Those present believe that only 1 per
cent of the milch cows of the state are
in the dairy herds, that, the action of
the test to stamp out tuberculosis in
milch COWB was unjust to them as they
controlled such a Brnall proportion of
the cows.
They believed that the state should
remunerate them for tbeir IOSBBS. A
committee was appointed to circulate a
subscription paper to raieo funds to
fight the state. Ont hundred and sixty
eight dollars and fifty cents was sub
scribed. The dairymen practically de
cided to get out an injnnction restrain
ing the veterinarians from making
further tests, and may apply for one to
day. A lawyer will be retained to fight
the case in behalf of the dairymen, who
believe they are being unfairly treated.
—Slows Cltjr Journal,
MANCHESTER, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5. 1899.
FANATICAL CHINESE.
SUPERSTITION RULESTHE RACE FROM
CRADLE TO GRAVE.
ALL ftnfitii«sM nnd Family Mutter* Di
rectly Controlled by TliUl nreniion
lnjr Influence, Which Makes Bratea
of Itn Slavlnh Devotee*.
No race In the wide world is more
controlled by superstitious notions than
tho Chinese. They enter into eveiy act
of a Chinaman's lifo, and their influ
ence is more lasting than that of his re
ligion. He cannot move baud or foot
without their agency, and from the
earliest moment of his life down to the
last detail in connection with his burial
their power and influence aro the guid
ing motives of his acts. All business
and family matters are directly con
trolled by superstitions sentiments, both
rich and poor, young and old, being
slaves to their force.
To the average Chinaman hie religion
is a mere negative factor in his mode of
life, to be followed or disregarded at'
will, but no true son of Han dares to
aot otherwise than in accordance with
the striot precepts of those spiritual
powers which directly control his life.
There are some amusing superstitions
connected with Chinese entertainments.
A dinner party is an ordeal which onoe
experienced is never forgotten. It oon
sists of from 40 to 60 distinct oourses
and oooupies the greater portion of a
day During the whole of these repasts
and notwithstanding the endless variety
of djishes served the invited guest re*
tainsjthe same plate throughout. The
explanation of this strange custom is an
old proverb, which has now become a
superstition, that "he who changes tho
plattia kills the housewife."
Chinese proverbs explain several of
the superstitious notions with regard to
women. It is considered unlucky for a
womai? to mix with the builders of a
house or other editioo during its ereo
tion, and to avoid any possibility of one
straying into the premises all approaches
are carefully guarded by watohmen,
and a fence is erected around the pro
posed building as soon as its founda
tions are laid.
Tho explanation of this is the saying,
"Women mix ill with wood, and death
lives in the house over whose founda
tionsa woman has walked." There is
a eimilar horror of the fair sex interfer
ing with any publio matter of national
interest or in any business transactions
where men are concerned. Women tie
knots," gays the Chinese proverb. "Let
them Remain at home."
No ^funeral can take placo until as
trologers and professional fortune tellers
have been oousulted. These unsorupu
ious^ftyinerB decide the plaoe of burial,
anA
the ivent of. disagreement no
fceraont oan take place. This «o
lib 40r tho nul»b&r:af unburiedoofc
ichftto seen jafm^ the oountry
j* miIHii'i
is temporarily aepositod in a templo or
kept in the house of the heir of the de
ceased. Among the poor as often as not
it is conveyed to some sheltered spot
and oovered with a mat.
When in course of time (by aid of
additional fees) the diviners oau report
that all objections to final burial are re
moved, the funeral takes place amid re
joioing and profane excesses. The mode
of propitiation generally prescribed by
astrologers is the purchase of some stone
or piece of iron, to which an elaborate
ritual of prayer and sacrifice is made,
or, if the olient is wealthy, the building
of a pagoda iu suggested, in connection
with whioh the mercenary fortune teller
doubtless reaps a large commission.
The last species .of superstition to
which we will oail attention forces us
to place Ohina among the half civilized
and brutal nations. One of these super
stitions is that the soul of a dying per
son takes possession of the bed aud room
in which the invalid is lying. To obvi
ate such a curse as this the relatives of
the dying person, as soon as they per
ceive his end approaohiug, forcibly re
move, him from his bed and place hitn
almost naked upon a board. If by chance
a man should expiro in his bed, it, to
gether with all the furniture in the
room, must be burned and many atone
ments offered before the room is consid
ered fit for habitation again.
Many strange and inhuman ideas are
associated with the illness and death of
children. If a child sickens and dies be
fore the age of 12 years, its last mo
ments aro hastened by the horrible
cruelty of its parents. So long as hope
is possible the parents do their utmost
to save their child, .but as soon as the
doctors abandon hope the child is strip
ped naked and placed against the outer
door of the house. When tho end has
ooine, the corpse is thrown out into the
street to be pioked up by the passing
dead cart.
The reason for this brutality is thiB:
If a family loses a child before it has
grown to maturity, its parents refuse to
regard it as their offspring, but rather
as some evil spirit who has worked its
way into their home iu order to bring
ruin and misfortune upon it and them.
—St. Peter's.
It'a Bllaa For Her.
Mrs. Wicklins—You and yonr hus
band and Mr. and Mrs. Caddsley seem
to be very good friends.
Mrs. Dimpleton—Yes. You see, Mr.
Caddsley and E used to be engaged.
Mrs. Wicklins—But I don't under
stand why that faot should make yoa
enjoy each other's society now.
Mrs. Dimpleton—Well, of course, I
oan't speak for him, but he married a
woman who is at least five years older
than I am and not half as good looking,
if I do say it myself. You don't know
what a comfortable feeling takes pos
session of me when we are together and
I see him glauoing firtrt in her direction
and thou in mina —C1"'Aiand Leader.
Let me say I have used Ely's Cream
Balm for catarrh and can thoroughly
recommend it for what it claims Very
truly, (Rev.) H. W. Hathaway, Eliza
beth, N. J.
I tried Ely's Cream Balm, and to all
appearances am cured of catarrh. The
terrible headaches from which I long
suffered are gone.—W. J. Hitchcock,
late Major U. S. Vol. and A. A. Gen.,
Buffalo, N. Y.
A 10c. trial size or the 50c. size of
Ely's Cream Balm will be mailed.
Kept by drugglBte. Ely Brothers. 56
Warren St., N. Y.
Notice to Patrons.
I wish to notify my patrons that on Wednes
day of eaoh week I will be at Iowa City but wll
be at my office on all other daya.
ttti
FABMER8,
Tho time is near at hand when
you should begin seeding. The
wheat question has not received
the attention the past few years
that it should. There is a large
demand for good wheat the year
round, and a number of farmers
were fortunate in sowing a few
acres of wheat last season, with a
good yield, which brought them a
snug sum of money.
It pays to sow wheat and there
is no reason why you cannot sow
a few bushels and be well paid for
it. We are quite anxious to have
lots of wheat sown this year, and
have therefore made arrange
ments for a car of choice spring
seed wheat, which we will let go
at cost in order to further the in
terest in the matter. Think this
over and, if possible, put a few
acres into wheat.
QUAKER MILL CO.
THE
NEW 101 WORLD,
TflRICE-A-WEEK EDITION.
The Best Paper at the Lowest Price.
156 Papers
A YEARFORONE DOLLAR.
As good as a daily at the price of a
weekly.
During the Spanish-American war
TILE THBICE-A-\VEEK WORLD proved
its great value by promptness, thorough
ness and accuracy of its reports from
all the scenes of important events- It
was as useful as a daily to the reader,
and it will be of equal value in report
ing the great and complicated questions
which are now before the American
people.
It brings the news of all the world,
hayln special Correspondence from all
Im^rtot^newsj^^s^onthe^lobe. It
great authors, a capital humor page,
complete markets, departments for the
household and women's work and other
Bpecial departments of unusual interest.
We offer this unequalled newspaper
and the Manchester Democrat together
one year for $2.15.
The regular subscription price of the
two papers Is 32.50.
J. W. MILES, Prest. M. F. LzKOY, Cashier
B. F. MILES, Asst. Cashier.
R. R. ROBINSON Sd V. President,
H. C. HAKBERLE.lst V. President.
First National
1
BANK.
MANCHESTER. IOWA.
CAPITAL. $50,000
Gonoral
Banking
Business
L°ss_
VOL. XXV—NO. 14.
Spite
Why Not Sow Wheat This Spring?
Transacted.
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
FOR RENT.
sisaoissa
K. K. Robinson, M. F. LeRoy,
W. Miles, W. NorriB,
E5. M. Carr,
1
WM. C. CAWLEY, CHAS. J. SEEDS,
President. Cashier.
R. W. TIBBILL, C. W. KEAGY,
Vioe President. Asst. Cashier.
DELAWARE COUNTY
State Bank
CAPITAL S60.000
—DIRECTORS—
Win. O. Cawley.
W. G. Kenyon.
Edward P. Seeds.
Clms. j. Seeds.
TIME MORTGAGE T.QANS
Made, Bought and Sold,
SAFErY DEPOSIT BOXES
Forithelstorage of|valuable(papers,
etc. for rent.
Banking
House
Henry Hutchinson
Hutchinson's Building, Manchester, Iowa.
CAPITAL, $70,000
JOSEPH HUTCHINSON, Cashier.
COLLECTIONS
DR. P.E.
TKIBM*
IF'roaaaptly 3£»d.e.
DEPOSITS
on Time, Interest Al
lowed and other deposits reoelved.
DRAFTS
sold on New York, Chicago
and Dubuque also on Great Britain and Ire-'
land and European
Cities.
TIOK6T8 sold to and from all European
ports via Cunard or Alleft or White Star
Bteaeashlp Lints
el*
mmum ntei nfinwKrm rrWftn
J"
Beehler,
A. Granger, A. H. Blake,
B. F. Miles, H. C. Haeberfp,
F. J. Atwater.
First National Bank, Dubuque, Iowa.
Central National Bank New York City.
Commercial National Bank. Chloaeo. Ills.
H. F. Arnold.
R. W. Ttrrill.
G. W. Dunham,
M. H.,Willlston
C. W. Keagy.
INTEREST PAID on Time Deposits.
Prompt attention given to all business. Pas
senger tiokets from and to
all parts of Europe
dlreot to Manohester. for sale.
mm
-Ah
Canned
Goods
3ttje democrat.
RATE8_OF ADVERTISING.
SPACE. 1W| 8w 1* 3* 6M
One inch
Two inches..
Three Inches.
Pour Inches..
PIve Inches..
OOW fiO
1 TO
9 00
8 50
3 00
4 fiO
6 60
IW wjlg 00,86 ooloo o5|l» nTi
5 25
8 00
3 76
4 60
6 B0
0 00
S3 60
3 50
4 50
5 75
7 00
8 00
13 00
£5 00
S4 50
5 75
7 00
10 00
13 00
15 00
Column....
Column....
One Column..
Your old SHOES and
buy a pair that will
Fit Your Feet.
Plenty of style and
service in our new
spring Shoes. «.
Bro-s.
Vii
H50
9 00
18 00
16 00
80 00
96 00
I40 00
88
Cafd8'
110 00
00
80 00
85 00
90 00
40 00
00
26 00
60 QD
I* Advertisements ordered discontinued ill'
oontralt win be charged ac
cording to above scale.
per year
Qot
Special Prices this Week on
exceeding* six lines, few
Business locals, ten cents per line for ttoe ftrat
Q"fc"t l0n"e?tD['o,"TeCenta
per 1,116 for eMh
"j'2 -8*.
I-
i.
All the very latest styles and cov­
erings and the largest stock at
the lowest prices ever shown in
Manchester. It will pay you to
take advantage of this sale.
pa
Austin D.
OF
A large assortment now in
stock. New and fresh
groceries received daily.
Have'you tried those Uneeda
Biscuit? If not call and get
a five cent package.
simmm
5
?S)',
Noble ##$##
Arnold
You Do Not
Know
You Should Know
est line of Groceries, Canned Goods,
Relishes and, in fact, everything that
should be kept in a first-class grocery
a and provision store can at all times be is
-v.:: found at
Peterson
Bros.
••Lit*- Vr
1'. S. Have you examined our fine line®®1
of Crockery and Glassware? !s§
'V
Si
-fit
-3*.
•M
P&:
..V1'
SftSiSSISl
k!-
1 I
a.**
*«Sw

xml | txt