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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, June 28, 1899, Image 1

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d)t Democrat.
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY.
BFLONSON. FL. M. OMR.
BRONSON & CARR,
Editors and Proprietors
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE.
Yearly, In advance II
If not paid in advance 8 00
NOTICE.—On the slip of paper upon which
the name is printed, appears the date to whioh
the paper is paid for, and a renewal Is always
resncoUullv solicited.
Tbe wrf£?'8 name must aocompany any arti*
cle! for publication, as an evidenoe of good faith
the editor*
New,
Nice,
Nobby
Go
Carts
for the
little folks,
O. W. DUNHAM. B. B. 8TILB8 W H. NOBHIB*
DUNHAM, NORRIS STILES.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AND NOTARIES
Publlo. Special attention given to Collec
tions Insuranoe, Real Estate and Loan Agts.
Dflloe in Olty Hall Blook, Manchester, U.
O. YORAH. H. P. AHVOLD. M.J. YORAK
YORAN, ARNOLD YORAN
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, and Real Estate
H. Acenis. Office in City Hall Block, Man
chester, Iowa.
O. E. BBOHSON. JC. M, CABB.
BRUNSON 'ft CARR.
0RNEYS AT LAW. Special attention
iven to coUeotions. Oflfoe in Demoorat
iHC, Franklin Street, Manchester, Iowa,
FRED B. BLAIR.
^TTJRNEY_AT LAW. _Offlce in the City Hall
Manchester, Iowa,
PHYSIOIfNS.
A. J.'WARD.
PHYSICIAN and Surgeon. wUl attend to calls
•L promptly at all hours of the day or night,
bamont, Iowa.
H. H. LAWRENCE.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. Special at
•L tention given diseases of children. Have
also made a special study ot Gyneooologv,
Obstetrics, and Rectal Diseases. AU chronic
diseases successfully treated with the aid ot
various Thermal and Massage treatment. All
ohronios solicited. Consultation free. Office
over Work's market. All calls promptly at*
tended. Residenoe on Main street, the old Dr.
Kelsey property.
DENTISTS.
O. A. DUNHAM, D. D. 8.
rtENTISJrs. Offloe over Carhart Adams'
hardware store. Franklin St Manchester,
Iowa.
C. W. DORMAN.
TYENT1ST. Offloe on Franklin Street, north
of the Globe Hotel, Manchester, Iowa.
Dental Surgery in all its branches. Makes
reqnent visits to neighboring towns. Always
at offloe on Saturdays.
C. LEIGH. D.D.S.
entist. Offloe over Ander A Philip
Store Corner Main and Franlul
owa. Telephone 185,
Manchest^i
WATCHMAKERS.
p't Drug
I streets,
I7tf
E. E. NBWOOMB.
\ENTI8T. Office over Clark Lawrence ft
store on Franklin street Grown
bridge work a specialty. Will meet patients at
Farley Wednesday of each week, 82tf
PBStaehle's
hridi
VETERINARIAN.
DR. J. W. SCOTT.
TTPTEMNARY Sur »on, and Dentist. Office
In H. o. Smith's Drug Store, Main St. At
night oan be found at roomrover Ralph Con
ger's Store.
MANUFACTURING.
MANCHESTER MARBLE WORKS
TB prepared to furnish Granite and Marble
1 Monum«nttf und ltoud Stonw of various de
signs. Ha\o tb« county right for Stpe's Pat
ent Grave Cover also dealer in Iron Fenoes.
Will meet all competition.
THOMAS GIVEN,
Omtractor
and builder. Jobs taken lo town
or country. Estimates furni*ho«l. First
olatts work guaranteed. Prioes reasonable.
Shop on Howard street near Franklin. Man
chester. Iowa.
B. liSHSHY. KKBDBEIOK HLNSUY.
HENSEY SON.
If ANUFACTURER8 of Pork and Flour Bar*
rels, White Ash Butter Tubs, Cooperage
zenezftlly. Shop on Franklin St* east of the
lenezftlly.
bridge.
W. N. BOYHTOK. J. K. McEwaN
BOYNTON MOEWEN,
Jewelers and Hnuravers
dealers in Watche*. Clocks, Silver and
Plated Ware. Fine Jewolry. ttpeotaclett, cutlery.
Musical Instruments, etc.. Main street.
W. 8. JONES.
A LL KINDS OF FURNITURE constantly In
A- stook. Undertaking done In all Its
Drenches. Manchester. Iowa.
M. W.8HKLDOB. J. P. FOLKY
Undertakers and Embalmera.
ur stock ts'new and complete, Prices reason
able. Opposite K. P. Hall. 46tf
0
A* D. BROWN.
ealer In furniture etc., and undertaker,
Main Street.
P. WbRKMhlilKR,
nENERAL DEALER IN FURNITURE,
U" Coffins. Picture Frames, Etc, A oomplfte
stock of Furniture and Upholstery always vn
hand, at prioes that defy oompeUnon. A good
Hearse kept for attendance at funerals Earl*
vllle, Iowa.
KIDDBLL A CO..
TvRY GOODS. Carpets. Milllnrry, Haw and
'U Caps, Boots and Shoe*, etc.. Main St.,
Manchester, Iowa.
HENRY GOODHILB.
oneral store. Dry Goods, Milliner
vT log, Cloaks, Boots and Shoes, I
gaps, Carpets, eto, Manohes er. Iowa.
BKTEKKD AT TOE POSTOmCK AT
Aounlg
MAHOHESTBH. IOWA, A8 SECOND-CUABB MATTER.
Wloipii,
The demand increases for our
new, nice, nobby, Go-carts.
One of these Carts is
Just
what
you
want!
Nothing
better
made
hand^nddurable
Also a fuU line
Baby Cabs
Call and get prices.
W. S. JONES.
Our' Business Directory.
ATTORNEYS.
GEO. S. LISTER*
ITARDWARE, STOVES, TINWARE, ETC.
AX Keeps a first-class tinner and does all
kinds of repairing with neatness and dlspatoh.
Store opposite First National Bank, St.
HOI* LISTER LUMBER CO.
UMBBR and all kinds of building materials,
AJ Posts and Goal. Corner of Delaware and
M&cUson streets.
MANCHESTER LUMBER CO.
UMBER and Builders Materials, Posts and
Li Coal, West side near depot
THOS. T. CARKEBK.
A RCHITECT AND BUILDING SUPERIN
A- TENDENT, S. E. Cor. 8th and Main St,
Dubuque, Iowa
WM. DENNIS.
pARPENTER, CONTRACTOR 4 BUILDER,
I ub now prepared to do all worVin my
line in a good ana workmanlike manner. Satis
faction guaranteed. Plans and estimates fur-,
nlshedr Work taken ihtownor oountry. Shop
near the stand tower on West Side 6t river.
B.S. COWLES.
fllTY DRAYMAN. Am prepared to do aU
v. rk In my line. Moving household
and piaoos a specialty.
go
All work will receive
prompt attention. A share of your patronage ip
solicited. Charges right. Give your draylng
to a man who has oome to stay.
J.H.ALLEN.
/CLOTHING and Gents furnishing goods. Cor
ner Mala and Franklin streets.
L. R. STOUT,
flLOTHING and Gents furnishing goods.
Bradley & Sherman .building, Franklin
Street.
CLARK LAWRENCE.
DRY
GOODS, Notions. Carpets, Gents fur
nlshing goojls. eto. Franklin street.
QUAKER MILL CO.
TpLOUR and Feed, Manufacturers of the ueie
bra ted White Satin and White Pearl Flour.
GREGG WARD,
J^rugglsts anddealers In Paints, 011b, Wall
Fran]
Paper, Stationery & o.
kiln street.
Atwater's block, I
STORY & ABBOTT.
T\RUGS, Wall paper, Stationery, Paints, Oils
AS eto. City hall blook.
A ANDERS.
DealersPHILIPP
In Drugs, Wall Paper, Stationery,
Paints, Oils, etc. Corner of Main and
Franklin streets.
PETER BOARDWAY.
Dealer
In flour, feed, hay, straw. Maquoketa
lime, stucco and oommonandAtlascement.
Telephone lis. Lower Franklin Street.
RAOKET STORE
FittY GOODS. Clothing, Hats, Caps, Boom,
A/ Shoes, notions, eto. West side Franklin
street north of Main.
NOBLE ARNOLD.
/GROCERIES, Provisions, Fruits, eto. First
vT door north of Delaware County Bank.
P-TERSON BROS.
Dealers In Groceries, Provisions, Crockery,
Fruits,etc. Main Street.
T. F. MOONEY.
(Suocessor to Lee Bowman.)
BLACK8MITHdone
INSURE
r. Cloth
ats and
A. THORPE.
GRASSPIBLO BROS
(Successors to Beth, Brown.)
CARHART ADAMS.
PLUMBERS, Tinners, and dealers In.Shfltf
and Heavy Hardware, Franklin street,
Manchester, Iowa.
J. J. HAWLBY.
TlEALER IN HARDWARE,' BTOVN, Tin
iJ van* 9U Manoattfttlowa1
to do paper liangiuii and painting
In town or country, will give
orders
DRAYINC
1 am still in the business and
will give the same prompt at
tention to all orders and care
in handling all goods as here
tofore. My effort is to please
my patrons.
ICE
I have a large supply of clean
pure ice, which I will supply
in any quantity desired,
promptly and at a fair price.
YOOR PATRONAGE IS RE
SPECTFULLY SOLICITED,
J. M. PEARSE.
PATENTS
^Caveats, and Trade*Marks obtained and all Pat
ent business conducted for MODERATEFees.
'OUR OrricE is OPPOSITE U.S. PATENT OFFICE!
and we can secure patent in less time than those]
remote from Washington.
Send model, drawing or photo., with descrip-i
,tion. We advise, if patentable or not, free off
charge. Our fee not due till patent Is secured. S
1
PAMPHLET, "HOW to Obtain Patents," with!
cost of saxne in the U.S. and foreign countries!
sent free. Address, 1
QPAPSNOWdtCO.]
Of* Min (mil, wuMm.TOH.I
OLD SETTLERS' REUNION.
Notwithstanding the unfavorable
weather, the Old Settlera' annual re
union last Thursday was a success. Ta
bles were spread in the Amphitheater
building on the Fair Grounds and a
goodly number partook of a first
picnic dinner.
The rain storm delayed the afternoon
exercises for a short time, but President
Cowles and Secretary Marvin did not
permit Jupiter Fluvius to intefere with
their plans to any great extent. The
literary exercises seemed to interest and
please everyone in attendance, and the
productions of those who specially pre
pared papers or addresses for the occas
ion were so meritorious that we devote
a large portion of our space this week
to their-reproduction. The historian of
the future may find in some of these
papers verification of important facts
which at this time may seem of little
consequence. In addition to the pub
lished papers, Bhort addresses were de
livered by Franklin Emerson, Rev. B.
M. Amsden and Judge A. S. Blair.
Secretary Marvin then read the death
roll for the paBt year as follows:
George Acres, died March.22,1899.81 years.
Henry Baker, died June 16,1890,85 years.
Albert Boomer, died April 15,1899, 7fi years.
Mrs. Mary Denton, died January 17, 1809, G3
years.
M. F.Hunt, died November 17, 189B, 58 years.
L. A. Loomls, died September 24,1898,77 years.
John Nethercut, died May 20,1899,88 years.
Mrs. Wilia Seeds, died March 7,1899,44 years.
James J. Todd, died January 80
ent, dieaAi
•garet Mllroy,
yean,
Mrs, Elizabeth Safgent, died April, 1899
Margaret Mllroy, aled November 4, 1898, 85
K. H. Evans, died June 13, 1809,79 years,
The old officers were all re-elected
for the ensuing year. Before closing
the exercises the audience roBe and sang
averse of the "Sweet By and By."
Below are the papers and addresses
in the order ot their delivery.
Jas. Legaeslok.
With respect for the pioneers of Dela
I ware county, the vanguard of civiliza
tion, from one who came to this county
I in 1858. What was It then? A beautiful,
uninhabited plain. The lope of the deer
and the howl of the wolf were seen and
heard on hill and dale, being our only
companions to relieve the monotony of
the time.
We left the old homestead in Cook
county, Illinois, on the 15th day of May,
1854, with two covered wagonB and a
drove of thirty head of cattle, one wagon
drawn by hones and one by oxen. After
a journey of two weeks we arrived at
what is known as Plum Creek. Dub.uque
was the only available market for prod
uce. Lumber and all provisions had to
be hauled with teams and they mostly
oxen. It was then considered a pleasant
life to the pioneer. Many has been the
time that I have taken the boardB of the
wagon and put them under it and slept
upon them until morning, then yoked the
oxen and got home in good time for din
ner. The other wagon was being used In
the meantime as a house of general pur
pose while the house was being built and
we were settling down. The next thing
was to till th^ virgin, soilof Delaware
I county. I swung my lojig whip and
shouted "whoa" and "haw" to break the
first furrow in this part of the township.
Myself and sister have broken many an
acre of prairie and many a day, breaking
being done, the next thing was haying
and we had a big meadow from the Ma
quoketa to Plum Creek and with nothing
to trouble you. Once In a while an In
dian would surprise us a little.
The sheds came next. They were like
the Dutchman's house—sided and shing
led with hay. In October, 1854,1 went
to work for the late Judge Dyer. There
was only one very small store in Dyers
viile then and all goods had to be hauled
with ox teams from Dubuque, two trips a
week, having to drive out into the river
to get your load at low water time, and
there was a very low stage of water in
October, 1854. Things were running in
good order when the town of Burrington
was talked of.» All was Burrington. To
start a Btore was the next thing. I was
one of three sent to Burrington with
three leads of groceries and dry goods,
with, two yoke of oxen on each wagon
aud sometimes we had all six yoke on
one wagon. The worst time we had was
at Center Grove. We had to dig and the
oxen had to pull. We always had a spade
to dig the wheels loose. This was in the
latter part of November, 1854. If we are
blessed with a spot that stands second
only to the Garden of Eden, persever
ence and toll have accomplished it
Bockville, Delhi and Colesburg were
the only places to get anything in the
line of blacksmithlng or shoemaking
done.
Now pioneers, in nine instances out of
ten where you have made a success of it,
the bride that you took from the com
fortable eastern home !B entitled to her
share of the credit Many a time that
know for myself the wife has been left
at home to care for all that waB to be
.. cared for, whien timber was to be haul-
and Wagonmaker, Delhi, I
LACK8MITH and Wagonmaker,
0d
Iowa. Work promptly aud iu a work-1 •»,*.
from Turkey Timber. What little was
manlike manner. Charges reasonable. Your 11®" from being sold to the new settlers
patronage solicited. i6tf had to be hauled to Dubuque to the mar
ket. We never heard of a blizzard then,
but thirty degrees below zero for a week
YOUR PROPERTY against cyclones
and tornadoes in the old reliable Pho
loenix
Insurance Co., BRONSON ft CARR, Agents.
A SEVERTSQN.
Tsonic
HE ARTIBT1C TAYLOR. Shop in Ma-:
block, Manchester Iowa.
C.E PRATT.,
AINTING AND PAPER HANGING.
on sliort notice. In town or country,
estimates on all work In my line.
at H. C. Smith's-drug store
A few words more and I am done,
The lady now resides in Manchester who
taught school in Sub-DlBtrlct No. 1, Bre:
men township, and laid foundations for a
great many successful men and women
who have attained great prominence.
Many a time I have just been able to Bee
her head and her beautiful chestnut hair
bounding through a Bnowbank that was
at least five or six feet deep, and at other
timeB I have seen her ride through water
rolled upon her horse's back In all shapes
and I am proud to say that she brought
out more scholars than graduates. The
change now in the life of the teacher is
remarkable. The teacher of to-day can
board where she Is a mind to, but the
pioneer teacher I speak of bad a distance
of over three miles to go. That was the
perseverance and determination of the
pioneer women and long may they wave!
Mn. C. M. 8. Wllmott.
The Introduction of my Bubject will
date from May, 1855, when George \V.
I Stewart with a Btock of mercantile goods
I left Savanna, Illinois, destined for Yan
I kee Settlement, a country place situated
in the northern part of the county border
ing on Turkey Timber. Here
waB
coaches, or rather the Walker line, had I
been transferred from Yankee Settlement,
the former route through to the Indian
trail road, crossing Honey Creek at the
south point of Hinkley Grove—Thomas
Frentress being the only Bettler in the
gome
rove. Farther on to the west was the
of two elderly people, Mr. and Mrs.
John Heath, and just beyond was their
son and family, Uriah Heath, parents of
our townsman, John Heath. At this point
Mr. Stewart put up a log building in
which to live until he could build a more
comfortable home, which took nearly the
entire summer as all the pine lumber was
hauled by oxen or Lorse teams from Du
buque, 50
CIBBS
rnilHS
away, or Guttenberg, 25
mileB away. Most of the lumber came
from the former place, as did
Blck
HISO
all
mercantile goods. At the same time Mr.
Stewart was making arrangements for
putting up a steam sawmill, the first
built In the county the boiler being de
ficient, after two years, exploded and sent
the Investment into air, no one being in
jured
We will for a time leave the log build
ing going up log by log until the height
of two stories and return to the cheerful
boarding place at Yankee Settlement
where they not only had a store, post-of
fice and hotel, but could boast of a small,
neatly built Congregational church and
parsonage, presided over by Rev. Graves,
a most worthy pastor and a wife his equal.
By the way, the good man wanted a well
of water. The newness of the country
demanded work not only from the laymen
but the pastor In building up the new
town. He thought to turn the windlass
for bringing up the dirt and not being
strong he lost his hold and the arm of the
windlass struck him on the head causing'
unconciousness. No phvsician being
nearer than Colesburg or Dr. Acer's mill,
the same now called Quaker Mill, the
family at once sent for your humble ser
vant, I having been successful In a num
ber of
cases. I took my big book
and a case of medi6ine the size of a testa
ment and went, as 1 always aim to do
when needed, gave such medicines and
bathed the head as directed In the book.'
In a few dayB he was around but not to
turn tbe windlass. Will mention here
that I was the first homeopatb^t in the
country, and like all new theories, was
thought to be a humbug, but it then cured
as it now doeB, its proportion. Sometime
later there came two physicians by th.:
name of Chase, no connection In family or
practice. The elder was of the old school
practice, having no charity for the new
school or homeopathy, locating at Yan
kee Settlement, the younger at the new
'town of York. About the first of July We
moved into the log building leaving the
business to be carried on at the old placfc,
Yankee Settlement, until such timeB
our own new home on the hill was com
peted. Ten or twelve days after movlj
Ur. Stewart's brother and family
from Montlcello, New York. After thr«e
days Mrs. Stewart was taken with thM
terrible disease, Asiatic cholera. In 34
hours you would not have recognized Uu£
strong, healthy woman that she was anin
life was at a low ebb with little ho|
Being of a strong constitution she llvi
but not so with their three cbildrei
Their three and our two were sent up on
the hill to John Heath's but one byooe
their children were brought back slcki
The two girls lived only a few- houi
passing away on Sunday, both the
day, the' boy only a few days later. Sail
it seemed to hear htni.plead not tycoiq'
back, Mr. Heath's home heing-th.*
place for the well one's. Johnnie
the result of going, which came' to *hlm
after lingering two days. The fatality
did not end here. Miss Blair, sister to
Judge Blair, of Manchester, kindly offer
ing to come to our aid. on Sunday night.
lie the girls lay sleeping the sleep of
death, caskets were made duringthe night
by carpenters of such material
aB
treeB
nA,» aattia»a
or ten days was common. Honor to the
pioneer women of the pastl They are
entitled to the largest share of credit for
success. Now behold the change in lesB
than a half century. Rockvllle is a thing
of the past, Delhi and Colesburg remain
very nearly the same, Burrington has
been changed to Manchester. What will
It be in the next halt century? I think
we all hope that the future owners will
guard and protect the right that has been
handed down to them by those whose un
ceasing toll and hardships, with a great
deal of inconvenience that had to be
overcome by industry and determination,
have made it what It Is.
located
one store and postofilce kept by Joseph
1 Belknap, one small inn, as it was then
I called, kept by Mr. Gifford, where the
I stranger was made welcome and where
I we enjoyed a pleasant boarding place un
ijlled In a pl%ce of ot)r own,
Ul.gemwy
I which we dl
weit when Uucle
by going three miles south
ng tore
Mini tour horn
and for a time we
feared the house would go, but the storm
seemed a God send. No more cholera
cases were heard of.One seemed to be liv
ing in a purified atmosphere and the rou
tine of buBineBS moved on as before. Mr.
Stewart completed his house and we
moved into better quarters, fitting up the
log building for his goods until such time
BB
he could build a store building, which
he did In due time, with hall above for
public use and where the young people
kept time to the music of Clark & New
ton's band.
The years '56 and '57 brought in a num
ber of new settlers and there was a gen
eral building up of the Country. Some of
our young men, commers, taking to them
selves wives among the number being
Dr. H. Chase and fi. W. Tirrlll, former
state commander of the G. A. K. Mrs.
Terrlll's father, Mr, Week's, having loca
ted a short distance west of York. A
small schoolhouse was built, with Miss
Crawford as teacher, who afterwards mar
ried William Madison. With preacher
Bsrr, as Superintendent, we established a
Sunday school with John and William
Graham among the scholars, and If they
were like their older sisters, who were in
my clasB, two scholars would be all one
teacher would have time to hear repeat
their Bible verses, it being no uncommon
occurrence for them to commit an entire
chapter. Our school was the banner
school. Ministers from other places would
have stated service. Elder Blxby and
wife came often as messengers of the
truth, for truly she was a helpmeet In
proclaiming the gospel when the elder
was away ministering the word of God to
the church of his choice. Quite a settle
ment we had In and around the little
town of York. The great loads of mailt
besides that carried on Walker's great
coaches, going through from Dubuque to
St. Paul on this route was enormouB.
Then too in the spring the condition of
the roads were terrible, loaded' teams
would Bettle to the hub on top of a hill
and men with ox teams did a lucrative
business hauling out loaded wagons, yet
the timeB Beemed prosperous and every
body enjoying all they could get, as many
do, when all that Is needed can be bought
on time. Everything bought and sold on
a general credit basis will bring a re
action sooner or later and a crash will
come. It came to us In the year 58, with
very little good money In the country, and
the west had no credit In the east, for tlin
reason that eastern capitalists had loaned
money on western bonds at an assumed
value and lost largely by being obliged to
take the land. The investment was not
only a loss to them but a great hindrance
to the building up of our portion of the
country. Most of the money of our state
bankB was below par and money, taken in
to day reported good might not be half
Its value tomorrow. Mr. Stewart took In
Notwithstanding the depression or
money matters we were a happy milted
people except on the question of north
and south, living In accordance with the
times fully as much so as now, while we
had no peddling wheels we had Bide
saddles and riding habits, and what is
more graceful and healthful than horse
back riding. To me then riding on my
pony over to Mr. Boggs' and Loban's, out
to A. A. Strong's, Graham's and Blair's or
over to Yankee Settlement for a call,
most of them three miles away, was no
more of a task than going up to John or
William Grahams living only a few blocks
away. Then other feet carried my weight
while now my own are put into action,
declining strength to added age.
While many of our first settlers have
either moved or are sleeping the sleep
that knows no waking,-re yet there area
few left to tell the Btoiy the up-bulld
ing and down-going of !v le York. Mr.
and Mrs. Ahner Smlth.vHr. and Mrs.
Whitman, Mrs. Mason, Mrk ''-raham, Mr.
and Mrs. A. A. Strong, Mr. Mrs. Em
merson. The eldest and th^Lprightliest
ot all being elder Blxby and grandma
Blair, these two just nearing the century
mark.
AB
Xn. 0. M. Blanchard.
was on
hand for the new building. This was the
quickest way of providing a house for
their little bodies. Soon Johnie too was
carried away. Monday morning follow
ing Miss Blair's watching she went to her
school at Ead's Grove, only to fall a vic
tim to the disease and lived but a few
hours.
The next one to fall a prey was Mary
Jane Howe, daughter of E. K. Howe, liv
ing two miles east.. The young girl came
to do an act of kindness by fanning Mrs.
Stewart a few hours. She was taken
home at 0 p. m. apparently well and at
midnight came a messenger with 'the sad
news of her sickness and wanted the phy
sician. Before evening the next day she
too had given up those little acta of kind
ness which help to majie up a pure and
unselfish life. She was their only girl,
her parents' and brothers' pride. Mr. Gif
ford, the landlord at.Yankee Settlement,
went as suddenly and several others not
far away laid by their work from the same
cause. No doubt many others would have
fallen victims had not a windstorm come,
tearing down
On the 10th of September, 1854, my
parents, in company with five other fami
lies, started from Garllnghouse, Ontario
county, New York, for the west. We
came as far as Buffalo by rail,.then from
^Buffalo to Detroit by boat At Detroit
we changed again to rail, coming on to
Chicago, then to Scales Mound. From
then we traveled by stage to Galena, then
by boat to Dubuque, then stage again to
Delhi, Delhi at that time being the coun
ty seat. Part of our party stayed there
aver night and the rat went on to Hart
wick. We wen among thOM who went
We arrived at our destination after
dark and experienced some difficulty In
fording the river. That, together with
the Inconvenience of lodging, made me
ready, when daylight came, to go back
with the stage driver to Dubuque on my
way home to York state. But my parents
belug old I would not leave them.
Mother's health was very poor aud while
coming through Illinois she was so sick
we didn't know but we would have to
stop and lay her away. However, we
were supplied with medicine and I gave
her the beBt of care I could and the Cord
spare her till '61.
Arriving about the 17th, father rented a
very small log cabin with one room and
low chamber. There were five of us to
occupy It, so it made us close quarters.
This place waB known as the old Mc
Donald property and was near what 1B
now known as "Table Rock" at Spring
Branch.
In the spring of '55 father bought prop
erty In the vicinity of Hoyt's springs and
built a log cabin. At that time there
were twelve families settled at Bprlng
Branch. These were: Tunis MoBhier,
Solomon Moshler, Mid Eldridge, Alfred
Coates, Seeley Raster, Martin Lanning,
Charles GrommonB, Rufus Philips, Dan
Potter, Steve Potter, Matt Brayton, Her
man Ainnis. About this time, in the latter
part of the winter, Burrington, now Man
chester, was laid out Mr. Loomls, Dea
con Merrill and Mr. Hancock built the
Qrst three houses In Manchester. Mr.
Loomls and Judge Dyer built the first
dry goods store, Thomas Toogood and
Iiethel the first hotel, Rote and Henry
Conger were the next merchants. I at
tended the first prayer meeting held here
and also heard the first sermon preached.
Then the services were held around at
different houses, later they were held
over AdamB' hardware store. The differ
ent denominations all met together and
liad their services and a union Sunday
School. I well remember when each one
took their own church name and com
menced building their church homes.
But that did not entirely divide us. We
are pretty good neighbors yet The old
settlers saw some pretty hard times. Du
buque was. the nearest place where one
could do much trading. If one wanted a
stove or much groceries he must go there.
Mother bought dried fruit and soap that
lasted a year. As more settlers came in
It became easier to get the necessaries
and even the comforts of life.
Though we had many hardships to en
dure and had to do without many things
considered as necessaries nowadays, still
when things came our way we knew how
to appreciate them and if it happened to
be asocial pleasure make the most of it
and get as much enjoyment out of it as
possible. Some way It didn't seem to
mar our pleasure If we did have to go
crowded In a big lumber wagon InBtead
of In an easy carriage. Then the saying,
"the more the merrier," seemed literally
true.
But soon there will be none left to tell
about those early days when the west
was being settled. The old are passing
away one by one. Of the twelve families
that settled along the Branch there are
only eight of the old people alive.
This proves a constant reminder that
the old must die and the young may.
The old settlers are so few that It will
not be many years.we will be able to have
our basket picnics together, but we will
enjoy them while we may and hope tlmt
the people who were children thenwii^
keep up the old Bettlers' organization
while they live. Though I have travel.
some through Iowa and Kansas I alwa.
come home satisfied with Delaware couu
ty, cyclones and all.
Continued on Second Page
Doe. Qoffee Agree With You?
If not, drink Graln-O—made from
pure grains. A lady writes: "The first
time I made Grala-o I did not like it but
after using it for one week nothlnt:
would Induoe me to go baok to ooffee."
1110
MANCHESTER, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 1899. VOL. XXV—-NO. 26.
one day $200 on account, started next day It nourishes and feeds the system. The
for Dubuque, the nearest bank 59 miles children can drink it freely with great
nm
»in
away, but could not get In before closing
hours. When he called In the morning
$50 was ail he realized for the $200.
Those were trying times, all pending bus
iness on a credit basis.
Teach your boys and girls to beware of
debt. Such were the times when the
south fired into Fort Sumpter stirring the
people to war and most of our men re
sponded to their country's call. Many of
our women worked the farm while their
husbands and sonB gave themselves t,
preserve the union, sending home »liat.
they could of the little pay tliev reoelv. d.
We will not give thought to'thnim win.
ridiculed our loyalty for all Is well that
endR well, and thus It Is with our govern
ment to-day we area united north ami
south.
benefit. It is the strengthening sub
stance of pure grains. Get a package to
day from your grocer, follow the direc
tions in making it and you will have a
delicious and healthful table beverage
for old and young. 15c and 25c.
Farm for Sale.
..The Clark farm, consisting of 200 acres of cul
tivated land and 20 acres of timber Is for sale.
II Is located about 0 miles south east of
Manchester on the Delhi road. For particulars
address or call on llronson & Carr, Manchester,
Iowa,
Use
Our
my paper is already too lengthy
I will pass over the war times also the
saddest and most trying period of my life
at York. Mr. Stewart's last work was
helping to fill a box for our soldiers In the
south.
Mr. Belknap, the pioneer merchant of
Yankee Settlement, later on came to Man
chester, built him a pleasant home, where
he lived until the year 98, when he re
ceived the summons for passing in to the
unknown world, his most esteemed wife
having gone a few years previous. There
fore, let us few who are left, watch and be
ready for the Bummons when we too
must go, and as some of us believe, to
meet and be with loved ones gone before.
Vloe President.
V-'
1 HI. .Annt Mary's Pickling V1 A.ftw*
III
Bi:-
WHITE
PEARLand
WHITE
SATIN
FLOUR
Quaker
Mill Co
tasS
J. W. MILES. Prest. M. P. LvROY, Oashier
B. F. MILES, Asst. Cashier.
R.<p></p>First
R. ROBINSON 3d
V.<p></p>National
1
Hartwick.
That fiat night In Delaware county we
»y*d 1° house 12x14 which already had
toittoccupula, and twelve more comlng
itHUf-aU^nlght -youscan ^Imaclne-wh^re
and how we slept. Beds were bullron ev
ery available space of floor. Gould some
ot the young folks of the present day
have looked In it would have reminded
them of their camping expeditions.
Presideat,
H. 0. RAEBERLE.lst V. President.
BANK,
MANCHESTER. IOWA.
CAPITAL. $60,000
Bankin
Business
Transaoted.
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
FOR RENT.
R. R. Robinson,
J. W. Miles,
E. M. Carr,
H. A. Granger,
B. F. Miles,
M. F. LeRoy,
W. H. Noms,
M. Beehler,
A. H. Blake,
B. O. Haeberle,
F. J. Atwater.
First National Bank, Dubuque, Iowa.
Central National Bank New York City.
Commercial National Bank. Chicago, Ills.
WM. C. CAWLEY,
President.
R. W. TIRRILL,
CHAS. J. SREDS,
Cashier.
C. W. KEAGY,
Asst. Cashier.
DELAWARE COUNTY
State Bank
CAPITAL S60.000
-DIREOTORS-
Wm. C. Cawley.
W. Q. Kenyon.
Edward P. Seeds.
Chus. J. Seeds.
11. F. Arnold.
R. W. Tirrlll.
G. Dunham,
M. H. Willislon
C. W. Keagy.
INTEREST PAID on Time Deposits.
Prompt attention given to all business. Pas
senger tlckotsfrom and to all parts of Europe
direct to Manchester, for sale.
,ONU I'IME Mortgage
J,PANS
Made. Bought and Sold.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
For the storage of valuable papers,
eto. for rent.
Banking
House
Henrv Hutchinson
Hutehinsan'* Building, Manchester, fowa.
CAPITAL, 870,000
JOSEPH HUTCHINSON, Caahier.
COLLECTIONS
gxomptly
DEPOSITS
on Time, Interest Al­
lowed and other deposits received.
DRAFTS
sold on New York, Chicago
and Dubuque also on Great Britain and Ire
land and European Cities.
TICKETS sold to and from all European
ports via Cunard or Allen nr White Star
Steamship Lines.
60 YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
PATENTS
Patents taken through Uunn & Co. reoelve
tptcial notic*, without charge, in the
Scientific Jlmericati.
A handsomely illustrated weekly. r*nreat cir.
culotlon of any aolentlflo journal. Terms, 98 a
year: four months, Sold by all newsdealers.
wearing
and Wheat Screenings. r?--
Reproduction of
I RADE KIAnnS
DESIGNS
COPYRIGHTS AC.
Anyone sending a ekotch and description mar
quickly ascertain oar opinion free whether an
invention is probably patentable. Communica
tions strictly conQdontlaL Handbook on Patents
seat free. Oldest agency for Becurtoffpateuts.
SUIT
Other Styles are .Here
Up to $30.00.
n,j'
$ 3 J. 4 I* t!
RATES OF APVlBTHHIfc
SPAOS,
One inoh
Two inches..
Three Inches.
Four inches..
Five ifitthes..
•1 OOltl 60
100 8 09
I have on hand a large line ol oouowi which
I will dispose of at greatly reduced prices to clear
out the stock and to make room for more goods.
Take Notice—New goods bought after May
15 are froni 15 to 25 per cent higher on account of
advance in price of raw materials. Take warning.
Remember that these are not shoddy or out-of
date goods, but strictly of the best quality and an
ail around up-to-date stock.
A. D. Brown
Celebrate
the 4th
By
a
pair of our
Good
Grassfield Bros.
Another Cflrlosd
Also Louisville Cement kept on hand.
Stucco and Callolite Plaster, Plaster Hair.
*00
4 so ao
60 9 00
IS 1018 00 25 0Q6*
Column....
Column..,.
ne Column.
Boalneu earda, aot aaninfflar l«. M—». *0
per year.
Business looals, ten oentaper liatiwflhi fnt
insertion, and fire oeata per liae for aaafe sabse
quest Insertion.
flaiichester, Iowa
landcemkjt
in a few days.
Maquoketa Lime,
iIV
Flour and all kinds of Peed,
Hay and Straw, Wheat
.•,! MY FARM, of 240 acres, in Prairie Township for sale.
Call and see me before buy
ing elsewhere.
Peter Boardway.
To Dress
Well
Visit the Clothing.
House of J. H. Allen
All the latest and finest
Novelties in
Men,
Boys' and
Children's
Clothing.
Shirts
In all new designs, and
Neckwear of every
description.
HiS
iiitfp
We Will Satisfy
taste in our large
selection
Spa
•I11UM."-

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