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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, August 16, 1899, Image 8

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I
BARGAIN
In Delaware
County Land
6 1 5 A Richland Town­
ship for $ 15 Per Acre. wm
'V:^'• '::.'
Try- Us!
n'A
mm
We are sole agents for the
Loomis tract of land (near the
Backbone) in Richland town­
ship, and will sell same at any
time during the present month
for $ 15 per acre.
BRONSON .& CARR,
Of
The Racket Store.
ERECTED BY
APPRECIATIVE GU8T0MER8,
RACKET STORE
The Excelsior Laundry still retains its reputation for doing all kinds of
LAUNDRY WORK
ecus to that of any steam laundry in this section of thu state. It not only
all 11 necessary machinery and appliances, but export workmen as well,
,[th« ropciotor 1Bdetermined to maintain tho high rank which the
EXCELSIOR LRUNDRY
has ttainod for doing first-class work in all linos. If you havo not given the
Exci sior Laundry a trial. Why not? We think a trial would convince you.
We i.avo no small machineB for ironing neckbands because our method does
oet.i and more satisfactory work.
To the People who wear Clothes:
IT WILL PAY YOU!
Manchester Steam Laundry
DON'T YOU THINK SO?
Satisfactory Work at the
Same Kind of Prices.
ijfetl
kt
vl*-
*,..-,
rj.-vwy.vs
ft-
III
Manchester. Iowa.
RACKET STORE.
Here Rests
The Remains
Of
5 Killed By
fy
The Methods
1
ipiSiS
H'
•fr*. ijt.
rrjjK
1%
I
$
I
se our mpthpd flopi
FRED EILLS J*
TELEPHONE 241. "^PROPRIETOR
5.
To send your linen to the *rM
Phone
You Do Not
Know
You Should Know ™£nT
est line of Groceries, Canned Goods,
Relishes and, in fact, everything that
should be kept in a first-class grocery
and provision store can at all times be
found at
Fruits of every kind during their season.
Peterson
Bros.
P. S. Have you examined our fine line
of Crockery and Glassware'
238
I »u Iljy I.... TjV,iWy n-vrrm-tiiiti irr
ctvaFEMiicias
[Copyright, ifioH, py
TTNDER A CLOUD.
The silont soldier sat smoking at
Chattanooga. 1 can see him now as I
saw him then, his sword arid sash laid
aside, his uniform coat thrown open
negligently, his whole appearance de
noting rather one of the drudgery of
ficers of the staff, whose soldierly bear*
ing had given way under the continued
performance of clerical duties, than the
cojnmander of an army. Before him on
a tabic was a bundle of papers, one of
which he had taken up and was finger
ing absently. Direotly opposite stood
the general"—my general we of the
staff always spoke of him as "the gen
eral," though there were a hundred
generals in the army—with a dogged
look on his face that boded no goocl to
himself or anyone else.
I had attended the general on a sum
mons to headquarters, and should have
waited in the hall, but curiosity to see
the new commander'of the Army of the
Cumberland, who had achieved renown
at Donelson and Vicksburg, had over
come whatever of modesty I possessed
•it was not a gem of the first water—
and, stalking confidently past staff of
ficers and orderlies, 1 entered the room
with my chief. Once there, I stood back
in a corner where I would attract as
little attention aa possible, fearing that
I would be ordered to betake myself to
parts more fitted for a second lieuten
ant than the apartment of the com
manding general.
"Gen. Heath,'* said the commander,
I have sent for you to communicate
to you the contents of this paper which
received thiB morning from the sec
retary of war."
The general started. "The secretary
of war?"
"Yea. He directs your arrest and trial
by court-martial."
'What new persecution is this?" ex
claimed the general, impatiently.
The secretary seems to hold you re
sponsible for the disaster at Chicka
mauga."
Chickamauga? In what way does he
conneot me with that blunder?"
You are accused of purposely leav
ing the gap in our lines through which
the confederates poured, thus effecting
the rout of the Army of the Cumber
land."
Qen. Heath made no reply, standing
with his hand resting on his sword-hilt,
his brows knit, his lips
compressed.
I regret this new complication," said
the general in chief, presently. "1 have
especial use for you, and at once."
'Use for me, general? But just re
leased on one charge of treachery, and
rearrested on another. Who would fol
low such a leader? I would much rath
er you would procure the acceptance
of my resignation. Why should I serve
a government that distrusts me? My
friends, my family in Virginia, begged
me to stay with them, to fight for them.
I remained true to the union. What has
been the result? At the very outset,
in the spring of '61, I was accused of
conniving to surrender my command in
Texas. Then there were, those rumors
of treachery at Shiloh—that I had with
drawn the picket in my front in order
to leave the way open to attack—and
my arrest and confinement by the sec
retary of war. What use to beg for a
copy of 'the change? What use to de
mand a trial? No accuser, no accusa'
tion. Then, after months behind bars,
the public gaze being attracted else
where by another battle, the secretary,
finding it inexpedient to hold me longer,
turns me out of prison and orders me
to report to you, expecting you to
utilize a disgraced man. And now, be
fore you can assign me to duty, a scape
goat being needed for the disaster at
Chickamauga, an order comes for my
rearrest. The blunderer who left the
gap through which Bragg hurled Hood
has succeeded in covering up his identi
ty, while I, who commanded cavalry
and had nothing to do with the main
line of battle, must be sacrificed to ap
pease the public, who are looking for
victories and get nothing but defoats.'
ha&
and
I should not have been present at
such an interview—I, a beardless boy
In my teens—but I had been Qen.
Heath's aide from the start, and had
served him through all his troubles,
often carrying his messages to those
high in authority in his efforts to gain
a hearing. I could huve withdrawn,Tftit
nothing short of an order would have
driven me from an interview which in
terested me intensely. Gen. Heath, nat
urally restless and sensitive, had been
maddened by his confinement and dis
grace. This new trial that loomed up
before him rendered him ready to turn
like a hunted beast and rend hlB perse
cutors. It was plain to me that the
general in chief was giving his sub
ordinate time to cool. I remembered
how he had himself been deprived ol
his command after Shiloh and shelved
as a mere assistant to the cominandei
in chief, and could understand his pa
tience with one who had sultcred so
much more keenly in a similar munner
When his subordinate had finished, the
superior gave a few deliberate puffs at
his cigar, then asked:
"Have you no suspicion as to the ori
!**S
E*
of these rumors?" 1
*None whntAVPv."
The general in cucz sat thinking.
"Tho wrongs of this war," he said, pres
ently, "will be righted only as oppor*
tunity is given the wronged to right
them."
"Will you explain, general?"
The commander smoked on, unruffled,
pensive. Gen. Heath stood mute, while
I wondered what solution would be
given for so knotty a problem.
"I cannot refuse to obey the secre
tary's orders," said the general in
chief at last, "but I can postpone its ex
ecution. Meanwhilel can give you an op
portunity to perform a signal service,
which, if successful, will bear witness
to your loyalty."
Gen. Heath stood restlessly attentive,
while his chief proceeded: "You pos
sess the faculties requisite for a cav
alry leader to a marked degree—dar
ing, ingenuity, rapidity features es
pecially needed in an expedition I have
in view."
"Why do you propose, general, to
trust me with a command, handicapped
as I am, when there ure so many others
who have never been smirched?"
"Because they have not the ability to
do a work for which you are conspicu
ously fitted."
There was a brief silence, whicp) was
broken by the general in chief,
"It haa been reported to me thia
taorain* that Ufttttnel1! bom
..jsifeftl
Llppincott
Co.]
'A*' ••V'iif:
MITCHEL
about To be detached from Br'ngg's
army on Missionary Ridge, and moved
by the East Tennessee & Georgia rail
road to Knoxville, with a view to crush
ing Burnside. It is extremely impor
tant that I should know definitely if
this move be made. BurnBide must be
warned and supported, while Bragg,
weakened by the loss of one of his most
efficient corps, may be attacked and de
feated."
Gen. Heath's eye lighted.
"The means by which you propose to
gain this information?"
A corps of observation posted near
the railroad to watch the passage of
trains." I
"Cavalry?" I
"Yes." *M
"How large a force?*'
"What is the effective strengtn of
your brigade?"
Five hundred men—a mere remnant
of the force I led at Chickamauga."
'Just the number I would desig
nate."
Bragg will carefully protect the
line from our observation."
You are right he will keep bodies
of cavalry moving along tho railroad,
in order not only to protect his bridges
and telegraph wires, but to preserve his
secret. My plan is for you to take your
brigade to some point midwaybetween
here and Loudon, from which- to make
forays, in the hope of encountering the
trains on which his troops are trans
ported. You may be able to slip be
tween patrolling forces, or eut your
way through them by hard fighting."
There was a long silence,' during
which the commander smoked on,
.while
his subordinate pondered.
Supposing the move be not. jnade?"
said Gen. Heath, presently.
"I believe it will be made.**
"Then why not act accordingly?"
"First, it is not a certainty second
ly, I do not care to weaken .my army
by sending troops to support Burnside.
I wish the government to do that, and
the government would pay no atten
tion to a mere rumor."
'H'm! You would be lucky if you
could move the war department on per
fect evidence."
To this the commander made no re
ply.
Why not send a spy, instead of the
force you propose?" asked the subor
dinate.
"First, because I could not'trust a
spy who works for pay secondly, be
cause the government would, not be
likely to pay attention to a spy's re
port thirdly, a spy might be detected
by the enemy and never heard fromf
fourthly, in case you discover a large
force moving by train, you may pos
sibly, by burning a bridge, delay it, or
cut it in two. However, when hear the
railroad you can exercise your own dis
cretion as to sending a spy, though I
should recommend you rather to use a
small reconnoitering party, so that,
from- among a number, one may get
back to you with the information.
Lastly, you are to use all diligence in
communicating what you may learn to
Gen. Burnside at Knoxville."
There was another silence, at the end
of which Gen. Heath,
in a more softened
tone than he had yet used, said: "I
will perform the service, general." He
waited for his commander to speak
again, but there were only silent puffs
of tobacco smoke, while an occasional
gun boomed on Lookout mountain,
where the confederates had poBted ar
tillery and were sending shellB Into the
town. Presently Gen. Heath asked:
"Shall I forage on the country?"
"Certainly. We need all the rations
we can haul, here.*9
"Have you any further orders?"
"No."
n.
THE FACE AT THE WINDOW.
We left Chattanooga at midday,
erossed the Tennessee. nr.) moved
northward by the pike along the base
of Waldron's Ridge. On our left tow
ered the fidge on our right, among in
numerable hills, wound the Tennessee.
The general rode at the head of the col
umn, his hat pulled down over his eyes,
doubtless to conceal the turbulent
thoughts within him. We of the staff
knew that he was in no mood to be
trifled with, and took pains to execute
promptly and satisfactorily such orders
us he gave us, that he might have no
cause to lash us with his sharp-edged
tongue, which he could use with such
effeot when irritated.
The afternoon was spent. I was rid
ing with the general, the head of col
umn a short distuncc to the rear. Com
ing to a sharp rise in the road, just be
fore reaching the summit, there ap
peared suddenly the face of «a woman
then her form, then the horse she rode,
came successively into view. At first
she seemed about to turn and flee, but
instead she sat blankly staring at us.
The Bun, which was near the setting,
shot a sheaf of rays flashing in her eyes,
lighting up her face her Hps were
compressed in an effort to appear calm,
"Margaret
1" exclaimed the general,
Whether the girl was too startled to
control her tongue or did not recognise
an old friend, she continued to stare
mutely.
"What are you doing here?"
"I live near here,."
"Live near here?"
"Yes. When the federal troops en
tered Nashville we to our planta
tion."
"I did not know of any plantation be
longing to your family in this region
Where is it?"
"Two miles back, at Morganton's
Cross-Roads.*'
"Where are you going
"To visit a friend."
"We shall stop at the Cros6-Boadsi"
jf "Mamma will receive you."
The general looked perplexed. He
saw mischief in the girl'B going on, now
that she knew of our presence. At that
moment he especially desired to keep
Iris movements from the
enemy.
"It will not be safo for you to ,go to
Chattanooga alone better go baclowilh
us to the plantation."
She gave him a look otf mingled sur
prise and reproach. "Do you mean that
you will use force?"
I had never seen the general BO em*
barrassed. None of us .who were look*
ing on knew of his past} relations wfth
this girl, except that it was apparent
they had been acquainted. The sharp
interest with which wo regarded both
added to the general's perplexity.
"This is war," he said. "Inclination
must be subservient to dufcy."
1
"UnikUiMm mudctrtiv
S S
said the girl, with a rising color in her
cheek and an angry light in her eye.
"Your very anxiety to go forward
necessitates my preventing you."
It was a strange picture, one that aft
er long years of peace I often rccall as
typical of the many incongruities of
war the men in the ranks sitting in
their saddles in the various positions by
which horsemen contrive to relieve
their strained musclcs, the horses, some
lowering their tired heads, others rest
lessly biting their bits, or nibbling at
the grass growing beside the road the
young general—I thought him. an old
man then—his eyes fixed on the delicate
face of the woman, in such marked con
trast with his own. Yet of all these de
tails, one I recall far more vividly than
the rest—a tear on the girl's cheek,
which the rays
of the setting sun caused
to sparkle like a diamond.
But there was only this tear to mark
her woman's weakness, for she sat de
fiant in our path. In a twinkling the
general broke her Uown with a kindly
tone that had been natural to him be
fore his troubles, but which was rarely
heard now:
"Come, Margaret, go with us, won't
you?"
Turning her horse's head, she rode
back as peacefully as a child. But
there was an evident constraint be
tween her and the general, for, beyond
an inquiry from him as to her mother's
health, and a reply that she was still
an invalid, no word passed. We trotted
on, wondering at the strange meeting
and what would come of it, a continued
beating of hoofs and clanking of sabers
behind us, until we reached a plantation
in the eonter of which stood a square
house, in its front one of those porticos
with Ionic columns in voguo during the
"fifties." Tho yard included something
like a dozen acres, and was surrounded
by a high picket fence. The general,
the girl and I entered the gateway and
rode up to the house.
And now happened something which,
had I not looked up at the very moment
I did, would have turned the whole cur
rent of this story, perhaps rendered it
not worth the telling. What put it into
my head I know not. I might as well
have cast my eye on the well-house,
or on a roek jutting but between
the trees, or an, old darky back
in the road scraping the dirt off
hoe, or a couple of mules feed
ing. I saw all these, and there was
nothing strange in it, for they were on
a level with my eye but what was
strange was that I should have leoked
up at certain window in the top story
of the house in the very nick of time to
see the slats in the shutter turn, and an
ashen face with startled eyes quickly
sweep our party and rest an instant on
our prisoner. Then the slats were
turned again. It was aU done so quick
ly that I could not tell whether I had
seen a man or a woman. Quick
thought I flung a glance at the girl be
side me. She was white as death.
I spurred to where the general was
about to dismount.
"Something wrong, general," point
ing to the house.
"What do you mean?"
"Some one concealed up there.
a face at a*window, and a look between
it and the girl."
At the moment my brother aide-de
camp, Walter Bland, came riding into
the place, and the general ordered him
to bring a sergeant and half a dozen
men and surround the house.
"Go upstairs," the general said to me,
"and find out who is lurking there/
(TO BE CONTINUED.)
LANCE1
By CHAUNCY C. HOTCHKISS
{Copyright, 1607, by D. Appleton & Co. AH
rights reserved.)
On the morning of the 5th of Septembci
Mrs. Thoradyke was too ill to rise from
her bed. John Philhpsc, the doctor at
Edgartown, was called.
"Nothing ails your mother," he said to
Donald, "saving the disease of old uge. You
may have her with you for awhile yet, but
she's tender, lad."
Next morning the llntish landed on the
island, with but little warning of what waa
to come. Capt. Scummell with several ma
rines was at tho house. Dr. Phillipsc am)
Rachel Thorndyke were in the mam room.
Donald hud had time to hide himself to
await developments. No one seems to have
known at tho moment what had become
of Gertrude. Ames, of coursc, was still con
fined to his room.
Without knocking, Scammell entered and
demanded that Gertrude King, Hcverly.
Ames and Donald Thorndyke beam-rendered
to hun. At that moment the hall door
o)cned and Gertrude entered. Her face was
flushed as though just awakened from a nap.
Seeing Scammell, she uttered a scream,
and turning, fled throuph the doorbv which
she had just entered, slamming the portal
behind her. Hachel placed herself against
the door, but one of the marines pulled her
rudely .away and sprang up the stairs, with
Scammell close behind.
As 1 horndvke appeared on the soene he
meta marine, who opposed his advance, but
he waa shortly laid out by a blow from the
butt ot a gun. A third marine had uttacked
the doctor, and Donald dealt vyith him in
the same summary fashion. Ihen up the
stairs to his mother's room, where he knew
he would find Gertrude, he rushed.
Ames was leaning againet the wall con
fronted by the marine who had come up
with Scammell. In front of the bed stood
Gertrude with a cockcd pistol in her hand
and facing Scammell.
As Donald entered the room, he heard
the brave girl say, in answer to home ques
tion: "Never alive, sir! Settle with hun!
I am the promised wife of Donald Thorn*
dyke!"
Donald drew his sword, and with the
cry: "lurn, you villain, tUfal" he smote
Scajnmcll across the shoulders with the Uat
of the blade. As the two men shitted, cir
cling for an advantage, bcammcll ncared the
door, and quickly turning, rushed to the
r6oin below. Here there was more room
for the play of swords. The ofileer wu
clever, but Donald drew him foot by foot.
Suddenly throwing his wrist out of line, his
point fell off. Like lightning Scammell took
the bait the next mstant his sword was
spinning through the air. Before the whirl
ing steel reached the ground, Thorndyke's
blade had passed through the throat of the
villain.
In the meantime in the room above the
marine had shot at Gertrude. Ihe bullet
hud missed her, but had done its deadly
work
011
the uged sufferer in the bed. Ger­
trude fired with her pistol, and the marine
lay on the tioor dead.
Over the bed, where lay his beloved dead,
Donald swpre a vcngcuuce which should not
cease until his country was rid of the butch
ers invading it. Ames reached out his hand,
and thus was cemented anew the covenant
between them.
ior the two days the British remained on
Martha's Vineyard Donald .and his little
party lived in a disused shed deep in the
heart of the forest. On the sccond evening
he returned alone to the house, and was
surprised to lind it still standing, showing
no evidence of having been entered since
they had fled from it. A crude coffin was
constructed and tne mother was buried in
the woods near the edge of the home lot,
Dr. Phillipse doinfe the last offices. And
there she still rests, marked by the stone
Donald lived to see begin to crumble away
toadtr the hand of time.
Letter* aud Trade.
The London Daily Nows notes the
affinity between letters and trad«\
Charles Lamb and Mill used tondouu
the old India House. Austin Dobsou,
Gosso and Cosmo Monkhouse are in the
board of trado. Benjamin Kidd and W.
M. Rossetti used to bo at Somerset
House. Dante Gabriel Rossetti narrow
ly escaped at one crisis in his career
being a telegraph clerk instead of an
artist. The postofiioe absorbed for many
years the superfluous energies of An
thony Troll opo.
HIH Lfint Chance.
"Did you ever notioe," said Mrs. N.
Peck, "that about half of the piotnres
in the photographors' windows are of
bridal oouples? I wonder why they al
ways rush off to a photographer as soou
as tho knot is tied?"
"I fancy tho-husband is responsible
for it," said Mr. Peck. "Ho realizes
that it is about his last ohance to ever
look pleasant."—-Pearson's -Weekly.
HOW'NTHIH!
Wo otter One Hundred Dollars reward Tor
any CHKO of Cntarrh that cannot be cured by
Hall's Catarrh Cure,
.1. Cheney & Co.. Toledo, O.
We, the undersigned, have known F. J.
Cheney for the hist fifteen years, and believe
htm porfectly honorable In alt business transac
tiotis and financially able to carry out any
obligations made bv their Arm,
AViwi' & TIU'AX, Wholesale Drugulst,Toledo, O,
AVAI.UINC.
KIN NAN &
MARVIN,
Illinois Central Time _able No.
8:43 a.m
Wholesale
Urugsjlsts,Toledo^!).
'K Catarrh Cure Is taken Internally, actlug
dlrcctly upon the blood and mucous surfaces of
the system. Te*ttmonlals sent froe. Price 75c.
per bottle. Sold by all druggists.
Hairs Family Tills are the best.
Residence Property for Sale.
A good house, barn and large lot in
Manchester for sale at a bargain.
Long time given oh half of purchase
money if desired.'
Inquire of UUONSON
&
Cement Walks
am prepared to put down first
class cement walks, aUo do all
kinds of plastering and stucco
work. All work guaranteed to
Btand and also guaranteed as to
workmanship and material.
If you have any work in this
line call or address
W. A Whitman
HOMESEEKERS' EXCURSIONS
Via the B., C. R. & IT. Ry., June 20,
July 4 and 18, Aug. 1 and 15,
Sept. 5 and 10, Oct. 3 and 17.
On these dates round trip tickets,
good 21 days will be sold at the rats of
One Fare, plus $2, to all points on thiB
line in Iowa, UinneBota and South Da
kota, north of and including Shell Bock
and Abbott Crossing and to Waverly.
Tickets at this rate will also be Bold to
a large number of citieB and towns in
Northern, Western and Southern states.
For further information call on B., C.
R. & N. Agents or address
12:20
J. MORTON, P. & T. A.
25wl7 Odar Rapids, la,
Me Flyer to Florida
DAILY TO ST. LOUIS
and connecting lines by way of
Nashville,
Chattanooga,
Atlaijta
Leaves bt. l*ouls every evenlotc, IN a solid train
to Nashville, and carries a
Through Sleeoing Car
St. Louis to Jacksonville, Fla
to Nashville, Chattanooga, Atlanta and Jackson
*s in thdsouMi'
ngton, Aiken
rida.
ville, connecting all principal points in tliesouth
east, such as Charleston. WlUmlng'
and havannah for all points Ploi
Tickets aud full information concerning the
above can he had of agents of the "Central 'and
connecting lines.
C. C. McCAllTY, D. T. A.. St. Louis, Mo.
A. 11.11AK80N, O. 1*. A. 1. P. MKUUY. A. (IJ'A
Chicago, 50lf Dubuque. Iowa.
R. W. TIRRILL
Is Loaning Honey as cheap
as any person or Corpor
ation.
UHESNER
Blacksmith
Al-j
Does a general line of blacksmith
ing
HORSESHOEING and
PLOW WORK.
All work done in first-class order
and guaranteed. Prices reason
able
SHOP, WEST SIDE OFRIVER
Near th 4RO.
Good Advice.
When you want anything In the line of
Furniture
do not lorget to write us or examine
our stock and prioes. We have no
room for shoddy (roods, but with forty
years of experience can guarantee you
honest goods at fair prices. Remem
ber this and you will profit by it
F. Werkmeister,
3-9 Earlville, Iowa.
MICA
[AXLE
CREASE
helps the team. Saves wear and I
expeuse. Sold every
where.
MA!E
,..,*• -'."-v./ 'v.-":•
Railroad Time Table.,
ILLINOIS CENTRAL.
21,
taklnit ct
feet at 12:00 o'clock noon, Sunday,SJuly
3,
Main Line Passenger Trains.
Arrive
West Bound. I 1/eavo
C:OG p.
.tNo.ai, Clipper p. 111
Day Express.. '8:43 a.
+N0.3,
...
10:20 p.
*Xo.
1.
Flyer ..
9:40 u.
8:10 p.
9:22 a.
....,o
5 p.
I Leave
tNo 82, Clipper
...+N0.4,
Day Express...
10:40 H.
8:10 p.
|3:26 a.
*No. 2, Flyer
Freights Carrying Pagsengere.
West Hound. Leave
I2j25 p. ml....tNo.81, Way Freight...
No. 803 0:46
a.m
No
11
:K
p,m
p. m|.tNo. 71, Through Freight.
|2:80
p.
ArrlTo East Bound.* I Leave
10:MJ a.
U11..4K0.
Kit Way Freight... 110:58
12:15 p. in|.tNo. 82.Through Freight.Il2:00p.m
CEDAR RAPIDS BRANCH.
South Bound
Leave—
Bet Cedar Rpds
an Manchester
North liound
—Arrive
No,304 0:10 p.iu
No 3228:35 a.ill
No.8Tl 1:45 p. in
.. .tPassenger..
..tPassengor..
tFrelgut..
881 0:30P.M
"0.851 B:80p.m
•tl
Twenty-nine sheep introduced into
the Australian colonics in 1788 uro now
represented by lliO,000,000 of the tiuert
wool sheep in the world.
•Daily.
tDally Except Sunday.
B. G. PIBRCB. Station Agt.
DIKMOGREATWESTBNRI
"The Maple Leaf Route.**
Time card, Thorpe, Iowa.
Ci-icago Special, Daily, Going East 7:40 a ni
Day Ex ess, daily except Sunday 3:0i
Way Frelcht, daily ,11:35 a
__ Qot» West, North and South.
Way Freight, dally..
0:35
pm
dally except Sunday.. .. 1:58 pin
St Paul A Kansas City Exp, daily ... 5:41am
For information and tlokets apply to
J. I*. O'HARROW Agent Thorpe.
C. M. St. P. Ry.
1KLAWARE
TIME CAKW.
North Bound
St. Paul & West, Passenger,..'..,.
Way Freight,
South Bound
l:0» a. in
.11:59 a.
Davenport fe Kansas City, Pass.,...
Way Freight
OAKK.
0:07 p.
10:20
a.
B. C, R. & N. R'y.
KDAtt KAPIDS TIME CAK1).
MA1N1.1NKOOINO NORTH.
Arrive
ogt ..Sioux Falls Fast Express .. 18:80 ngt
IOWA CITY, CLINTON AND DA VKWORT.
2 :80 P&fBfDger 8:06
Pa 7 1 6 a
i: a Passenger g:40
... Passenger
6:0&PM
7:eo Clinton I ss&mger 7:16 a
7:60 m....Davenport Passenger.... 7:15 a ...
••Trains numbers 5. o, 8,18, ly, and Sioux Falls
Fast Express run dally, all other trains dally ex
cept Sunday."
J. MORTON, J. A. LOMAX
Gen'l[l'ass & Agt. Ticket Agent.
Cedar Baplds Iowa.
PURE-BRED
COTSWOIDS
Flock headed by choice XM
POBTEDBAMS. Wlllfur
nleh Cotswolds and grades,
singly or by carload. A
choice lot of young rams
for fall trade.
Buy our bucks now and fit
them up for work to suit
yourself. Beet and cheapest at
w.
Day Express also leaves St. Louis ever)*
morning ami carries a through sleeping car, St.
Louis to Nashville and Chattanooga, connectln
wllh through stooping car to Augusta. Throug
coach St. Louis to Nashville, thus giving
DOUBLE IDAILY SERVICE
J. STRAIN & SONS,
Masonville, la.
ALEX SEFSTROM,
LACKSMIT
tr M»ke«a8peol»ltyof
Horse
Shoeing:
Interfering
And
Corns Cured
no
Pay.
Do All Kinds Sf
Work
in
Iron—:''
Machinery and all kinds ot Farm Implement*
and Machinery repaired. The best of
work guaranteed.
PRICES REASONABLE.
A share ot the Public Patronage la solicited.
Alw
SaMMBor
to Peter Merer*
Compound Vapor and Sham
ooo Baths.
Most all dis­
BATHS
eases are caused
by poisonous sec
retionB, which
clog the wheels
of NATURE.
.Vapor ,v-
The name and
the' symptoms
may be different
but the cause of
disease can us
ually be traced
::i and
Shampoo.,
to the lmperiect notion ol the millions
of pores of the human body. A bath in
accordance with scientific require*
ments is the best preventative and
remedy known. The methods employ
ed by me are the most soientifio, ever
invented or discovered for dispelling
disease. Results tell the story. Give
me a trial. This is the Oonant system
of baths. A competent lady attendant
in charge of the ladies department.
Office and bath rooms on Franklin
street, opposite Globe Hotel
16«
G. D. QATT3.
The Old Reliable Blacksmith,
P. J. Roche
Can be found at his ahop on Franklin street
during business hours, with a oompetent
foroe of workmen to do all kinds of
BLACK.
BY
STANDARD OIL OO.
I-.• ^—.-. i.rfl ii ii W
SMITHING
Horse Shoring a Specialty.
Corns and InterterlngOnred or no pay. Satis*
•-"Hf-iv faotion Guaranteed.
Respectfully,
P.J.Roche.
:--.=\
FARMS
FOR SALE
Choicc Farm Lands, easj
terms, very desirable property at
low prices. Large list to select
from. When you want to buy or
sell call on
H. C, HAEBERLE,
Manchster, Iowa.
Abstract Co.,
DELAWARE COUNTY
Manchester, Iowa.
ABSTRACTS^*
REAL ESTATE.
LOANS AND
CONVEYANCING.
Office In First Natio na
Bank Building.
Orders by mail will receive cnrefnl
attention.
We have complete copies of all records
of Delaware county..
Leave
FI:06
am
S0,1 Minneapolis Express..
!S:I5
No.8 Waverly Passenger... 3:»p
SMftneapolls Express.,i2:8o
ngt
8:4B a ra No. 18 Chicago Passenger.
it:46 pin No. lo Chicago Passenger.
cJ8lt
car and coaches to Mlnno
apoUs and St. I aul. No. 0—Pullman sleepers
and coaches to Minneapolis and St. Paul.
MAIN LINK QOINO RAHT AND SOUTH.
iSiS S S S°- JChlcago l-assenRer.... 8:40pin
10.16 am No. 4St. Louli fassenger.. 3:0Gpm
i-f 'i? 5 £!',!c*k0 St.Louls Ex. 3:30 a
12.20
ORt No.
8
Pullman sleeper, free chair car and
coaches to Chicago. No. 6—Pullman sleepers
ma through coaches to Chloago and St. Louis.
S-™'"'"1! sleeper to Chicago arrives
Chicago :B9 a. m. fcgt.—night.
DECOKAII DIVISION.
Decorah Passenger.
8:10 m..
4:06
... uecoran passenger.
... Decorah Freight.
8:16 am
0:20PM
IOWA FALL8 DIVISION.
pm....SpIrU Lake Passenger....
8:80am
1
ENNIS BOGGS.
UANAOKH.
You'r not
so warm
in one of I
our negligee
Shirts. ..
A fine line of soft shirts cr sum-,
mer wear.
Call and examine our
line.
111
Chicago Past Express.
12:80
wet
No-iorassonfcr 6:06 pm
No Burlington Passenger
7.15
a ni
F. M. FOLEY
S RYAN. IOWA.
J. E. DAVIS, Manchester,
la., Main St., North of
Court House.
TO LOAN 0/
TODAY O O
MONEY
I am making first-class farm loans
at 5 and
6
per cent., with privi­
leges.
ABSTRACTS
furnished at a rate meeting
all competition.
J. E, DAVIS, Abstracter,
EATON
FRESH riEATi
Oysters in season.
Fish, sausage and the
best cured meats.
8HOP CLOSED ON SUNDAY.
EATON HOGKADAY.
TELEPHONE 261.
may be larger thun ours In slzei
but Saturn isn't in it when it
comes to Styles, Kinds and Qual
ity. We have rings to please the
most fastidious. Diamonds, Opals,
Rubles, Emeralds, Pearls,Engage
ment and Wedding, Society Em
blem Rings, Masonic, Odd Fel
lows, Knights of Pvthiaa, etc., etc.
Ladies'watches, Gent's watches,
Boy's watches, Chains, Charms
Bracelets, etc. Large variety of
patterns in Solid Sterling Silver
Spoons, Forks, etc. Souvenir Sil
ver Spoons with Court House
or Fish Hatchery engraved~ln
bow Call and see them
Bofflti & icEvei
Jjewelers.
Our Spring Suitings
j&'jr*'-"1
HOGKADAY.
w.
Successors to A
Stevens & Co.
(CITY HALL BLOCK.)
We have on hand all
kinds of
)so desiring
have arrived, and those desiring
SUITS
GOOD
AND
STYLISH
Should not fail to
call and examine
our stock.
Our
Suits
Overcoats
rftrf
are admirable in
fabric3
and in fit, in winsom
ness and in workman
ship.
Nearly a quarter of a
century in business in
Manchester ought to be
a guarantee of our com
potency and qualifica
tions to give satisfac
tion. •_'
You are Invited to in
spect our stock and
gel
•••, our prices.
L. & A.
WOLFF.

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