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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, September 20, 1899, Image 1

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$tl)t JBcmacrat,
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY.
B. BRONSON. 6. M. CARR.
BRONSON & CARR.
Editors and Proprietors
SUBSCRIPTION PRICK
Vearly, inadvanec |l &t»
If not paid In advance 3 Oil
NOTICE.—On the slip or paper upon which
tho name Is printed, appears the date to which
the paper (B paid for, and a renewal in always
respectfully solicited.
The writer's name must accompany any arti
cle for publication, as an evidence of good faith
to
the editors
C«'
Shoes to
Shoe the
Shoeless
-s I
8f$$ iiiSiiii ilSti
No old goods but plenty of new fall styles to show
you at
Lower Pric.es Than Eyep
&BIS8FIELD
MANCHESTER, IOWA-
Our Busjness Directory.
ATTORNEYS.
G. W. DUNHAM. E. U, STILES |(. N0HWI8.
DUNHAM, NORRTS STILES.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AND NOTARIES
C*. Public. Special attention Riven to Collec
tions Insurance, Real Estate and Loan Agts.
Dffloe In City Hall Block, Manchester, la.
C. YOAAM. H. F. ARNOLD, M. J, YORAN
YORAN. ARNOLD
ft
YORAN
.ATTORNEYS AT LAW, and Real Estate
Agents. Office tn City Hall Block, Man*
Chester, Iowa.
C. E. BBON30N. £]. M, CARR.
BRONSON CARR.
FRBD B. BLAIR.
ATTORNEY AT I4AW. Ofllce lu the City HaU
Block, Manchester, Iowa.
PHYSICIANS.
A. J. WARD.
PHYSICIAN and Surgeon, will attend to calls
•L promptly at all hours of the day or night,
Vamont, Iowa.
-tffil/LA WHENCE?
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. Special at
-t tentlon given diseasos of children. Havo
also made a speolal study of Gyneocology,
Obstetrics, and Rectal Diseases All chronic
diseases successfully treated with tbo aid of
various Thermal and Massage treatment. All
ohronios solicited. Consultation free. Office
over Work's market. All calls promptly at
tended. Residence on Main street, the old Dr.
Kelsey property.
DENTISTS.
O. A. DUNHAM. D. D. S.
rvENTISTS, Office over Carbart A Adams'
hardware store, Franklin St. Manchester,
C. W. DORMAN.
piENTlST. Office on Franklin Street, north
of the Olobe Hotel, Manchester, Iowa.
Dental Surgery in all its branohes. Makes
requent visits to neighboring towns. Always
at office on Saturdays.
C. LBIGH. D. D. S.
Dentist.
Office over Auder & Plilllnp's Drug
Store Corner Main aud Franklin streets,
Manchester Iowa. Telephone 185. I7tf
KNTI8T. Office over Clark Lawrouce &
Staeble'8 store ou Franklin street. Crown
bridge work a specialty. Will meet patients at
Farley Wodnesuay of each week sstf
brli
VETERINARIAN.
DR. J. W. SCOTT,
VETERINARY Surueon, and Dentist. Office
in H. C. Smith's Drug Store, Main St. At
night can be found at rooms ovor Ralph Con
ger's Store.
MANUFACTURING.
MANCHESTER MARBLE WORKS
to furnish Granite and Marble
aonuments and Head Stones of various de
signs. Have tho county right for Slpe'a Pat
ent Grave Cover also dealer in Iron Fences.
Will meet all competition. 9tf 94.
Contractor
and builder. Jobs taken in town
or country. Estlmatos furnished. First
class work guaranteed. Prices reasonable.
Shop on Howard street near Franklin, Man
chester, Iowa. 86tf
W. N. B07NT0M. J. p. MOEWEN.
BOYNTON 6c MCEWEN,
WATCHMAKERS,
Jewelers and Engravers
dealers tn Watohcs, Clocks, Sliver and
Plated Ware, Fine Jowolry, Spoctacles,
Cutlery,
Musical Instruments, eto., Main street.
W. S. JONES.
ALL KINDS OF FURNITURE constantly in
A. stock. Undertaking done in all its
oranohes. Manchester, iowa.
M. W.BUELDON. J. P. KOI.RY
Undertakers and Embalmers.
Ourable.
stock Is new and complote, Prices reason
Opposite K. 1\ Hull. 40tf
A.D.BROWN.
ealer in furniture etc., and undertaker,
Main Street.
F. WKRKME1STER,
/GENERAL DEALER IN FURNITURE,
VjT Coffins. Picture Frames, Etc. A complete
stook of Furniture and Upholstery always on
hand, at prioes that dofy competition. A good
Hearse kept for attendance at funerals. Er~'
vllle, Iowa.
KIDDELL A CO.,
rvRT GOODS, Carpets, MlUlnery, HaU and
IS Caps, Boots and Shoos, etc., Main St..
Manchester, Iowa.
A. THORPE.
PROPRIETOR OF "KALAMITY'S" PLUN
der Store and Dealer in Clothing, Boots,
Shoes, Notions, oto. Masonto Block, Manches
ter, Iowa
GRASSPIELD BROS.,
(Successors to Seth, Brown.)
"DOOTS AND SHOES of all grades and prioes.
-D Custom Work and Repairing given special
attention. Store in City Hull Blook.
J. J.
HAWLEY.
rvEALER IN HARDWARE, Stoves, Tin
LS ware, eto Manchesterlowa*
IN8DRE
YOUR PROPERTY against cyclones
and tornadoes In the old tablo Phoenix
iniurance Co., BRONSON &» UK, Agouts.
A
L. SEVERTSQRT
Tsonic
HE ARTISTIC TAYLOR. Shop in Ma
blook, Manchester Iowa.
HOLLISTER LUMBER CO.
UMBER and all kinds of building materials,
•U Posts and Coal. Corner of Delaware ana
.Madison streets.
MANCHESTER LUMBER CO.
CMBBB ud BuUilu. tfetuUls. PoiU uA
oou. WMtaid,.MrdspotT
ENTKKK1 AT THE POSTOrPICE AT
MANCHBSRRIT, IOWA, AS
SKCOND-CLASS I
ofi^.
1
FIT THE FEET."
GEO. S. LISTER.
tTARDWARE, STOVES, TINWARE, ETC.
Keeps a tlrst-class tinner and does all
kinds of repairing with neatness and dlspatoh.
Store opposite First National Bank, Main St.
THOS. T. CARKEEK.
A RCHITECT AND BUILDING SUPERIN
rt- TENDENT, S. E. Cor. 8th and Main St.,
Dubuque, Iowa
WM. DENNIS.
pARPENTER, CONTRACTOR & BUILDER.
,V I

now prepared to do all work In my
line In a good ana workmanlike
manner. Satis
faction guaranteed. Plans and estimates fur
nished. Work taken in town or country. Shop
near the stand tower on West Side of river.
E. S. COWLES.
{"11TY DRAYMAN. Am prepared to do all
-k in my lino. Moving household goods
and pianos a specialty. All work will receive
prompt attention. A share of your patronage is
solicited. Charges right. Give your cTraying
to a man who has come to stay.
J. H.ALLEN.
f~1LOTHING and Gents furnishing goods. Cor
ner Main and Franklin streets.
L. R. BTOUT,
/"1LOTHING and Gents furnishing goods.
^V^Brodloy «k Sherman. bui^lng^ Fjaaklin
CLARK & LAWRENCE.
DRY
GOODS, Notions. Carpets, Gents fur
nisbing goods, oto. Franklin street.
QUAKER MILL CO.
1^ LOU It and Feed, Manufacturers of the celo
brated White Satin und White Pearl Flour.
GREGG
& WAFD.
TiruRglsts and dealers In Paints, Oils, Wall
1/ Paper, Stationery &o.
Franklin street.
Atwater's block.
STORY & ABBOTT.
T\RUGS, Wall paper, Stationery, Paints, Oils
etc. City hall blook.
PH1LIPP & ANDERS.
T\ealers in Drugs, Wall Faper, Stationery,
1.9
l'aints. 011*3, etc. Comer of Main and
Franklin streets.
PETER BOARDWAY.
Dealer
E. E. NEWCOMB.
in flour, feed, hay, straw, Maquokota
lime, stucco and common and Atlas
cement.
Telephone 113. Lower Franklin Street.
RAOKET STORE.
"TvKY GOODS. Clothing, Hats, Caps, Boots,
•L' Shoes, notions, etc. West side Franklin
street north of Muin.
NOBLE ARNOLD.
/^.ROCERIES, Provisions, Fruits, eto. First
vJ door north of De'
Delaware County Bank.
PETERSON BROS.
Dealers in Groceries, Provisions, Crockery,
Fruits, etc. Malu Street.
T.
F. MOONEY.
(Successor to Lee Bowman,)
BLACKSMITH
and Wagoumaker. Delhi,
Iowa. Work done promptly aud lu a work
manlike manner. Charges reasonable. Your
patronage solicited. istf
C. E PRATT..
PAINTINGto
WM.
MCINTOSH.
THOMAS GIVEN.
U. M. PEAR8E.
TUSTlCE OK THE PEACE AND COLLECT
tJ OH. All business entrusted to hliu
prompt attention,
second lioor.
DEMOCRATIC STATE TICKET.
For Governor,
FRKD 15. WlilTI
Keokuk county.
For Lieutenant Governor.
M. L, BKV1S,
Montgomery cntml\
For Judge of Supromo Court.
A, VAN WAGGKNKN.
.i Woodbury count)
For Railway Commissioner.
W.H.CALHOUN.
Marshall county.
For Superintendent of Public Instruction,
P. B. HOLST,
Boone county.
COUNTY TICKET.
ForRoprosentatlvo,
A, S, COON,
Delawaro township.
For Treasurer, rt'JW
CHAS. H. FUltMAN.
Delhi ^township.
IwH-
For Sheriff.
1). F. IIENNESS\
$ v*1 Manchester.
For Superintendent of Schools.
F.K. MAIN,
*, Hopklnton.
For Coroner,
A. H. SW1NBUKNK.
Earlvlllo.
Mombor of Board of Supon-lsors,
JOHN REILLY,
Adams township.
When the Trans-Siberian Uailway is
finished, we shall be able to make the
tour of the world in thirty-three days.
According to the Russian Minister of
lloadB and Communications the itiner
ary will be Uremen to St. Petersburg, by
rail, one and a half days St. Petersburg
to Vladivostock, by rail, ten dajs
thence to San Francisco, by steamer, ten
dayB thence to New York, by rail, four
and a half days, and back to Breman, by
sea, seven days. Perhaps some l'hin
eas Fog?" will do it in a month. At
present the shortest route from South
ampton, by Paris, Brindisi, Yokohama,
San Francisco and New York, is sixty
six days.
Rheumatism is often preventable in
oneorall of thefollowingways:First,
and most important, by abstaining
from such articles of diet as are known
to consist very largely or almost en
tirely of nitrogen, such as lean meat,
cheese, and milk. Second, by taking as
much oxygen by means of active exer
cise as may be necessary to oxidize all
the nitrogen in the blood. Third, if
one is unwilling or unable to eat lees
meat and take exercise, then the next
best thing to do is to driuk enough pure
water to dissolve as much of the unoxi
dized nitrogen as possible, and thus to
eliminate it by means of the kidneys
from the blood. When necessary a
mild and harmless cathartic should also
be properly used.
One of tbe twertjw?tmost. relj^t|Le_
guides through the forests of the north
west is Dan Heywood, and among the
many interesting and wonderful provi
sions of nature he has noted is that which
protects a doe deer during the period
when her oil'spring 1B very young. Be
tween the toes of her feet the doe has a
hole terminating in a sack, which se
cretes a very strong odor, and ordinarily
she can be tracked by this scent several
hours after passing over the ground
but for several months after the fawn is
born, and she needs to protect them
from intrusion, these glands in the feet
of the faithful mother are entirely dry
and emit no odor by which she might
betray the hiding-place of her young.
The census of Rome, which has just
been taken, shoWB the population of
that city to be more than )a half a
million, or considerably more than
twice what it was when Victor Em
manuel made it the capital of Unit
ed Italy. Few cities have grown so
rapidly in these last twenty-nine years,
and perhaps not one has Been more ex
traordinary changes in size in itB whole
history. When it was founded by ftom
ulus it is said to have had 111,000 inhabi
tants. In the days of Augustus it had
nearly 2,500 000. In the days of the
Medici it had fallen to 35,000, and while
the 1'opeB were at Avignon it had uo
more than 17,000. Its "babilitatton to
the rank of a great city is an occurrence
almost unique in history, and impres
sively conilrms its right to the proud
title of "Eternal City."—Household.
I am
AND PAPKK HANGING
prepared do paper hanging and 1
on short notice, in town or country, will give
estimates on all work In my line. Leave orders
at 11. C. Smith's drug store
ulveu
Office in city Hall block,
Horses Wanted.
A few good horses for eastorn markets, must
sound and In good condition. Enquire at my
plai'o on Union street In Manchester.
Mtf T. W. ROUINSON
Chimneys Cleaned.
1 have got a patent devise for cleiinlug chim
neys. If you want yours cleaned leave orders
for moat Hetli Brown's or Graham & Son's. I
also do all kinds of niasou work and white wash
ing, build chimneys and cisterns and do repairs.
All werk warranted to give satisfaction.
8tf JOHN TOWSLEE,
Homesoekers' Excursions.
Aug. 15 and September 5th & l'.lth,the
Chicago Ureat Western liy. will have
on sale Ilomeseekers tickets to variouB
points in the South West and North
west at one fare plus 82.00 for the
round trip. Tickets limited for twenty
one days from date of sale returning.
For full information as to homeseekers
points, rates, time of trains etc. call on
any Agent "Maple Leaf Route" or ad
dress, P. II. Lord, Gen. I'ass. & Ticket
Agent, 113 Adams St. Chicago. 24wl2
EXCURSION TICKETS are on Bale
daily at all stations of the Chicago
Gret Western Ry to Denver, Colorado
Springs, Pueblo and Glenwood SpringB,
Colo., at a very low rate. Apply to any
Agent "Maple Leaf Route" for full par
ticulars or address F. 11. Lord, General
Pass. & Ticket Agent, 113 Adams St.,
Chicago. 25wl5
Locations for Business.
Opportunities overlooked, are the
chances for business in small villages
that are surrounded by good farming
communities. The village will grow
and your business will grow witn it.
Just the place for young men with
capital to make money ana to save it.
1 always have locations for General
Mdse., Hardware and ImplementB,
Blacksmiths, Lumber yards and all
staple lines. Free advice that will save
rou time and money by writiug W. J.
ieed, Industrial Agent, Chicago Great
Western Railway, 604 Endicott Big.,
St. Paul, Minn, uwr
iitiii&Mi m-
The Republican party upholds trusts,
because they furnish the funds to con
trol elections. The young man of to
day who supports the republican partj^
except of course those who are benelic
iaily connected with trusts and mono
polies, stands in his own light when he,by
his word or vote aids in maintaining
it. In a recent interview Ex-Senator
Washburne, of Minnesota, a life long
republican, though now it seems not in
accord with his party on the subject of
trusts, truly said:
"The present situation, to the good
citizen, the good republican and the
man who loves his- country, is really
alarming, and it is more largely ow
ing to the rapid formation of what is
called the trust than to any other agency.
First, the trust craze has changed the
whole nature of doing things- When 1
was a young man—I am now 08 -I had
the world before me, and there was an
absolutely fair Held before ine. Take
all of our most successful business
men of today and their experiences
were like mine. They entered the race
without a handicap and their grit and
capacity won. Now this building up
of truBts puts a stop to fair and equal
opportunities for the young men of
today. The young man just out of
college has no opening as a rule, lie
cannot begin business on his own ac
count against organized capital. He
must join the procession. He must
content himself with being a mere clerk
and the chances are that he will never
get any further, because there are so
many in bis clasB. This makes the
situation a serious one, and 1 am sorry
fur the young man of today. I've stud
ied the situation and I'm sure (of what
tunMytot.'
Lnv Willi,Hit A l.ivlllK.
(li, I win wiilk wlt.li you my ul wlilcliovor
wny 'in irr,
Y.iirll lmvn inn, loo, tlio sMt of yon, Willi
ltcitrt us Unlit us air
No caro for whuro tlio roiul you take Is load
ints—anywhero—
It can lint bo a joyful jnunt tho whilst you
journey thoro."
So sani fair .lomilo warm ami true bofore
lior weililllm iluy.
For luarrlauo to her foolish heart was but
protty play
She loved nor tail. Ills kisses swoet, woroall
tho worlil to hor.
Anil thought of llfo's haril riiKKeil roail 'tworo
bPttor to ilefor,
Tho roiul you taUo "s tho road of love an'
that's the breailth of two,
Anil 1 will walk with you, my lad, oh 1 will
walk with you."
llut, ah full soon .Ion chutiKod her time, the
fairest brlilo must (line.
And living In a bare, cold room, the sweetest
wife will pino,
A dainty Rlrl may live on love, a wife wants
beefsteak too.
And when there is naimht for dinner, poor
love himself looks blue.
Ilor rooms must he furnished nicely, how
else can a woman live,
And tho plumpest wife pets scrawney If .lad
has but kisses to give.
Aye clad, my lad, I'll walk with you, what
ever winds may blow,
llut .len Is sure to want good shoes to keep
her feet from tlio snow.
She plies hor needle day and bight though
the pain In her side Is bad.
Ho whittles a box ami ogles the girls, nor
cures for his wife," dear lad,"
Ills pipe and beer are more to him than bis
wire and cheerless home,
Aod lad and work are enemies and never
can
friends biKiome.
'TIs better to daneo tliall cry," says lad, blit
.leunle 1s sick at heart,
There's rent to pay, the flour Is gone, lad
plays so poor his part,
Tliat .len Is angry wllli all the world, with
ten rs bemoans her fato,
Crios, oh were the river twice as deep,
could not drown my bate,
For the cruel tie that hinds me—but she had
her own sweet way.
She'd marry hor lad In spite o' the de'it but
sorry Is Jen to-day.
\K1UF. B.
Tho Care ol Corn Stalks
(lty W. u. Kockwood.J
One lamentable waste which is go
ing on under the very eyes of the far
mer, and one for which there is no
shadow of excuse ia that now at har.d
in ihe cornfield.
In the western and middle states
where hundreds of acres of corn stalks
have been allowed to stand and go
back into the earth or else be burned
in order to get rid of them, this waste
has been very great. The actual value
of the stalk as food is nearly as great
as that of the grain itself.
ln the great corn growing belt it
may not be possible to utilize fully this
part of the plant, but for the farmer
whose cornfields do not acquire so ex
tended an area there is not the slight
est cause for treating this valuable pro
duct as it is treated on the average
farm.
Corn should be cut before it is fully
ripe. This secures the juices In the
plant, at the same time doing no In
jury to the grain, which will mature
after It is in the shock.
Large shocks of corn are preferable
to small ones, since the surface expoi
ed to the weather is less. Hu«jritif§
should-bedone-aa eariy 'in tKo seiflSiSS
as possible and the fodder secured at
once instead of allowing it to stand
in the fiold until mid-winter or even
later, as iB sometimes the case. There
is very little food value left after the
bundles have been soaked through and
through by rain and completely weath
er beaten. Fallen shocks should be
righted after a wind storm and not
allowed to remain lying on the ground.
Care is necessary in stacking the
bundles of corn stalks, or they will
spoil. I have seen stacks which rotted
badly by reason of being improperly put
up. The center must be kept full and
not allowed to be on a level with the
outside of the stack or it will settle too
much then when heavy rains come
they beat in and, following the course
of the bundles, A'et it through.
Where one depends on stacking corn
fodder it should be put in small stacks,
these can be drawn inside the barn to
better advantage as required, without
leaving any portion exposed to the
weather.
Load (or load good, bright, well-cured
corn fodder is equal to hay for feeding
stock. What is wasted on the average
farm often equals the amount consum
ed.
Feed for Dairy Cowa.
Pastures are dry and brown or eiae
thick with rank weeds and brush, so
why expect boss to till the pail as full of
rich milk as she did in June? Those
who have good pasture are not the ones
who complain so greatlyover the failure
of the milk llow. Those who knew in
Beason that their pasture would be Bcant
in midsummer and prepared forage
crops against the certain time of need,
do not complain either, for if they feed
heavy enough boss not only keeps up
the June How in both quality and quan
tity, but generally increases for she likes
changes of diet as well as her owners.
Now, while the troublous time is on
you, get the lay of your ground and de
cide on the crop that you will use for
next season's scarcity, for come it sure
ly will. There are many good crops for
this purpose—different ones being need
ed for different localities. It doesn't
matter a great deal whether it is good
fodder, clover, peas, millet or what, so
you have enough, and good what there
is. Sheaf oats are a good feed for both
cows and horses. To be their best for
such uses they should be cut before they
are ripe. One year, I remember, the
pastures were almost burned they were
BO dry, and we procured sheaf oats for
our cow and heifer. How they did en
joy them! It being so dry the oats were
short and not well filled—indeed some
fields were not worth threshing—but it
made fine feed. They were cut green
Borne Btalks and heads were brown, oth
ers green, as the crop ripened very un
even. 1 have often wondered why more
farmers, especially thuse who keep a
small dairy, do not cut and cure their
oats green or else purchase of some one
to put up in that Btage. It Beems to me
they would be worth more so than the
grain will bring when threshed,
MANCHESTER, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, SEPT, 20, 1899.
One traveling through this part of the
state would be surprised at the majority
of poor butter cows, the poor care and
wrong feed given, and the very lacking
o- —i «w—0 meat, a.bk you
convenlencea (V) for taking care of the &6W food drmk*
milk and making butter. To Btich the
creamery is a money bringer to a great
extent, but if they would cull their cows
dispose of all the poor ones, even if they
had to purchase an entirely new set of
cows, and would feed intelligently, how
much greater help the creamery would
be.
One of our neighbors has four cows
whoBe milk they sell to thecreamery for
Kl cents per pound for butter fat con
tained therein, and they receive 7(1 cents
per cow each week. It looks small in
deed by the side of the cows To be sure
he will have calves to sell, but to us it
seems it would be better for him to pro
cure better cowd.
Did it ever occur to you that through
the country, especially the sleepy nooks,
there are more cows giving milk six
months than there are nine, and more
that give milk nine than ten, with
scarcely any cowa giving milk ten and
one-half and eleven monthB? Often
this is not the cow's fault as they would
do better were they rightly managed,
but very often it is the cow and nothing
else. She WBB bred to do no more, was
raised to do no more and is cared for
along the same lines. The owners do
not expect anything else and they ought
not,|for a cow fed on dry, hard corn,
with an occasional desert of musty hay
or spoiled fodder, ice water to drink and
a row of posts to shelter her, can't make
a 300-pound-a year record, not much.
Yes, this is summer, but winter is
coming and it is excellent policy to pre
pare beforehand, so think of these things
and do your beBt towards preparing a
comfortable place foe the cows, and feed
and water that won't go down in chunkp.
—Emma ClearwaterB, in AViscons
Agriculturist
FOR HAWKEYE FOLKS
STATE ITEMS WHICH WILL BE OP
GENERAL INTEREST.
Sioux (.'lty. In., Sept. O.—The Journal
lays today: John M. Rnlya, a humble
Sioux City butcher, hns got the best
of the great Armour concern to the
tune of perhaps $100,000, and all in an
entirely legitimate way. Last spring
a representative of the Armours made
a proposition to llalya to furnish him
his "entire supply" of fresh pork for
the succeeding nwuths at a rate based
upou 5% cents for loius, from which
chops are cut, and a corresponding
figure for other grades. Ralya ac
cepted the proposition, aud a contract
was drawn and slgued. In this con
tract there was no limit placed upon
the amouut of fresh pork that would
be supplied to Ralya. In a short time
the price of products for which Ralya
had contracted commenced to rise.
Kalya Knows a Good Thing,
Then Ralya commenced doing a job-
a time Mswiie?raSe^outsltfe
of his own market were filled as fast
aBMj^JiL But the prices kept boom
IriPS^^fcfcssctly got to such a figure—
10 und 16 cents a pound—that the
Armours refused to fill the orders se
cured by Ralya on Ihe outside. As the
prices mounted skyward Ralya came
to more aud more appreciate the snap
he had in his contract, and he became
a convert to expnuslon. Ralya has
been able to get orders for scores of
carloads of pork loins, etc., at a profit
ranging in the vicinity of .$700 per car
load.
HU Salea Will Measure HI* Olnhu,
The statement Is made that he Is
8elliug subject to delivery, and that
every refusal of the Armours to fill
the orders is simply piling up the
amount of the claim which he will
have against them for breach of con
tract. These sales will therefore be
the measure of his claim, and there are
those who estimate the amount of the
profits at not less than $100,000. It
is reported thnt Armour seut a couple
of his best attorneys here to investi
gate the Ralya contract, and that
after taking everything into considera
tion they advised him that the best
that could be done would be to flatly
refuse to till the orders under it and
trust to the law suit by Ralya, what
ever might be tlio amount of dam*
ages he could secure.
STATE TWINE FACTORY.
Fro»pect That Iowa Will lluve Cue iu the
Not Distant Future.
Des Moiues, la., Sept. 11.—The mem
bers of the board of control of state
Institutions returned Saturday from
Stillwater, Minn., where they thor
oughly investigated the binding twine
factory which the state operates in the
penitentiary there. The board was
disappointed in finding that it would
require about $250,000 capital to estab
lish the manufacture.
But there is every reasou to believe
It would be profitable to the state, aud
it will probably be recommended to
the next legislature. The board has
determined that it will consider any
plan of manufacturing ou state account
in the penitentiary. If adpoted, the
plan will be operated at Anamosa
penitentiary.
New Defenite Against the Game Laws.
Des Moines, la., Sept. 7.—Attention
has been called by the state game
warden to the fact that Estherville
people are operating a cold storage
plant, sending hunters into the coun
try throughout the northern part of the
state to kill game in violation of law,
dressing, and shipping it out of the
state. The defense is that they are. en
gaged In interstate commerce and can
not be interfered with by the state. At
torney General Remley will prosecute
at once, holding that the defense, never
before advanced for such actions, is
worthless.
Gotliaiu llutcher* Offered a I'luut.
Des Moines, la., Sept. 7.—The Liver
pool and Des Moines Packing com
pany's plant in this city will be of«
fered to the New York Retail Butchers'
association, which wants an independ
ent western plant. The Des Moines
establishment has not been in opera
tion for three years. It cost $300,000,
and Is one of the largest in Iowa, fitted
to handle either hogs or cattle. The
association has just dropped negotia
tions for purchase of a Kansas City
nlout-
Drink Grain-0
after you have concluded that you ought
not to drink coffee. It is not a medi
cine but doctors order it, because it
healthful, invigorating and appetizing
it is made from pure grains and has
that rich seal brown color and tastes
like the finest grades of coffee and costs
about )£a8 much. Children like it and
thrive on It because it is a genuine food
drink containing nothing butuou rish
meat. Ask your grocer for Grain-o, the
and Bsc. gg
CYCLONE AND TORNADO
Insurance In Drsl eliiss mmpunlos written and
polloU's issm'il by HJ«»NS(Y
&
Flour that we guarantee
to be equal to any and
superior to many flours
on the market. Econo
mize! Help yourself by
helping your home mill.
Ask for Quaker Mill flour
the kind with
A Quaker on Every Sack.
Your neighbor uses it,
why not you?
Quaker Mill Co.
J. W. MILES. Prcst. M. P. L*ROY, Cashier
II. P. MILKS, Asat. Cashier,
tt. R. ROUINSON 2d
V.
H.<p></p>First
C. HAKUEULE.ist
V.<p></p>National
1
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
SAFETY DEPOSIT"" BOXES
FOR RENT.
SZBECTOBS.
R. R. Robinson, M. P. LoKoy,
J..W.
Miles, .. W.H.Norrls,
a. M. Carr, -v m. Beehler,
H. A. Granger,
WM. C. CAWLEY,
President.
R. W. TIBR1LL,
2#
i&M
Vice President.
State Bank
CAPITAL' $60,000
-DIRECTORS—
Wm. C. Cawlcy.
W. G. Ki'nyon.
Edward P. Seeds.
Chas. J.
INTEREST PAID on Tlm« DapoiUf.
prompt atteotlon given to all business. Pas
senger tlekots from and to
all parts of Europe
direct to Manchester, for sale.
T.ONO
E
House
Henrv Hutchinson
Hutchinson's Building. Manchester. Iowa.
CAPITAL. S70,000
JOSEPH HUTCHINSON, Cashier.
COLLECTIONS
Fxomptly 2gq.cla.
DEPOSITS on Time, Interest Al
lowed and other deposits received.
DRAFTS sold ou New York, Chicago
and Dubuque: also on Great Britain and Ire
land and European Cities.
TICKETS
VOL. XXV--NO. 38.
TAJIK.
BE HONEST!
A re
•ipainst the use ol Quaker
Mill Flour?
Arc you one tvho thinks
that in order to get good
Hour you must buy flour
that is made elsewhere?
Have you ever given
Quaker Mill Flour a fair
trial?
Do you want to econo
mize?
Lend Us Your Listener!
Don't let your grocer
buzz you into paying io
-H to 2o cents more for a
sack of foreign flour when
you can buy Quaker Mill
A
President,
President-
BANK,
MANCHESTER. IOWA.
CAPITAL. $50.000
General
Banking
Business
The most complete
Line of....
Successors to
Transacted.
A.
J. ATWATER.
H. Blake,
B. P. MUes, H. C. Haebcrle,
F.
J. Atw&ter.
cosroESFoarsssrxs.
Commercial National Bank. Cbleago. Ills.
&
CHAS. J. SEEDS,
Cashier.
C. W. KEAGY,
Asst. Cashier.
DELAWARE COUNTY
H. P. Arnold.
R. W. Tlrrill.
G. W. Dunham,
M. H. Williston
Secdn.
C. W. Keagy.
MORTGAGE
7,PANS
Made, Bought and Sold.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
For tho storape ot valuable payers,
etc. for rent.
Banking
sold to aud from all European
ports via Cunard or Allen nr White Star
Steamship Lines.
50 YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
TRADE MARKS
DESIGNS
COPYRIGHTS &C.
quickly iisuortnln our opinion froo whether on
invention Id probnbly piiteutnblo. Communion
tlonsfltrlctlyconOclcntltil. Handbook on Patents
sent froo. oldest auency for Roeurtnt* put
out
H.
I'jttonts taken through Mutui A Co. receive
jjtrcfuf notice, without charge, lu tho
Scientific American.
A handsomely Illustrated weekly. I.nrco9t ctr
Ternis, (3 a
cuiiitluii of any flclontitlo journal.
vonr: four monthu, 1. Bold by ull newsdealers.
NIUNN & Co.36,Broadwa»' New York
Crunch Office. G25 SU WiiBh'uuton D. C-
F. P.
PETERSON,
Manufacturer ot
WAGONS
And Repairer
of all kinds of Vehicles, and general ropalret
of all Kinds of Wood Work
For Farming Implements and Machinery
Shop on Franklin Street, near the bridge, with
Alex Scfstroxn, in building lately occupied by
Peter Meyer. Have had several years exper
ience the past three with Kennedy Buggy Co.
Work Guaranteed. F. P. PETERSON.
Kiniie & Madden
81je Oeraocrat.
RATES
OP
ANNOUNCEMENT
In
making
If Flour and all kinds of Feed,
S Hay and Straw, Wheat
and Wheat Screenings.
MY FARM, of
240
Call and see me before buy
ing elsewhere.
Reproduction of the
$5.98 SUIT
Other Styles are,Here
Up to $20.00.
ADVERTISING*.
SPACE.
lw Sw
1M
eo
360
4 60
676
7 00
8 00
18 00
25 00
SM
One Inch
Two inches..
Three lnohes.
Four inches..
Five inches..
ii Column....
One Column.i
FALL
my annual fall announcement I
am pleased to be able to state that I am
now prepared to show my patrons the fin- x&fa
est, most stylish and serviceable stock of
Furniture
ever seen in this county. I
D. BROWN'S
Furniture Stare.
Shoe the Children
We have just what you
i^i^^ are looking for. A
&
shoe that looks well and
will wear well. Come and
look atjthem.
Sch°o1 B°°ks.
School
IV
1100
1
*00
9 SO
800
•1 RO
985
8 00
875
4 60
60
000
18 00
iT51
$•60
•00
13 00
18 00
SO 00
576
700
$10 00
16 (10
to 00
00
90 00
40 00
86 00
186 00
10 00
13 00
16 00
96 00
60 00
4 AO
6 SO
Column....
26 00
19 60
«J 00
soon
OT
Advertisements ordered discontinued bo
fore expiration ofoontract will be charged ao
oordlng to aboveseale.
Business oards, not exceeding six Haw, 16.0
per year.
Business locals, ten oents per line for the first
Insertion, and five oents per line for esdi ntbse
quest Insertion.
A
DOWN PILLOWS. CUSHlbNS
Anew lot in all sizes, covered with muslin,
just received. -. si
EVERYTHING usually kept in a first
class Furnituie Store besides many novel- 4
ties will be found at
writing tablets
j. and general school supplies
and
ever offered in Manchester.
Gregg & Ward
-The school
season it
near at
hand and
the
children
will
each
want a pair
want a pan
of shoes.
Another Carload LAND CEMENT
., in a few days.
Also Louisville Cement kept on hand. Maquoketa Lime.
Stucco and Callolite Plaster, Plaster Hair. -r.
1
acres, in Prairie Township for sale.
Peter Boardway.
To Dress
Well
Visit the Clothing
House of J. H. Allen -m
All the latest and| finest
1
Novelties in
Men,
Boys' and
Children's
Clothing.
Shirts
In all new designs, and w*
Neckwear of every
description.
We Will Satisfy
Any ,s
taste in our large
selection
J. H.
Allen

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