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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, October 11, 1899, Image 1

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Democrat,
)t
PUUL1SHED EVERY WEDNE8DA i«
BRONSON, K, M. CARR.
BRONSON & CARR.
Editorsiand Proprietors
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE.
japxy. In advance
If opt paid In advance
NOTICE.—On the slip of paper upon winOP
the bame is printed, appears the date to which Voir,
(ho .paper is paid for, and a renewal 1B always
respeotfully solicited.
The writer's name rauetaocompany any arti
cle tor publication, as an evidence of good faith
to the editor*
'heri Winter Fires Begin to
Burn,
en's Thoughts to Slippered
Comfort Turn,
IV
rtENTIST. Offloe on Franklin Street, north
L/ of the Globe Hotel, Manchester, Iowa.
Dental Surgery In all its branohes.
.rsquent visits to neighboring towns,
at offloe on Saturdays.
C. LEIGH. D. D.
Dentist.
Store Corner Main and Fran!
Manchester Iowa. Telephone 18S.
\TETERINARY Surgeon, and Dentist. Offloe
in H. 0. Smith's Drug Store, Main St. At
night can be found at rooms over Ralph Con
ger's Store.
MANUFACTURING.
MANCHESTER MARBLE WORKS
T8 prepared to furnish Granite and Marble
1 Monuments and Head Stones of various de
signs. Have the county right for Slpe's Pat*
ent Grave Cover also dealer in Iron Fenoes.
Will meet all competition. 8tf M.
1
W. S. JONES.
ALL KINDS OF FURNITURE constantly in
A stook. Undertaking done
oranohes. Manchester, Iowa.
Ourable.
sir
cs
Boots, Shoes and Rubbers.
A WE FIT THE FEET. MANCHESTER. IOWA.
Our Business Directory.
ATTORNEYS.
Q. W. DUNHAM. B, B, STILES FL. RORUIS.
DUNHAM, NORRIS STILES.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AND NOTARIES
Fublio. Special attention given to Collec
tions Insuranoe, Real Estate and Loan Acts.
Dfllce in City Hall Block, Manchester, la.
0. YORAK. H. F. ARNOLD. M. J, YOKAN
YORAN. ARNOLD YORAN
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. and Real Estate
Agents. Office over Delaware County State
Bank, Manchester, Iowa.
O. E. BB0V80H. JS. M, CARR.
BRONSON CARR,
FRED B. BLAIR..
A TTORNKY AT LAW. Office in the City HaU
Block, Manchester, Iowa.
PHYSIOIANS.
A. J. WARD,
PHYSICIAN and Surgeon, will attend to calls
^w4CompUy «t^h4tii*or.ttae toy or nigh*,
.^anient, low*.
H. H. LAWRENCE.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. Speolal at
tention given diseases of children. Have
also made a speolal study of Gynoooology,
Obstetrics, and Rectal Diseases. All chronic
diseases successfully treated with the aid of
various Thermal and Massage treatment. All
chronics soliolted. Consultation fr$e, Offloe
over Work's market. All calls promptly at
tended. Residence on Main street, the old Dr.
Kelsey property.
DENTISTS.
O. A. DUNHAM, D. D. S.
DENTISTS, Offloe over Carhart A Adams'
•J hardware store, Franklin St. Manchester,
Iowa,
C. W. DORMAN.
ENTERED AT THE POSTOTriC* AT
WILL PAY
you to get our prices on NEW FALI. GOODS.
WE WANT YOUR TRADE
and have made prices that will get it.
(SHIELD BROS.
GEO. S LISTER*
ITARDWARE, STOVES, TINWARE, ETO.
Keeps a first-class tinner and does all
kinds of repairing with neatness and dispatoh.
Store opposite First National Bank, Main St.
THOS. T. CARKEEK.
A RCHITECT AND BUILDING SUPERIN
TENDENT, S. E. Cor. 8th and Main St.,
Dubuque, Iowa
WM. DENNIS.
flARPENTER, CONTRACTOR & BUILDER,
I am now prepared to do all work in my
i'Bein a good and workmanlike manner. Satis
faction guaranteed. Plans and estimates fur
nished. Work taken in town or oountry. Shop
near the stand tower on West Side of river.
E. S, COWLES.
rjITY DRAYMAN. Am prepared to do all
"k in my line. Moving household goods
and pianos a speoialty. All work will receive
prpmpt attention. A share of your patronage Is
solicited. Charges right. Give your drayimr
to a man who has come to stay.
J.H.ALLEN.
/~1L0THING and Gents furnishing goods. Cor
ner Main and Franklin streets.
/"CLOTHING and Gents furnishing goods.
Bradtav A Shflrmnn building, Franklin
Bradley & Sherman
atreet.
CLARK & LAWRENCE.
r\RY GOODS, Notions, Carpets, Gents fur
nishing goods, eto. Franklin street.
QUAKER MILL CO.
T?LOUR and Feed, Manufacturers of the cele
brated White Satin and White Pearl Flour.
GREGG & WARD.
Druggists
and dealers In Paints, Oils, Wall
Paper, Stationery & c. Atwater's block,
franklin street.
STORY ft ABBOTT.
T)RUGS, Wall paper, Stationery, Paints, Oils
a-* eto. City hall blook.
PHILIPP
Dealers
Makes
Always
_. .. ....
Office over Ander ^lMiillpp's Drug
kiln streets,
E. E. NEWCOMB.
DENTIST.aspecialty.Franklin
Office over Clark Lawrence &
Staehle's store ou street. Crown
bridge work Will meet patients at
Farley Wednesday of each week 82tf
VETERINARIAN.
DR. J. W. SCOTT.
WM. MoINTOSH.
THOMAS QIVBN
•^LKontractor and builder. Jobs taken in town
\J or country. Estimates furnished. First
class work guaranteed. Frloes reasonable.
Shop on Howard street near Franklin, Man
chester, Iowa.
W. N. BOYMTON.
F. McEWSH.
BOYNTON MoBWEN,
(XTATOHMAKERS, Jewelers and Engravers
VV dealers in Watohes, Clooks, Silver and
Plated Ware, Fine Jewelry,
Spectacles, cutlery,
Musloai Instruments, eto., Main street.
In aU Its
M. W. SHBLDOH. J. P. FOLEY
Undertakers and Embalmers.
stock Is new and complete, Prices reason
Opposite K. P. HaP
able. Opposite K. P. Hall.
A. D, BROWN.
Dealer
in furniture etc., aud undertaker,
Main Street.
P. WBRKMEISTER.
rtENERAL DEALER IN FURNITURE,
\JT Coffins. Picture Frames, Etc. A complete
atook of Furniture and Upholstery always on
band, at prloes that defy competition. A good
Hearse kept for attendance at funerals. Earl
Tille, Iowa.
KIDDBLL & CO.,
T\RY GOODS, Carpets, Millinery, Hats and
Caps, Boots ana Shoes, eto., Main St,
Manchester, Iowa.
A. THORPE.
PROPRIETOR OFJ'KALAMITY'S" PLUN
A der Store and
Shoes. Notions, eto.
ter. Iowa
der Store and Dealer in Clothing, Boots,
Masonlo Blook, Manobes-
GRASSPIELD BROS..
(Successors to Seth, Brown.)
DOOTS AND SHOES of all grades and prloes.
Custom Work and Repairing given speolal
attention. Store In City. Hall Block.
J. J. HAWLEY,
HEALER IN HARDWARE, Stoves,
I' ware, eto ., Manchesterlowa*
& ANDERS.
Wall Paper, Stationery,
etc. Corner of Main ana
in Drugs.
Paints, 0119,
Franklin streets.
PETER BOARDWAY.
D,ealer
in flour, feed, hay, straw, Maquoketa
lime, stucco and common and Atlas cement,
lelephone U9, Lower Franklin Street.
RACKET STORE.
DRY GOODS, Clothing, Hats, Caps. Boots,
Shoes, notions, eto. West side Franklin
street north of Main.
NOBLE ARNOLD.
/^.ROOERIES, Provisions, Fruits, eto. First
door north of Delaware County Bank.
PETERSON BROS.
Dealers in Groceries, Provisions, Crockery,
Fruits, etc. Malu Street.
T. P. MOONBY.
(Successor to Lee Bowman.)
LACKSMITH and Wagonmaker, Delhi,
1
Iowa. Work done promptly and in a work
manlike manner. Charges reasonable. Your
patronage solicited. istf
C.E. PRATT..
PAINTINGto
AND PAPER HANGING. I am
prepared do paper hanging and painting
°o snort notice, In town or country, Will give
estimates °n all w°rk In my line. Leave oraei
at H. C. Smith's drug store
J, M. PEARSE.
OF THE PEACE AND COLLECT
All business entrusted to him given
OR.
prompt attention,
second floor.
i.
Office In City Hall block,
Horses Wanted.
A few good horses for eastern markets, must
be sound aud In good condition. Enquire at my
piacft on Union street In Manchester.
T. W. ROIIINSON
Chimneys Cleaned.
I have got a patent devise for cleaning chlm
J'.S01 ,"!?1" y?ura cleaned leave orders
(or me at Hetb Brown's or Graham & Son',. I
?'80 ooall kind, of mason work and white wash
ing, build chimneys and cisterns and do repairs.
Ail work warranted to give satisfaction.

46 tf
Tin
TNSURE YOUR PROPERTY against cyclones
JL and tornadoes In the old reliable Phoenix
Inturanoe Co., BRONSON ft CARR, Agents.
A L. SEVERTSQN.
TsonloARTISTIC
HE TAYLOR. Shop in Ma
block, Manchester Iowa.
HOLLISTER LUMBER CO.
UMBER and all kinds of building materials.
Jj posts and Coal. Corner of Delaware and
Madison streets.
MANCHESTER LUMBER CO.
tJMBBR MA BttlUM. M.UrUlI, Potts aaB
A* OML WMiatdt uu 4»#oi.
JOHN TOWSLEB.
EXCURSION TICKETS are on sale
daily at all stations of the Chicago
faret Western Hy to Denver, Colorado
Springs, Pueblo and Glenwood Springs,
Colo., at a very low rate. Apply to any
Agent "Maple Leaf Boute" for full par
ticulars or addresB P. H. Lord, General
Pass. & Ticket Agent, 113 Adams St.,
Chicago. 25wl5
Business Opportunities.
Thei B. C. B. N. By. is constructing a
new line north and west from Worth
ington, Minn., to the west line of the
state, which will be completed within
thevear. The country through which
the line passes 1b the best in south-west
ern Minnesota, is practically all under
cultivation and thickly settled by well
to-do farmers who have been going fif
teen and twenty miles to market. Ar
rangements have been made to lay out
townB at the most advantageous loca
tions for business. These towns will
need stores and shops of all kinds and
merchants \vlll find favorable openings
on thiB new line. Doctors and profes
sional men will alBo find good locations.
This company is also constructing a
line from Armstrong to Estherville, la.
There will be two new towns on this
line named Maple Hill and Irwin, and
investors will find splendid opportuni
ties at either of these points.
The railway company will, as they
have always done, join with the Duslness
men of their towns to build up centers
of trade.
For Information write
THOMAS H. BROWN,
General To'
iwnslte Agent,
M-VU
DEMOCRATIC STATE TICKET.
For Governor,
FEED K. WHITE,
IKeokuk county.
For Lieutenant Governor,
M.L.BEVIS,
Montgomery county.
For Judge of Supreme Court,
A, VAN WAGGENEN,
Woodbury county,
For Kallway Commissioner,
:w. H. CALHOUN,
Marshall county.
For Superintendent of Public Instruction,
P. B. HOLST,
Boone county.
COUNTY TICKET.
For Representative,
A. 8. COON,
Delaware township,
For Treasurer,
CHA8. H. FURMAN.
Delhi township.
For Sheriff,
D. F. HBNNESSY,
Manchester.
For Superintendent of Schools,
F. K. MAIN,
Hopklnton.
For Coroner,
A. H. SWINBURNE,
Earivllle.
Member of Board of Supervisors
JOHN REILLY/
Adams township.
According to newspaper reports Mr.
McKinley will be greatly relieved when
tbe Dewey celebration is over. The ad
miral evidently has too much senee to
be drawn into politics and tbe president
need not fear him as a rival. However,
be can doubtless tell many things about
the Philippine situation that McKinley
would prefer not to hear. It is safe to
predict that tbe home-coming of Dewey
will have more effect on tbe immediate
future in the Philippines than upon
American politics.—Louisville Dispatch.
Ex-senator Mantle, of Montana, who
is a bachelor and regarded as a great
matrimonial "catch," much surprised
society recently when he referred to Mb
sweetheart." He was plied with
questions about the identity of the lucky
woman, but for some time be dodged an
answer. At last, however, he replied:
"She is not pretty she's beautiful,"and
finally, his face growing tender, he add
ed, and she's not very young some
where between 70 and 80. My sweet
heart is my mother."
We are upon grave times. Great new
Issues have arisen, new questions of su
preme Importance have come into view,
even since Mr. McKinley's nomination
little more than three years ago. Vv bile
crediting bim with honesty of intention,
there is a feeling among a vast number
of people that a president 1s needed
more thoroughly equipped in statesman
ship, more vigorous in determination
and action, less,.dependent upon the
promptings of advisers in. his personal,
circle, leis subject to to swayed
iiy
MANCHS8TKR, IOWA, AS SECOND-CLASS MATTKR. 1 MANCHESTER, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER. 11, 1899.
iSS#?
The Chicago Chronicle ventures the
opinion that the election of Mr. Hanna
to the senate cost more than the salary
of the office has amounted to. Of course
every well-informed person in this sec
tion of the country understands that,
but Mr. Hanna is not entitled to such a
tremendous degree of sympathy ou that
account. The expense was not all out
of hli pocket. A great deal of the pay
was in patronage. Mr. Hanna baB been
extremely generous with tbe federal of
fices, for his own benfit and when there
have not been enough of them to serve
hiB purpose he has bad tbe civil service
restrictions lifted, so as to have more
means at his command. Of course Mr.
Hanna has spent a great deal of his own
money, but the demandB on his purse,
even when it has been replenished by
the trusts and financial institutions,
have been so great that he has paid a
good deal" in trade." He has parceled
out tbe offices. He IB now engaged in
assessing them. Every federal official
from Ohio is threatened with tbe loss of
his official head if he does not contrib
ute a large slice of his salary to paying
for the "gold brick enterprises which
Colonel Dick is entertaining as chair
man of the republican state executive
committee.—Cincinnati Enquirer.
Gov. Shaw is proud of the rapidity
with which the state debt has iieen paid
off. Other republican speakers will
doubtless make much ado over the same
matter. You know the state debt was
created in an almost incredibly short
space of time by tbe McFarland's and
Dobson's of the republican party. They
didn't pay it the people paid it, and
this is the way they paid.
Tax levies since 1888:
1888—State taxes 2% mills (Larabee.)
1889—State taxes 2% mills (Larabee.)
1890—State taxes 2% mills (Boies.)
1891—State taxes 2 mills (Boies.)
1892—State taxes 2 mills (Boies.
1893—State taxes
2
mills (Boies.)
1894—State taxes mills (Jackson.)
1895—State taxes 2% mills (Jackson.)
1896—State taxes 2 810 mills (Drake.)
1897—State taxes 2 8-10 millB (Drake.)
1898—State taxes 3 3-10 mills (Shaw.)
When the people pay 32 per cent high
er taxes under Shaw than they did un
der Boies, IB it any credit to the republi
can officials that they should use part of
it to pay the debt? Were they calcula
ting that Increase was made to go into
their private pockets? If they were
not, it is an odd thing for them to brag
over having used the money, at least in
part, for the purpose for whicb it was
collected. The people are asked to thank
them
tot
net misappropriating it—Trl
CORYDON'S COMPLAINT.
Tho garlands on my crook aro faded,
That every niorn I once renewed.
To gather which in streams I waded
Or genrohed the woodland's solitude,
Whoso blooms in dowy wreaths I brnided—
Gold, watohet, whlto and rosy hued.
Now fle on Jove and all his folly I
My goodly mion Is quite foregone
My looks, that were so plump and jolly,
Are chunged to monger, lean and wan
In mournful slough of melancholy
Right bogged and mired is Cory
don.
Sweet, dainty maid, for whoso dlsdainlag
I do in Hcnth and sorrow fare,
Beauty once lost nor skill nor feigning
Its lovely aspect may repair.
Behold thctio wretched blossoms waning!
As you are now,
HO
onc-e they were.
—Pnll Mall Gazette.
Facts for Farmers.
It Ib rarely safe to risk going through
the summer without a good forage
crop.
If you like greens, use the young
beets, tops and all, taken out in thinning
tbe crop.
If the clover that is expected to make
seed is being pastured care must be tak
en not to graze down too close.
Having the soil fine and mellow and
stirring frequently will aid materially
in retaining the moisture in the soil.
The sugar corn will ear better if not
too much crowded. It needs sun and
air around it to grow it to perfection.
Some weeds seem to hold possession
of the land persistently, but when they
are kept down by frequently cutting off
the tops it is but a matter of time before
they will die, as every cutting causes ex
haustion.—Western Plowman.
Beware of Rubber Hose.
Tbe care of the pipes leading from
the milk tank to the separators will
come under this head of heating milk.
A short time ago a certain creamery
changed bands, and to be sure that the
milk pipes were clean they were taken
down and examined," says Leighton in
Chicago Produce. Imagine their sur
prise to find them nearly filled up with
casein, etc., although the butter maker
had steamed them out every day. It
showed that there was a little left eacb
time. There is another practice which
I am sorry to say is becoming more gen
eral every day. This is in having a rub
ber hoBe to conduct the milk from the
tempering vat to the separators. Now,
I don't know how you feel about it, but
I could relish a glass of milk better be
fore it came through that bose than af
terward. Some one will say, well, what
are we going to do anyway Separator
manufacturers make the milk faucets
so that a hose must be used. It really
does look this way. Still you can sub
stitute a tin spout for a rubber
hose. Sup
pose, for instance, that you have to con
duct the- milk three feet to tbe separa
tor. Why not have a galvanized Iron
pipe made just the proper length and
3? 'these can be very easily cleaned
and then you can rest assuied-that they
are clean and your butter is not liable to
taste of rubber boots. Then, too, instead
of having that long milk pipe eight or
ten feet in lengih, where there are pla
ces in which 10,000,000 microbes could
hide, without the steam ever finding
them, have a heavy, square, galvanized
iron spout, with the_ top open and having
an opening for each separator. I know
this would be better, but perhaps not so
convenient as the hose and pipe, which
have been termed the lazy butter mak
er's tools, although I think this is a mis
nomer, as many of the best butter mak
ers have their creameries equipped in
this manner."
pop­
ular clamor from conscientious convic
tion.
We believe that with an able leader
the democratic party will carry the elec
tion next year, for the mass of the peo
ple are still and ever will be true to the
principles upon which our country was
founded and for more than a century
maintained and, although at times in
numbers misled, or influenced for tbe
maintenance of some appealing issue to
sacrifice others, there is no doubt that
they understand the present condition
well. They know that the new era up
on which the nation has entered calls
for the services of a master mind and a
giant heart.—Buffalo Courier.
PEDIGREED STOOK. W
Hints to Beginners on the Capability
of Breeds.
One must hark back to the dayB of
the early eighties to find a parallel to the
remarkable activity in the investment
in pedigreed live stock that character
izes the industry at present, says The
Breeder's Gazette. A material differ
ence may be noted, however, in tbe fact
that the trade then partook more or less
of a "boom "character, whereaB now the
steady swelling of the tide represents
the fixed conviction of a remunerative
basis for legitimate business transac
tions in tbe production and handling of
live stock. Large purchases at present
are being made in the beef cattle trade,
although unusual activity characterizes
all other branches of the industry.
Much of the present Investment in live
stock IB now made by those who have
been familiar with the business, but
who lost heart and let go their hold du
ring tbe period of depression from which
it has happily emerged. They are pro
ceeding with seasoned judgment and
have no reason to fear for the future. A
goodly portion of the money now being
invested in pedigreed stock, however,
comes from beginners, from those who
are practically unacquainted with the
technicalities of the trade and who have
their eye teeth yet to cut.
It would take a book to cover this
subject thoroughly, and then it would
not he exhausted. Some things can be
learned only by experience, but much
knowledge may be acquired at less ex
pense. The fundamental proposition to
be observed is look before you leap."
This is trite and very general, but itB ap
plication may be readily made. The
man who invests in pedigreed stock
should be governed by his tastes or, to
use a longer word meaning much the
same, by bis predilections. If he likes
the feeding of beef cattle and hates to
be tied to the tail of a dairy cow, it
would be folly for him to invest in milk
stock, no matter how successful his
neighbor may be with bis herd of dairy
cattle. If a man dislikes the squeal and
grunt of the festive porker, it is folly to
invest in swine, no matter how remu
nerative the venture may appear to be.
Dislike begets indifference, and with
neglect comes an end to profit. A man
with the shepherd's instincts, to whose
ear the bleat of a lamb is music and to
whose nostril the odor of wood is incense
goes far at sea in embarking in any oth
er line because it seems to promise
greater returns. Let the farmer suit the
tottoM to tbe ttotdMhM Mil
the variety of stock to his taste. II his
heart Is not in any given speciality, it is
a mistake for him to enter upon it.
Equally is this true of breeds. The
adaptability of some breeds to certain
conditions is quite marked, but it is a
fact that within certain limits there is
frequently choice of breeds, and this
point must be carefully considered by
the beginner. Adaptability to the de
aired purpose should govern as the prim
consideration, but after that is deter
mined choice should be predicated on a
preference for shape or color or disposi
tion or horns or no horns or on other
amall distinguishing difference in the
breeds.
Much of failure that has attended the
attempted breeding of pedigreed stock
has come from a plunge In the dark.
Men are not thus rash in other business
ventures, and vet in no line of invest
ment is knowledge of detail more im
portant. The beginner in tbe propaga
tlon of pedigreed live stock should be a
studious scholar before his course of de
lation determined.
Called Her.
An old colored woman, who was bora
In Georgetown and had never been ten
miles from home In her 70 years of
life, started on a Journey to see her
niece, who Uvea about 30 miles from
Washington on the Virginia Midland.
The conductors personally know every,
body who travels on the road, and chit
dijen and old people are always confid
ed to their care. This was the case
with the old colored woman, and the
conductor was requested to see that
she did not leave the car at the lint
station reached, as she was very likely
to do unless watched. He sat her down
In-the end seat of the car, hefiged her
about with her parcels and told her
not to budge until he called her. Th.
second stop made was at a little sta
tion called Vienna, and Just aa th.
conductor was about to sound the start
ing bell he saw the old woman tum
bling off tbe car.
Where are you going? Get back on
that car!" he shouted. "Didn't I tell
you not to get out till I called your
''Please, mister, you done called me."
'No, I didn't. Get back quick."
"Deed you did call me, sah," per
sisted auntie aa she scrambled aboard.
"You done call my name twice."
"Culled your name? What la your
name?" asked the conductor.
'My name, please, sab, Is Vienna,
l."—Chicago Inter Ocean.
A well to do man of perfectly clean
record and good social position named
Proment Adelot has been sentenced to
two months' imprisonment for wear
ing, .without right. In the buttonhole of
bis coat, the tiny bow of red rlbbofi
usually worn by the knighta of the
Preach Legion.of Honor.
You can buy them for a few cents Is
any of the shops devoted to the sale of
Insignia of European orders, and I
have known of not a few English and
American tourists vrha, seeing a num
ber of people wearing these little bows
of red ribbon in their buttonholes^ did
likewise.
This, however, entails heavy penal
ties, and It Is punished by the authori
ties as the illegal wearing of the In
signia of the national ordera,
It must be thoroughly understood
that even supposing any American be
longs to some patriotic or other society
here In the United States, the Insignia'
of which comprises a bow or button of
red ribbon worn In the buttonhole, he
cannot wear It in France -without risk
ing Jail.—Washington Post.
Ths Curious CasMowavf,
Every explorer who visits the Aus
tralasian Islands discovers a new kind
of cassowary. None of these birds
possesses any wings to speak of, and
their bodies are clothed with dense
masses of curious, halrllke feathers.
According to a recent traveler, these
feathers are put to a very remarkable
use.
When a cassowary feels hungry—ao
the lagend runs—It wades out Into a
stream until only Its head and neck are
above water and spreads out Its long
plumes on either side. Numbers of un
sophisticated little Ashes Immediately
mistake these for a new kind of water
weed and nestle confidingly up to the
motionless cassowary for shelter.
Then that artful bird suddenly
presses his feathers close against his
body, walks ashore and shakes out his
prisoners on the bank so that he not
only enjoys a delightful bath, but ob
tains an excellent meal Into the bar
gain.
Tk. Rat That Sailed.
A rat was caught alive on board a
naval vessel in a trap, and the beast
was thrown from the trap Into the wa
ter without being killed. A large gull
that was following In the wake of the
ship to pick up scraps of food thrown
overboard by the steward swooped
several times, endeavoring to pick the
rat up. Once the bird got too close to
the rat's Jaws, and the beast grabbed
it by tbe neck. After a short fight the
rat succeeded In killing the bird. When
the gull was dead, the rat scrambled
upon tbe bird's body, and, hoisting one
wng as a sail and using the other as
a ..udder, succeeded In steering for the
shore. Whether the rat reached shore
or not Is the question, since the ship
soon got out of sight of the skipper
and Its craft
She LOTM Kill-**.
The dowager empress of Ohina Is de
voted to birds of all kinds, and Innu
merable bird pets are kept about tbe
palaoe. She is reported to have wept
copiously about the death of a favorite
nightingale not along ago. Upon being
told of a Chinese girl who had com
plained bitterly of the dreariness of life
this exalted lady remarked sagely that
a woman ought to take so nraoh pride
In her home that It oould be a heaven
to her, adding, "There are always birds
and flower* "She is a olever artist and
delights In painting from nature.
Qrain-O Bring* Belief. -T
to the coffee drinker. Coffee drinking
is a habit that la universally indulged in
and almost as universally injurious.
Have you tried Grain-0 It is almost
like coffee but the effects are just the
opposite. Coffee upsets the stomach,
ruins tbe digestion, effects the heart
and disturbs uie whole nervous system.
Grain-O tones up the Btomacb, aids di'
gestlon and strengthens the nerves.
There Is nothing but nourishment in
aimiMBti
raln-0. It can't b. otherwise. 15 and
emurf
n\
CYCLONE AND TORNADO
Insurance In first class companle, written and
policies Issued by
tf
BHOHBON & C'AIIR.
BE HONEST!
Are you prejudiced
against the use of Quaker
Mill Flour?
=t Are you one who thinks
that in order to get good
flour you must buy flour
that is made elsewhere?
Have you ever given
Quaker Mill Flour a fair
trial?
Do you want to econo
mize?
Lend Us Your Listener!
Ill Don't let your grocer
||p buzz you into paying io
ggi to 20 cents more for a
|ffj sack of foreign flour when
you can buy Quaker Mill
Flour that we guarantee
•'.yjfc to be equal to any and
fif superior to many flours
on the market. Econo-
m'ze!
1
Btraa,. Freneh Laws.
A trial has just taken place at Paris
which may serve as a warning to
American tourists visiting France.
Help yourself by
10. helping your home mill.
Ask for Quaker Mill flour
the kind with
i|S
A Quaker on Every Sack.
rj!j Your neighbor uses it,
iS why not you?
Quaker Mill Co.
W. MILES. Prest. M. F. LlBOY, Cashier
B. F. MILB6, Asst. Cashier.
:. R.R. ROBUBOH 3d v. Pruldent,
..•'-V'-
H.<p></p>First
C. HA»B»Wi».l»t
V.<p></p>National
President.
BANK,
MANCHESTER. IOWA.
CAPITAL. $50,000
General
Banking
Business Transacted
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
FOR RENT.
R. Robinson,
J. W. Miles,
B. M. Oarr,
H. A. Grenger,
B. P. Miles
M. F. LeRov,
W. H. Noma,
M.Bsefcler
A.
CAPITAL $60,000
-DIRBOTORS-
Wm. C. Cawley.
W. O. Kenyon.
Edward P. Seeds.
Chas. J.
H. F. Arnold.
R. W. Tin-ill.
W. Dunham.
M, H. Willlston
Seeds.
0. W. Keagy.
INTEREST PAID en Time Deposits.
Prompt attention given to all business. Pas
senger tickets
from and to all parts
of Europe
direct to Manchester, tor sale,
JJONQ Time ^"ORTQAGE T,PANS
Bade, Bought and Setd.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
For the storage of valuable papers,
etc. (or rent.
Banking
House
Henry Hutchinson
Hutchinson's Building. Manchester, Iowa.
CAPITAL. $70,000
JOSXFH HUTCHINSON, Cashier.
COLLECTIONS
gxuaaptly
DEPOSITS on Time, Interest Al
lowed and other deposits received.
DRAFTS sold on New York* Chicago
and DubuQue also on Great Britain and Ire
land and European Cities.
TIOKETS Bold to and from all European
]Mrts via Cunard or Allen or White 8tar
Steamship Lines.
SO YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
PATENTS
DcaiaNs
COPYRIGHT* AC.
Anyone sending a sketch and description
may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
Invention Is probably patentable. Commnnlca
tlonastrletlyconBdenttaL Handbook on Patents
•ent free. Oldest agency for securing.patents*
Patents taken through Munn A Co. receive
qwdaJftoMo, without charge, in the
Scientific American.
.andsomely Illustrated weekly, tantect cir.
4lstton of any Bcientlflo journal. Terms, 98. a
year: four months, |L Sold by all newsdealers.
MllNN ICo.88,Br*-'New York
Branch Offloe 636 8L. Wanhtnirton D. 0.
F. P. PETERSON,
Manufacturer of
WAGONS
Ana Repairer
ot all kinds of Vehloles, and general repalrci
of all Kinds of Woo(f Work
For Fanning Implements and Madiinary
Shop on Franklin Street, near the bridge, with
Alex Sefstrom.Jn building lately oooupled by
VOL. XXV—NO. 41.
B. Blake,
F. J. Atwater.
H. O. Haeherle,
Firht National Bank. Dubuque, Iowa.
Central National Bank New York City.
Commercial National Bank. Chicago, Ills.
WM. 0. CAWLEY, CHAS. J. SEEDS,
President. Cashier.
R. W. TIRRILL, C. W. KEAGY,
Vloe President. Asst. Cashier.
DELAWARE COUNTY
State Bank
Another Carload
tSA
c,iK*
production of the
$5.98 SUIT
Other Styles are Here
Up to $0.00.
1
Qfye HUemoctaL
RATES OP ADVERTISING
BPAGB.
One inoh
Two inches..
Three Inches.
Four Inohec.,
Five Inches..
1W| Sw lit 3M tu
•1 0011 60
$sm
Column...
Column...,
One Column..
All styles! All colors! Best
goods
We have the finest line of couches in Delaware county, and
we are going to sell them at the loweat prices ever made in
Delaware county.
Step in and see the couches of leather, the couches of velours
and the couches of tapestry at '1
A. D. BROWN'S
You'r not so warm
this kind of weather, are you? Why not purchase your heating
stove now? People have been buying coal! We are carrying,
large line of heaters this year and have one that will suit YOU.
COME IN and look over our line of stoves.
A COMPLETE LINE OF HARDWARE. :C
J. J. HA\
VLEY.
JUST RECEIVED
A large assortment of ladies' fine shoes in kid and vesting
tops, lace and button. All the late styles to retail at
$2.50 $3.00
We will be pleased to show them to you. '*,
KINNE& MADDEN.
Also Louisville Cement kept on hand. Maquoketa Lime,
Stucco and Callolite Plaster, Plaster Hair.
Flour and all kinds of Feed,
Hay and Straw, Wheat
and Wheat Screenings,
mm
iE MY FARM, of 240 acres, in Prairie Township for sale.
Call and see me before buy
ing elsewhere
1*
MM
100 9 28 8 6(1 nn too
100 8 00 4 no TOO *8 00
8 60 8 75 675 10 00 18 00
8 00( 4 60 700 18 00 WOO
4MH860 800 15 00 85 00
60 9 00 18 (HI *00 40 00
18 80 18 00 26 00 60 00 80 00
$10 00
Ifi 00
X) no
«r GO
8J 00
40 00
5 00
125
00
Advertl—eata ordered dlaoonttnued be»
fore expiration of oostraet will be charged ac
oordlnc to above aeale.
BuiUwa eute, not umdlac six Hiw, t&o
per year.
Business locals, ten oents per line for the lint
insertion, and five oents per line for each subeo
queet insertion.
SPECIAL SALE
-Couches
of ATLAS PORT
LAND CEMENT
in a few days.
in a icw uciys.
Peter Boardway.
To Dress
Well
Visit the Clothing
House of J. H. Allen
All the latest and finest
Novelties in
Men,
Boys' and
Children's
'A
Clothing.
Shirts
h*
In all new designs, and
Neckwear of every
description.
fc
We Will Satisfy
Any
taste in our large
selection
J.
+-K
if®

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