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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, November 15, 1899, Image 1

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€l)c EDemacrat,
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY.
BftONSON. e. M. CARR.
BRONSON &. CARR,
Editortfand Proprietors
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
Vearly, in advance $1 60
If uot paid in advance 300
NOTICE.—On the slip of 1
the nanf.e is printed, appears
the paper 1B paid for, and a
"nnn which
respeolfuny solicited.
The writer's name rauBt accompany any am
ole for publication, as an evidence of good faith
the editor*
s.i. ""I J'-'.-i
1
oth
C. LEIGH. D. D. S.
Dentist.
Office over Ander & Phllipp's Drug
Store Corner Main and Franklin streets,
Manchester Iowa. Telephone 186 I7tf
E. E. NGWCOMB.
TkENTIST. Office over Clark & Lawrence's
Xj store 'on Franklin stroet. Crowu
bridge work a specialty. Will meet pationts at
Farley Wednesday of each week £2tf
VETERINARIAN.
DR. J. W. SCOTT,
XTETEKINARY Surgeon, and Dentist. On:
in H. O. Smith's Drug Storo, Mala St. At
night oan be found at rooms over Ralph Con
ger's Store.
MANUFACTURING.
MANCHESTER MARBLE WORKS
T8 prepared to iurnlsh Granite and Marble
Monuments and Head Stones of various do
[Have the county right for Slpe's Pat
ve Cover also dealer in Iron Fenocs.
iet all competition. 8tf 94.
class
shop
ohester,
W. N.
M.
W. SHELDON. J.
Wjf,
We Will Save You Money On
Felt Boots
SNAQ PROOF OVERS.
We are better prepared than ever to fit
you out in
WINTER FOOTWEAR
Everything new, just what you want
and when you want it.
Our Business Directory.
ATTORNEYS.
Q. W. DUNHAM. E, B, STILES FL. NOHHI8.
DUNHAM, NORRiS & STILES.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AND NOTARIES
Pablio. Speoial attention given to Collec
tions Insurance, Real Estate and Loan Agts.
Dffloe in Oity Hall Block, Manchester, la.
O. YORAN. H. P. ARNOLD. M. J. YORAN
YORAN. ARNOLD YORAN
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, and Real Estate
Agents. Office over Delaware County State
Bank, Manchester, Iowa.
C. E. BROHSOR. T£. M. OAKR.
BRONSON & CARR.
FRED B. BLAIR.
A TTOIWKY AT LAW. Office In the Cltj Hall
Block. Manchester, Iowa.
PHYSICIANS.
A A.J.WARD,
HY3IGIAN and Surgeon, will attend to calls
promptly.at all hour-, of the day or night.
'.jamont, Iowa.
H. H. LAWRENCE.
pSYSlOlAN AND SURGEON. Special at
J- tention given diseases of ohlldren. Have
also made a speoial study of Gyneocology,
Obstetrios, and Reotal Diseases. All chronic
diseases successfully treated with the aid of
various Thermal and Massage treatment. All
ohronlos sollolted. Consultation freo. Office
over Work's market. All calls promptly at
tended. Residence on Main street, the old Dr.
Kelsey property.
DENTISTS.
C. W. DORMAN.
I t&NTIST. Office on Franklin Street, north
of the Globe Hotel, Manchester, Iowa.
Uental Surgery in all its branches. Makes
sequent visits to neighboring towua. Always
at office on Saturdays.
ETFTKILED AT THE POSTOFFICE AT I
MANCHESTER. IOWA,
AS
Dealers
WM. MCINTOSH.
THOMAS
V'lVBN,
actor and builder. Jobs taken In town
country. Estimates furnished. First
irk guaranteed, Prloes reasonable,
"toward street noar Franklin, Man
wa, Sfitf
WATOHMA&ERS,
Jewelers and Engravers
dealers JA Watohes, Clocks, Silver and
fried Ware, vine Jewelry, Speotaoles, Cutlery,
nents, eto., Main stroet.
oal Inst
JONBlBft COOLIDGE.
A LL KINDS OF^FURNITURE constantly in
A- 8VV&. Undertaking done in all Its
oranoht'- Manchester, Iowa.
I\
SECOND-CLASS MATTER,
GEO. S LISTER.
HARDWARE,
in Drugs, Wall Paper, Stationery,
Paints, Oils, etc. Corner of Main and
Franklin streets.
PETER BOARDWAY.
FOLEY
Undertakers and Embalmers.
Ourable.
stock Is new*nnd complete, Prices reason
Opposite K. P. Hall. 40tf
A.JD. BROWN.
Dealer
In fimilture etc., and undertaker,
Main Street.
F. WURKMEISTER,
riENERAL DEivLER IN FURNITURE,
v-T Coffins. Plotury Frames, Etc. A complete
stock of Furniture and Upholstery always ou
hand, at prices thb defy competition, A good
Hearse kopt for attendance at funerals. Earl
Tille, Iowa.
HIODfiLL A CO.,
F)RY GOODS, Carpets, Millinery, Hats and
L/ Caps, Boots and Shoes, et$,, Main St.,
Manoheatec, Iowa.
A. THORPE,
PROPRIETOR OF "KALAMITY'S" PLUN
i- dor Store and Dealer in Clothing, Boots,
-,Ma
Shoes. Notions, eto.
ter. Iowa
Masonic Blook, Manohes-
QRASSP1ELO BROS.,
(Succossors to Seth, Brown.)
DOOTS AND SHOES of all grados and prices.
JJ Custom Work and Repairing given speoial
attention. Store in City Hall Blook.
J. J. HAWLEY.
FlEALER IN HARDWARE. Stoves, Tlr
LT
ware, eto ., Manohesterlowa*
TNSURE YOUR PROPERTY against cyclones
J. and tornadoes In the old reliable Phoenix
Insurance Co., BRONSON ft CARR, Agents.
SEVERT3QN.
[HE AliWTlu TAILOR. Shop
sonlo block. Manchester Iowa.
HOLLISTER LUMBER CO
UMBER and all kinds of building matortuls,
•Li Posts and Coal. Cornor of Delaware and
Maatson streets
MANCHESTER LUMBER CO.
BBS and Builder. Materials, Posts kill
Wwtaid. aur depot.
ealer In Hour, feed, hay, straw, Maquokota
lime, stucco and common and Atlascement.
Telephone 113. Lower Franklin Street.
RACKET STORE.
T\KY GOODS. Clothing, Hats, Caps, Boots,
J-' Shoes, notions, otc. West side Franklin
stroet south of Main.
NOBLE ARNOLD.
/^.ROCERIES, Provisions, Fruits, eto. First
V* door north of Delaware County Bank.
PETERSON BROS.
Doalors in Groceries, Provisions, Crockery.
Fruits, etc. Main Street.
T. F. MOONEY.
(Successor to Lee Bowman.)
BLACKSMITH
I
4
*. U.
1
v"
1 7 », $ I**" i.
WE FIT THE FEET. ^MANCHESTER, 10WA.
STOVES, TINWARE, ETC.
Keeps a llrst-class tinner and does all
kinds of rer~'~' ....
Store
.."•L" MAUWIHO UUUW UUU UUBH II II
3 or repairing wltb neatness and dispatch,
a opposite First National Bank, Main St.
THOS. CARKEEK.
A RCHITECT AND BUILDING SUPERIN
TENDENT, S. E. Cor. 8th and Main St.,
Dubuque, Iowa
WM DENNIS.
pjARPENTER, UONTRACTOR & BUILDER,
I am now prepared to do aU work in my
lineln a good and workmanlike manner. Satis
faction guaranteed. Plans and estimates fur
nished. Work taken In town or country. Shop
near the Btand tower on West Sldo of river.
E. S. COWLES.
1ITY DRAYMAN. Am prepared to do all
T.
*k in my line. Moving household goods
and pianos a specialty. All work will rcooive
prompt attention. A share of your pat'onage is
solicited. Charges right. Give your draying
to a man who has oome to stay.
J. H. ALLEN.
C'.
tLOTHING and Gents furnishing goods. Cor
ner Main and Franklin streets.
I.. P. STOUT.
LOTHING and Gents furnishing goods.
City Hall Block, Franklin Street.
CLARK & LAWRENCE.
IAKY GOODS, Notions. Cnrpots, Gents fur
nlsUlng goods, etc. Franklin stroet.
QUAKER MILL CO.
IJiLOUK and Feed, Manufuoturors of the uele
brated White Satin and White Pearl Flour.
GREGG & WAPD.
rucgists and dealers In Pulnts, Oils. Wall
I'nper. Stationery & c. Atwater's blook,
I)
O. A. DUNHAM, D. D. S.
piSNTl&TS, Offloe over Garhart & AdamB*
•J hardware store, Franklin St Manchester.
Iowa.
Frunklln Bt.reet.
STORY A ABBOTT.
T\RUGS, Wall paper, Stationery. Paints, Oils
etc. City hall blook.
PHILIPP & ANDERS.
and Wagonmaker, Delhi,
Iowa. "Work done promptly and In a work
manlike manner. Charges reasonable. Your
patronage solicited. istf
C.E. PRATT.,
PAINTINGto
AND PAPER HANGING, I am
prepared do paper hanging and painting
on short notice, iu town or country, will give
estimates on all work In my line. Leave orders
at 11. C. Smith's drug store
J. M. PEARSE.
JUSTICE
JNAPN. J. F. MCEWEN.
JO^QJTON & MoEWBNi
OF THE PEACE AND COLLECT-
OR. All business entrusted to him given
prompt attention. Office in City Hall block,
Horses Wanted.
A few good horsos for eastern markets, must
b« sound and in good condition. Enquire at my
piucn on Union street in Manchester.
39tf T, w. ROBINSON
Chimneys Gleaned.
I have got a patent devise for cleanlug chim
neys. If you want yours cleaned leave orders
for ine at SethBrowu's or Graham & Son's. I
also doall kinds of mason work and white wash
ing, build chimneys and cisterns and do repairs.
All work warranted to give satisfaction.
8tf
JOHN TOWSLEK.
The "Plow Boy Preacher," liev. J.
Kirkman, Belle Hive, ill., Bays: "After
suffering from Bronchial or lung
trouble for ten years I was cured by
One Minute Cough Cure. It ia all that
ia claimed for it and more," It cures
coughs, colds, grippe and all throat and
iung troubles. H. C. Smith.
Business Opportunities,
The H. C. K. N. liy. is constructiBg a
new line north and west from Worth
ington, Minn., to the west line of the
state, which will be completed within
the year. The country through which
the line passes iB the best in south-west
ern Minnesota, is practically all under
cultivation and thickly settled by well
to-do farmers who have been going lit'
teen and twenty mileB to market. Ar
rangements have been made to lay out
townB at the most advantageous loca
tions for businesB. These towns will
need stores and shops of all kinds and
merchants will Qnd favorable openings
ou thiB new line. Doctors and profes
sional men will also Had good locations.
This company is also constructing a
line from Armstrong to Estherville, Ia.
There will be two new towns on thiB
line named Maple Hill and Irwin, and
investors will lind splendid opportuni
ties at either of these points.
The railway company will, as thev
have always done, join with the Dusine»«
men of their towns to build up centers
of trade.
For Information write
THOMAS
H.
BROWN,
General Townilte Agenl
86-W18. Sioux
i&m
rfO.«
The money coat to Spain in her at
tempt to retain Cuba was $350,000,000.
The United States contributes five
times as much annually for public li
brary purposes as does any other na
tion.
A statue of Washington on horse
back is soon to be erected in Paris. The
work has been done by Daniel 0. French
and the money raised by the Daughters
of the Revolution.
Mrs. Hetty Ureen in a recent inter
view said: "The idea that the way to
financial success is a hard one is all
wrong. The road is not rough. It is
easy to find and to travel, l'eople look
for it in out of the way places and so
miss it.
The work of draining the Zuyder
Zee of Holland will soon begia, and
will be one of the greatest undertakings
of the age. It will involve an outlay of
818,000,000 at the least. Thousands of
men will be engaged for nine years in
building the dyke that will shut tho
German ocean from the Zee, and not
less than thirty-three years will be re
quired to complete the work. Fully 787
square miles of fertile land will be add
ed to Holland territory when the task
of reclamation is fulfilled.
Mrs. Jackson, widow of the famous
".Stonewall Jackson," is living in ad
vanced years in poverty. Her condi
tion, borne heroically, as becomes the
wile of a great captain, accidentally
was discovered by some of her hus
band's friends, and in a single day the
city of Norfolk, Virginia, raised over
31,000 for her relief. Mrs. Jackson
lives near Charlottesburg. N. C.. and
sixty years ago waB the bene ana ad
mired wit of the neighbor! ood
Judge Kinne has been making some
statements concerning the care of in
sane persons in county poor houseB, in
advance of the report which the board
of control will make to the legislature on
the subject and in general, bis conclu
sions are not favorable to the idea of al
lowing counties to care for theii insane
patients. In one instance, he says, he
found a patient chained to the wall,
and in another be found a man and his
wife attempting to cook and care for
seventy people, the insane and paupers,
and between them they received lifty
dollars a month for their labor. In an
other county he found the insane and
the paupers in the same building with
a partition between them made of dry
goods boxes. He promises that the
facts will be presented in detail in their
coming report.—Monticello Express.
Two years ago at Commonwealth,
Georgia, an
.Arcadian scheme was set on
foot in the founding of a colony which
attracting muuh attention. The
originators were men of strong relig
ious conviction, who intend to imitate,
as far as possible the life of Christ. The
colony haBits school, church, workshops
and printing-press, and every one la
bors in some way while all are govern
ed by the law of love alone. A barren
stretch of land has been transformed,
by skilled labor and scientific devices,
into a thrifty, fertile and prosperous
farming region of nice hundred and
thirty-one acres. The land was pur
chased by a company of enthusiastic
men from Nebraska. All good or bad
results are held in- common, and the
following covenant has been entered
into Dy eighty or so members: "I ac
cept as the law of my life Christ's law
that 1 shall love my neighbor as myself.
I will use, hold, or dispose of my pro
perty, my labor and my income, accord
ing to the dictates of all who need. I
will not withhold for my selfish ends
aught that 1 have from the fullest ser
vice that love inspires." Some of the
familleB of the colony live about in
cottages doing all their own work, while
many live and cook together. Culture
is promoted and innocent amusements
indulged in, but always as incident
to service. Diversified industries are
•pringing up, and a greater prosperity
promised.—Ex.
Colonel Hendersoin, as speaker of tho
next house, is not destined to have an
easy time. Already forces are gather
ing which are calculated to embarrass
him and which will require his utmost
resource to meet and overthrow. Re
port comes from Washington that signs
multiply that the lobby which will be
present this winter will be the largest
for many years. According to the
Washington correspondent of the
Brooklyn Eagle, "men identified with
the third house are already boasting
that Speaker Henderson wiil let down
the bare and give congressmen who
favor special legislation a chance to be
heard." For the past few years par
ticularly during the administration of
Thomas B. Reed as speaker of the
house,the Washington lobby has fared
badly. A few of the old-timers have
remained on guard in the corridors
and reception rooms of the senate and
house, but they have been in hard luck
and have not been conspicuous by reas
on of lavish entertainments or excessive
expenditure of money. But the close
vote in the lower house and the fact
that a green speaker will be in the
chair have brightened the hopes of the
professional wire pullers and log roll
ers, and they hope to make a profitable
raid. Colonel Henderson will be com
pelled to fight the fight which Speaker
Reed won during his first t$lm in the
chair. Colonel Henderson will doubt
less be equal to the emergency. lie
knows the third house, its personnel
and its motives and methods, and can
scuttle it out before its members are
nested. The Iowa congressman may
indeed be a proud man if, when his
term or terms as speaker end, the peo
ple will say of him, as they say of Mr.
Reed, that he set his face rigidly and
determinedly against everything which
might tend to even cast suspicion on
the integrity of the American oongress.
—De, Molnei Leader.'
if rf
«s
The Imperative Mandaie.
Alfalfa, too
He sez lie's
HOID*
to run this raRcli Jest like his
Uncle BUI
Did a place he was tenant on back yon in Cen
tral, 111.
Pa sez he'll plnnt the place In corn, and reap
theyollerKraln,
An'then he'll plow It up again and wait for
springtime's rain
Ile'll crib the corn and hold It all, Jost like his
Uncle Joe,
Who rented land for years and yoars back In
the state of Mo.
The nex' yearafter that, pa sez, he'll sow the
land In wheat
lle'U bet he'll raise a crop o' grain no man
'round here kin beat,
He'll build a bin to put it In, the same as Cousin
Ben
Use* to whon he was rentln' dirt, way baek in
hilly I'enn.
By that time bo will have enough, pa sez, to buy
this farm,
Provldln' site don't peter out. an' things don't
loso their charm
He may want them to move along, jos' like his
olil chum Dau
Did when he leased a township,'most, back In
the state of Kan.
Las' night 1 heard ma's quiet voice a arguln'
with pa.
An'I'll jost bet my Berkshire pig them words
will be the law
she told him movlu' on must stop, an' she'd also
told hlin this,
That If ho didn't git to work, why, she'd go back
to Miss.
An' ma says pa'ii run this ranch the way tlioy
run farms here
She's tired of hearln' 'bout the men that rent
from year to year
She sez we'll own a place here ylt, an' when my
ma sez "shall."
There's very Utile doubt but what we'll settle
down In Cat.
—Los Angeles Times.
DAIRY AND CREAMERY
Some Feeding Tests.
Bulletin No. 39, of the Massachusetts
experimental station says: Feed has
very little elTect upon the quality of
milk. By quality we refer to the per
cent or amount of total solid matter in
the milk. It is a well recognized fact
that some feeds affect the flavor and to
some extent the color of milk. Feeds
rich in protein have a tendency to
slightly increase the percentage of fat in
some cows: the Bame can be said of
feeds rich in fat. This increase is prob
ably only temporary, however, the milk
gradually coming back to its normal
composition. The milk-producing func
tion is to a largo extent under the con
trol of the nervous syBtem. Any in
fluence that disturbs the quiet or nor
mal condition of the animal, be it rough
Usage, extremes of temperature, etc.,
will have its effect upon the quality of
.the milk., -On the .other hand..p!enly:!of
good feed increases the quality of milk
until the animal reaches^ her maximom
of production. Prof. Patrick, of the
Iowa station, conducted an experiment
in which a number of cows were fed
"sugar meal," a refuse of our glucose
factory. In the first experiment it was
thought that the cows fed this feed
gave a decided increase in butter fat,
but the experiment not being satisfac
tory, a second trial was given, and in
this experiment it was found that cows
fed "sugar meal" gave no increase in
butter. A similar experiment was made
in one of our eastern stations in which
beef tallow was fed, beginning with a
ration of two ounces and increasing to
two pounds per day, and at the close of
this experiment it was found that the
cow was still giving her one pound of
butter daily, her previous record.
These references and experiments are
given to Bhow that it is the breed, more
than the feed given, that is to deter
mine the character and composition of
the milk. Were it only the feed given,
what would be the use of our choice
dairy breeds, when a Texas cow could
be made by feeding to produce as many
pounds of butter as the Jersey. We
should then feed the cow a sufficient
quality of rich, wholesome food, with
plenty of pure water constantly on hand.
—Farmers' Voice.
Cows' Borns.
Cows' horns have a considerable val
ue and owing to circumstances sur
rounding the dairy they are constantly
raising in price. The hornB are care
fully Baved at the great western slaugh
ter houseB, but so general has the CUB
tom of dehorning cattle become that it
is Baid that over one-half the cattle
have loBt these appendages, and one re
ceiver reports that not more than one
animal in six has horns. They are now
quoted at $150 per ton, and the price is
continually going higher.
Sorghum Good Feed.
Some are inquiring about sugar cane
for feed. We planted about ten acres
last-year, writes Tom Pontingin Breed
ers' Gazette, drilling it In with a corn
planter.^ We fixed the plates so It
would drop about three Beeds in a place
and tended it as we do corn. We cut
and bound it with a corn-harvester.
You must be very careful In putting it
in shock as the tops are so heavy it will
fall over. We had no trouble in curing
ours, but we had to let it stand in the
field until we were ready to feed it. It
has so very much moisture in it that It
cannot be piled together until very
late in the BeaBon. I think it made six
tons to the
acre after It was cured. I
would like to ask some one which has
the most feeding quality, sugar cane or
Cafllr corn We bought a little Kaffir
corn at a sale the other day and our
herdsman does not think there Is as
much feeding quality in the corn as
there is in the cane. If there is I would
like to plant about half KafHr corn in
stead bf so much sugar cane. The
trouble with sugarcane in this black
soil is that it gets so tall that 'the wind
blows it over. Kaffir corn wiil not do
this. I think the sugar cane is grand
feed for cows Buckling calves it in
creases the riohnesa and Increases the
flow of milk, Wa fed a gradt haUu on
S&rV/iCi
MANCHESTER, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER. 1 d, 1899. VOL. XXV—NO. 46.
sogar cane alone to try it and I never
ate abetter piece of beef than she made.
plans
I'd Struts around about the farm and
"What Uu will do
Sez ho'U plow up the garden patch and the
Stock on the Farm.
Tbe man with a large farm may be
able to go on raising and selling grain
and let the wastes go, but tbe small
farmer cannot allow these losses.
For the small farmer horseB or cattle
are out of the question as they require
too large an area of pasturage, but
with hogs or sheep the case is different.
They can be kept with profit in com
paratively cramped quarters. Either of
these kinds of stock may be UBed to
make meat of grass and grain. Feed
may be sold in the shape of mutton,
wool or pork to better advantage than
in its original condition. The&small
farmer should be an intensive farmer
and Intensive farming is impossible
without the help of live stock or the
purchasing of large quantities of fertil
izers, which is not good farming.
The man who owns a small farm und
keeps a small herd of hogs or a small
flock Qf sheep, is likely to become an
entlmBiast, and if this is tbe case the
stock kept will get much larger prices
than common stock and the profits tvill
be increased.
AB a matter of fact tbe small farn^
with a few animals is in a position to
take the very best care of his animals
whether they are to be used for market
or are pure-breds which are to be suld
for breeders and in either case the re
turns will be larger than they could be
where larger floc&B with less care are
kept.—Farmers' Voice.
The Bet Von the Cue.
"In one of the remote counties of the
Panhandle of Texas," says Law Notes,
"two lawyers were trying a ease be
fore a justice of the peace. It was 00
miles as the crow files to tba nearest
law book, and the attorneys differed,
of course, as to the law upon the main
Issue In the case. Tbey were trying tbe
case without the Intervention of a Jury,
and his honor, who conducted a gam
bling bouse in conncctlon with his ho
tel, saloon, livery stable, stud horse and
Jackass, was In doubts as to what his
decision ought to be.
"Finally Miller,the plaintiff's counsel,
offered to bet Hoover, the defendant's
attorney, $10 that he was right. Hoover
did nqt happen to have that much of
the Circulating medium concealed
abontthls person, and was naturally at
a loss bow to parry this forcible argu
ment.
"Tht court waited a few moments
-OB TOgveT, and finally said: 'Well, Mr.
Hoover^ "the court" KM—W4!|ed long
enough. Miller's proposition seem?
be a fair one, and, since you don't put
op, I will decide this case in favor of
the plaintiff.'"
Vnexpcetcd.
One of tbe district school trustees
was a crank on the subject of Are,
and when he called round with the ex
amining board he always confined his
remarks to a question addressed to the
pupils as to wbat they would do In
case the building should catch Are.
The teacher waB acquainted with bis
hobby, so she prompted ber scholars
as to the answers tbey should give
when he rose to propound hlB accus
tomed Inquiry. When the board called,
however, this particular trustee, per
haps from a desire to emulate his as
sociates in their addresses, rose and
said:
"You boys and girls have paid such
attention to Mr. Jones' remarks, I
wonder what you would do, now, If I
were to make you a little speech?"
Qulok as thought a hundred voices
piped In unison:
"Form a line and march down
stairs."—London Answers.
flo V.rj. AMommoAttln,.
8cene—A swell restaurant (say.
Simpson's). Walter presents bill to
swell, who has been dining botb "wise
ly and well."
Swell—Walter, Just tell Mr. Simpson
I should like a word with him. Ah.
how, do you do, Mr. Simpson? Some
12 months ago I dined here, but, un
fortunately. was unable to pay. You
made a few rather powerful remarks
and then very properly kicked me
down Btalre.
Mr. SlmpBon—Ah, I do remember tbe
matter, now you mention It. But,
never mind, sir—never mind. Let by
gone be bygones.
Swell—Just so. sir. I have now to
compliment you upon the charming
dinner I have just enjoyed. The wlue
was really excellent, but I am sorry
to say—er—that Is,
I
the fact Is (lifting his eoattalls ac
commodatingly) I must trouble you
again, Mr Simpson.
Bow to Fall Unhurt.
"People wonder how an actress can
fall on the stage without hurting her
self, but It Is the easiest thing in the
world," said an actress.
"The great secret of falling Is to re
lax. If you slip and fall some time
when you do not wish to. If you can
only remember to relax your muscles,
you will be saved perhaps from a seri
ous Injury. Children and drunken peo
ple fall relaxed."
In 9ome Plnce..
Shooting Tenant (Just arrived for the
grouse)—What a beautiful place to
live. Dougald!
Dougalrl—It's no bnrt place to live.
But whot wad ye think o' hnvln to
travel IB miles for a glass o' whuskj I
Shooting Tenant—But why don't you
buy souie and keep it?
Dougald—Ah. mon, but wiiuskv
na' keep!—Punch.
Give the Children a Drink,
called Grain-O. It is a delicious, appe
tlzing, nourishing food drink to take the
fiked
ilace of coffee. Sold by all grocers and
by all who have used it because
when properly -prepared it tastes like
the finest coffee but is free from all its
injurious properties. Grain-O aids di
gestion and strengthens the nerves. It,
IB not a stimulant but a health builder
and children, as well as adults, can
djink it with great benefit. Costs about
limtMhMooflM. 16 and Mo.
iftr-W
WHEN A
man becomes jealous of hie neigh
bor, dissatisfied with his lot and
resorts to dishonest and untruth­
a:
No farm is so small but there are
some wastes on it If the product is sold
direct from the farm. It is impossible
to rain and sell grain and hay without
losing some portion of it which might
have been saved if live stock were
kept,
ful means to gain the favor of the
community, he is generally known
among his fellowmen as a
SOREHEAD.
A man who lies will cheat and
steal, and if you deal with him he
will bear watching.
Honest business methods are
always sure trade-winners.
The above is a likeness of a
sorehead as our special artist sees
him.
We do not claim that our flour
is the best in the world, but we do
assert that is as good as any in
the world, and that's enough.
There is more QUAKER Mill
Flour sold in Manchester and
Delaware County than any other
flour and we have the documents
to prove it.
Our goods are sold by the best
deak-rs everywhere and you'll not
find them in "shoddy" places.
Help home industry by using
the flour with A QUAKER ON
EVERY SACK and you'll not be
deceived.
QUAKER HILL CO.
J. W. MILES. Prest. P. LEROY, Cashier
B. F. MILKS, Asst. Cashier.
K. RODINSON 2d V. President,
H. P. HABDERi'R.lBt V. President.
First Nations
1
BANK,
MANCHESTER. IOWA.
CAPITAL $50,000
General
Banking
Business
Trunsaotod.
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
SAFETY "DEPOSIT" BOXES
FOR RENT.
PIREC'IHJRS.
R. R. Robinson. M. F. L.'Roy,
J. W. Miles, W. II Norrfs,
E. M. C&rr,
k--
M. Beehler,
H. A. Granger, v1 A. H. Blake,
B. F. Miles, H. 0. Haeherle,
B\ J. Attvater.
cozussGFoaroBsres.
IflrstNationsBank, iDoboque. lowtt.
Central National Bank New York City,
jnerelftl National Bank. Chicago. Ills.
tt. C. CAWLEY,
President.
W. TIRRILL,
CHAS. J. SEEDS,
Cashier.
r. W. KEAGY,
Vice President.
Asst. Cashier.
DELAWARE COUNTY
State Bank
CAPITAL $60,000
-DIREOTORS-
Wm. C. Cawley.
W. G. Kenyon.
Edward P. Seeds.
Clias. J. Seeds.
H. F. Arnold.
R. W, TJrriU.
G. W. Dunham.
M. H. Wtlliston
C. W. Keagy.
INTEREST PAID on Time Deposits.
Prompt attention given all business. Pas
senger tiokcts from and to all parts of Europe
direct to Manchester, fur sale.
r.ONG MORTGAGE J.OAKS
Made, Bought and Sold.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
For the storage of valuable papers,
etc. for rent.
Banking
House
Henrv Hutchinson
Hutchinson's Building, Manchester, Iowa.
CAPITAL, $70,000
JOSEPH HUTCHINSON, Cashier.
COLLECTIONS
P^ioaaptly Mad*.
DEPOSITS
regret—er—well,
on Time, Interest Al
lowed and other deposits received.
DRAFTS
sold on New York, Chicago
and Dubuque: also on Great Britain and Ire»
land and European Cities.
TICKET6 sold to and from all European
ports via Cunard or Allen or White Star
Steamship Llru.s.
60 YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
1 RAOC MARKS
DESIGNS
COPYRIGHTS AC.
Anyouo sending skcteh and description may
quickly Hscerutiii our opinion free wnetbor an
Invention la probably putetitable. Cotntnunlco*
ions Rtrict
ly conthlentful. Handbook on I'atento
sent free. Oldest upency for securing pateuts.
Patents takeu through Munn & Co. receive
*prclu/»uNc*, without charge, in the
Scientific American.
A handsomely lllnstratod weekly. largest clr
culatUm of any oclontlbo Journal. Torma, (3
a
year: four months, fL Sold by all newsdealers.
MUNN & Co.36,B™»d—*- New York
Braucb Office. G25 St~ Washington D. C-
F.
P.
Anci Repairer
of all kinds of Vehicles, and general repalrei
of all Kinds of Wood Work
For Farming Implements and Machinery
Shop on Franklin Street* near the bridge, with
Alex Sefetrom. in building latoly oocupled by
Peter Meyer. Have had several years ex
per-
Another Carload
Also Louisville Cement kept on hand.
Stucco and Callolite Plaster, Plaster Hair.
ing elsewhere.
k«p
PETERSON,
Manufacturer of
WAGONS
$tl)e Democrat
RATI8 OP APVBRTI8IH6,
•PACT. IW tw 1M SM IT
One tnoh SI 00 mo 5*80 $4 60 f«S0 910 0
Two inchee.. 1 fiO
TT may BE TOO E^puy
YOU'RE NOT SO WARM
this kind of weather, are you? Why not purchase your heating
stove now? People have been buying coal! We are carrying
large line of heaters this year and have one that will suit YOU
COME IN and look over our line of stoves.
A COMPLETE LINE OF HARDWARE.
J. J. HAWLEY.
JUST RECEIVED
A large assortment of ladies' fine shoes in kid and vesting"
tops, lace and button. All the late styles to retail at
$2.50 $3.00
eased to show them to you.
KINNE ilPBBEB
Flour and all kinds of Feed,
Hay and Straw, Wheat
and Wheat Screenings.
MY FARM, of 240 acres, in Prairie Township for sale.
vduvnon of the
$5.98 SUIT
Other Styles are Here
Up to $0.00.
W* 3 60 6 78 000 16 OU
Three Inches. 00 8 00 4 60 00 12 00 to 0
Fourlnohes.. 2 60 8 76 6 76 10 00 16 60 *6 0(
Five Inches., 8 00 4 60 7 00 18 00 ao 00 80 0(1
J4 Column.... 4 RO 6 50 8 00 lb 00 00- 40 00
Column,...
One Column.,
6 GO 0 00 18 00 86 00 40 00 •6
Column,...
One Column., 18 80 18 00 26 00 60 00 soon 126 Oil
ISF"Advertisements ordered dlaoontlnued be
fore expiration of oootraet will be charged ac
oordin* to atom Male.
Business oardn, not exceeding tlx limes, t&O
P«ry«w.
Business looall, ten oents per line
for the first
Insertion, and fire oents per line Tor each subsv
quest Insertion.
to talk about Christmas goods, but nevertheless
we have a few suggestions to make. We are un
packing the finest—by far the finest—line of holi­
day furniture ever shown in this part of Iowa.
Space will uot allow us to particularize, but the,,
new goods make up a line that is
Copiplete ip Every particular
Now, fore the stocV is broken into, why not 'J
come in and pick out such holiday furniture as
you may w.int, have it la'd away and delivered
when called for? You will then have a wider
assortment to choose from and be more certain of
getting exclusive styles. We will be glad to show
you this beautiful line of furniture at any time.
Austip Dlr Browp.4
of ATLAS PORT
LAND CEMENT
in a few days.
Maquoketa Lime,
before buy. Peter Boardway.
To Dress
Well
Visit the Clothing
House of J. H. Allen]
All the latest
and finest
Novelties in
Men,
Boys' and
Children's
Clothing.
In all new designs, and
Neckwear of every
description.
We Will Satisfy
Any
taste in our large
selection
J.
Allen

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