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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, December 06, 1899, Image 8

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Again in the ring
and now ready
The Maid was In
the Garden
hanging out the clothes and
met with a most unpleasant ac
cident. Why not send your
clothes to the Manchester
Steam Laundry to be laundried
and this save all trouble at
nome? You can get better
work for less money at a first
class laundry than you can in
any other way. Clothes called
or and delivered promptly.
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£& *r jfo •, %r»eti
for business
I have recently refitted my former place of business on Frank
lin street and have placed therein a new and fresh line of
Groceries and
Provisions.
It is my intention to keep a complete line of all goods usually
kept in a first-class retail Grocery Store.
Former patrons and new ones are cordially invited to
call and see me in my improved quarters.
'PHONE
The cold weather is coming.
Don't let it catch you with your
coal bin empty. We can supply
you with the best coal at low.- st
possible price. Call and leave
your order.
HUB LH CO.,
'Phone 156. Manchester, Iowa
.T.'.T:.*.'.T'X .T. 'T. 'T.
A nice new and fresh line of
y)t
Af"
Y"V -.4
t%\
152.
Iff
COALsWOOD.
59 993
1
"English Currants,
Candied Citrons, Seeded Raisins,
and Nuts at
&
T. N. ARNOLD'S.
Ours isr
the:
Peoples'
Store.
RACKET STORE
BECAUSE
we carry the goods you need
every day in the year.
OUR QUALITIES
are always as we represent
them.
WE GUARANTEE
satisfaction to our trade.
WE SAVE
you a little money on every
article you buy of us.
THE RACKET STORE
MANCHESTER STEAM LAUNDRY
We ask only one trial. 'PHONE 238
You Do Not
Know
You Should Know ™£rT
est line of Groceries, Canned Goods,
Relishes and, in fact, everything that
should be kept in a first-class grocery
and provision store can at all times be
found at
Fruits of every kind during their season.
Peterson
Bros.
P. S. Have you examined our fine line
of Crockery and Glassware?
.. V.. ....
A 5\iiTina story of
AI-MY
[Copyright,
v'
CHAPTER I.—Billy Gray, young college
Rtndent, secures a lieutenant's commission
on breaking out of Spanish-American war.
He meets a Mr. Prime, Miss Prime and
Miss Amy Lawrence.
CHAPTER II.—After a conference In
his official tent, Gen. Drayton Joins a gay
company in his personal tent—Mrs. Gar
rison doing tho honors as hostess.
"With every assurance that the prod
igal should be produced forthwith and
restored to the paternal bosom," de
claimed Mrs. Garrison, melodramatic
ally, and would have ranted on, never
noting the flush of pain and embarrass
ment that almost instantly appeared
in the faces of Miss Lawrence and her
dark-eyed eastern cousin, nor seeing the
warning in her husband's eyes but at
the moment the tent flap was thrown
back and held open to admit a tall,
gray-haired civilian whose silk hat was
uplifted as he entered in courteous rec
ognition of the group, despite the dis
tress that was betrayed in the pallor of
his face and the instant glance of his
dark eyes toward the slender girl, who
stepped eagerly forward. Mrs. Gar
rison, turning quickly, saw, and with
swift, agile movement sprang to one
side. The general slowly struggled up
from his easy chair. Reaching her
CatheWs side Miss Prime laid her hand
u^on his arm, looking fondly and
anxiously into his face. A soldierly,
middle-aged officer, in dripping forage
cap and rain coat, stepped quickly in
and lowered the flap.
"Did you find him, father?" was Miss
Prime's low-toned, faltering question.
"We found—the soldier referred to
Col. Armstrong has been most kind but
it wasn't your brother at all, my child
CHAPTER m.
A day had dawned on the Presidio
Heights as brilliant as its predecessor
had been dismal. A soft south wind
had kept the fogs of the Pacific far out
to sea and cleared the summer sky of
every wisp of vapor. The sun of early
August shone hot and strong upon tEe
sandy wastes between the western lim
its of the division camps and the foamy
strand beneath the low bluffs, and beat
upon the canvas homes of the rejoicing
soldiery, slacking cloth and cordage so
that the trim tent lines had become
broken and jagged, thereby setting the
teeth of "Old Squeers" on edge as he
gazed grimly from under the brimof his
unsightly felt hat and called for his one
faithful henchman, the orderly. Even
his adjutant could not condone the regi
mental commander's objectionable
traits, for a crustier old villain of a vet
eran lived not in the line of the army.
"Ould Canker" the troopers had dubbed
bim during the few year3 he had served
in the cavalry, transplanted from a foot
regiment at the time of the reorganiza
tion, so-called, of the army in '71 but
a few years of mounted duty in Arizona
and later in the Sioux country had sick
ened him of cavalry life and he gladly
accepted chance to transfer baclfio
the infantry. Now, 20 years after,
risen by degrees to the grade of lieuten
ant-colonel, he found himself in com
mund of a famous old regiment of regu
lars, whose colonel had donned the stars
of a general officer of volunteers, and
the pet name—save the mark—of cav
alry days had given place to the unflat
tering sobriquet derived from that hor
ror of boyish readers—the ill-favored
schoolmaster of Dothcboys hall. He
had come to the —teenth with a halo
of condemnation from the regiment in
which he had served as major and won
his baleful name, and "the boys" of his
command soon learned to like him even
less than those who had dubbed him
"Squeers," because, as they explained,
there wasn't any privilege or pleasure
he would not "do the boys" out of if he
possibly could. Gordon had promptly
tendered his resignation as regimental
adjutant when his beloved colonel left
the post to report for duty in the army
destined for Cuba, but Lieut.-Col. Can
ker declined to accept it, and fairly told
Gordon that, as he hadn't a friend
among the subalterns, there was no one
else to take it. Then, too, the colonel
himself added a word or two
and settled
the matter.
A big review had been ordered for
the morning. An entire brigade of
sturdy volunteers was already forming
and marching out by battalions to their
regimental parades, the men showing
in their easy stride and elastic carriage
the effects of two months' hard drill and
gradually increasing discipline. The
regulars were still out in the park, hid
den by the dense foliage and busy with
their company drills. The adjutantand
clerk were at their papers in the big
office tent, and only the sentries, the
sick and the special duty men remained
about the body of camp. There was no
one, said Private Noonan to himself, as
he paced the pathway in front of the
colonel's tent, after having scrupulous
ly saluted him on his appearance: "No
wan fur theould man to whack at, bar
rin* it's me," but even Canker could
find nothing to "whack at" in this vet
eran soldier who had served in the
ranks since the days of the great war
and had borne the messages of such
men as Sheridan, Thomas and McPher
son when Canker himself was sweating
under Lis knapsack and musket. Like
most men, even most objectionable
inen, Canker had some redeeming fea
tures, and that was one of them—he
had been a private soldier, and a brave
one, too, and was proud of it.
But life had little sunshine in it for
one of his warped, ill-conditioned na
ture. There was a profound conviction
in the minds of the company officers
that the mere sight of happiness or con
tent in the face of a subordinate was
more than enough to set Canker's wits
to work to wipe it out. There was no
doubt whatever in the minds of the
subalterns that the main reason why
Squeers was so manifestly "down on"
Billy Gray was the almost indestruct
ible expression of good nature, jollity
and enthusiasm that had shown in the
little fellow's face ever since he joined
the regiment. "If we call the old man
Squeers we should dub Billy Mark Tap
ley," said Gordon one daj', when the
lad had laughed off the effect of an un
usually acrimonious rasping over a
trivial error in the guard report book.
"He's no end kind when a fellow's in a
fix," said Gray, in explanation, "and all
the time he was soaking me I was think
ing how he btood by Jimmy Carson in
his scrape"—a serious scrape it was,
too, for young Carson, detailed to escort
certain prisoners to Alcatraz and in
Crusted with certain funds to be turned
Life in The PHlitym
1899.
SYNOPSIS.
by F. Tennyson Ntely.]
over to the chief quartermaster of the
department, had unaccountably fallen
into a deep sleep aboard the train and
awoke to find both funds and prisoners
gone. Explanations were useless. The
commanding general would listen to no
excuse a court-martial was ordered,
and a very worthy young officer's mili
tary career seemed about to close under
a cloud, when "Old Canker" threw
himself into the breach. He had long
suspected the sergeant who had ac
companied the party in immediate
command of the little guard. He hated
the commanding general with all his
soul, and how it came about no one
could thoroughly explain, but one day
Canker turned up with indubitable
proof that the sergeant was the thief—
that he was bribed to bring about the
escape of the prisoners, and that he had
drugged the fresh spring water he
brought in to the young officer after
the burning heat of the desert was left
behind in the dead of the summer night.
Canker even recovered most of the
stolen money, for there was a woman in
the case, and she had safely stowed it
away. Carson was cleared and Canker
triumphant. "See what the man can
do when his sense of justice is aroused,
said the optimists of the army. "Justice
be blowed," answered the cynics. "He
never would have raised his finger to
help Carson but for the joy of proving
the general unjust, and a regimental
pet, the sergeant—a thief."
Yet Gray reverted to this episode as
explanation of his tolerance of Canker's
harshness and thereby gave rise to a
rejoinder from the lips of a veteran
compuny commander that many a fel
low was destined to recall before the
regiment was two months older:
"In order to settle it, somebody's got
to find his life or his commission in
jeopardy. Maybe it'll be you, Billy,
and
I'm betting you won't find Squeers a
guardian angel."
Yet on this sunshiny summer morn
ing, with hope and sunshine and con
fidence in his handsome, boyish face,
Lieut. Gray came bounding up to the
presence of the regimental commander
as though that sour-visaged soldier
were an indulgent uncle who could not
say him nay. A stylish open carriage
in which were two remarkably pretty
girls and a gray-haired, slender gen
tleman, had reined up in the street
opposite the entrance to the row of
officers' tents and Canker had ripped
out his watch, with an ugly frown on
his forehead, for three of his compa
nies had just marched in from drill
ind three of their young lieutenants,
on the instant of dismissal, had made
straight for the vehicle and he half
hoped to find they had lopped off a
minute or so of the allotted hour. The
sound of merry laughter seemed to
grate on his ears. The sight of Gray's
beaming face seemed to deepen the
gloom in his own. Instinctively he
knew the youngster had come to ask a
favor and he stood ready to refuse.
"Colonel, I'd like mightily to go over
and see that review this morning, sir:
and Mr. Prime is good enough to offer
me a seat in his carriage. May I go,
sir?"
"Yq^i can't go anywhere, sir, with the
tents of your company in that disgrace
ful condition. Just look at them, sir!
as ragged as a wash line on a windy
day." And Canker scowled angrily at
the young fellow standing squarely at
attention before him.
"I know that, colonel, but the sun did
that while we were out at drill, and the
men will straighten everything in ten
minutes. I'll give the order now, sir."
And Billy looked as though refusal
were out of the question.
"You'll stay and see it done, sir, ond
when it's done—to my satisfaction—
will be time enough to ask for favors.
Mr. Gordon, send word to the company
commanders I wish to see them here at
once." continued the senior officer,
whirling on his heel and terminating
the interview by so doing. It was in
Gray's mind for a brief minute to fol
low and plead. He had made it tell
many a time with an obstinate universi
ty don, but he knew the carriage was
waiting—the carriage load watching,
and deep down in his heart there was
keen disappointment. He would have
given a big slice of his monthly pay
to go with that particular party and
occupy the seat opposite Amy Lawrence
and gaze his fill at her fair face. He
well-nigh hated Squeers as he hurried
away to hail his first sergeant and give
the necessary orders before daring to
return to the carriage and report his
failure. His bright blue eyes were
clouded and his face flushed with vex
ation, for he saw that the rearmost
regiment was even now filing into the
Presidio reservation afar off to the
north, and that no time was to be lost
if his friends were to see the review.
The distant measured boom of guns
told that the general in whose honor
the ceremony was ordered was already
approaching the spot, and away over
the rolling uplands toward the Golden
Gate a cavalry escort rode into view.
Billy ground his teeth. "Run and tell
them I cannot get leave," he called to
a fellow sub. "Squeers has set me to
It thrilled him with anew and struge delight
work straightening up camp. Turn out
the company, sergeantl Brace the tent
cords and align tents," and a mourn
ful wave of his forage cap was the only
greeting he dare trust himself to give,
as after a few minutes of fruitless wait
ing, the vacant seat was given to an
other officer and the carriage rolled
rapidly away. A second or two it was
hidden from his sight behind the large
wall tents along the line of fence, then
•hot into full view again as ha stood
-.1 v.' .'
at the end of the company street look
ing eagerly for its reappearance. And
then occurred a little thing that was
destined to live in his memory for many
a day, and that thrilled him with a new
and strange delight. He had never been
of the so-called "spooney" set at the
varsity. Pretty girls galore there were
about that famous institute, and he had
danced at many a student party and
romped through many a reel, but the
nearest he had ever come to something
more than a mere jolly friendship for a
girl was the regard in which he held
his partner in the "mixed doubles,"
but that was all on account of her ex
uberant health, spirits, general come
liness of face and form, and exquisite
skill in tennis. But this day a new
and eager longing was eating at his
heart a strange, dull pang seemed to
seize upon it as he noted in a flash that
the seat that was to have been his was
occupied by an officer many years his
senior, a man he knew only by sight
and an enviable reputation, a man
whose soldierly, clean-cut face never
turned an instant, for his eyes were
fixed upon a lovely picture on the op
posite seat—Amy Lawrence bending
eagerly forward and gazing with her
beautiful eyes alight with sympathy,
interest and frank liking in search of
the sorely disappointed young officer.
"There he is!" she cried, though too
far
away for him to hear, and then, with
no more thought of coquetry than a
kitten, •with no more motive in the
world than that of conveying to him
an idea of her sorrow, her sympathy,
her perhaps pardonable and exagger
ated indignation at what she deemed
an act of tyranny on the part of hiscom
mander, with only an instant in which
to convey it all—her sweet face flushed
and her eyes flamed with the light of
her girlish enthusiasm—in that instant
she had kissed her hand to him, and
then Col. Armstrong, turning sudden
ly and sharply to see who could be the
object of interest so absorbing, caught
one flitting glimpse of Billy Gray lift
ing his cap in quick acknowledgment,
and the words that were on the tip
of Armstrong's tongue the moment be
fore were withheld for a more auspi
cious occasion—and it did not come too
soon.
It was only four days after that in
itial meeting in the general's tent the
foggy evening of the girl's first visit
to camp, but both in city and on the
tented field there had been several oc
casions on which the colonel had been
in conference with Mr. Prime and in
company with the young ladies.
Junior officers had monopolized the
time and attention of the latter, but
Armstrong was a close observer and a
man who loved all that was strong,
high-minded and true in his own sex,
and that was pure and sweet and win
some in woman. A keen soldier, he
had
spent many years in active service, most
of them in the hardy, eventful and vig
orous life on the Indian frontier. He
had been conspicuous in more than one
stirring campaign against the red war
riors of the plains, had won his medal
of honor before his first promotion,
and his captaincy by brevet for daring
conduct in action long antedated the
right to wear the double bars of that
grade. He had seen much of the world,
at home and abroad had traveled
much, read much, thought much, but
these were things of less concern to
many a woman in our much married
army than the question as to whether
he had ever loved much. Certain it was
he had never married, but that didn't
settle it. Many a man loves, said they,
without getting married, forgetful of
the other side of the proposition ad
vanced by horrid regimental cynics,
that many men marry without getting
loved. Armstrong would not have
proved an easy man to question on that,
or indeed on any other subject which
he considered personal to himself,
Even in his own regiment in the reg*
ular service he had long been looked
upon as an exclusive sort of fellow—
a man who had no intimates and not
many companions, yet, officers and sol
diers, he held the respect and esteem
of the entire command, even of those
whom he kept at a distance, and few
are the regiments in which there are
not one or two charcters who are not
best seen and studied through a binoc
ular. Without being sympathetic, said
his critics, Armstrong was "square,"
but his critics had scant means of know
ing whether he was sympathetic or
not. lie was a steadfast fellow, an un
swerving, uncompromising sort of man,
a man who would never have done for a
diplomat, and could never have been
elected to office. But he was truthful
just, and as the English officer reluct
antly said of Lucan, whom he hated:
"Yes—damn him—he is brave." The
men whom he did not seem to like in the
army and who disliked him according
ly, were compelled to admit, to them
selves at least, that their reasons were
comprised in the above-recorded, re
grettable, but unmistakable fact—ho
didn't like them. Another trait, unpop
ular, was that he knew when and how
to say no. He smoked too much, per
haps, and talked too little for those
who would use his words as witnesses
against him. He never gambled, he
rarely drank, he never lent nor bor
rowed. He was a bachelor, yet would
never join a "mess," but kept house
himself and usually had some favored
comrade living with him. He was 40
and did not look 35. He was tall, erect
athletic, hardy and graceful in build
and his face was one of the best to be
seen in many a line of officers at parade.
His eyes were steel gray and clear and
penetrating, his features clear-cut, al
most too delicately cut, thought some
of the best friends he had among the
men. His hair was brown, sprinkled
liberally with silver his mouth, an ad
mirable mouth in every way, was
shaded and half-hidden by a long,
drooping mustache to which, some men
thought and some women said, bis
tapering white fingers paid too much
attention, but I doubt if a knowledge
of
this criticism would have led to the
faintest alteration in the habit. Gen
erally the expression of Armstrong's
face was grave, and, on duty a trifle
stern and not ten people in the world
were aware what humor could twinkle
in the clear, keen eyes, or twitch about
the corners of that mobile mouth.
There were no five who knew the ten
derness that lay in hiding there, for
Armstrong had few living kindred and
they were men. There lived not, as he
drove this glorious August morning to
the breezy uplands beyond the camps,
one woman who could say she had seen
those eyes of Armstrong's melt and
glow with love. As for Amy Lawrence,
she was not dreaming of such a thing.
She was not even looking at him. Her
thoughts at the moment were drifting
back to that usually light-hearted boy
who stood gazing so disconsolately
after them as they drove away, her eyes
were intent upon an approaching group
that presently reclaimed her wandering
thoughts.
Coming up Point Lobos avenue strode
a party of four—all soldiers. One of
these, wild-eyed, bareheaded, dishev
eled, his clothing torn, his wrists lashed
behind him, walked between two armed
guards. The fourth, a sergeant, fol
lowed at their heels. Miss Lawrence
had just time to note that the downoaat
face waa dark and oval and r*fla«d»
when it was suddenly uplifted at Bound
of the whirring carriage wheels. A
light of recognition, almost of terror,
flashed across it, and with one bound
the prisoner sprang from between his
guards, dove almost under the noses of
•he startled team, and darted through
the wide open doorway of a corner sa
•oon. He was out of sight in a second.
TO UK CONTINUED.
How's This!
Wo offer One Hundred Dollars reward for
aaycaseof Catarrh that cannot be cured by
Hall's Catarrh Cure,
J. Cheney & Co., Toledo, O.
Wo, the uuderslcnod, liave known F. J.
Cheney for the last fifteen years, and belteve
him perfectly honorable In all business trnnsac
tlons and financially able to carry out any
obligations made by their llrin,
A\KST & TKUAX, wholesale Dmgatsl,'Toledo, O,
A\AIJIK3. KINNAN & MAIIVIN, Wholesale
CI ruculsts,Toledo, 0.
Hall's Catarrh Cure 1s taken Internally, acting
directly upon tho blood ana mucous surfaces of
tho system. Testimonials sout free. Price 76c.
per bottle. Sold by all druggists.
Hall's Family Pills are the best.
Through Pullman Touris Sleeping
Car Service To Texas, Old Mexico
And California. 1
1
via the Chicago Great estern Ry. to
Kansas City and the MiBsouri, Kansas
& Texas, the San Antonio & Arkansas
Puss and Southern Pacific Railways
through Dallas, San Antonio, El Paso
and Los Angeles to San Francisco.
The only through car line from the
Northwest to TexaB points and con
necting at Spoft'ord Junction for all
points in Old Mexico. A new weekly
service established on November 3rd
and continuing weekly thereafter.
They will be in charge of an experi
enced official and will leave Minne
apolis at 10:45 p. m. and St. Paul at
11:20 p. m. every Friday and reach
Dallas the following Sunday, San
Antonio on Monday, El Paso on Tues
day, Los Angeles at noon Wednesday
and San Francisco early Thursday
morning. These cars are the Standard
Pullman Sleeping Cars, simlliar to
those run on all transcontinental lines
and the charges for berths are about
half those charged in regular Standard
Pullman Sleepers. To persons who
have made the trip to California via
other routes, this Southern route will
prove a most delightful change, and to
persons contemplating a trip to Texas
or Mexican points it furnishes facilities
heretofore unoffered. This car may be
taken at any point along the Line of
the Chicago Great Western Railway
between Minneapolis and Kansas City.
For full information and assistance
call on or address any Chicago Great
Western Agent, or F. H. Lord, General
Passenger fe Ticket Agent, 113 Adams
St., Chicago. 44-9
Mexico.
Eureka Harness Oil Is tbe best
preservative or new leather
and the best renovator of old
leather. It oils, softens, black
ens and protects- Use
Eureka
Harness Oil
on your best harness,^our old bar
nesa. and your carriage top, and they
will not only look better but wear
longer. Sold everywhere In cans—ail
•ilea from half pint* to five gallons.
Mi4t by STAMUAUD OIL CO.
SALESMEN
WANTED
to canvass for the sale of Nursery Stock I Steady
employment guaranteed. GOOD PAY for sue
cessful men. Apply st once stating age. Men
tion this paper.
E. L, Watrous, Des Moines, la.
BO YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
PATENTS
TRADE MARKS
DESIGNS
COPYRIGHTS AC.
Anyone sending a skctcb and description may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
Invention is probably rotentublo, Communica
tions strictly conOdentfid. Handbook on Patents
sent free. Oldest agency for Hccurfng patents.
Patents taken through Munn A Co. receive
ipeclal notice,
without charge. In the
Scientific American.
A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest dr.
culutlon of any scientific Journal. Terms, $8 a
year four months. $L Sold by all newsdealers.
MUNN &
New York
0Q#361Broadway,
Hram* Office ©6 8t- Waub'ngtoo. D. C.
C0TSW0LDS.
m.
Flock heat'ed by IMPORT
ED BAMS. A nice lot of
breeding ewes and a dozen
ram lambs FOB SALE.
Eight hundred head to se
lect from.
W. J. STRAIN & SONS,
Masonvilie, la.
Something NEW IN
LEATHER
JEWEL
CASES,
Pocket books, and Calling Card
Cases. Just what
Eyery Lady
-:/f- Needs
We have a fine line of
Silk umbrellas
with FANCY HANDLES.
Call and see them
,V|
inn Mm'1
Railroad Time Table.,
ILLINOI8 CENTRAL.
Illinois Central Time Tablo No.
22,
taking ef­
fect at 12:00 o'clock noon, Sunday, Oct. 8, 1899.
Main Line Passenger Trains.
Arrive
.,,+No.81, Clipper
+No, 8, Day Express....
....•No. l. Flyer
0:15 p.
8:44 a.
10:25 p.
Kast Bound,
0:40 a. +No. 82, Clipper
8:20 p. ....tNo.4,DayKxpross....
3:22 a. *No. 2, Flyer...
9:40 a.
8:20 p.
3:22 a.
FrelRhts Carrying Passengers?
Arrive 1
West Bound. I Leave
12:25 p.ml..i tNo.81, wayFreight...|i p,m
2:00 p. iql.tNo. 71,trough Freight.12:80 p.
Arrive East Bound. Leave
10:10 a. ml...No. 92t Way Freight...Il0:55a.m
CEDAR HAPfDS T1RANHH
South Bound
Leav
I Bet Cedar Rpds
and Manchester
No. 303 9:45
a.m
No 38t Q:20p.m
No. 3fl 5:55p.m
North Bound
Arrive
No,304 f»:50 p.m
No. 822
8:35 a.m
No.8511:45 p.m
...tPasBonger..
..tPassenger,..
....tFrelght....
•Dally.
•Daily fixoept Sunday.
H. Q. PIERCE, Station Agt.
CHICAGOGREATWESTERN RY.
"The Maple Leaf Route.**
rt.
Time card, Thorpe. Iowa.
Chicago Special, Daily, Going East 7:40 a
SIS
elceDt
8unto*-•
Way Frelcbt,' daily ..........7.*.n":8B a
Goirg West, North and South.
WayFreight, dally 9:36 pm
dally except Sunday.. .. 1:58 pm
St Paul 4 Kansas City Exp, dally ... 5:41am
For Information and tlokets apply to
J. L. O'HARROW Agent Thorpe.
C. M. St. P. Ry,
DELAWARE TIME CARD:
North Bound
St. Paul & West. PaGsenfter, 8:03 a.m
AW
Davenport a Kansas City, Pass., ... 0:07 p.
Way Freight a.
B. C. R. & N. R'y.
CEDAR RAPIDS TIME CARD.
MAIN LINK GOING NORTH.
Arrive Leave
7:85 a No. Minneapolis Express.. 8:05 a
J2j80 No.sWaverly Passenger... S:80pm
12:03 ngt NO. 6 Minneapolis Express..12:90 net
6:45 a No. 13 Chicago Passenger.
11:46 No. 19 Chicago Passenger.
No. l-Free chair car and coaches to Minne
apolis and St. Paul. No. 5—Pullman sleepers
nnd coaches to Minneapolis and St. Paul.
MAIN LINK GOING EAST AND 80UTH.
8:90 No. 2 Chicago Passenger.... 8:40 pm
10:15 a No. 48t. Louis Passenger.. 3:06pai
8:10 No. 6 Chicago & St.Louls Ex. 8:80 am
12:2U ngt No. 8 Chicago Fast Express. 12:80 net
No. 10 Passenger.. 6:05 pirt'
No 12 Burlington Passenger 7:15 am
No
On Tuesday, January 23, a special
vestibule train of Pullman Palace cars,
compartment, drawing-room, library,
observation and dining cars will start
from Chicago going to the City of
Mexico and to the other prominent
cities ol' the Republic and back to Chi
cago again without change, making
THE TOUF OF ALL MEXICO,
compute. The party will be strictly
limited and absolutely flrst-class.
TICKETS INCLUDE ALL
EXPENSES EVERYWHERE.
The tour is under the personal escort
and direction of Mr. Reau Campbell,
General Manager of The American
Tourist Association.
For maps, books of tour, tickets, etc.,
call on Agents of the Chicago, Mil
waukee & St. Paul R'y. 47w4
2—Pullman
sleeper, free chair car and
coaches to Chicago. No. c—Pullman sleepers
and through coaches to Chicago and St. Louis.
wi?1a.m.Ngt,—night.
*11
sl®ePer ,t
Chicago 7:50
Chicago srrlves
DKCORAH DIVISION.
8:10 Decorah Passenger. .... 8:15 a
*•05 Decorah Freight. G:20pm
IOWA PALLS DIVISION.
T2:50 pm... .Spirit Lake Passenger.... 8:80am
12:20 ngt ..Sioux Falls Fast Express .. 12:80 ngt
IOWA CITY, CLINTON AND DAVENPORT.
2:80 Passenger 8:06
7:86 Passenger 7:J6 a
is 5 Passenger 8:40
Passenger 6:oc
7:50 Clinton 1'sssenger 7:15 a
7:50 m....DavenportPss6enger.... 7:16 a
"Trains numbers 6.6,8,18, 19, and Sioux Falls
Fast Express run dally, all other trains dslly ex
fflnk RiirHftv
(H» iA|)iosa
cept 8uoday."
JNO. G. FARMER,
Gen'l Ps6i & Tkt Agt.
J. A. LOMAX.
Ticket Agent,
tplds Iowa.
Cedar sa
R. W. TIRRILL
Is Loaning Honey as cheap
as any person or Corpor
ation.
DON'T YOU
NEED A
NEW HARNESS
We have the right
kind at the right kind
of prices. Come in
and
1
LOOK THROUGH
our line of horse fur-
||P!nfshings—acomplete
'SSSpline of Ai goods.
H.R.EATON
ALEX SEFSTROM,
LACKSMIT
Makes a Specialty of
1111 Horse
Shoeing
Interfering and Corns Cured or
no Pay.
Do All Kinds of
Work in Iron—
Machinery and all kinds of Farm Implement*
and Machinery repaired The best of
work guaranteed.
PRICES REASONABLE.
A share of the Publlo Patronage Is solicited.
JBLlrnxm Bs&trom,
Buooessor to Peter Mever'
Compound VaDor and Sham
ooo Baths.
BATHS
UoBt all dis­
eases are caused
by poisonous sec
retlons, which
clog the wheels
of NATURE.
Vapor
and
The name and
the Bymptoms
may be different
Shampoo.
but tte
Office and bath rooms on Franklin
street, opposite Globe Hotel
18TF Q. D. QATC3.
The Old Reliable Blacksmith,
P. J. Roohe
Can be found at his shop on Franklin street
during business hours, with a competent
force of workmen to do all kinds of
BOYNTON&HcEW£N P.XRoche
fStpppl
.aj
•mm
SMITHING
Corns and Interfering Cured or no pay. Satis*
faotlon Guaranteed.
BespeotfuUy*,
TI ,VV
j'frnf
FARMS
1
Wost Bound,
5:55 p.
8:44 a,
10:20 p.
I Leave
FOR SALE)
•*. M*
Choice Farm Lands, easy
terms, very desirable property at
low prices. Large list to select
from. When you want to buy or
sell call on
H. C. HAEBERLE,
Manchster, Iowa.
DELAWARE COUNTY
Abstract Co.,
Manchester, Iowa.
ABSTRACTS?*
REAL ESTATE.
LOANS
AND
CONVEYANCING.
Office in First Nationa
Bank Building.
Orders by mail will receive careful
attention.
We have complete copieB of all records
of Delaware county.
ENNIS BOGGSj
ABSTRACTS
furnished at a rate meeting
all competition.
J. E, DAVIS, Abstracter,
EATON & HOCKADAY.
Successors to A. W.
Stevens & Co.
FRESH nEATS
Oysters in season.
Fish, sausage and the
best cured meats.
8HOP CL08ED ON 6UNDAY.
EATON 2 HOCKADAY.
TELEPHONE 261.
Good Advice.
When you want anything in the line of
Furniture
do not forget to write us or examine
our gtook and prices. We have no
room for shoddy goods, but with forty
years of experience can guarantee you
honest goods at fair prices. Remem
ber this and you will profit by it.
F. Werkmeister,
3-91 Earlville, Iowa.
Our Winter Suitings
have arrived, and thost desiring
GOOD
AND
8TYLI6H
cause of
disease can us
ually be traced
to the lmperiect aotion ol the millions
of pores of the homan body. A bath in
accordance with scientific require
ments is the best preventative and
remedy known. The methods employ
ed by me are the most scientific, ever
invented or discovered for dispelling
disease. Results tell the story. Give
me a trial. This is the Oonant system
of baths. A competent lady attendant
in charge of the ladiesdepartment.
L,
ml
MANAOKR.:
Felt Boots.
S Snag
Proof
Overs
ARCTICS. MITTENS, UNDER
WEAR, ETC.
We are better prepared' than
ever to supply your wants in the
above goods Prices away down.
F. M. FOLEY
RYAN, IOWA.
J. E. DAVIS, Manchester,
la., Main St., North of
Court House.
M0NEY...T?ODAY"...5VO
I am making first-class (arm loans
at 5 and 6 per cent., with privi
leges.
ill
tea
••V-we
'f
(CITY HALL BLOCK.)
We have on hand all
kinds of
SUITS"
Should not tail tu
call and examine
our stock.
Our \t
Suits
Overcoats
N
are admirable in fabric
and in fit, in winsom
neea and in workman
ship,
Nearly a quarter of a
century in business in
Manchester ought to be
a guarantee of our com
petency and qualifica
tions to give satisfac
tion.
.... You are invited to in
spect our stock and get
our prices.
L. & A.
WOLFF.
ADVICE AS TO PATENTABILITY
Notice in Inventive Age
Book "Howtoobtaln Paten ta"
•Vi. '"i
-"O
TRADE-MARKS
AND COPYRL&H
_OBTA)NE0

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