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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, December 27, 1899, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038306/1899-12-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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\)t JDemcrcrat
LlSHeD EVERY WEDNESDAY.
pfkONSON. |. M. OARR.
9RONSON & CARR.
EdilortTtnd Proprietors.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE.
in advance so
paid In advance 9
pB.Wor.«
and have
prices.
00
CE.—On the slip of paper upon whioh
iftme is printed, appears the dato to whloh
*?£r.?8
and a renewal Is always
otfully solicited.
writer's name muBt accompany any arti
publication, as an evidence of good faith I
16 editor*
OUR OREAT
Clean S\fe
Sale!
We must reduce our large stock of
Shoes, Boots,
Rubbers
Our Business Directory.
ATTORNEYS.
O. W. DURHAM. K, B, STILES ft. NOB&IS.
DUNHAM. NORRIS STILE8.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AND NOTARIES
a
Public. Special attention given to Collec
tions Insuranoe, Real Estate and Loan Agts.
Mice la City Hall Block, Manchester, la.
O. YORAN. H. P. ARNOLD. M.J, YORAN
YORAN. ARNOLD YORAN
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. and Real Estate
"f*- Agents. Office over Delaware County State
Bank, Manchester, Iowa.
C. E. BBOHSOH. jfi. M. CABR.
BRON8ON CARR.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. Speolal attention
given to collections. Offloe in Democrat
Building, Franklin Street, Manchester, Iowa.
FRED B. BLAIR.
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Office In the City Hall
Block, Manchester, Iowa.
PHYSICIANS.
A. J. WARD,
IHYSIClAN and Surgeon, will attend to calls
promptly at all hours ox the day or night,
f?C*mont, Iowa,
H. H. LAWRENCE.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. Speolal at
A tentlon given diseases of ohlldren. Have
also made a speolal study of
Obstetrics, and Rectal Diseases
diseases successfully treated with the aid of
various Thermal ana Massage treatment. AU
chronics solicited. Consultation free, Offloe
over Work's market. All calls promptly at
tended, Realdenoe on Main street, the old Dr.
Kelsey property.
OENTISTS.
O. A. DUNHAM, D.
D. S.
PVENTISTS, Office over Carhart A Adams'
L/ hardware store. Franklin St. Manchester,
Iowa.
C. W. DORMAN.
PkENTIST. Offloe on Franklin Street, north
of the Globe Hotel. Manchester, Iowa.
Dental Surgery In all its hranohes. Makes
sequent visits to neighboring towns. Always
at offloe on Saturdays.
C. LEIGH, D.D.S.
Dentist.
Office over Ander & Phlllpp's Drug
Store Corner Main and Franklin streets,
Manchester Iowa. Telephone 186. 17tf
ENTIST.
store
brk
bridge work a specialty. Will meet patients at
Farley Wednesday of each week.
TTETERINARY Surgeon, and Dentist, Offloe
in H. O, Smith's Drug Store, Main St. At
night oan be found at rooms over Ralph Con
ger's Store.
MANUFACTURING.
MANCHBSTBR MARBLE WORKS
TS prepared to furnish Granite and Marble
A Monuments and Head Stones of various de
signs. Have the county right for Slpe's Pat
ent Grave Cover also dealer In Iron Fences*
Will meet all competition. 9tf M.
WM. MolNTOSH,
p'-7 THOMAS GIVEN,
Oontraotor
and builder. Jobs taken ln town
or country. Estimates, furnished. First
class work guaranteed. Prioes reasonable.
Shop on Howard street near Franklin, Man
chester, Iowa, 35tf
W. N. BOYHTON. J. F. MOEWEN.
BOYNTON MOEWEN,
1X7 ATCHMAKERS, Jewelers and Engravers
vV dealers in Watohes, Olooks, Silver and
Platod Ware, Fine Jewelry, Bpeotaoles, Cutlery,
Musloal Instruments, etc.. Main street.
A. D, BROWN.
Dealer
ln furniture etc., and undertaker,
Main Street.
F. WBRKMBISTBR,
riENERAL DEALER IN FURNITURE,
VX Coffins. Pioture Frames, Eto. A oomplete
stock of Furniture and Upholstery always on
hand, at prioes that defy competition. A good
Hearse kept for attendance at funerals. Earl
ville, Iowa.
J.H.ALLEN.
/"1LOTHING and Gents furnishing goods. Cor
VJ ner Main and Franklin streets.
L. R. STOUT.
flLOTHING and Gents furnishing goods.
City Hall Block, Franklin Street.
KIDDELL & CO.,
T\RY GOODS, Carpets, Millinery, Hats and
Caps. Boots and Shoes, eto.. Main St.,
Manchester, Iowa.
A. THORPE,
ter. Iowa
GRASSFIBLD BROS.,
(Successors to Seth, Brown.)
J. J. HAWLBY.
T*\EALER IN HARDWARE, Stoves, Tin
ware, eto Mancbesterlowa*
INSURE
YOUR PROPERTY against cyclones
and tornadoes ln the old reliable Phoenix
Insurance Co., BRONSON A CARR, Agents.
A L. S EVERTSQN.
TrsonicARTI8TKJ
HE TAILOR. Shop in Ma-
__j.
blook, Manchester Iowa.
HOLLISTER LUMBER CO.
UMBER and all kinds of building materialSj
•L4 Posts and Coal. Corner of Delaware
Madison streets
MANCHBSTBR LUMBER CO.
LUMBERandBuilders
Materials, Post* and
Coal.w «at not tut ee|«t.
ENTERED AT THE POBTOFTICE AT I
MAHOBKSTEIt. IOWA, A8 SK001TD-CLA8S MATTER. I
Shoe
"-».
M.
CUT THE PRICE awav below our former low
$2.65
buys your choice of all our ladies' $3.00, $3.50 and $4 00 shoes.
6B0SSFIELD BROS
flanchester, Iowa WE FIT THE FEET
N II II11 IL IT
GEO. S LISTER.
tTARDWARE, STOVES, TINWARE, ETC,
,V\. Keeps a first-class tinner and does all
kinds of repairing with neatness and dlspatoh.
Store opposite First National Bank, MainSt.
THOtt, T. CARKBBK.
A RCHITECT AND BUILDING SUPERIN
A TENDENT. S. E. Cor. 8tb and M£SL,
Dubuque. Iowa
WM- DENNIS.
ARPENTER, CONTRACTOR & BUILDER
,y I am now prepared to do all work In my
Une in a good and workmanlike manner. Satis*
faction guaranteed. Plans and estimates fur
nished. Work taken in town or country. Shoo
near the stand tower on West Side of river.
E. S. COWLBS.
/^jITY DRAYMAN. Am prepared to do all
*k
ln
myllno-
Moving household goods
and pianos a specialty. AU work will receive
prompt attention. A share of your patronage is
solicited. Charges right. Give your draylng
to a man who has come to stay.
CLARK A LAWRENCE.
HRY GOODS, Notions. Carpets, Gents fur
nishing goodSt.eto. Franklltfstreet.
QUAKER MILL CO..
I?LOUR and Feed, Manufacturers of the uele
brated White Satin and White Pearl Flour.
GREGG & WARD.
Druggists
and dealers In Paints, Oils, Wall
Paper, Stationery &o. Atwater's block,
franklin street.
W. A. ABBOTT.
T\RUGS, Wall paper, Stauonery. Paints, Oils
eto. City hall blook.
& ANDRRS.
DealersPHILIPP
in Drugs. Wall Paper, Stationery,
Paints, Oils, etc. Corner of Main and
trr&nklln streets.
PETER BOARDWAY.
Dealer
in Hour, feed, hay, straw. Maquoketa
lime, stucco and oommon and Atlas
cement,
'.telephone us. Lower Franklin Street.
RAOKET STORE.
GOODS. Clothing, Hats, Caps, Boots.
-L/ Shoes, notions, otc. West side Franklin
tvaal .AIKh It.l-
street south or Main.
S. 6. NEWCOMB.
Office over Clark & Lawrence's
Franklin street. Crown
NOBLE ARNOLD.
/^J_ROOERIES, Provisions, Fruits, eto. First
v-* door north of Delaware County Bank.
PBTBRSON BNOS.
ln«^roS?rle8.'
tf
VBTBRINAR1AN.
DR. J. W. SCOTT,
Provisions, Crockery.
Fruits, etc. Main Street.
82
T. F. MOONEY.
(Successor to Lee Bowman.)
T3LACKSMITH and Wagonmaker, Delhi.
ALilS**4
Work do5£
promptly and in a work­
manlike manner. Charges reasonable. Your
patronage solicited. igtf
C. E. PRATT..
PAINTING AND PAPER HANGING. I am
'leave orSer!
estimates onaU workiii mylffe.
I'I
at H. 0. Smith's drug store
J. M. PEAR8S.
TVS-noB OF THE FEAUG AND COLLECT
O OK. AU business entrusted to him given
jrompt attention,
second floor.
0fflc8 JJJJy
HaU
'jook
The Best Offer Or The Year
is that made by Frank Leslie's Popular
Monthly, justly termed "the monarch
of the 10 cent magazines." For a limit
ed period, this famous and popular
magazine, now $1.00 a year, wiil send
free with each yearly subscription, the
beautiful "Little Sweethearts" Calen
dar. This calendar is in Bix groups of
water-color designs by Frances Jirund
age, the famous painter of children,
each group in twelve colors,
size 10x12W
IncheB, on fine Whatman paper, tied at
top with a silk ribbon each sheet con
tains two monthB' dates—thus being a
complete calendar for 1900. Frank
Leslie's Popular Monthly, edited by
Leslie, now publishes the
best literature and illustrations that
money and energy can obtain, from
such authors and artists as Hudyard
Kipling, William Dean HoweUs, A
S° w?i2?oylI.VFl?nfc
K-
Stockton, Mary
E. Wilkins, Stephen Crane, Buth Mc
Enery Stuart, S. it. Crockett, F. Hop
kinBon Smith, Joel Chandler Harris,
Bret Harte, "JoBlah Allen's Wife,"
Henry James, Will Carleton, Edgar
Fawcett and Hev. Henry van Dyke A
B. Wenzell, H. Chandler Christy F.
Luis Mora, W. Granville Smith, 6lif
ford1 Carleton, F. W. Bead, Ch. Grun
wald and others. Prospectus for 1900
and a pretty folder ln colors sent free
for the asking. Specimen copy for
„rS?. ?,cen' stamps. Frank Leslie
Publishing House, 141-143 Fifth Ave
N. Y. 48tf
The New Blacksmith
on South Franklin Street, does
HORSESHOING and GEN
ERAL Repair Woik, guar
anteeing satisfaction. Experi
enced workmen.
HARRISON & SMITH
ID some parts of Holland a birth is
announced by fastening a silk pin
cushion on the doorknob. If the pin'
cushion Is red the baby Is a boj, and if
white a girl
Milton Stewart is building an ark' on
the top of West rock, near New Haven,
Conn., In the belief that the world is to
be visited by another deluge. Mr.
Stewart makes no definite prediction as
to the date of its coming.
The school board at Keokuk has de
elded to adopt the Savings Bank sys
tem. The pupils will be permitted to
deposit pennies with the teachers and
once a week the savings will be col
lected by a bank clerk and deposited for
the pupils. The object of the new sys
tem iB to instill economy in the minds
of the Bchool children.
To shake or not to shake Is a serlouB
question for politicians. It's so hard
to make a rule. Now, there's Quay
be shook a plum tree and is likely to
lose his seat in the senate for it. And
on the other hand, there's Boberts he
has lost his seat in congress because he
didn't shake his extra wives. What is
a man to do anyway.— Kansas City
Tribune.
Ex-Governor George W. Peck, ot
Wisconsin explains the story of his
ringing afire alarm to get an audience
by the statement, that at the time be
was in charge of a relief train to the
starving miners at Hurley, Wis. The
laborers employed refused to unload the
cars unless they were paid in advance
and Governor Peck rang a Are alarm
and when the crowd gathered made a
speech successfully asking for recruits.
Centralization of wealth and indus
trial power in great corporations destroys
the prospect of the youth of humble
fortune of ever rising to financial inde
pendence. He sees the giants of trade
and commerce who overshadow him
and the power which they wield to
crush and destroy, and he despairs of
ever overcoming the obstacles before
him. Not so when fortunes are small
er, but more numerous, for then they
appear within the reach of all who are
frugal and Industrious.—Buffalo Times.
The resolves of the recent conference
are food for jest. England goes to war,
the United States plunges into militar
ism and the German emperor announces
the entry of his empire into "world
politics" with a larger navy and a big
ger army. Ware and rumors of war
disturb the sleep of prince and peasant.
What makes the spectacle grotesque is
that all this bluster is in the name of
trade. Commerce, we are told, Is war.
If you want cothmerce you must go
out and kill somebody. Military con
quest is the condition precedent with
out which trade is not possible. And
the funniest part of the joke is that
many sane persons actually believe it.
St. Louis Dispatch.
The Cedar Rapidis Gazette says that
Williams, the evangelist, is defendant
in a suit for 95,000 damages for alleged
slander, the plaintiff being Justice of
the Peace Ferguson, of Shenandoah,
Iowa, where Williams is now holding
a series of meetings. It is rather sur
prizing that Williams' tactics have not
made him defendant in more legal
actions. His long Buit is abuse, and he
never misses an opportunity to roast
those who differ from him. His career
in this city was short. For obvious
reasons the press refused to take any
notice of hiB meetings, and the revival
effort was brought to a close. Many
good (people were surprised at the
position taken by the press, but bave
no* criticisms to offer. It is ex
ceedingly doubtful whether Williams
could start another series of meetings
here under any circumstances.
Aguinaldo, the Balay.
It is difficult to form an opinion upon
a character belonging to another nation
or race, and the boyish Malay chief,
Emilio Aguinaldo, remains a character
not easily analyzed. That he is a man
of magretism and of certain power has
been proven by hiB success on organiz
ing a heterogenous mob of rebels will
ing to follow him to Bure death.
In away the interest of the world is
centered upon him, and it is interesting
to learn something of his career.
He was born not quite thirty years
ago, probably in the province of Cavite,
in the island of Luzon. There is some
doubt as to his ancestry, but he is
mostly declared to be the son of a Span
ish general. The circumstances of hiB
boyho6d were favorable to his mental
developement.
When but four years old, he was tak'
on into the house of a Jesuit priest in
Manila as "houBeboy" helping wash
dishes, clean Bilver, and the like. His
master took an Interest in him, and
gave him an education above the aver
age.
He afterwards attended universities
in Manilla and Hong Kong. He had a
fiery sense of wrong done in the in
human oppressions practiced by Spain,
and he led many enterprises for the vio
lent punishment of those who haB been
the most flagrant oppressors. He was
always a leader, a "general" or a "col
onel" from the start. Yet it was hiB
influence which caused the insurgents
to accept the overtures of the Manila
goverment at last.
In his hands was placed the small
quota of the promised $1,000,000 actu
ally paid by the Spaniards, and he,
with hiB chief, left the island, under
bonds to keep the peace. But the
unauthorized promises, in May last, of
Mr. ltounsevelle Wlldman. the Ameri
can conBul at Hong Kong, to the effect
that the United States would recognize
the independence of the Philippines,
sent Aguinaldo and the others back to
the island, and they organized the in
surrection on a vaster scale than be
fore, As a leader he has enormous
energy, self-control, and shrewdness,
but he Is shifty and unscrupulous as
well.—Household,
Chinese Proverbs.
No sound can startlo In the darkest night
Him who has kept his conscience clear and
white.
Our good ileetlx and our actions that are wrong
Are like two shadows following us along.
Empty Is gold, and silver, too, Is vain
Since neither can the hand that's dead retatn
—Joel Benton. In Harper's Weekly.
Vio, and Com Paul,
(Respectfully Dedicated to the Anglo-Maniacs
Who Want an Alliance.)—M. D. Nagle in
Dubuque Globe Journal.
Tbere was an old lady named Vic.,
Who, with Oom Paul, a quarrel did pick,
And her brain It Is burning.
And her mind It is turning
While cold chills up her ample spine creep.
Then she cried out aloud in her grief,
"Oh! for a man and a chief.
To s&lty'er the sea
And do battle for me,
And bring my poor heart some relief."
Then camo forth the greatest of all,
To "lay out 'our old Uncle Paul,
But Paul he was fuller
Of fighting than Buller,
And old Vic. gave another loud bawl.
Now Oom. with his thumb on his nose.
Is wiggling his hand at his foes,
For, on Afrlc's dark jphore,
He has made Vicky sore,
And knocked out the chap with silk hose.
Now Oom gives a shout of defiance,
To her gen'rals of tinsel, not science
And In words loud and clear,
Says to Vicky, "Look here!
Dairymen in Session.
At the South Dakota Dairyman's
association held at Mitchell last week
instructive papers were read on the
smooth brome grass as a forage plant,
by Prof. Saunders, of Brookings col
'ege, and John Armstrong, of Desmet,
who spoke on feeding of the dairy cow.
During the afternoon the buttermaker's
assooiation held a meeting to decide on
the future of the organization, and sent
a committee before the dairymen ask
ing that the two associations be consoli
dated, adding the name of buttermak
ers to the name of the association and
giving them the presidency of the com
bined organization. The dairymen
finally agreed to take in the buttermak
ers on the proposition, and the name
was changed to the South Dakota
Dairy and Buttermaker's association.
The exhibition of butter was the
largeBt seen at any of the conventions
in a good many years, tbere being over
fifty entries in the competitive contest.
Granular Butter.
The following method is employed
for making butter which it is desired to
keep for a considerable time. When the
butter has reached the granular condi
tion in churning, that is, when the par
ticles are about the size of barley grains,
the buttermilk is drawn off and ice
cold water added. The butter is then
washed with cold water and removed
from the churn to a stone jar without
packing or mashing the grains. The
jar is then filled with brine. This brine
will soon dissolve some of the casine in
the butter and so acquire a cloudy as
pect. A change of brine will leave the
second solution clear on the butter. A
plate should be used to cover the butter
allowing the brine to come up over it.
The brine, of course, intermingles free
ly about each granule of butter
throughout the mass, which will pre
serve for weeks in tbis way. It can be
taken'out any time and worked into
rolls or prints. If too salty it may be
washed out with clear water.—Guy E.
Mttohell, in Farm and Flmtda.
MANCHESTER, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER. 27, 1899.
v:
With you I don't want an alliance."
Color is subservient to flavor in
butter.
good
Each year finds the silo reac hing
out and it Is becoming popular on
farms where dairy herds are kept.
The round silo is in the lead.—Bural
World.
Milk for the creamery must be milk
in Its proper condition. The farmer
who has permitted his milk to get Into
bad Bbape had better teed it to his hogs
or poultry than attempt to kaud it to
the creamery where it will be likely to
spoil a hundred other batches of milk.
—Farmers' Review.
Dairy Cow. Sating Straw.
Whenever grain is grown largely and
its straw is stacked in the barnyard
after threshing, cows have a great lik
ing for rubbing themselves against the
stack to rid themselves of the file, that
torment them. A fence should be
built around the stack t» protectit from
being pultod to pieces. Cows will eat
considerable straw, picking at It, and
they will often eat enough of the chaff
to lessen their flow of milk. This chaff
makes good winter feed if moistened
and grain meal or bran IB mixed with it.
Thus fed even the straw will not help
dry the cows off, as it will if fed dry.—
American Cultivator.
Buttermaker. at Hitchell.
The meeting of the South Dakota
buttermakers was one of the
most successful in the hiBtory of the
association, from the fact that
there was a larger attendance and
that there was a greater number of
creameries of the state entered in the
butter contest. During the session a
resolution was adopted urging the
South Dakota representatives in con
gress to take up the oleomargarine bill
and use every effort to secure its pas
sage. Each senator and congressman
was notified of this action by a tele
gram to one and strong letters to the
others. The secretary of the national
association was present during the
meeting and was able to secure the
promises of a large number of butter
makers toattend the meeting of the
National Buttermakers' association at
Lincoln, Neb., in February.
Do not change milkers If possible to
avoid It.
No one knows what a cow
until It is teBted.
The milking qualities of a cow de
pend more upon those of her Bire's
mother than upon those other own.
In breeding see that the males come
from milking ancestors, in order to get
good heifer calves for the dairy.
Allowing the cream to remain in the
milk too long before skimming will
often cause white speckB in the but
ter.
4
And cannons now roar
In the land of the Boer,
And the sound makes old Vicky feol sick.
She sent down her men by the corps,
To fight the stout-hearted old.Boprn
Who laughed at her style,
And laid low rank and file,
And he should "Just send us some more"
Then Vic. wrung her bands and did weep,
O'er the heaps that Oom Paul put to sleep
To Keep Out Tuberculosis.
In keeping the herd of dairy cows
free from tuberculosis a few general
rulee at least should be observed. First
know that the herd is free from the
disease. Then do not bring anew cow
into the herd uniesB she has been first
tested by tuberculin. If milk is taken
to a creamery and Bkim-milk brought
back., do not permit it to be used till
it has been pastuerized. ThiB will not
only make'it safe to feed to calves, but
if it Is fed to pigs will also prevent the
disease being spread in that direction,
which means its getting a foothold on
the farm. Do not under any circum
stances permit strange cattle to run in
the pastures or occupy the stables.
Above all, do not permit a consumptive
person to take care of the cows.—Farm
ers' Review.
Kysterioua Disease in Cattle.
A number of cattlemen at Ains
worth, Neb., have of late lost cattle
from some mysterious cause. The cat
tie so dying were those turned into corn
fields. They are attacked with dizzi
ness, stagger to and fro for a short time,
ending In falling to the ground in
spasms, and after a struggle, seem to
die in-terrible agony. A Star-Journal
reporter has interviewed a number of
stockmen over the cause of these
deaths ana each and everyone seems
mystified and unable to account for it.
Some think it is caused by the deadly
"nightshade others claim it has been
caused by "loco," so well known in
southern Kansas. Whatever the cause,
fully fifty head of cattle have died
within a radius of a few miles of Ains
worth. And also, whatever the cause,
it comes from the corn fields, for BB
soon as the cattle were taken off the
corn stalks and pot into the feed lots
the losses ceased.
It is claimed by some that the deaths
resulted from lack of water and salt,
the cattle overfeeding and becoming
bound up. This theory, though, is un
tritt witb regard to I. Fowler's cattle,
for instance. Mr. Fowler lost eleven
head j^fore he took them off the corn
IP llfti1- every case the
cattle had free acceas'to Ijoth salt'and
water and helped themselves liberally,
and instead of the binding process the
direct opposite was manifest. Neither
were the cattle bloated in the leaBt. It
is surely a case for the. state veterin
arian, and it is to be hoped that official
may help to earn bis salary by a strict
investigation. There have been no
deaths reported the past few days, as
cattle have been taken out of the fields
by alarmed cattlemen, and In so doing
the number of fatalities seems to have
ceased. At Trenton, Neb., farmers and
cattle dealers have loBt more cattle this
year than any previous year. E. A.
Hogg is one of the heavy losers, having
lost thirteen from blackleg. He is using
vaccine virus with some success.
Ola Little Contribution.
One of the many stories told of the
late Dr. Wallace, &L P.. Is to the effect
that when the editor of a local paper
In the north asked him "If he would
kindly furnish an article on 'a light
theological topic'" Wallace responded
with one bearing the title "The Rela
tions Between the Presbyterian Ohurch
and Modem Thought" When set up
the article made 40 columns, and it be
came a puzzle to editor and printer
bow to get rid of it They began by
using it In pieces, and whenever the
printer said to the editor, "We've got
no leader," the reply was, "Eh, mon,
just sneck off about a column and a
quarter o' Wallace," In this way the
contribution was used, first working
down from the beginning, then up
ward from the eu1. -Loudon Academy.
A HERO OF THE MINE.
B. Risked HI. Lite to Save Tbst of
Felloiv Workman.
Heber Franklin, a young man em
ployed at tho Clear Creek mine, Is as
much a hero aB any man who ever
braved death on the battlefield. Frank
lin sought not glory, but to save a hu
man life. There was afire In the mine.
The men were called out. Then they
were about to shut off the air In order
to stop the flames, when It was learned
that alone miner was working deep In
the mine beyond the point where the
fire Btarted and waB then raging with
growing strength. Here Is the story
of the subsequent events:
Foreman Thomas Immediately called
for volunteers to go with him into the
mine to rescue the man. Several at
tempts were made by different ones,
but they were driven back by the
flames, and the cry of "Powder!"
caused a hasty retreat
Finally Heber Franklin, a young man
whose work keeps him on the outside,
said, "I will go." And accompanying
Foreman Thomas he pressed on
through the fire and found the man
working away tamping a hole, entire
ly unconscious of the danger threaten
ing him. They succeeded ln getting
out ot the mine safely, when the fan
waB shut off and the dip closed up.
The rescue was an act of great bravery
on the part of Franklin, as bis work
kept him on the outside and be was
unacquainted with the exact lay of the
land inside, and the danger of suffoca
tion from black damp was great. He
was the only man of the many stand
ing by whose nerve did not desert him.
It is stated upon good authority that
ten minutes more of lost time would
have resulted ln the death of the miner
who was at work and possibly a great
loss to the company, as the supply of
air could not be cut off while there was
any hope of rescue, and this would
have tuM to (Md th« flames.—Salt
What do the Children DrinkP
Don't give them tea or coffee. Have
will do tried the new food drink called
GRAIJT'O? It is delicious and nourish
ing and takes the place of coffee. The
more Grain O you give the children the
.-nore health you distribute through their
systems. Grain-U is made of pure
grains, and when properly prepared
tastes like the choice grades of coffee
but costs about as much. All
grocers sell it. 15c. and 25c.
Quaker
Mill Co.
StPifsi
The ever
increasing demand fori
QUAKER MILL FLOUR
is sufficient evidence
that it is the
FAVORITE FLOUR
of the household. «. .*•
Try it and you'll not deny it.
A QUAKER ON EVERY SACK.
Quaker
Mtll Co.
J. W. MILES. Prest. F. LsROY, Cashier
_B.F. MILES, Asst. Cashier.
R. ROBIWSOW 8d V. President,
H.<p></p>First
C. HABBBRLB.lst
V.<p></p>National
VOL. XXV-NO
President.
BANK,
MANCHESTER. IOWA.
CAPTAL. $50.000
General
Banking
BUSillGSS
Transacted,
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
••V FOR RENT.
SXX&S3CXOS2B.
R. tt. Robinson, M. F. LeRoy,
W. Miles, w. H. Norris,
E. M.Carr, M.Beehler,
B. A. Granger, A. H. Blake,
B. F. Miles, H. O. Haeberle.
F. J. Atwater.
C0XtKS8F02TSSlTT8.
First National Bank, Dubuque, Iowa.
Central National Bank New York City.
Commercial National Bank. Chicago, ills.
WM. C. CAWLEY,
President.
R. W. TIRRILL,
CHAS. J. SEEDS,
Cashier.
C. W. KEAGY.
Vice President.
Asst. Cashier.
DELAWARE COUNTY
State Bank
CAPTAL $60,000
-DIREOTOR5-
Wm. C. Cawley.. H. F. Arnold.
G. Kenyon. fPH R. W. Tirrill.
ward P. Seeds. G. W. Dunham.
Chas. J. Seeds. M. H. WlUiston
C. W. Keagy.
INTEREST PAID on Time Deposits.
prompt attention given to all business. Pas
senger tloke
is from and to all parts of Europe
direct to Manchester, for sale.
T.ONQ TIME MORTGAGE T.QANS
Made, 8ought and Sold.
SAFEI7 DEPOSIT BOXES
For the storage of valuable papers,
etc. for rent.
Banking
House
Henrv Hutchinson
Hutchinson's Building. Manchester, Iowa.
CAPITAL. $70.000
JOSEPH HUTCHINSON, Cashier.
COLLECTIONS
riOiiiptly
DEPOSITS
ing elsewhere.
on Time, Interest Al­
lowed and other deposits reoeived.
DRAFTS
sold on Now Yorkt Chloago
and Dubuque also on Great Britain and Ire
land and European Cities.
TICKETS sold to and from all European
ports via Cunard or Allen f»r White 8tar
Steamship Linas.
COTSWQLDS.
Flock headed by IMPORT
ED BAMS. A nice lot of
breeding ewes and a dozen
ram lambs FOB SALE.
Eight hundred bead to se
lect from.
w.
2MSS8
r*
J. STRAIN & SONS,
Masonville, la.
4 i*
w^t^'wasiawsi
If so, this will interest you.
Maybe it will anyway. It sure
!y
„t I
WILL
if you area lover of nice furni
ture. Come and look at our
line of bedroom sets anyway.
We have a large line in the lat
est woods, styles and finish.
They are simply exquisite.
The prices are too small to
mention, they will not flatten
the thinnest purse.
OUR MOTTO: A small
price and a large value.
Thanking our patrons of 1899
for favors received and trust
ing that we merit a continu
ance during the year 1900, we
wish you a most happy and prosperous New Year.
Stye democrat
RATE8 OF ADVERTI8INQ.
SPACE.
*8*
AUSTIN D. BROWN
YOU'RE NOT SO WARM
this kind of weather, are you? Why not purchase your heating
stove now? People have been buying coal! We are carrying a
large line of heaters this year and have one that will suit YOU.
COME IN and look over our line of stores.
A COMPLETE LINE OP HARDWARE.
J. J. HAWLEY.
JHIMIIIINIMIiMIIIMflMUCMMNMNNMNHi
A HAPPY NEW YEAR!
HMMHtHHMMHHmtHMMMtMtNnnMHMMl'
We wish to thank our friends for the patronage they have given,
us during the part of the year we have been in the trade hope to
merit your favors for the year to come, and hope to make the
acquaintance of many others. Wishing you a happy and prosper
ous New Year, we are yours to command.
KINNE I MADDEN
Another Carload LAND^MENT
Also Louisville Cement kept on hand.
Stucco and Callolite Plaster, Plaster Hair.
Flour and all kinds of Feed,
JSHay and Straw, Wh at
and Wheat Screenings.
MY FARM, of 240 acres, in Prairie Township for isle.
be,oreb"f
SIS
wwwwwwww
r-iir-T"
Reproduction' of the
$5.98 SUIT
Other Styles are Here
Up to
$0.00.
1
in 8M •M IT
S3 50
S3 50 •480 $880 •10 00
I 880
4 00
One inch
Two inohea..
Three Inches.
Four inches..
Five inches.,
•100
1 HO
00
STB 800
2* Aft
18 00
I 880
4 00 TOO
800
9 60
800
4 HO
2* Aft 80 00
5 T6 ieoo 18 00 88 00
700 18 00 80 (Kl 80 00
800 1800 MOO 40 00
18 01 »on KIOO 88 00
»UJ BO 00 WOO 188 00
ra«red dUoonnnuaa be
Column...,
Column....
One Column.,
..
IS 00118 00
oonUoctoateTeml*.
Bnalneaa eud*, aot amilUt six limw, «u)
Bu«ln«M locals, »en oenu per IftM forUM ant
^tft£rt&?T,,",,Up"U,,,r#r,*,'h ",Ue
Going to Get Marriod?
3
in a few days.
Maquoketa Lime,
Peter Boardway.
t-v
To Dress
Well
Visit the Clothing
House of J. H. Alien
All the latest and finest
Novelties in
Men* 1
Boys' and
Children'
Shirts
In all new designs.
Neckwear of every
description.
We Will Satisfy
Any
taste in our large
^selection
J.
I
!|®t
tills
it
uf:
II
Allen
T*
P-

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