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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, May 09, 1900, Image 1

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SEND US YOUR
MAIL ORDERS....'
O. E. BBOHSON.
Blore Corner Main and
S1.00
See our
ifl.
line of
Ladies' Oxfords
TIV .1 .7 S1.
made by Pontiac Shoe Co. They
are flexible and comfortable to*','.-
the feet made from splendid wear-?'
ing kid or calf.
is nr.
Our Business Directory.
ATTORNEY8.
Q. W. DURHAM. B. B, STILES W. 8. R0RHI8
DUNHAM. NORRIS STILES.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AND NOTARIES
Publlo, Special attention given to Collec
tions Insurance. Real Estate and Loan Agts,
Dffloe in Oity Hall Blook, Manchester, la.
0. YORAW. H. F. ABHOLO. M. J, YORAN
YORAN. ARNOLD YORAN
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, and Real Estate
Agents. Offloe over Delaware County State
Bank,Manchester, Iowa.
M, OARB.
BRONSON ACARR.
-A TTORNEYS AT LAW. Special attention
f*.Riven to collections, Office in Democrat
Building, Franklin Street, Manchester, Iowa.
PRKD B. BLAIR.
A TTOBKEY AT LAW. Office In toeOlty Hall
Block, Manchester,j[owa.
PHY8IOIAN8.
A. J. WARD,
"DHYSIOIAN and Surgeon, will attend to oalla
A promptly at all hours ox the day or night,
Lamont,Iowa.
H. H. LAWRENCE.
pEYSlOlAN AND SURGEON. Speolal at
a tentlon given diseases of children. Have
also made a speolal study of Gyneooology,
Obstetrics, and *Seotal Diseases. All ohronlo
diseases successfully treated with the aid of
various Thermal ana Massage treatment. All
ohronlos solicited. Consultation free, Office
over Work's market. All calls promptly at
tended. Resldenoe on Main street, the old Dr.
Kelaey property.
DBNTI8T8.
O. A. DUNHAM. D.D.g.
T^ENTISTS, Office over Garhart A Adams'
hardware store, Franklin St. Manchester,
Iowa.
C. W. DORMAN,
TTONTIST. Offloe on Franklin Street, north
of the Globe Botel, Manchester, Iowa.
Dental Surgery In all its branohea. Makes
•reqneht vlslUi to neighboring towns. Always
at offloe on Saturdays.
C. LBIGH. D. D. S.
Dentist.
Office over Ander Phillj
fc rniupp's Drag
Franklin itreett.
Manchester Iowa. Telephone 186. I7tf
E. B. NEWOOMB.
^ENTIBT. Office over Clark & Lawrence'9
store on Franklin street.
bridge work a specialty. Will meet patients at
Farley Wednesday of each week.
Crown
82 tf
VETERINARIAN.
DR. J. W. SCOTT.
XTETERINARY Surgeon, and Dentist. Office'
is H. U. Smith's Drug Store, Main St. At
night oan be found at rooms over Ralph Con
ger's Store.
MANUPAOTURINQ.
MANCHESTER MARBLE WORKS
T8 prepared to furnish Granite and Marble
A Monuments and Head Stones of various de
signs. Have the oounty right for Slpe's Pat
ent Grave Cover also dealer In Iron Fenoes
WUl meet all competition. Stf M..
WM. MCINTOSH-
THOMAS QIVBN.
Contractor
and builder. Jobs taken In town*,
or country. Estimates furnished. First
olass work guaranteed. Prices reasonable.
Shop on Howard street near Franklin, Man
chester, Iowa. s&tf
W. N, BOINTOH. J. F. MoEwair.
BOYNTON MoEWEN,
tnATOHMAKERS, Jewelers and Engravers
Yv dealers in Watohes, Clocks, Silver and
Plated Ware, Fine Jewelry, Bpeotaeles, cutlery,
Musloal Instruments, etc., Main street.
A. D, BROWN.
ealer In furniture etc., and undertaker,
Main Street.
P. WERKMEISTER,
flENERAL DEALER IN FURNITURE,
Coffins. Ploture Frames, Etc, A complete
stock of Furniture and Upholstery always on
hand, at prices that defy competition. A good
Hearse kept for attendance at funerals. Earl
ville, Iowa.
J.H.ALLEN.
flLOTHING and Gents furnishing goods* Cor
ner Main and Franklin streets.
L. R. STOUT.
piLOTHING and Gents furnishing goods,
City Hall Block, Franklin Street.
KIDDELL CO.,
T\RY GOODS, Carpets, Millinery, Bats and
XJ Caps, Boots and Shoes, etc.. Main St,
Manchester, Iowa.
A. THORPE.
ter, Iowa
MARTIN GOLLOBITZ,
MERCHANT
TAILOR—Fine softs made to
order and guaranteed to fit. Prices reas
Shop first door north of Globe Hotel.
able,
GRASSPIBLD BROS.,
(Successors to Seth, Brown.)
BOOTS
AND SHOES of all grades and prloes.
Custom Work and Repairing given special
attention. Store in City Hall Blook.
INSURE
YOUR PROPERTY against cyclones
and tornadoes in the old reliable Phoenix
insurance Co., BRONSON ft OARR, Agents.
HOLLISTBR LUMBER CO.
.T UMBER and all kinds of building materials,
Posts and Coal. Corner of Delaware and
Madison streets
MANCHESTER LUMBER CO.
UMBER aud Builders Materials, Posts and
Li Coal West stW near depot.
RACKKT8TOR6'
TlRY GOODS, Clothing, Hate, Caps, Boots,
JJ ShoM^nottouk etc. West Bids Fraaklin
SS«5!'
The new two button
SSillllilftilB
FEDGPA LOW SHOE
is a beauty, tan or black come
and see them.
They will please you. 31.50
We have plenty of others to
show you.
Hanchester,
Iowa
QBO. S. LISTER,
TTARDWARE. STOVES, TINWARE, ETC.
XX Keeps a first-class tinner and does all
kinds of repairing with neatness and dispatch.
Store opposite First National Bank. Main St.
THOS. T. CARKEEK.
ARCHITECT AND BUILDING SUPERIN
JX TENDENT, S. E. Cor. 8th and Main St,
Dubuque, Iowa
SCHARLES SEBECK.
Ming
ERCHANT TAILORS and Gents Furnish
Goods. Bradley & Sherman bldg., Man
chester, Iowa.
HARRY STEWART.
T\EALEK In Groceries, Provisions, Fruits, etc,
1/ Franklin Street, Manchester, Iowa.
CAL. ATKINSQN.
RALRR in Groceries, Provisions, Fruits, etc.
Masonic Block, Manchester. Iowa.
WM. DENNIS.
riARPENTER, CONTRACTOR & BUILDER,
I am now prepared to do all work In my
llneln a good and workmanlike
manner. Satis
faction guaranteed.* Plans and estimates fur
nished. Work tak,.a la towp or oountry. 8hop
near the stand tower on West Side of river.
E. S. COWLBS.
OITY DRAYMAN, Am prepared to do all
VJ v. ?k In my line. Moving Household goods
and pianos a specialty. All work will receive
prompt attention. A share of your patronage Is
solicited. Charges right. Give your draylng
to a man who has oome to stay.
B. CLARK.
T\RY GOODS, Notions, Carpets, Gents fur
as nlshlng goods, etc. Franklin street.
QUAKER MILL CO.
1?L0UR and Feed, Manufacturers of the ceie
brated White Satin and White Pearl Flour.
GREGG & WARD.
Paints,' Oils, Wall
Atwater's blook,
Druggists
and dealers In
Paper, Stationery & a.
Franklin street.
W. A.ABBOTT.
TlRUGS, Wall paper. Stationery, Paints, Oils
etc. City hall block.
ANDERS A PHILIPP
Dealer
in Drugs, Wall Paper, Stationery,
Paints, Oils, etc. Corner of Main and
Franklin streets.
PETER BOARD
WAY.
Dealer
In flour, feed, hay, straw. Maquoketa
Ume, stucco and common and Atlas cement
Telephone us. Lower Franklin Street.
NOBLE ARNOLD.
riROOERIES,Provisions, Fruits, eto. First
VJ door north of Delaware County Bank.
PETERSON BROS.
Dealers in Groceries, Provisions, Crockery,
Frults.etc. Main Street.
T. P. MOONBY.
BLACK8M1TI1done
(Successor to Lee Bowman,)
and Waeonmaker, Delhi,
Iowa. Work promptly and In a work
manlike manner. Charges reasonable. Your
patronage solicited. istf
C.E. PRATT^
PAINTINGto
AND PAPER HANGING.
prepared do paper hanging and_pi
•on short notice, In town or country, Will giv
(estimates on all work In my line.* Leave order
isrt H. C. Smith's drug store
«J, M. PEAR8B*
TUSTICE OF THE PEACE AND COLLECT*
OR. All business eutrusted to him given
prompt attention. Office In City Hall block,
second floor.
Motion Work.
I am prepared to furnish estimates and guar
antee satisfaction on all kinds of Mason work.
C. P. MILLRR,
I7tf Manchester, Iowa.
Chimneys Cleaned.
I have got a patent aevtie for cleaning ohlm
tnys. If you want yours cleaned leave orders
fer me at Heth Brown's or Graham ft Son's. I
also do all kinds of mason work and white wash
few, build chimneys and cisterns and do repairs.
AB work warranted to give satisfaction.
8tf JOHN TOWSLEE,
Horses Wanted.
•JLfewgood horses for eastern markets, must
Ve sound aud In good condition. Enquire at my
£iace on Union street In Manchester.
T. w. ROBINSON
Hoxneseekers' Excursion Tickets,
To Dearly all points in the United Sta tea
on sale at all ticket ofllces of the Chi
cago Great Western Hallway on the
first and third Tuesdays of May and
June at the very low homeseekerB'rate
of one fare plus $2.00 for the round trip.
Tickets good for return within 21 days
'from date of sale Persons contem
plating a trip will
Bave
money by calling
on any ag«nt of the Chicago Great
Western Uy and obtaining detail ofln-
1
formation regarding the homeseekera'
rates or addressing F. H. Lord, G. P. &
T. A., 113 Adams St. Chicago. 17wg
UBiSill
HURRAH FOR
First-class Horse Shoers.
•.Also PLOW WORK and GEN
'ERAL REPAIRING.
PRICES RIGHT!
CALL AND SEE US1
At
tof Franklin street.
Rev, Dr. Sitae C. Swallow, prohibi
tion candidate for governor of Pennsyl
vania In 1808, has invited ex-Senator
Quay to join tne prohibition party, as
suring him of appreciation in its ranks.
A committee of the Ohio legislature
declared that Hanna secured his elec
tion as senator by corrupt means. That
charge has repeatedly been made by re
sponsible men. But the virtuous sen
ate which refused to seat Quay on a
technicality still bows to the dictates of
a man who is charged with having
made his elevation to the senatorship a
matter of barter and &ale. When the
senate takes up the charges against
Hanna, investigates them thoroughly
and honestly and actB in accordance
with the Ondlngs, the people will have
some faith in the republican claim that
the g. o. p. is entitled to credit for being
the party of purity.—World-Herald.
An Englnhman'. Tribute to the
Boer.,
A. C. Hales, the South African cor
respondent of the London News, tells
In pathetic words of the heroism of the
Boers. Here is an extract from one of
his recent dispatches:
I saw Borne of these old graybeards,
shattered by oar shells, dying grimly,
with knitted brows and fiercely clinched
jaws saw some of their beardless boys
sobbing their souls oat as the life blood
dyed the African heath.
Those things I have seen, and in the
ears of English men and women let me
say as one who knows and fain would
speak plain, nngilded truth concerning
friend and foe, that not alone beneatn
the British (lags are heroes found. Not
alone at the breaBts of British matrons
are brave men suckled for, as my soul
livetb, whether their cause be just or
unjuBt, whether the right or the wrong
of this war be with them, whether the
blood of the hundreds that have fallen
since the first rifle spoke detiance shall
speak for or against tbem at the Day of
Judgment, they at least know how to
die and when a man has given his life
for the cause be believes in, he is proven
worthy even of bis woret enemy's re
spect.
And it seems to me that the British
nation, with its long roll of heroic
deeds,
wrought the world over, from Africa to
Iceland, can well afford to honor the
splendid bravery and self-sacrifice of
these rude, untutored toilers of the soil.
I have seen them die.
Last fall we were told if the republi
can policy in the Philippines was en
dorsed by the election of Governor
Shaw, that immediately after the elec
tion the natives would lay down their
arms and every evidence of hostility
and opposition would be wiped out.
Shaw was elected by one of the largest
majorities ever given a candidate for
governor, but instead of laying down
their arms the Filipinos are fighting
harder ihon ever. Last week, as told
by the press representatives in the
Philippines, was the "bloodiest of the
war," hundreds of the Filipinos being
shot, while many of the American boys
were laid away under the Philippine
Bod. The natives evidently are deter
mined to continue the fighting until
every "patriot" is either killed or cap
tured. We are now told by the die
patches that both the Filipinos and
Americans are engaged in burning
townB and destroying the country, so
that when American authority IB finally
extended over the island it will be over
a barren waste. More troops are
needed to conquer and bold the coun
try and it will be years before an
American can travel over the Island
with any degree of security. The
natives will hate UB with an undying
hate the same as they have done the
Spaniards for generations and in the
end what have we accomplished Noth
ing but placed ourselves on a par with
the land-grabbing empire of Great
Britain.—Clinton Advertiser.
In a recent article in the New York
Journal Andrew, Carnegie, who enjoys
an income of over 968,000 per day, and
is actively engaged in trying to increase
it, said:
As a rule there is more happiness,
more genuine satisfaction and a truer
life, and more obtained from life, in the
humbl. cottages of the poor than in
the palaceB of the rich.
You know how people are all moan
ing about poverty as being a great evil,
and it seems to be accepted that if peo
ple only had money ana were rich they
would be happy and more useful and
get more out of life. There was never
a greater mistake.
There never has been a com.
rich president since Washington, and,
think, Madison, who had Virginia es
tates. The choice of the people for
any high oflice, and especially for the
presidency, must have a record of hard
work, plain living and simple tastes and
honest poverty. The only rich vice
president in our times was Mr. Morton,
whose extraordinary personal charm
made him a universal favorite and ex
cused his fortune.
I awake from a dream that has car
ried me away back to the days of early
boyhood—the day when the little white
haired Scotch laddie, dressed in a blue
jacket, walked with bis father into the
telegraph oflice in Pittsburg to undergo
examination as applicant for position
as messenger boy at two dollars and
fifty cents a week.
I think that we are all agreed as to
the advisability, nay, the duty, of laying
up a competence, and hence to retain
our self-respect.
That the acquisition of money is the
business of the world arises from the
fortunate fact that, with few excep
tions, young men are born to poverty,
and therefore under the salutary oper
ations of that remarkably wise law
which enacts for their good: "Thou
shalt earn thy bread by the sweat of
thy brow."
It is not from the sons of the million
aires or the noble that the world re
ceives its teachers, its martys, its
Inventors, its statesmen, its
poets, or even Us men of affairs. It is
from the cottage of the poor that all
these spring.
There is nothing so enervating, noth
ing so deadly in its effects upon the
qualities which lead to the highest
achievements, moral or intellectual, as
hereditary wealth.
It iB not the poor young man who
goes forth to his work in the morning
and labors until evening that we should
pity. It Is the son of the rich man, to
whom Providence has not been so kind
as to trust with this honorable taBk. It
Is not the busy maA but the man of
idleneu who should arouse oar sympa
tbytad WIN UI aorrow.
foot
Tlio Rrltlflh Lion and African Ro«r.
Roar bravo old lion, boast and roar,
ItungorlnR for all oarth and more
Your pawa )*ud on some heathen shore,
And spray their flelds with heathen gore.
Then whiten them with Christian lore.
And claw up all their precious ore.
But look out for that heathen Boer,
WIttrllons he has played before.
He twists their tails and makes them sor,.
Hoar Christian Uon, boast and roar,
Koar on against tho mausor's sting,
Clutch the wild Boer, he's just the thing
Give him a royal christening.
But all his geld be suro to bring,
To great Britain's money ring.
And look out for that heathen Boer,
For bibles he has thumbed before,
1'or days and years full many a score,
Koar on and boast, tho welkin 1111,
Boast Watorloo with fearles yell,
Boast India with remorseless chill,
Boast Crimea with a trembling thrill,
Roast Egypt, Soudan, slow and si 111,
But boast not yet Xajuba hill.
And now you're warned Just three time, o'.r
To look out for that hrathen Boer
For many a cat he's trapped before.
Manchester May 2.1800. .D, O, Fotter*
Improving Dairy Boom*.
Modern and improved methods of
butter making cannot ba successfully
carried out unless the Burroundings are
suitable. Ventilation and coolness are
two of the prime requisites for a dairy
room, and its architecture most be
planned accordingly. I know an out
of-door cellar laid up with stone in
mortar and with a cement floor, that
keeps cool in hot weather without the
employment of ice. It is kept well
ventilated by screened windows, no veg
tables are allowed to be stored therein,
and a tool house poBsesBing a double
floor was erected overhead.
If your dairy house or room sets
wholly above ground, other means
must be taken to keep it cool. Kven
should tbe Swedish method or a hand
separator be employed, a temperature
of CO degrees or below ought to be
maintained in the room. In the ab
senceof ice or running water, the floor
and walls may be sprinkled several
times daily with cold water
freBh from the well. Double walls, to
gether with window shutters will do
much to exclude outside heat. The
building should be haded, either by an
other and larger structure, or by trees.
A little dairy houBe may be set in a
grove of trees to great advantage.—
tiorange Judd Farmer.
EOW
Marketing Butter.
In a bulletin on dairying in Califor
nia the agricultural department says,
that practically all the beat creamery
butter sold on tbe Pacific coast is In
squares of about two pounds each.
This method of handling butter iB ex
cellent in some respects, but it is sub
ject to criticism in two important fea
tures: First, there is now no uniformity
in the weights of the squares. One
creamery sends cases of 60, 1% pound
squares, or 105 pounds, to Sacramento,
and to the same market another cream
ery sends cases holding 60. squares, ag
gregating 101 pounds. This latter
creamery also sends to San Francisco
cases holding 60 squares of 93 pounds.
It muBt be both confusing and annoy
ing to handle squares of such varying
weights, and no really good reason for
the practice was found. Doubtless
many people who purchase butter do
not notice the difference in weights,
but consider all squares alike, and the
seller who can shave off tbe most
without being suspected is the gainer.
Such competition is not only discredit*
able, but dishoneBt. The second criti
cism of the method of marketing but
ter relates to the packages. Eastern
dealers have learned that it Is more
economical and satisfactory in many
ways to use cheap but neat boxes for
shipping, which do not have to be re
turned, than to use the heavy and ex
pensive trunks or chests that were so
common only a few years ago. These
latter are continually being lost and
broken, cause annoyance at both ends
of the line and require muoh labor for
proper cleaning (and this is too often
neglected), while the cheaper package,
have not these objections.
A correspondent of The National
Stockman and Farmer says that if til
butter put on the market were brand'
edtlio quality in a very short time
would be improved, as each brand
would then stand on the merits of the
product it represents. So long as good
butter must be sold at an average
price, so as to pay the groceryman to
handle inferior grades, making the
profits on tbe best grade, bear him
out there is no incentive for the but
ter maker to improve her quality of
butter. I use the pronoun advisedly,
for the great bulk of butter Is yet mad.
by the farmers' wives. oThe person
who makes a really good article need
not fear detriment to his trade to offer*
hiB product for Bale un.'er a private
brand.
One butter maker who packed a good
quality of butter in firkins was allow
ed by her marketman 1 cent extra on
the pound for simply writing the fuot-|
ly initial in blue on the lid of each
firkin. The customers soon learned
the handwriting and knew it represent
ed a good quality of butter. Another
woman molds her butter Into pound
blocks and is allowed by the market
man 2 cent, extra per pound. She
uses a home made butter mould, a rec
tangular box, which makes the block
5 inohes long, 8 Inches wide and 2
Inches deep, containing 30 cubic inches.
The mould has a loose bottom on which
is carved an unassuming fern leaf, but
which on careful scrutiny is the family
initial. Therels a plain band one-half
Inch wide around tbe outside of this
bottom piece. This is lowered to the
depth of a quarter Inch. Tbe fern
leaf is lowered scarcely a quarter inch.
When the block of butter is finished,
the outside band serves as a protector
for the fern leaf when it becomes nec
essary to pile one block on top of the
other.
Walking Up Stklra,
A physician who declared that few
people knew how to walk up stairs
properly was asked to describe how It
should be done. He said: "Usually a
person will tread on the ball of tho
foot in taking each step. This
®Sff
Food Injurious to Butter.
In the spring and summer cows will
often wander into low fields and swamps
and eat weedB and wild plants that
affect the taste of tbe butter, says E.
P. Smith in the American Cultivator.
There is sometimes a strong odor to it
and again a decidedly bitter taste. This
is first noticeable in tbe milk and cream
and the procesB of churning does not
eliminate the trouble. The only sure
way to prevent such odors and disa
greeable taste in the butter in summer
is to root out all weeds and noxious
plantB from the pasture. If the latter
is in a rundown condition, where weeda
thrive end grass dies, it will be pretty
hard to make the food of the cows good
enough to produce excellent milk and
cream. It will pay better in such
cases to rent more and better pasture
fields and
the old one with new
seed and fertilize it well. Most tainted
and bitter summer butter comes from
farms where the cows are pastured on
wornout grassfields.
IB
Why There Wu Ho Room.
When he was a young man. Senator
Hale of Maine, like many young men
who have later on In life made their
mark in the world, was not without
that egotism which Is said to be an
dement of success.
On one occasion Mr. Hale was rid
ing In an old fashioned stage coach
with'Semitor and Mrs. Frye. The only
other^ij^issenger was an- Irish woman
past middle life, rather comely of face,
who wore enormous hoops, 'fashiona
ble at that period. To amuse his fel
low passengers Mr. Hale pretended to
be much enamored of Biddy and would
sidle up close to her as If he were about
to put his arms about her, look unut
terable things at her and entertained
himself and hlB companions at the
good natured creature's expense. Final
ly at one of the stations a man put his
head in the door and asked If there
was any room to be had Inside tho
coach.
"No," said Mr. Hale. "All the seats
are taken." Then turning to the Irish
woman and looking Into her eyes with
great tenderness he said:
"There Isn't any room in here, la
there? We don't want any one else In
here, do we?"
"No," said Biddy, with a delightful
brogue. "My hoops are pretty large,
and I see you feel pretty large, and
there is no room here."—Detroit Free
Press.
Hole the Chmnire.
In March, 1815, the Paris Monlteur
announced the expected return of Em
peror Napoleon from Elba. The first
announcement of the Monlteur was
far from polite, but as the little Oor
slcon approached Paris a gradual
change took place In Its tone:
"The cannibal has left his den."
"The Corslcnn wolf has landed In
the bay of San Joan."
"The tiger has arrived at Gay."
"The wretch spent the night at
Grenoble."
"The tyrant has arrived at Lyons."
"The usurper has been seen within
SO miles of Paris."
"Bonaparte Is advancing with great
rapidity, but he will not put hlB foot
Inside the walls of Paris."
"Tomorrow Napoleon will be at our
gates."
"The emperor has arrived at Fon
talnebleau."
"His Imperial majesty Napoleon en
tered Paris yesterday surrounded by
his loyal subjects."
A
Row at the Show.
The lord mayor's show Is an annual
theme for the newspapers. Very little
can be said about It that has not been
sold again and again. It costs about
£2,000, the banquet from £2,000 to £3
000. The show has sunk during tho
century to borrowing some of Its splen
dors from tbe "property num." There
by hangs a tale.
A certain lord mayor hired from the
Surrey theater two suits of armor,
brass and steel, with a couple of su
pers to go inside them. The manager
of the Surrey stipulated, by the way,
that tho steel armor should not be
used If the day be a wet or a foggy
one. After the show the men In armor
were taken to the Guildhall, remain
ing there several hours without food.
No one, It appears, was able to rid
them of their Ironmongery.
Wine was given them, and the man
of brass became Intoxicated. The by
standers, thinking If he fell about that
he would Injure others as well as him
self, tried to eject him. But ho show
ed fight, and, to add to their further
dismay, his companion In arms Joined
htm. They were overcome at last only
by sheer weight of numbers. Then
the maker of the armor was sent for.
He eventually succeeded In freeing th?
men, who were In danger of belnj
stifled by the weight of their equip
ment—Good Words.
Anaeithetlcs were known In the'days
of Homer, and the Chinese 2,000 years
ago bad a preparation of hemp known
Vuna-To" to deaden pain—aomatblng
ilMllaifta iiii HUMUM
DOOB Coffee Agree With Tou.
If not, drink Graln-o— Made fioin
pure grains. A lady writes: "The tirst
time I made Grain-o I did not like it
but after using It for one week nothing
would induce me to go back to coffee."'
It nourishes and feeds the system. The
children can drink it freely with great
benefit. It is the strengthening Bub
stance of pure grains. Get a package
today from your grocer, follow the di
rections in making it and you will have
a delicious and healthful table beverage
for old and young. 15c. and 25c.
Farm for Sale.
The Clark farm, consisting of oti acres of cul
tlTated land and 20 acres of timber Is for sale.
It Is located about 6 miles south oast of
Manchester on tho Delhi road. For particulars
address or call on Branson & Carr, Manchester.
Iowa,
ECONOMY
Shonld be practiced
in every household.
Do ou use Quaker
Mill Flour? If not
have you ever stopped
to consider that you
can save ioc to 15c l|f||
per sack by so doing.
By buying home flour
11 you not only save the
freight, but you get
good flour also.
very
tiresome nnd wearing on the muscles,
as it throws the entire suspended
weight of the body on tho-muscles of
the legs and feet You should in walk
ing or climbing stairs seek for the most
equal distribution of tho body's weight
possible.
"In walking up stairs your feot
.hotild be placed squarely down on tho
step, heel and all, and then the work
should be performed slowly and de
liberately. lu this way thero is no
.train upon any particular muscle, but
each one Is doing Its duty In a natural
manner. The woman who goes up
stairs with a spring Is no philosopher,
or at least she Is not making a proper
use of her reasoning faculties.
"The habit, too, of bending over half
double when ascending a flight of
stairs is exceeding reprehensible. In
any exertion of this kind, when the
heart Is naturally excited to a more
rapid action, It Is desirable that tho
lungs should have full play. The
crouching position Interferes with
their action, the blood Is Imperfectly
aerated, and there is trouble at once.
Give the lungs a chance to do their
work everywhere and at all times."—
New York Sun.
Every sack of
QUAKER HILL
FLOUR
is guaranteed to
be equal to anything
on the market—with
no exceptions.
Try it and get
your money back if it
does not please you.
The genuine has
"AQuaker on every Sack"
Quaker Mill
O A N
J. W. MILES. Prest. M. F. L*ROY, Caahlei
£?•££& U. F. MILKS, Asst. Cashier.
IGMP.
K.
R. ROBINSON Sd
first Nationa
1
BANK,
MANCHESTER, IOWA,
CAPITAL. $50,000
General
Banking
WM. C. CAWLEV CHAS. J. SEEDS,
President. Cashier.
R. W. TIBR1LL, C. W. KEAQY,
Vice President. Asst. Cashier.
DELAWARE COUNTY
State Bank
CAPITAL $QOjOOO
-DIRECTORS—
Wm.O. Cawley. n. F. Arnold.
W. Q. Kenyon. R. W. Tirrlll.
Edward P. Seeds. G. W. Dunham.
Chas. J. Seeds. M. H, WillUton
C. W. Koagy.
INTEREST PAID on Time Deposit!.
Prompt attention given to all business. Pas
senger tickets from and to all parts of Europe
dlreot to Manchester, for sale.
T.QNQ TIME MORTGAGE J,PANS
Made, Bought and Sold.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
For the storage of valuable papers,
etc. for rent.
Sanking
House
Henry Hutchinson
Hutchinson*! Building, Manchester, Iowa.
CAPITAL, $70.000
JOSEPH HUTCHINSON, Cashier.
COLLECTIONS
Fxeaaaptlsr &£ad*.
DEPOSITS
It has
V. President,
^V^.rv H. C. HAKBERr.B.ist V. President.
on Time, Interest Al­
lowed and other deposits received.
DRAFTS
sold on New York, Chicago
and Dubuauc also on Great Britain and Ire
land and European Cities.
TIOKETS sold to and from all European
Dorts via Cunard or Allen nr White Btar
itoanishlp Unas.
0. K. BARBER
SHOP.
GIVE ME A CALL!
SATISFACTION
GUARANTEED.
First door south of Coo
ley's Grocery.
PETER DRESS
...
PROPRIETOR.
Satisfied others.
Call in
And see
Our line.
-v
Business
Transacted.
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
FOR RENT.
DIEECTOEe.
R. R. Robinson, M. F. LeRoy,
J. W. Miles, W. H. Norria,
E. M. Carr, M. Bcehler,
H. A. Granger, A. H. Blake,
U. F. Mile*, H. 0. Haeberle,
F. J. Atwater.
C0BZSSSP01TSE2TT8.
First National Hank, Dubuque, Iowa.
Central National Bank New York City.
Commercial National Bank. Chicago,
Jlty.
'.Ills.
AUSTIN D.BROWN
We have just received a large and
complete line of
of the latest patterns and styles,
which we invite you to call and
inspect. We call especial attention
to our large and complete line of
Couches
MADE on honor—to last—for com=
fort.
BROWN
If you are
Going to paint.
It will pay you
To look over
Our stock of
Paints and Oils,
And get our prices.
Use H. & M. Paint S!
And you will
Be satisfied—
The FURNITURE
MAN...
5
EjTjSBUjmiA
Hints
Housecleaning is hard enough without making
it needlessly hard. Use borax or ammonia in
cleaning woodwork or windows and you lighten
the labor and get better results.
While you're at it
there are many little things that can be improved
in appearance. Furniture can be polished, dingy
spots painted, stained or varnished. We have
paints, stains, etc., all ready for the brush and put
up in handy little cans. Everything made bright
and new by the use of these little things that cost
so little.
IW. A. ABBOTT!
THE LEADING DRUOQIST.
SPORTING
GOODS
GREGG & WARD
QIVE US A TRIAL.
fssTJ
More
BEST PREPARED
Pflim
MADE BY
FTEJMLLIGAN
i(§i=2lgfe Hfff.Go.,
(^5g?) ISSoLD
TttAItAftY
ANFlPD^ CENTRAL
/A.1 lUDIVO PHARHAC
mm
«f A*
W
OTHER
nixEDPAim!
THffT IS BECAVSE
FoR3Aiepy
0
01
Juvenile Base
Ball Goods, Official
League Balls,
Bats,
Mits and
Gloves.
The Excelsior Laundry Re-opened
I have re-opened my laundry on Main street and am prepared to
turn out strictly j,
FIRST-CLASS WORK
Your patronage is earnestly solicited. The wagon will collect and
deliver bundles regularly. Orders may be left at the postoffice
newstand. Give me a share of your work.
FRED ELLIS.
PROPRIETOR

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