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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, May 16, 1900, Image 1

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®fee Uteroocrot.
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY.
C. BRONSON. M. CARR.
BRONSON &. CARR.
V_* Edilors'and Proprietors-
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE.
Yearly, in advance II BO
If not paid in advance 8 00
NOTICE.—On tbo slip of paper upon which
tae name Is printed, appears the date to which
tbe paper Is paid for, and a ronewal Is always
respectfully solicited.
The writer's name must accompany any arti
cle for publication, as an evideno of good faith
to tho editor*
Bring the Children
to us and have their feet
fitted correctly in a pair
of GOOD SHOES AT
LOW PRICES.
Little men's dress shoes
warranted to wear, sizes
9
to 13^ S1.00
Tan and Black, Button
and Lace, size 8 to 11
only S1.00
Same in Misses sizes
SEND US YOUR
MAIL ORDERS*..
ATTORNEYS.
O. V. DTJNBAM. E. D. STILES W. FL. NORMS
DUNHAM. NORRIS ft STILES.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AND NOTARIES
-w Publio, Speoial attention given to Collec
tions Insurance, Real Estate and Loan Agts.
Office in City Hall Blook. Manchester, la.
C. YOBAN. H. F. ARNOLD. M. J, YORAN
YOF)AN. ARNOLD YORAN
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, and Real Estate
-A- Agents. Officeovor Delaware County State
Bank, Manchester, Iowa.
C. E. BBONSON. JS. M, CARR.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. Speoial attention
A given to collections. Offioe in Demoorat
Building, Franklin Street, Manohester, Iowa.
FRED B. BLAIR.
AB£
PHYSIOIANS.
A. J. WARD.
'PHYSICIAN and Surgeon,-wlty attend to oalls
promptly At aU hours of tt'e-day ornlfht,
LamontTlvWa*
H. H. LAWKBNCB.
"PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. Speoial at
a tentlon given diseases of ohlldren. Have
also made a speoial study of Oyneocology,
Obstetrics, and Reotal Diseases. All chronic
diseases successfully treated with the aid of
various Thermal and Massage treatment. All
•chronica soliolted. Corsultatlon free, Office
over Work's market. All oalls promptly at
tended. Residence on Main street, the old Dr.
Kelsey property.
DENTISTS.
O. A. DUNHAM. D. D. S.
T\ENTISTS, Office over Carhart & Adams'
hardware store, Franklin St. Manohester,
Iowa,
C. W. DORMAN.
T\ENTIST. Office on Franklin Street, north
A-r of the Globe Hotel, Manohester, Iowa.
Dental Surgery in all its branohes. Makes
:?9Quent visits to neighboring towns. Always
at office on Saturdays.
C. LEIGH. D. D.S.
,entl«t. Office over Ander & Phlllnp's Drug
yranklln streets,
Store Corner Main and
Manohester Iowa. Telephone 185.
E. E. NEWCOMB.
,ENTIST. Office over Clark & Lawrence's
store 011 Franklin street. Crown
bridge work a specialty. Will meet patients ut
Farley Wednesday of each week. 82tf
VETERINARIAN.
DR. J. W. SCOTT.
VETERINARY surgeon, and Dentist. Office
in H. O. Smith's Drug Store, Main St. At
night can be found at rooms over Ralph Con
ger's Store.
MANUFAOTURINQ.
MANCHESTER MARBLE WORKS
PMonumontsto
prepared furnish Granite and Marble
and Hoad Stones of various de
signs. Have the oounty right for Sipe's Pat
ent Grave Cover also dealer In Iron Fences.
Will meet all competition, Stf 94.
THOMAS GIVEN.
Contractor
and builder. Jobs taken in town
or oountry. Estimates furnished. First
class work guaranteed. Prioes reasonable.
Shop on Howard street near Franklin, Man
ohester, Iowa. SBtf
W.N. BOINTON. J. F. McEWBW.
BOYNTON MoEWEN.
CT7ATOHMAKERS, Jowelors and Engravers
dealers in Watches, Clocks, Silver and
Plated Ware, Fine Jewelry, Speotaoles, cutlery,
Musical Instruments, eto., Main street.
A. D. BROWN.
ealer In furniture etc., and undertaker,
Main Street.
P. WERKMBISTER.
GENERAL DEALER IN FURNITURE,
V* Coffins. Picture Frames, Eto. A oomplete
8took of Furniture and Upholstery always on
band, at prloos that defy competition. A good
Hearse kept for attendanoe at funerals. Earl
vlUe, Iowa.
J.H.ALLEN.
flLOTHING and Gents furnishing goodB. Cor
ner Main and Franklin streets.
L. R. STOUT.
/"1LOTHING and Gents furnishing goods,
City Hall Block, Franklin Street.
K1DDELL A CO.,
T\RY GOODS, Carpets, Millinery, Hats and
Caps, Boots and Shoos, eto., Main St.*
-Manohester, Iowa.
A. THORPE.
vtor, Iowa
MARTIN GOLLOB1TZ,
MERCHANT
TAILOR—Fine suits made to
order and guaranteed to fit. Prices reason
able, Shop first door north of Globe Hotel. 6tf
GRASSP1ELD BROS..
(Successors to Seth, Brown.)
ITKJOTS AND SHOES of all grades and prioes.
Custom Work and Repairing glven-speolal
attention. Store in City Hall Blook.
TNSURE YOUR PROPERTY against cyolonos
JL and tornadoes In tho old reliable Phoenix
insurance Co., BRONSON & CARR, Agents.
HOIH-ISTER LUMBER CO.
UMBER and all kinds of building materials,
AJ Posts and Coal. Corner of Delaware and
Madison j. yoots
MANCHESTER LUMBER CO.
UMBER aud Builders Materials, Posts and
Li Goal West SUU near depot.
RAOK6T STORE.
ENTERED AT THE POBTOITICE AT
MANctresTKR, IOWA, AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER, I
12
to
2
Our Business Directory.
MILIUM,
$1.35
rianchester,
Iowa
8gtfi8ff
GEO. S. LISTER.
TTARDWARE, STOVES, TINWARE, ETC.
J-*- Keeps a first-class tinner and does all
kinds of repairing with neatness and dispatch.
Store opposite First National Bank, Main St.
THOS. T. CARKEEKi
ARCHITECT AND BUILDING SUPERIN
A TENDENT, S. E. Cor. 8th and Main St.,
Dubuque, Iowa
SCHARLES & SEBECK.
Ming
BRONSON CARR.
ERCHANT TAILORS and Gents Furnish
Goods. Bradley & Sherman bldg., Man
chester, Iowa.
HARRY STEWART.
DEALER
1q Groceries, Provisions, Fruits, etc,
Franklin street, Manchester, Iowa.
CAL. ATKINSON,
DEALER
.. JRNEY AT LAW. Office In the City Hall
Blook. Mancheiter, Iowa.
In Groceries, Provisions, Fruits, etc.
Masonic Block, Manchester, Iowa.
WM. DENNIS.
flARPENTER, CONTRACTOR & BUILDEB.
I now prepared to do all work in my
line In a good ana workmanlike manner. Satis
faction guaranteed. Plans and estimates fur
nished. Work taken in town or oountry. Shop
a^ar the stand tower on West Side of river.
E. S. COWLBS.
("1ITY DRAYMAN. Am prepared to do all
v- rk in my line. Moving household goods
and pianos a speolalty. All work will reoelve
prompt attention. A share of your patronage Is
soliolted. Charges right. Give your draylng
to a man who has oome to stay.
B. CLARK.
T\RY GOODS, Notions, Carpets, Gents fur
nishlng goods, eto. Franklin street.
QUAKER MILL CO.
"COLOUR and Feed, Manufacturers of the cclo*
A brated White Satin and White Pearl Flour.
GREGG & WARD.
Druggists
and dealers In Paints, Oils, Wall
Paper, Stationery & c. Atwater's block,
Franklin street.
W. A.ABBOTT.
T\RUGS, Wall paper, Stationery, Paints, Oils
-L/ etc. City hall blook.
ANDERS A PHILIPP
[calers in Drugs, Wall Papor, Stationery,
Paints, Oils, etc. Corner of Main and
NNKLLN A,MIA,A
Franklin streets.
PETER BOARDWAY.
Dealer
In liour, feed, hay, straw, Maquoketa
llmo, stucco and common and Atlas cement.
Telephone lis. Lower Franklin Street.
NOBLE ARNOLD.
(GROCERIES, Provisions, Fruits, eto. First
va door north of Delaware County Bank.
PETERSON BROS.
Dualurs in Grocerlos, Provisions, Crockery,
Fruits, etc. Main Street.
T. F. MOONEY.
BLACKsMITHdone
WM. MCINTOSH.
(successor to Lee Bowman.)
and Wagonmaker, Delhi,
luwa. Work promptly and in a work
manlike manner. Charges reasonable. Your
patronage solicited. ietf
C.E. PRATT..
on snort notice, in town or country,
estimates on all work in my line. Leave orders
at II. C. Smith's drug store
J. M. PEARSE.
JUSTICE
OF THE PEACE AND COLLECT-
OR. All buslnesB entrusted to him given
prompt attention. Office iu City Hull block,
second floor.
Mason Work.
I ain prepared to furalsb estimates and guar
antee satisfaction on all kinds of Mason work.
C, p. MlLLKlt,
1'tr Manohester, Iowa.
Chimney. Cleaned.
I have got a patent devise for cloanlng chim
neys. If you want yours cleaned leave orders
formeatHeth Brown's or Graham & Son's. I
also do all kinds of mason work and white wash
ing, build chimneys and olsternBand do repairs.
All work warranted to give satisfaction.
8tf JOHN TOW8LKK,
Horses Wanted.
A few good horses for oastern markets, must
be sound and In good condition. Knqulro at my
place on Union street In Manchester.
»9tf T. W. KOUINSON
Homeseekers' Excursion Tickets,
To nearly all points In tbe United Stu tea
on sale at all ticket olllces of the Chi
cago Great Western Hallway on tbe
first and third Tuesdays of May and
June at the very low homeseekers' rate
of one fare plus $2.00 for the round trip.
Tickets good for return within 21 days
from date of sale. Persons contem
plating a trip will Bave money by calling
on any agent of the Chicago Great
Western Ky and obtaining detail of in
formation regarding the homeseekers'
rates or addressing F. H. Lord, G. P. &
T. A., 113 Adams St.
Chicago. 17wg
HURRAH FOR
First-class Horse Shoers.
Also PLOW WORK and GEN
ERAL REPAIRING, mm
PRICES RIGHT!
CALL AND SEE US I At foot
ofFranklin street.
Sig.bee's Present to Dowey.
[from tho Dilladelplila Koconl.]
A Germantown girl who usually gels
things mixed WBB the victim ot a hoax
one evening last week. Herd's a puz
zle far you to work out," said a friend
of hers, handing over a slip of paper on
which appeared the following, which
she said might be translated into a com
plete sentence:
11. B. 13. 13. 13. 13
Dewey
024918
348632}«SJS|i|iSS
973550
Limburger Cheese. E2S8S
Tho Germantown girl puzzled over
It for some time and finally gave it up.
"Why, it's easy," said her friend. "It
reads: 'Sigsbee sent Dewey some lim
burger cheese.'" "Yes," said the vic
tim, as she scanned the lines again,
"but Where's the 'sent "In the lim
burger cheese," was the reply.
State Senator Thomas Bucklin, of
Colorado, 1B in New Zealand investiga
ting tbe system of direct taxation in
tbe iSritiab colonies, and according to
a letter from tbe correspondent of tbe
New York Times be sees in the land
tax a solution of tbe trust difficulty by
first establishing the principal and then
gradually putting on the screws and
squeezing monopoly to death. Mr.
Bucklin ts to report tbe result of his
investigations to the next session of tbe
Colorado legislature. In an interview
with New Zealand's prem er the latter
expressed bis gratification at the fact
that some of the United States are
eager to adopt the advanced social leg
islation of New Zealand. Mr. Seddon
haB also drawn attention to the fact
that New Zealand has been in advance
of llenry George in the matter of sug
gesting a tax on the unimproved val
ues of land. The first land tax on un
improved land values was passed in
1878, by Sir George Grey, Sir Robert
Stout, and Mr. Balance, when Sir
George Grey was premier, after being
twice governor of the colony, and the
idea was afterward elaborated by Henry
George. New Zealand could therefor
claim to be the first country in the
world to put this reform in operation.
^The Man-Hade Person Against the
':..v
Qod-Hade Person. sS
Ss&Ssi
"I3y killing trusts you are not inter
fering with the natural rights of the
natural man. You are interfering with
the privileges conferred upon a Sctitious
person called a corporation. Look at
tbe difference between the natural man
and the corporate man.
When God made the natural man he
did not make the tallest man much
taller than the shortest he did not
make the strongest man much stronger
than tbe weaker.
"But when man made the corporate
man he made that man a hundred, a
thousand, a million times stronger than
the natural man. When God made the
natural man he placed a limit to his ex
istence so that if he is a bad man he
cannot be bad long. But when man
made the corporate man he raised the
limit on age, and sometimes the corpor
ation is made perpetual.
"But when God made the natural
man he breathed into him a soul, and
warned bim that in the next world be
would be held accountable for deeds
done in the flesh but when man made
the corporate man he did not give to
that corporate man a soul, so that If
the corporation could avoid punish
ment here it needn't worry about the
hereafter, and then the man-made cor
poration was sent out to compete with
the God-made man. The republican
party has taken the side of tho man
made giant."—Wm. J. Bryan.
George Fred Williams, known as the
leader of the progressive element in
the democratic party, speaking to the
members of the Bryan club of Boston,
Baid:
"I do not criticise men for failing to
understand in the short campaign of
1896 tbe true purpose of our party, nor
do I take Issue with men who did not,
or do not now, agree with us in our
coinage policy. But the developments
of the last three years of republican
policy are so marked in their character
that there is now no excuse to any man
who has a drop of democratic blood in
his veins for halting between the
parties.
"There are thousands of patriots
who, like Mr. Gamaliel Bradford,
thought to rebuke our monetary policy,
but who did not understand that their
voteB would bring this republic speed
ily to the verge of an empire there
were thousands like Thomas J, Gargan,
who did not dream that their voteB
would be used to cement an alliance be'
tween the United StateB and Great
Britain, for mutual policies of foreign
conquest and bloodshed. But these
men are here to-night, waiving their
viewB upon an economic policy that
they may uphold the party which alone
can now elt'ectually champion the
cause of freedom.
"I believe three quarters of the so
called gold democrats will take the
same course, indicating that they
would not have left us in 1896 if they
had fully understood the spirit of tbe
Chicago platform and appreciated the
dire results of a republican victory.
We welcome them we not only forgive,
but forget, deeming their return as
evidence that they are true democrats at
heart, eager by their renewed service to
undo the evil which has been wrought
TheBe men now accept the will of the
majority, nor do I believe they would
change one line of the Chicago platform
if they considered that thereby the
chances of democratic success would be
decreased. They reBpect the opinions
of 6,500,000 voters, who, in 189S, in
doned the Ohlotgo platform."
.1 nst Two Kinds of People
Tliore are two kinds of pooplo on earth to-day
Just two kinds of people, no more, I say.
Not tiio sinner and saiut, for It's well under
stood
The good aro half bad and the bad are half
good. I
Not the rich and tho poor, for to rato man's
wealth
You must flrst know the state of his conscience
aud health.
Not tho happy and sad, for tho swift Hying
years
liri ng each man ills laughter and cach man his
toars.
No tbe two kinds of people on earth I mean
Are the people who lift and the people who
lean.
Wherever you go you will lind tho earth's
mosses
Are always divided in just two classos.
In which class are you? Aro you easing tbe load
Or ovortaxed lifters, who toll down the road?
Or aro you a loan or, who lots others share
Your portion of labor, anJ worry, and oaro?
ABed Hog Advocate.
Each and every breeder has his own
fancy as to breeds, said Sam Walker
before the breeders association of Lick
ing county, O. Some perfect Berk
shires, some Poland Chinas, some Ches
ter Whites, some l)uroc-Jerseys. The
truth is no {doubt each breed has its
good qualities. But the question comes
forcibly to our minds which is the most
profitable breed to make a success in
bog raising. Tho Duroc-Jersey is the
only pure bred hog that will make bis
offspring uniformly after his own color
He was ridiculed a few years ago ts a
perfect curiosity but, like the Norman
horse, be has become popular. Today
the Duroc-Jerseys bring better prices
than any other breed. Why?
Because tbelr offspring prove to be
more profitable. Their superiority over
some other breeds lies in several things.
In breeding they are more prolific, hav
ing no equal in this. They make good
mothers no difference how young.
Seldom is a sow lost in farrowing, and
the little ones lose no time in finding
their own teat. They are very hardy
hogs and make good grassers will take
on fat at any age, and, having a good
coat of hair they will btand the cold
winters and hot summers as well and
will care for themselves. They are
easily handled. They will make a
weight in show condition at 6 months
old of 200 to 250 pounds. They have
been tried and not found wanting,
weighed and not lound light, tested
and all found to be good, raised and
found profitable, bred and found to be
the most profitable of all breeds of
swine. Never have to fill any of them
because they have too many white
spots. The Duroc-Jersey is a red hog
and red all over.
Live Stock South.
The restless energy and enterprise of
the cattle men of tho west have opened
up an entirely new source of revenue
and profit to the farmers of Georgia
and Alabama, says the correspondent
of the Cincinnati Enquirer. For months
the agents of the cattle men of Kansas
and other western states bave been
scouring every section of Georgia and
Alabama, buying every "piny woods"
cow and steer they could ilnd at prices
that were considered fancy by. the
farmers, who had hitherto been glad to
get rid of their "dry cattle" for almost
auy price. The railroads have carried
train load after train load of these
piney woods cattle to the western
ranges where they have been fattened
and shipped to the slaughter houses.
Infact, the shipments have been BO nu
merous and so large that people are
wondering where so many old, poor
cows came from. These sales bave
brought thousands of dollars Into the
south, but this has been the least of
tho benefits resulting to the section
from the enterprise and hustle of tbe
western cattle dealers.
The returns from tho sales have
opened tho eyes of the farmers to the
fact that there is money to be made by
raising cattle to sell to western dealers,
and as a result hundreds of pastures
are being built up and enlarged, and
breeds of cattle that mature early and
fatten easily are being rapidly Intro
duced. The farmers figured it out that
if the western men could pay them a
fair price for piney woods cattle, pay
freight on them to the western ranges
fatten them and then pay another
freight to the packing houM. that*
MANOHESTEK, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, MAY 10, 1900.
Ella Whoelor Wilcox
Abortion in Cattle.
I'urauant to our policy of placing
before our readers every scrap of in
formation from a reliable source that
bears upoa the Bubject of abortion in
cattle, wo give below an abstract drawn
up by Professor Williams, of Edinburg,
Scotland, at the
request of a committee
recently appointed by tbe Highland and
Agricultural Society. Professor Will
iams, whom we happen to know per
sonally, is regarded as one of the very
best veterinary authorities in tbe
United Kingdom. The directions are
as follows:
(1) Underground drains at farm
steadings should lie replaced by sur
face drains, and these Bhould be kept
clean (2) liquid manure should be
"kept some distance from wells and
Btreams of water (3) the floors of
byrea should be frequently flushed
and kept clean, a little crude carbolic
acid, say two ounces to a bucketful be
ing added to the water (4) all aborted
cjws and those showing signs of abor
tion should be immediately Isolated,
the after-birth (generally retained by
aborted cows) to be removed and de
stroyed and (5) the cilf-bed and
passages of aborted cows should be dis
infected and forthis ^purpose, and for
continuance of this peration—applied
externally as well as internally to tbe
genitals—he recommended the com
mercial chloride of zinc, one part in
1,000 parts of water. It was lesa irri
tating, ies3 poisonous, and much
chepear than other antiseptics or
germicides. It cost from 6d. to 8d. per
pound. The same committee reported
that they bad agreed to carry out ex
periments to test the quality of the
milk reacting tuberculous cows.
must be money In it for the buyers,
They reason that it will be much more
profitable for our farmers to raise tet
ter breeds of cattle, fatten them in
their own pastures and ship direct to
the packing houses than it would be to
continue the present plan of selling to
the speculators for shipment to ranges
in the west.
PAID BY UNCLE SAM.
Some of the Odd Expen... the fl...
eminent Ha. to DM*.
Every one knows that It costs almost
$400^)00,000 a year to run the United
States government in times of peace
and that the department of war and
the navy, the Indian and pension bu
reaus absorb the larger part ot tbla
amount, but In the course of years a
large number of dependents upon Un
cle Sam's purse have come Into being
of which the general public knows lit
tle.
Such, for example, are tbe Interna
tional bureau for tbe repression of the
African slave trade, located at Brus
sels, a highly laudable Institution, to
the expenses of which our government
contributes $100 a year the Interna
tional bureau of weights and measures,
also at Brussels, to which $2,2T0 Is con
tributed, and the International Geodet
ic association, the expenses of which
our government shares to the extent
of $1,600 yearly.
Aa a leading member of a group of
nations specially Interested In humane
and philanthropic work we subscribe
$325 a year to a lighthouse service on
the const of Moroceo, about $4,600 to
be divided among citizens of other
lands for service rendered to ship
wrecked American seamen, $500 a year
toward maintaining a hospital for sail
ors at Panama and $9,000 for keeping
and feeding American convicts impris
oned In foreign countries.
Among the unfamiliar purposes In
tho home country for which money
appropriated from the federal treas
ury Is the maintenance of the Wash
ington monument, costing $11,820 an
nually, and the provision of artificial
limbs for soldiers calling for $947,000
a year.—Leslie's Weekly.
DANGER IN CHEAP GLASSES.
A Gremt Manr Brw Ruined br At
tempt. at Bconomr.
Looking back now to tbe time when
the Itinerant quack doctor and the
wandering dentist spread misery and
destruction over the land, we wonder
at| the lgnornnca or carelessness of our
fathers In trusting their teeth or even
thilr lives to hands so untrustworthy.
A very similar thing Is done today by
people who buy spectacles or eycglaat
es from men who sell them on the
streets or have their eyes fitted by op
ticians who have no qualifications for
doing the work.
^'surprising number of people hoy
their glasses from venders on tha
streets. They get glasses for 00 cents
which seem to thom just as good as a
pair they would pay $5 for having
made ou an oculist's prescription, and
they think they have saved money.
Glasses acquired In all sorts of ways
by Inheritance or exchange from a
friend or even glasses found on the
streets are used to the detriment, even
to the destruction, of the wearer's
sight.
'People seem to think glasses are
like clothes," said an old oculist the
other day, "and If they aro fairly com
fortable and look well they ask no
further questions."
Another way In which peoplo dam
age their eyeB Is through carelessness
In trying to remove dust or cinder,
from them. They try themselves, a
friend tries a rub, the nearest drug
Store and the nearest optician are call
ed on, all before an oculist Is consult
ed. The result Is that the eyeball Is
often badly rubbed aud scraped, and
in many Instances permanent Injury Is
done.—New York Evening Post.
Lore -»f Liquor Not Hereditary.
Profeaior Sims Woodhead, speaking
before the Society For tho Study of
Inobrlety in England, came to these
conclusions: He held most strongly
that a direct transmission of tho taste
for alcohol never occurred. Of course
he accepted very fully the fact that
certain nervous diseases and degenera
tions Involving certain altered and
weakened Inhibitory powers aro trans
mitted from generation to generation.
These, however, did not always as
sume tho same form, tho manifesta
tion of the effect often taking on very
different characters in different gen
erations.
But whatever character they assum
ed the result as regards alcohol was
Inevitably the same, and until far more
evidence was brought forward than
had yet been presented ho should
strongly maintain that what was so
often spoken of as an Inherited taste
for alcohol was an Inherited weakness
and lessened self restraint affecting
many other things besides drink and
that a direct transmission of the taste
for alcohol from parents to children
In a constitution otherwise healthy did
not occur. AB with tuberculosis, tbe
disease was not transmitted, but only
the weakly and unbalanced condition
of the tissues.—London Hospital.
Whero'a the Dlflerencof
"So you don't bellevo In women
smoking}" said the little woman as sho
watched her husband light nig taird
cigar.
"No, I don't—decidedly! If 1 ever
should hear of your doing such a thing,
I would get a divorce!"
"Well, now, really, John, dear, what
do you call smoking, anyway 7"
"Why, Inhaling tobacco smoke, of
course."
"But I really don't understand your
objection to cigarettes," said she. "Now
Just look at this room It is blue with
smoke. I have Inhaled that Into my
lungs for tbe last six years. To be sure,
you have held all the cigars, but then
—now really, what la tho difference?
Why would It be any worse for me to
hold a cigarette In my hand while 1
inhale the smoke}"
"It's of no use trying to tell you—
there's no arguing with a woman,"
said John sarcastically.
"There's a little use In arguing with
some men, though," said his wife.
He didn't ask why, but she told him,
Just the same, that It was because of
the satisfaction of coming out ahead.—
Detroit
Ptm
Preu.
Does Coffee Agree With You.
If not, drink Grain-o—Made from
pure grains. A lady writes: "The first
time I made Grain-o I did not like it
but after using itfor one week nothing
would induce me to go back to coffee."
It nourishes and feeds the system. The
children can drink it freely with great
benefit. It is the strengthening sub
stance of pure grains. Get a package
today from your grocer, follow the di
rections in making it and you will have
a delicious and healthful table beverage
for old and young. 15c. and 25c.
ECONOMY
Shonld be practiced
in every household.
Do Ou use Quaker
Mill Flour? If not
have you ever stopped
"A Quaker on every Sack"
Quaker Mill
COMPANY.
J. W. MILES. Prest. M. F. LEROY, Cashier
B. F. MILES, Asst. Cashier.
R.<p></p>First
R. ROBIMKON 2d
V.<p></p>National
1
Interest Paid on Tims Deposits.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
FOR RENT.
23XEECrrOES.
K. K. Robinson, M. F. LeRoy,
J. W. Muos, H. Norrfs,
E. M.Carr, M. Beehler,
H. A. Granger, A. H. Blake,
B. p. Miles, H. O. Haeberle,
F\ J. Atwater.
coszeseroiTSEiTTS.
First National Bank, Dubuquo, Zowa. 1
Central National Bank New York City -U
Commercial National Bank. Chicago, Ills.
WM. C. GAWLE1, CHAS. J. SEEDS,
President. Cashier.
R. "W. TIRRILL, C. W. KEAGY,
Vice President. Asst. Cashier.
DELAWARE COUNTY
State Bank
CAPITAL $60j000
-DIREOTOR3-
Wm. O. Cawloy.
W. G. Kenyon.
Edward P. Seeds.
Chas. J.Socda.
fjONQ
VOL. XXVI-NO.
mrr
to consider that you
can save toe to 15c
per sack by so doing.
By buying home flour S8
you not only save the
freight, but you get
good flour also.
Every sack of
QUAKER niLL
"FLOUR
is guaranteed to
be equal to anything
on the market—with
no exceptions.
Try it and get
your money back if it
does not please you.
The genuine has
President,
H. C. HAEBERi.E.iBt V. President.
BANK.
MANCHESTER. IOWA.
CAPITAL. $50,000
General
Banking
Business ^..ted.
H. P. Arnold.
R. "W. Tirrlll.
G. W. Dunham,
M. H. Willis ton
C. W. Kcagy.
INTEREST PAID on Time Deposits.
Prompt attention given to all business. Pas
senger tlcke
ts from and to all parts of Europe
dlreot to Manchester, for sale.
rpiME
MORTGAGE J.OANS
Made, Bought and Sold.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
For tho storago of valuable papors,
etc. for rent.
Banking
House
Henry Hutchinson
Hutchinaon*s Building. Mancheiter, Iowa.
CAPITAL, $70,000
JOSEPH HUTCHINSON, Cashier.
COLLECTIONS
3FxcraptIy ££od«.
DEPOSITS
on Time, Interest Al­
lowed and other deposits received.
DRAFTS
sold on New York, Chicago
and Dubuoue also on Great Britain and Ire
land and Europoan Cities.
TIOKET8 sold to and from all European
ports vtiv Cunard or Allen or White Star
Stoauishlp Lines.
THE LATEST WORK OF
Fiction
by the best authors can
be purchased at the
the Postoffice
Newstand
All the current maga
zines and also a com
plete line of stationery, -i.
tobacco and confection
ery.
NIC MALVIN
i3
20.
IT PAYS
to paint your roof and
barn. Why not use a
good and reliable Paint?
ftsp We have the
I PAINT
suitable for barns. Call
in and see our line and
secure our prices.
Respectfully
@ti)e IHemocrai
PAXE® OF ADVERTISING.
Bl'ACE,
One inch
Two (nehes..
Three inohes.
Four Inchcs..
Five Inches..
1 9w TiT "3«
1 00 fl *0 12 fiO •4 50
1 50 335 3NI 5 75
9 00 3 00 4 50 700
850 8 ?fi 5 75 10 00
a oo
Column....
Column..
Spring Furniture
of the latest patterns and styles,
which we invite you to call and
inspect. Wecall especial attention
to our large and complete line of
MADE on honor—to last—for com»
fort.
BROWN
ANHPD^ CENTRAL
AHUClVO PHARHACY
tin
IV
1*50
V00
oo
$10 oo
15 00
90 10
85 00
30 00
40 00
6 00
125 00
26 00
4 60 7 00 13 00
woo
00
41100
80 00
450 50 800 15 00
60 0 00 18 00 25 00
18 60 18 00 86 00 50 00
One Column..
»AR AHISIHSVNIGIIWIINRARAU UIWUUUBUBDW
fore expiration of ooDtract will be charred
oordinc to above aeale.
Business cards, not ezeesdiai six Untw. I&O
l0S^ten
AOSTIN 0. BROWN
We have just received a large and
complete line of
cents per lint tor tbe lint
insertion, and five oents per line for each lubse
quest insertion.
The FURNITURE
MAN...
Sift
l£jw/uvr//£#I
NEGLECT
Dorir
YOVR
ROOr.r BARft
is A 7^^ IrwcsrncAT
It
V*
v-
5
in several different coiors
To Pil AT OTHER
WITH
I.X.L
ROOF and
NEATHemuiGAnPAMTBYBARNMADE
CHIGMIO.
imco..
& A
I.X.L. AND ALL OTHER OTTrtE
nCAT/t
6
niLLtGAHPAinr PROMTS
row
Talc
BY
PHILIPP
SCPAPLES
& SEBEGfC.
We are
closing out
our HATS
at nearly cost.
Schafles
Sebeck.
nil
"A the quickest and best route to Delaware county homes
I— use the MANCHESTER DEMOCRAT. It is relig
-S- iously read in the office, the shop, the factory, on the
street and in the home. Your ad in its columns is
bound to bring business.
FOLEY'S HONEY TAR
jr-
r=c
I®®- SV
UTHBOHAT
•NROAT and LUNG REMEDY.
T~T
FOLEY'S BANNER 8ALVE is a Healing Wonder*
Q-IR,.ElGKa-5c
WARD
IS
I
I
Tt
I I
I"

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