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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, May 23, 1900, Image 1

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PUBLISHED EVERY WBPNE8PAY«
O. a. BftONSON. C. M. OARfl*
BRONSON & CARR.
Editors and Proprietors-
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE.
Yearly, In advance 91 BO
If not paid in advanoe 9 00
NOTICE.—On the slip of papor upon whieh
tie name is printed, appears the date to whloh
the paper 1b paid for, and a renowal la always
respeotfully solicited.
The'wrltor's name must aocompany any arti
cle for publication, as an evideno of good faith
to the editor*
Bring the Children
to us and have their Icet
fitted correctly in a pair
of GOOD SHOES AT
LOW PRICES.
Jingo
vAiiuni»..oU0v.|.
warranted to wear, sizes
9 to I3J
$1.00
Tan and Black, Button
and Lace, size 8 to II
only $1.00
SEND US YOUR
MAIL ORDERS*...
Same in Misses sizes 12 to 2.....$1.35
Our Business Directory.
ATTORNEYS.
G. W. DtmitAlt. B, B. STILES W, H. 2T0HK18
DUNHAM, NORRIS 5T1LB8.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AND NOTARIES
tt- Public. Special attention Riven to Collec
tions Insurance, Real Estate and Loan Agts.
Dl&oe in City Hall Block, Hanchester, I*.
C. YORAH. H. F. ARNOLD. M. J. YOOAir
YORAN. ARNOLD YORAN
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. and Real Estate
A. Agents. Office over Delaware County State
Bank, Manchester, Iowa.
O. E. BBOVSOH. E. M, CARB.
BRONSON CARR.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. Special attention
A given to collections. Oflloe In Democrat
Building, Franklin Street, Manchester, Iowa.
FRBD B. BLAIR.
A TTORNBY AT LAW. Office In theClty Hall
Block, Manchester, Iowa.
PHYSICIANS.
A. J. WARD,
"PHYSICIAN and Surgeon, will attend to calls
1 promptly at all hours 01 the day or night,
UTC?ct,Ipw*.
H. H. LAWRINCB.
"PHYSICIAN AND BURGEON. Special at*
A tention given diseases of children. Have
also made a special study of-Qyneooology,
Obstetrics, and Rectal Diseases. AUohronlc
diseases successfully treated with the aid of
various Thermal and Massage treatment.
ohronlos solicited. Consultation
over Work's market. All calls pr
tended. Residenoe on Main street, the
Kelsey property.
free, Offloe
iromptly at*
9 old"
lDr,
DENTISTS.
O. A. DUNHAM. D.D.S.
TV&NTISTS. Offloe over Car hart A Adams'
hardware store, Franklin St. Manchester,
C. W. DORMAN.
TvENTIST. Office on Franklin Street, north
JL/ of the Globe Hotel, Manchester, Iowa.
Dental Surgery In all Its branohes,
frequent visits to neighboring towns,
at offloe on Saturdays,
C. LEIGH. D.D. S.
BenStore
Hit Office over Ander & Phlllpp's Drug
Comer Main and Franklin streets,
Manchester Iowa. Telephone 186, l7tf
E. E. NBWCOMB.
ENT18T. Office over Clark & Lawrence's
store on Franklin street. Grown
fridge work a specialty. Will meet patients at
Farley Wednesday of each week. 82f*
orU
VETERINARIAN.
DR. J. W. SCOTT.
TTETERINARY Surgeon, and Dentist. OIL__
in H. C. Smith's Drug Store, Main St. At
night ean be found at rooms over Ralph Con
ger's Store.
MANUFACTURING.
MANCHESTER MARBLB WORKS
TB prepared to furnish Granite and Marble
Monuments and Head Stones of various de
al ens, Have the oounty right tor Slpe's Pat
ent Grave Cover also dealer In Iron Fenoes,
Will meet all competition, 9ti 94.
WM. MCINTOSH.
THOMAS GIVBNi
/Contractor and builder. Jobs taken in town
\J or oountry. Estimates furnished. First
class work guaranteed. Prices reasonable.
Shop on Howard street near Franklin, Man
chester, Iowa. 96tf
W. N. BOINTON. J. F. MoEWB*.
BOYNTON MoBWEN.
fXTATCHMAKERS, Jewelers and Engravers
YV dealers in Watches, Clocks, Silver and
Plated Ware, Fine Jewelry,
Spectaoles, Cutlery,
Musical Instruments, eto.. Main street.
Bealer
A.D. BROWN.
...
Main Street,
in furniture etc., and undertaker,
P. WBRKMB1STBR.
/GENERAL DEALER IN FURNITURE,
UT Coffins. Picture Frames, Eto. A complete
stock of Furniture and Upholstery always on
hand, at prloes that defy competition. A good
Hearse kept for attendanoe at funerals. Earl
viUe, Iowa.
J.H.ALLEN.
CLOTHING
and Gents furnishing goods. Cor
ner Main and Franklin streets.
L. R. STOUT.
/CLOTHING and Gents furnishing
city Hall Blook, Franklin Street.
T\RY GOODS, Carpets, Millinery, Hats and
mJ Caps, Boots and Shoes, etc., Main St.,
Manchester, Iowa.
A. THORPE.
TROPRIBTOROF "KALAMITY'S" PLUN'
A der Store and Dealer in Clothing, Boots,
Shoes, Notions, eto. Masonic Blook, Manches
ter, Iowa
MARTIN GOLLOBITZ
MERCHANT
TAILOR—Fine suite made to
order and guaranteed to At. Prices reas
8hop first door north of Globe Hotel.
able,
GRASSP1ELD BROS,.
(Successors to Seth, Brown.)
DOOTS AND SHOES of all grades and prices
X) Custom Work and Repairing given speolal
attention. Store In City
INSURE
YOUR PROPERTY against cyclones
and tornadoes !n the old reliable Phoenix
insurance Co., BRONSON 6 CARR, Agents.
HOLLISTER LUMBER CO.
UMBER and all kinds of building materials,
Xi Posts and Coal. Corner of Delaware and
Madison streets
MANCHESTER LUMBER CO.
LUMBERWestBuilders
aud Materials, Posts and
Ooal slddi no&r depot.
RAOKET STORE.
T\RY GOODS, Clothing, Hats, Caps, Boots,
XJ Shoes, notions, eto. West side Fra&klln
trtei south of Main.
ERTZnVD AT THE POSTOmCB AT I
Manchester. Iowa, as sscono-Olasb Xarib,
1
A*T y-*1
GEO. S. LISTER,
CTARDWARE, STOVES, TINWARE, ETC.
•LA Keeps a nrat-class tinner and doeB all
kinds of repairing with neatness and dlspatoh.
'Store opposite First National Bank. St.
THOS. T. CARKEEK.
ARCHITECT AND BUILDING SUPERIN
TENDENT, S. E. Cor. 8th and Main St.,
Dubuque, Iowa
SCHARLES SEBBCK.
TfERCHANT TAILORS and Gents Furnish
ilLing Goods, Bradley & Sherman bid#., Man
chester, Iowa.
STEWART.
DEALERHARRY
In Groceries, Provisions. Fruits, etc.
Franklin Street, Manchester, Iowa.
CAL. ATKINSQN.
DEALER
In Groceries, Provisions, Fruits, etc.
Masonic Block, Manchester. Iowa,
WM. DBNNIS.
(CARPENTER, CONTRACTOR 4 BUILDER,
I am now prepared to do all work in my
line In a good and workmanlike manner. Satis
faction guaranteed. Plans and estimates fur
nished. Work taken in town or country, Shop
near the stand tower on West Side of river.
E. S. COWLBS.
fllTY DRAYMAN. Am prepared to do all
Tk In my line. Moving household goods
aoa pianos a speolalty. All work will rooelve
prompt attention. A share of your patronage 1b
80lletted. Charges right. Give your draylng
to a man who has come to stay.
AU
B. CLARK.
T^RY GOODS, Notions, Carpets, Gents fur
nlshing goods, eto. Franklin street.
QUAKER MILL CO.
I?LOUR and Feed, Manufacturers of the ceie
A brated White Satin and Whito Pearl Flour.
GREGG & WARD.
Druggists
Makes
Always
and dealers in Paints, Oils, Wall
Paper, Stationery & c. Atwater's block,
franklin street.
W. A.ABBOTT.
TtRUGS, Wall paper. Stationery, Paints, Oils
etc. City hall block.
ANDKRS PHILIPP
Dealersstreets.
to Drag,. Wall Paper, Stationery.
Paints, 0119, oto. Corner of Main and
Franklin
PETER BOARDWAY.
Dealer
In flour, feed, hay, straw. Maquoketa
lime, stucco and common and Atlas
cement.
Telephone lis, Lower Franklin Street.
NOBLE ARNOLD.
fiROCERlES,Provisions, Fruits, etc. First
door north of Delaware County Bank.
PETERSON BROS.
Dealera in Groceries, Provisions, Crockery,
Fruits, etc. Main Street.
T. F. MOONEY.
^^.(Successor to Lee Bowman.)
TLACKBM1TH and Wagonmaker, Delhi,
±9 Iowa. Work done promptly and In a work
manlike manner. Charges reasonable. Your
patronage solicited. utf
C.E. PRATT.,
on snort notice, in town or counfry, Will give
estimates on all work in my lino. Leave orders
at H. C. Smith's drug store
J. M. PEAR8E.
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE AND COLLECT
OR. AU business entrusted to him given
prompt attention. Office In City Hall block,
second floor.
Mason Work.
I am prepared to furnish estimates and guar
antee satisfactions all kinds of Mason work.
C. P. MILLER,
I'tf Manchester, Iowa.
Chimneys Cleaned.
I have^got a patent devise for cleaning chlm-
If you want yours cleaned leave orders
for me at Heth Brown's or Graham & Son's.
neys.
form
Until this country's war for conqueBt
lu tho Philippines the nation could
truthfully write above the graves of its
soldiers: "All time is the festival of
your glory.'' But who could write
such au epitaph for a mamwho lost
1
*1
Hanchester,
Iowa
constantly higher prices, the eastern
local newspapers are telling quite dif
fereut stories concerning agricultural
values. For example, near Bethlehem,
Conn, last week a farm of sixty acres,
with good buildings, sold at auction for
31,600, a price which would not replace
the barns. Another farm of twenty
acres in the same town, bought twenty
years ago for 1,000 was sold at auction
for 885. The omnivorous west, as Mr.
lleese called it, Is supreme in agricul
ture now, and In the next generation it
will be supreme in manufacture.—
Leader,
The principles of Jefferson are the
deflnitions and axioms of free society.
And yet they are denied and evaded
with no small
Bhjw
w,
also do all kinds of mason work and white wash
Ins, build chimneys and cisterns and do repairs.
All work warranted to give satisfaction.
8tf JOHN TOWSLER.
Horses Wanted.
A few good horses for eastern markets, must
be sound and In good condition. Enquire at my
place on Unlou street In Manchester.
89if T. W. KOBIKSON
goods.
KIDDBLL A CO.,
Homeseekers' Excursion Tickets.
To nearly all points in the United States
on sale at all ticket offices of the Chi
cago Great Western Railway on the
first and third Tuesdays of May and
June at the very low homeseekers' rate
of one fare plus 82,00 for the round trip.
Tickets good for return within 21 days
from date of sale. Persons contem
plating a trip will save money by calling
on any agent of the Chicago Grea
Western By aod obtaining detail of in
formation regarding the homeseekers'
rates or addressing F. H. Lord, G. P. &
T. A., 113 Adams St. Chicago. 17ws
HURRAH FOR
HUMS SHI
First-class Horse Shoers.
Also PLOW WORK and GEN
ERAL REPAIRING.
PRICES RIGHT!
CALL AND SEE US! At foot
of Franklin street.
of success. One
dashingly calls them "glittering gener
alities another bluntly calls them
'self-evident lies." Others insiduously
argue that they apply to "superior
races'' These expressions, differing in
forms, are identified in object and
elfect, in supplanting the principles of
free government and restoring thoee of
class, caste, and legitimacy. They
would delight a convocation of crowned
heads, plotting against the people.
Thev are the van guard, the miners and
sappers of returning despotism. We
must repulse^them or they will subju
gate us. This is a world of compen
sation, and he who would be no Blave
must consentjto have no slave. Those
who deny freedom to others, deserve it
not themselves, and under a just God
cannot long retain it.—From a letter
by Abraham Lincoln, April 6,1839.
Not Party of Lincoln
[Kansas Cltv Tlmea.i
The platform claims that the republi
can party under HcKinley's guidance is
actuated by the same inspiration and
motives that It drew from the states
manship and example of Lincoln.
Lincoln waged war to free the slaves
McKinley to rivet the shackles upon
human beings. Lincoln insisted on
equality before the law of every man
under the flag. McKinley authorizes
Blavery and polygamy in the Sulus, im
poses a discriminating and onerous tax
upon 1'orto Bicans without their con
sent and carries on a war of criminal
aggression against the inhabitants of
Asiatic Islands to force upon them a
government they do not want and to
deprive them of the right of governing
themselves.
All parallels between Lincoln and
McKinley in which the latter is likened
to the former, as far as his administra
tion acts go, is a profanation, which
nearly approaches sacrilege. The re
publican party of today has nothing
left of the party that triumphed under
Lincoln except the name.
Changes Brought in four Years!
[InJi»napol!s Sentinel.]
Four years ago we bad a declaration
ef independence—it is now an evan
escent dream of youth. We had a con
stitution—it is a curious bit of yellow
paper. We had traditions—we have
the Philippines. We had a republic—
we have almost thrown off such swad
dling clothes for the glittering gar
ments of empire. We declared that
"governments derive their just power
trom the consent of the governed"—we
know better now. We held taxation
without representation to be tyranny—
we have revised our governmental dic
tionary. The farewell address of Wash
ington was reverenced then—it is old
and musty now. We had repudiated
slavery—we now embrace it. We bad
denounced wholesale bigamy—we have,
in our Sulu treaty, formed a coalition
with It now.
Ob, what queer, fantastic fancies
emanate from youth—so foolishly
poetic like the poetry of Osslan! Well,
we have le'.'l that portion of our exist
ence—now for a broader field, a more
dignified plane. "Let the dead past
bury its dead." Hip, hip, hurrah for
the empirel Kl.j
The Bank. lake the Cake
Under the bill, now a law,
if
an or
dlnary man buys a government bond
he
iB
out the ubb of his money and
draws interest on the bond but under
this law, if a national bank buys the
same bond, it can deposit the bond, get
the face value of the bond in bank
notes, thus getting its money back, and
then it can draw Interest on the bond
besides. The ordinary man can eat
his cake or keep it the bank can eat
Its cake and keep |it, too.
And why? Because the republican
party is putting the state above the
man because the republican party is
legislating in the interests of aggre
gated wealth and neglecting the rights
of the great majority of the people.
Republicans, you never beard a man
Btand before an audience in this city
and declare that your national debt is a
national blessing and yet that bill, re
cently made a law by the signature of
your president, contemplates a per
manent debt and an increasing debt.
How are you going to have a perma
nent bank currency resting on bonds
unless you have a permanent debt for
it to rest on And how are you going
to have a bank currency increasing to
meet the needs of population and busi
ness unless you have an increasing
debt for it to rest upon. Your bill,
your infamous bill, proposes to make
the national debt permanent proposes
to increase It and make the common
people pay the interest while the bank
ers make the profit out of the debt.—
W. J. Bryan, Los Angeles, Cal., April
10, 1900.
The Nutlon'x Dead.
Some sleep beneath a suiithorn sun
Some 'neath a northern sky
Sorao dreamless rest In oceans breast,
Somo In far countries He. "*1
Butwlieresoe'erout^heroes sleep
Wltliln our hearts thoy llvo,
And bloom of spring today we bring
hlB
life while trying to deprive a race of
little brown men of their right to lib
erty and self-government?
While the Iowa local newspapers are
Oiled with items showing the exchange
of comparatively unimproved farms at
And to their mem'rles give,
Some fought their fight aud gained their rest
A contury ago
Their crumbling hones, unmarked by stones,
Their names wo lo not know.
But though unknown to us their names,
We hold their mem'rles .loar,
And wo today our homage pay,
Amber Cane Fodder.
Iowa is rapidly forging to the front
as the banner state for dairy products.
Creameries are being established in all
parts of the state and dairy farmers are
finding that it is one of tho best paying
of their farm products.
It is only recently that farmers have
discovered the great value of amber
cane as a fodder plant and it id safe to
say that it is attracting more attention
among dairy farmers than anything now
on the market, and it is recommended
as the most valuable fodder plant for
milch cows. During the past five years
the demand has increased about ten
fold each year.
This plant can be profitably grown
any where from Manitoba to Mexico on
on any good corn ground, and does not
appear to be effected by drout'i. It can
be sown at any time from the first of
May nntil the middle of July and in
places it is used as a citch crop, in place
of millet which it greatly outyields.
Dairymen who have been growing it
around this city claim that it Is tin
most economical fodder plant in exis
tence, being sweet, tender, nutritious
and greedily eaten by cattle, horses and
hogs either in its green state or dried
for winter use. The Bubstance is so
rich that it seems to make more and
richer milk. Some claim that it has
yielded as high as 50 tons of green fod
der to the acre. You can begin cut
ting and throwing It over into the feed
lot as soon as afoot high, and If weath
er is favorable it will start second
growth at once. After the general crop
of fodder is taken off and cured the
the field can be pastured, or If season is
moist it will make a fair second crop.
On ordinary ground 100 pounds ot
cane is sufficient, but if soil is very rich
it might be well to make it 115 to 125
so as to prevent the stalks growing too
large.—Farmers Tribune.
Fodder Corn for Dairy Cows
By George E. Newell.
There is no part of the United States
in which dairying is carried on, where
fodder corn cannot be raised to advan
tage for tho feeding of milch stock.
This fact stnuld be fully understood
and appreciated early in the season, so
that ample provision may be made for
the planting of this important feed.ux
illiary.
Some of the profitable dairy farms
in the land, besides mantaining blood
ed or graded stock, put out every
spring a large acerage of maize for
green feeding in the late summer and
early fall. The dairyman who does not
anticipate and provide for his milch
cattle's wants months in advance will
be compelled to witness the drying off
of his cows
jtiBt
MANCHESTER, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, MAY 23, 1900.
And drop the silent tear. V^
Somo fought their light but yesterday
Sume back In sixty-one.
It matters not whero'er they fought
Their lighting now Is done.
When Freedom's cause was jeopardized.
And she for succor crlod,
Thoy did not say lliolr country nay.
But nobly fought—and died
So now we bring our garlands fair
To lay on each doar grave,
And plant with love, each breast aboro,
The flag that "long shall wave,"
We bow tho head above the dead
Whose deeds will ever live,
And bloom of spring today we bring
And to tnolr mom'rleBglvo.
-ARTHUR J. BOBDICK.
Seed Potatoes.
j. he consular Report for January,
1900, contains the following Interesting
note from Consul Hughes, Coburg: "A
simple method of preveneing rot and
other diseased conditions of winter seed
potatoes is in use by the peasants of
ThurUigla. Those potatoes that rot
easily in the cellar in winter are made
better able to resist diseased conditions
and cold by being laid in a sunny place
aa far apart from each other as possible.
They are turned over morning and night
until they are thoroughly green, and
are then placed In the cellar for the
winter. Potatoes treated in this man
ner do not rot and can withstand a
great amount of cold weather without
freezing. Early potatoes thus treated
do not sprout in the cellar, and so re
tain their full strength. In February,
the potatoes are taken from the cellar
and put in a partially warmed room
until planting time. When planted,
they will sprout stronger and quicker
than potatoes not so treated, and the
crop will be larger and better."
when ho has no extra
feed to supplement a waning pastur
age.
Fodder corn should be planted early
enough so that it will get a good start
before hot dry weather is fairly launch
ed.
Mind you, I say planted, for I have
known some to indulge in the slovenly
practice of sowing the corn broadcast,
like small grain. It Bhould be listed or
planted j)in rows, so bb to admit of
thorough cultivation at least one way.
In this manner sunlight and Bir are
admitted, and combined with frequent
stirring of the soil, vigorous and succu
lent caneB develop, containing much
saccharine matter, capable of producing
a rich and abundant flow of milk. If
sowed or planted too thick and left prac
tically uncultivated, the caneB will be
white and watery and possess but little
feeding value.
If one has winter dairying at all in
view, a sufficient quantity of fodder
should be planted to insure a supply for
Bilage- making In the fall.
The value of properly put up ensilage
haa been practically demonstrated for
years, and generally those failure, in
lti use have followed Improper storage
In leaky silos.
Do not make the mistake of planting
fodder corn on second grade soil. If
you are engaged in dairying at all, you
are certainly in the business to try and
make it pay, and this merits first class
attention and first-class work in every
department.
Plant your forage crop on as rich soil
as you have on yonr place, and on s.
carefully a prepared seed bed as you
would use in putting In corn for grain.
Bear In mind tnat It Is yield more than
ace rage that will give the most effective
results, for I have seen more and bet
ter fodder produced on one acre care
fully prepared and cultivated, than on
three where the reverse was the case.
Plant varieties hardy to your section
that will make vigorous and stocky
growth,—Farmers Tribune.
pOME AWFUL DEATHS.
FEARFUL FORMS IN WHICH
GRIM DESTROYER CALLS.
The Vnra of a South Awlnllaa
Spider sad the Frlghltol A.onr It
C*B»e« A Grain That Makes Its
Victim a Ravins Maalae.
What Is the most awful shape In
which death may come to mortal mant
Not by fire, nor by water, nor by gun
shot. These are mere pleasures to
some of the deaths by which you may
die.
The most agonizing of all Is caused
by an Insect half the bIzo of a pea—a
•mall black Bplder. It lives In Peru
and South Australia, but a few speci
mens have reached Europe and Amer
ica In shiploads of timber. Not long
ago a dock laborer was unlucky
enough to come upon one In the Vic
toria docks while unloading bark.
The tiny death dealer dropped upon
the back of his hand and dug Its fangs
Into his flesh. The bite itself was noth
ing, but as soon as the poison began to
work the man fainted with pain. Boon
afterward he came to and lived three
days before the end came.
This spider's venom scorches up the
blood vessels and spreads through all
the tissues, causing the most fearful
agony a human being can have to bear.
The worst of It Is that the victim lives
at least two days, enduring unthinka
ble anguish the whole time. ThlB spi
der Is luckfly not common. It Is known
as the "specky," and when a man who
knows what the bite means Is bitten he
generally blows out his brains.
Another fearful death Is caused by
eating a grain called "bhat." This
sometimes gets mixed with rice, which
It resembles. The plant grows In the
east, and a few grains of It will drive
one Into a state of violent mania. The
victim becomes drowsy at first and aft
erward hilarious, then he goes stark,
M#dng mad and tears himself literally
to pieces with his fingers, biting month
ful8 out of his limbs. It is bad enough
to see such a case, but as for experi
encing it—
Of course falling Into a vat of boiling
metal, as unfortunate workmen some
times do, sounds bad enough, but It Is
mercifully quick. There Is a South
American vine called the "knotter,"
which Is far worse. It twines around
any living thing that comes within
reach, twisting Its long tentacles about
a man as a devilfish might These
tentacles sear and burn Into the flesh
like white hot wires, and the victim Is
dragged Into the heart of the foliage
and his jnlcea slowly drained, as a
spider sucks the blood of a fly.
All say that the pain Is worse *hnn
they could have believed It possible
for a man to feeL The "knotter" Is
well known to scientists and Is, In fact,
a sort of hnge flytrap plant Those
who have strong Instincts of cruelty,
coupled with curiosity, sometimes force
a dog Into the grip of the "knotter" to
watch the effects, which are too horri
ble to describe In detalL
Again, there Is nothing very much
worse than hydrophobia, when genu
ine. The patient often lives for days
In the acute stage aud In his last hours
Is simply tied up In knots and bent
backward and forward like a bow.
It Is a very rare disease with human
beings, for most people bitten by rabid
dogs, a small number at most escape
It In extreme cases the patient act
ually snarls and bays like any bound,
and, next to experiencing It the worst
thing Is to watch a case. It Is as dis
tressing a spectacle as any man could
witness.
There Is a snake called the "lancer,"
which Uvea In South America, and la
very ready with Its fangs. It Is a small,
brown. Insignificant beast but tts bite
Induces a sort of Imaginary swelling
all over the victim's body. He feela
as If every Inch of him were being
strained to breaking point and tho
agony which results Is too awful for
words. Generally, however, the ex
cess of pain drives the bitten man mad
before very long, and in four hours he
dies—a senseless Imbecile.
But all said and done, perhaps there
Is no death much worse than by the
common disease of cancer, which
gnaws at the patient's vitals through
month after month of unceasing ago*
ny and slays Its victim at last through
sheer exhaustion.—London Spectator.
Aa AkHtttalaM Bridegroom.
Robert Dewar, brother of Lord Wil
liam Do war, the British scientist who
was the first experimenter to liquefy
air, is a remarkably absentmlnded
man. It is said that on one occasion
he left his home early one morning
and repaired to the house of a friend.
In which there was a fine library to
which be had access. That afternoon
his relatives and friends searched the
neighborhood In vain for blm. At
length he was run down In this library.
By his side was a new BUlt of clothes.
"If a nice man you are," Ironically
•aid the spokesman.
"What's the matter now?" returned
Bobert Irritably.
"Your bride and the preacher are
waiting for you this two hours. Don't
you know this Is your wedding day,
man?"
"I declare," said the groom, "I'd for
gotten all about Itl Walt till I dress,
and I'll go along with you."—Saturday
Bvenina Pea(.
IV
Does Coffee Agree With Tou.
If not, drink Grain-o—Made ftom
pure grams. A lady writes: "The first
time I made Grain-o I did not like it
but after uBing it
for one week nothing
would induce me to go back to coftee."
It nourishes and feeds the system. The
children can drink it freely with great
benefit. It is the strengthening sub
stance of pure grains. Get a package
today from your grocer, follow the di
rections in making it and you will have
a delicious and healthful table beverage
for old and young. 15c. and 25c.
ECONOMY
Shonld be practiced
THB
"A Quaker on every Sack"
Quaker Mill
COMPANY.
1. W. MILES. Prest. M. F. LIROY, Cashier
B. P. MILES, Asst. Cashier.
B. R. ROBINSON Sd V. President,
B. C. BAaBEHi.K.lst V. President.
First NaiM
1
This grain Is only found In remote
parts of the east, but both white men
and natives are killed by It occasion
ally In the east, for the plant grows In
with the rice crops and "«n scarcely be
told apart, but that the dried grain Is
of a reddish color.
BANK,
MANCHESTER, IOWA.
CAPITAL. $50,000
81
General
Banking
Business
SX3KECTOIU3.
B. B. Robinson. M. P. LeRoy,
J. W. Miles, w. H. Norrls,
E. M. Carr, M. Beehler,
H. A. Granger, A. B. Blake,
B. F. Miles, B. O. Baeberle,
F. J. Atwater.
Pint National Bank, Dubuque, Iowa.
Central National Bank New York Clt
Commercial National Bank. Chicago.
WM. O. GAWLE1, CHAS. J. SEEDS,
President. Cashier.
R. W. TtRRILL, C. W. KEAGY,
Vloe President. Asst. Cashier.
DELAWARE COUNTY
State Bank
CAPITAL $60,000
-DIRECTORS-
WM. C. Cawley.
W. O. Kenyon.
Edward P. Seeds.
Chat). J. Seeds.
VOL. XXYI--NO. 21.
1
in every household.
Do Ou use Quaker
Mill Flour? If not
have you ever stopped
to consider that you
can save
ioc
to 15c
per sack by so doing.
By buying home flour
you not only save the
freight, but you get
good flour also.
Every sack of
QUAKER HILL
FLOUR
is guaranteed to
be equal to anything
on the market—with
no exceptions.
Try it and get
your money back if it
does not please you. fj
The genuine has
Transacted.
merest Paid on Time Deposits.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
FOB RENT. 7
H. F. Arnold.
R. W. TirrlH.
O. W. Dunham,
M. H.WlUlston
0. W. Keagy.
INTERE8T PAID on Time Deposits.
Prompt attention (riven to all business. Pas
senger tiokets
from and to all parts of Europe
dlreot to Manchester, for sale.
FfQNQ Time Mortgage J,pans
Made, Bought and Sold.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
For the storago of valuable papers,
etc. for rout.
Banking
House
Henry Hutchinson
Hutchinson's Building. Manchester. Iowa,
CAPITAL. $70,000
JOSEPH HUTCHINSON, Cashier.
COLLECTIONS
Fxcsaptly X£ekd*.
DEPOSITS
on Time* Interost Al­
lowed and other deposits reoelved.
DRAFTS
sold on New York, Chicago
and Dubuque also on Great Britain and Ire
land and European Cities.
TIOKET3 sold to and from all European
Sorts
via Cusard or Allen nr Whito Star
teamslilp Lines.
THE LATEST WORK OF
Fiction
by the best authors can
be purchased at the
the Postoffice
Newstand
All the current maga
zines and also a com
plete line of stationery,
tobacco and confection
ery.
NIC MALVIN.
Proprietor.
15
good and reliable Paint?
"t#
We have the
I PAINT
in several different colors
suitable for bams. Call
in and see our line and
secure our prices.
®l)e {Democrat
bates of advertising.
BPACB.
One Inch
Two inches..
Three Inches.
Four Inches..
Five inches..
ii Column....
1W *w 1M an
CI 00 11 BO (4 80
1 AO a MI
of the latest patterns and styles,
which we invite you to call and
inspect. Wecall especial attention
to our large and complete line of
Couches
MADE on honor—to last—for com
fort.
BROWN
IT PAYS
SGFAFt.ES
& SEBEGfC
''v
We are
closing out
our HATS
at nearly cost.
Schafles
Sebeck.
the quickest and best route to Delaware county homes
I— t* use the MANCHESTER DEMOCRAT. It is relig
JH iously read in the office, the shop, the factory, on the
street and in the home. Your ad in its columns is
bound to bring business.
lr
ft TO
1*50
wou
:son
it oo
snoo
00
40 00
won
110 00
15 00
CO
16 00
too uo 4 RO 1 00
21 60 8 7ft 5 75 10 00
800 4 Ml 7 (Ml Utff)
4 50 Ml 800 1ft (10
Column,...
One Column.,
SO 00
40 00
8 00
126 00
BO 000 IS (Ml BOO
1*80 18 00 »00 mm
tora explnaion Moortrmct will to ilvfrt
ooMlnc to •bofenkla.
*"»».eotMWdtie »U lbw, IM
i.SSi"?*'"S^"n
Mnu
We have just received a large and
complete line of
Spring Furniture
per II..
for Ue Int
^SiuSSi!SS£n
The FURNITURE
MAN...
TTSTJIBUJHEI)
fSS/
1
1
to paint your roof and
Dorfr
barn. "Why not use a
flEGLEGT
YOVR
ROOfor RARrt.
is
A
irwcsrncAT
ToPAIKIDTftIR
WITH
I.X.L
ROOF and
BARrt
fc. in
PAINT
MADE BY
Heath
bmilugah
MFQ. CO., CrtlClQO.
w.
V.S.A.
I.X.L
Respectfully
ANDERS ffiMcv
PHILIPP
AND All OTtllR OTITIC
ncArn a niuiGAit p&inr PRoowin
"UW
MM
Ml
K5??
'At
j.
I
FOLEY'S HONEY ss TAR
THB ORIAT
THROAT and LUNO
FOLEY'S BANNER 9AI.VE lea Healing.Wonder*
GKRZEJQ-G- & WARD
"f't
Viv &"\Ji
EZZ

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