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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, August 22, 1900, Image 8

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MASON'S
GLASS
JARS
20
lbs for
Boy's
FOR PRACTICAL CANNING
PURPOSE AT
T.
We are very anxious to get back to our old price 18 or
$1.00
WE ALSO WANT TO REMIND YQU
THAT OUR TRADE ON COFFEE
AND TEA IS INCREASING.
Why we are selling you a coffee that we defy competi-'/^
tion. You save 5c per pound by buying it. We are
sole agents for the famous BUNKER HILL Coffee.*-"^
It is taking the lead in all the eastern states and is fast
gaining afoot hold in Manchester. We shall not ad
v«nce our price on tests. Our years supply has been
contacted for at Old Prices. The best of goods at a Xi
Moderate Price has made our business a success. Our
flour is taking the lead, why, you never have a bad
batch of bread. When you buy Clear Quill, Splendid
or New Deal or Baker 4 x. They are perfect. We
don't mix them, but give you good straight goods.
Watch Cal Atkinson and this space in the democrat
and see how we come out.
CAL ATKINSON,
THT CORNER GROCER.
'WHEN YOU COME8TO THINK OF IT"
PETERSON BROS
Boys Clothing, 1
2-piece
$2.50. 1
Boy's Vestee Suits.
Ages 3 to 9 years.
$3.00 and $4.00 values.
Boy's Vestee Suits.
Ages 3 to 9 years.
$3.00 and $4.00 values.
$2.50
$2.50
Boy's Long Trouser
suits.
Ages 14 to 20 years,
13-50, $4.50, $5.00 up to
Boy's Long Trouser
suits.
Ages 14 to 20 years,
13-50, $4.50, $5.00 up to
$12.50
3
0
N.
ARNOLDS.
WE ARE GOING TO MAKE A GUESS
We are going to guess that by the last of August we
will have ...
CHEAPER SUGAR
1
it isn't quantity so much as qual
ity that tells in groceries—most
everything else in fact. Whether
it is staple or fancy groceries you
want, we can always fill your
order and All it "up to the"
handle." Every item will be
worth the price we ask for it it
will be as represented and will
afford satisfaction.
Very Special Prices. 1
Suits.
Ages 7 to 16 years.
•, $3.00 and. $4.00 values
Boy's Blouses and
Waists.
Banner Brand
5Qc.jg 75c va]jN£||g
Boy's Blouses and
Waists.
Banner Brand
5Qc.jg 75c va]jN£||g
J,
$12.50
J,
I
Boy's Blue Sergelfl
suits.
$8.00, $10.00 and
Boy
's
Blue Sergelfl
suits.
$8.00, $10.00 and
$12.00.
$12.00.
Children's Wash'
Suits..
Crash, Duck and Per
cales.
50C, 75c, $1.00 and
Of J'
IF YOU ARE
LOOKING FOR THE BEST
in the way of Vehicles, Buggies, Spring Wagons and Lumber
wagons or any special job in this line.
WE HAVE WHAT YOU WANT!
Anything in our line that can or cannot be had anywhere else
we can manufacture on short notice.
WORK POSITIVELY GUARANTEED
It must also not be forgotten that we keep constantly on
hand everything pertaining to a buggy or wagon and do all kinds
of repairing, having expert men in all the departments lequired for
carriage and wagon building.
S5 POSITIVELY
TEN to FIFTEEN DOLLARS CAN BE SAVED on ev.ery vehicle
by making your purchases of us.
WE DO AS WE ADVERTISE
Kennedy1" Buggy: Co.
-s
$1.50.
5TOUT.
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo
IA MICE I
M" OflU 8
lllllL.
BY FREDERIC
O RBDDAX.L.
O
O
CopyrigJiU by Frcdcric J?ca"fa
O
27lu*»
tint ionft by I.
tr.
Tahcr.
O
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOODOOOQOOOOo
TROLOGUE
STARTLING NEWS.
ONto
A certain morning In May
the dally papers of the
Bnited States, from Maine
California, from the
great lakes to the gulf, contained a
momentous news dispatch. It was sot
forth with all the bold nnd vivid Insist
ence of black "scare heads" and pun
gent headlines.
Some time during the previous night
part of limited express train on one
of our great western trunk lines had
disappeared without leaving a trace
behind either of coaches or pnssengers!
The occurrence was absolutely with
out parallel in the annals of railroad
ing, nnd the tragic Import of the Inci
dent was Intensified when It became
known that the living freight of the
lost cars Included a well known and
popular railroad mngnatc nnd financier
of national reputation with a party of
friends, among tho latter some women,
of wealth and social prominence.
Their complete vajilshmont could not
have been more mysterious nnd puz
zling had coaches and passengers been
sunk fathoms deep in some dark and
silent pool or engulfed In a bottomless
canyon. Not a trace was left, not a
clew. The railroad officials were ut
terly at fault Nor was tho mystery
olucldnted until several days and
nights had elapsed.
Meantime the wires east and west
wero kept hot, popular interest nnd ex
citement running high In every city,
town and village In tho United States
nnd oven In Canada. The wildest spec
ulations wero rife as to tho fato of the
persons concerned, all of them moro or
less wide of the mark, as the sequel
proved.
Xet when the truth was ferreted out
It was seen that the actualities rivaled
all tho fiction that had been woven
nround the cose, which thenceforth
took rank as a veritable romance of the
rail.
'SmMik. FIRST DAY.
THE START.
In the great dome roofed station of
the Pennsylvania railroad at Jersey
City on a certain morning In May the
limited train for the west stood await
ing Its lading of passengers.
The long line of vcstlbuled drawing
room coaches was resplendent In fresh
paint as though lust out of the car
shops. Tho burnished brass work on
gates, hand rails and steps shone like
gold plate, while the white capped and
blue uniformed officials—brakemen,
trainbands nnd negro porters—dignifi
ed and self important, yet gravely
cqurteous withal, stood ready to wel
come, direct or assist the fast arriving
passengers. The conductor waited,
watch In hand, for the great station
clock pointed at three minutes before
10, and precisely at the hour the filer
wonld be off.
Tho last train boat was In, and the
inevitable late traveler was even now
struggling down the asphalt platform.
The great engine backed down and
was coupled on, the engineer tested
the brakes to see if his "air" was all
right, the steam giant throbbed and
glowed with pent up energy, nnd the
"runner," as the engineer is callod In
railway parlance, leaned out of his
cab on the alert for tho electric Cry
'All aboard I"
At tho other side of the station an
equally interesting scene was taking
place. On one of the side tracks stood
two richly appointed coaches, one the
private car Miranda and tho other an
ordinary Pullman sleeper and drawing
room coach combined. Since 8 o'clock
relays of porters and expressmen bad
beon coming alongsldo heavy laden,
departing empty handed and wiping
their brows. Hundreds of pounds of
lee wero stowed away In tho long re
ceptacles under tho cars hampers,
crates and boxes of mineral waters,
"strong waters" and delicncles were
taken aboard and disposed In mysteri
ous recesses from within came the
musical clink of glasses and crockery,
while the white jacketed chef could be
seen flitting about in his tiny kitchen
and buffet putting matters to rights.
The last load of relishes was re
ceived and receipted for, the porters
for the last time flicked the dust off
the richly upholstered interior, when
tho first of those for whom these elab
orate preparations were made came
strolling down the platform, at whose
arrival ail tho train men in waiting sa
luted with bands to caps.
A good story Is told concerning two
poor Irishmen who once upon a time
wero debating what sort of an occupa
tion each would choose if kind Provl
donco should over give them the op
tion. After canvassing the advantages
,of the various vocations in life one of
them closed the discussion by saying:
"Faith, Mike, for a nlco, clnne, ulsy
Job let mo be a bishop!"
This probably summed up to Mike's
imaginative mind all the sunny side of
life—wealth, position, authority and
not overmuch work.
But I have often thought that for
puro and unadulterated bliss the posi
tion of president of a great railroad
left little to be desired. It certainly
seemed so to the onlooker this bright
May morning.
Hero was John Draper, president of
the Pacific and Atlantic railway, a self
mado man, a multimillionaire, old
enough to havo eschewed the follies of
life and yet young enough to enjoy the
benefits the gods send to sano mortals,
blessed with health, strength, good
conscience nnd a better digestion, at
the moment of wblch I write literally
monarch of all he surveyed and about
to take a trip of three or four thousand
miles in his personal and private car,
surrounded by a charming and con
genial company of his own choosing,
who would bnsk in the sunshine of his
bounty and give hitn grateful thanks,
homage and credit for all the pleasure
bcstowcdl
So who would not bo a railroad pres
ident, even If the head that carries the
bondholders' woes Is sometimes un
easy 1
With John Draper came two ladles,
an elder and a much younger one, and,
faithful to the old precept which gives
place to ago before beauty, the former
shall be described first. This was Mrs.
Bradley llurst, a married sister of our
host. Fair and 40 she certainly was,
but not even her bitterest enemy could
havo called her fat. A laughing eye, ii
well rounded and mature form, of me
dium height, with a carriage and man
ner that denote the thorough mistress
of society and Its forms—this was Mrs.
Bradley Hurst, the chaperon of the
party.
By her side and between the two eld
,«r people walked a girl half her age,.
foe exact opposite ot what Mrs. Hurst I
musl Wive Infeu In 1ie~r~youth—tfot loo
tall, graceful, dnrk of hair, eyes and
complexion, a Vnssar alumna nnd now
a two years' society graduate accom
plished, handsome nnd wholesome—and
there you have sketched Miss Florence
Grannlss, the ward of John Draper and
heiress to a cool million.
Down the platform they strolled,
laughing and chatting gayly, yet in the
tender solicitude with which the rail
road magnate handed the girl into tho
car might have beep discovered more
than tho ordinnry regard supposed to
subsist between guardian and ward.
Close nt the heels of this trio enmo
two others, both young, both vivacious,
both bubbling over with good humor
nnd good spirits, which were plainly
their natural heritage and partly born
of the prospect of this novel outing.
The lady wns Miss Madge Hurst,
daughter of Mrs. Bradley Hurst, a
piquant maiden of some 20 winters,
blond, petite, blue eyed and altogether
bewitching—at least so thought Mr.
Chester Ives, who walked at her side,
looking down from his fivo feet ten of
masculinity at tho five feet two of fem
ininity under the broad brimmed
Gainsborough hat then In vogue.
Chester Ives wns a member of the
fourth estate, whose privilege It is to
wield the weapon which Is said to bo
mightier than the sword—though it Js
often a more blue pencil—nnd who, by
dint of patience, perseverance nnd per
sistence, had risen from the foot of the
journalistic ladder to be "Wall street
man" on one of New York's great dal*
lies. Not yet 30, he was already book-,
cd by his intimates for higher things.
He had known John Draper when the)
latter was "biding his time" In com
parative obscurity as a small merohant
Here was John Draper, monarch of all
he surveyed.
in a southern town. Although there
were nearly 20 years between their ages
they were friends and confidants. Yet
each held certain matters in reserve.
Draper know that Ives loved his niece,
Chester thought he knew where the
senior hnd placed his affections, but
the younger man did not know that
John Draper was resolved to signalize
his own happiness—should It ever come
to pass—by doing what he could to
make Madge and Chester linppy at the
same time.
"Last of all came satan also," In
the person of Mr. Reuben K. Filley,
protege and confidential clcrl: of John
Draper. It is perhaps needless to say
that the world knew the young rann
In the latter capacity only. Alert, keen,
selfish, unscrupulous, a New York boy
of ucccrtain parentage, though he I
clata-M English, a product of the
slums and the gutter, Reuben Filley
had risen to the surface of the current
of life in the great metropolis" by tho
very simple method of throttling: or
pushing aside every other struggling
swimmer who came In his way. "Do
others or they'll do you" was his
cheerful motto., He attracted tho no
tice of John Draper when tho latter
first came to New York was taken In
to his employ as an office boy and ulti
mately reached the post of private sec
retary, a place which offered great pos
sibilities to a young man of his peculiar
proclivities and of which he Imme
diately proceeded to take unfair ad
vantage. "Looking out for No. 1" Fil
ley called It. Plainer people fond of
calling a spade by Its agricultural
name would have termed It lying and
stealing but, then, Filley took care
nover to be found out.
Rascal though be was, lie deserves to
have his pen picture lllie all the others
of the party, and here It is Height, 5
feet 8 weight, 140 complexion fair
eyes steely blue, shifting and treacher
ous a brownish yellow or "Cain col
ored" beard nnd mustache closely trim
med served to hide an animal jaw and
a cruel mouth cars pointed and pecul
iarly shaped, being so joined to the
neck ns to present no lobe In speech
garrulous, boastful and profane.
He was by nature coarse and vulgar,
yet by contact with the world had been
licked Into what passed current for
Huff frankness und good nature. Woe
betide the man, woman or child who
trusted Reuben IC. Filley, for treachery
was In his heart, and self wns his god.
His arrival was hnllcd with an ex
clamation of satisfaction by John Dra
per, who took from him several letters
and telegrams and darted Into the car.
Filley was the last of the guests, and
with the coming of Mrs. Hurst's maid,
Annette, and of Draper's man, Henry,
the personnel of the party was com
plete.
Filley followed his employer Into tho
car.
"Mr. Draper," he said, standing be
fore tho desk where that gentleman
sat, "Is it absolutely necessary that I
go along?"
"I thought we settled all that yester
day, Reuben," was the reply. "I shall
certainly need you when we get to
Denver. There will be hundred nnd
one things to attend to and mighty lit
tle time In which to do them. So let's
hear no more about It."
With this nnswer, delivered In
qulot but emphatic manner that brook
ed no argument, Filley was forced to
he content, and with a sulky fling of
his shoulders hp turned away, mutter
ing to himself ns soon as he was out of
Draper's hearing:
"The party will be smaller by one
several miles this Bkle of Denver, or
my name's not Reuben IC. Filley I"
'Twns exactly three minutes of 10
when a switching engine pushed the
president's private car and Its attend
ing sleeping coach out of the station
and on .to the main track. Here the
"limited" was halted long enough to
permit the necessary coupling, und
then, with a final toot, the monster
engine lay down to Its work and with
a full bead of steam went rushing and
panting across the Huckensack mead
ows, past Newark, Elizabeth, New
Brunswick and Trenton, 00 miles an
hour, nnd soiinto Philadelphia.
By this time the millionaire's party
were fairly well settled In their re
spective nooks and quarters. The three
ladles and the maid were assigned to
the double stateroom In the Miranda.
John Draper took the other and the
smaller one. Between tliem was tho
saloon, where all meals wore served
and which answered for a general ren
dezvous and lounglngjlace. Ives and
Ejilqy qnd the tijnneervunt Jjunked In
the TuTlmnii, with The liegro porter
Aleck for additional company and
sport.
All the way between the metropolis
nnd the city by the Schuylkill Draper
and Filley were busy over their corre
spondence at what might be dubbed
the business end of the saloon. Ar
rived at the Broad street station, the
secretary jumped to the platform and
hurried to mail several letters and dis
patcb divers telegrams. Rising from
his table, their host came toward the
ladles, saying:
"Now 1 am free until we reach Pitts
burg. Which shall It be, luncheon or
recreation, tho mind or the body?"
For, plutocrat and man of nffalrs
though ho was, his heart was young,
and the secret of much of his health
and success lay in the fact that when
he chose to play nothing else wns al
lowed to Interfere.
Mrs. Hurst looked up smilingly, bnt
it fell to Madge to answer, though
John Draper happened to be regarding
his ward solicitously.
"I move you. sir," she said, with
grave lips, yet dancing eyes, "that the
car now proceed to business and take
its pleasure afterward. I'm desperate
ly hungry. Aren't you, Flo?"
Florence admitted in her stately way
that "some slight refreshment would
be acceptable," and no sooner hnd the
wish been uttered than tho mllllonnlre
clapped his hands—a survival of his
southern training—when Aleck appear
ed and received the laconic order:
"Luncheon Immediately!"
A very merry party It was which sat
down to what Madgo christened a "car
picnic." Along and narrow table was
sot up In the center of tho saloon. A
chair at either end was occupied by
Mr. Draper and Mrs. Hurst.. Florence
Grannlss wns seated at her guardian's
right hnnd, with Chester next to her.
Reuben Filley sat on his employer's
loft. Madge and Chester were vls-n
vls nt the lower end, ns were, of
course, Miss Grannlss nnd Reuben Fil
ley. These positions were unchanged
during much of this memorable jour
'iey.
It is a safe assertion thnt only one
member of the party felt any regret nt
'icing there. This one was Filley.
John Draper waa bound for Deuvot
to attend an Important meeting of tho
presidents of some' of the greatest
trunk line railroads In the country
hence the prcscnco of his secretary and
of his confidential man was a necessi
ty. .Yet Filk-y had begged hard to be
left behind In New York on the flimsy
plea of Hi health and overwork. But
his employer overruled nil his objec
tions, ns we hnvo seen, saying that the
trip would do him good.
Now, as a matter of fact. It was as
much as Filley's reputation and safety
were worth to be out of New York at
this juncture. He had entered on a
career of duplicity culminating In actu
al crime. Unless he could be back In
the metropolis considerably within the
ten dnys named as the limit of the trip
he would be ruined and disgraced. He
must return nnd would, nnd he counted
on being able to concoct some pretext,
fnlr or foul, for lenvlng the party.
Meanwhile there was some Intermit
tent compensation to be gained from
the fact that he would be able to see
just how fnr matters had progressed
between his patron nnd Miss Grannlss,
for Reuben Filley cherished designs on
the heiress, nn'd if be "pulled off" his
present dangerous coup he would be In
a bettor position to sue for her band
nnd her fortune.
That high bred, high strung and
high minded maiden like Florence
FiUCu left to 8wear under hia yellow
beard and be amiable.
Grannlss could see anything repulsive
in such on ulllance uever occurred to
the conceltcd nnd self Batlslled fel
low. Beyond the usual conventional
greetings and a few brief conversations
at their casual meetlugs In her guard
ian's house there hud been no Inti
mate Intercourse between them. lie*
spectlng the man her mind was a
blank. On the other hand, Iteuben Fil
ley had dwelt so long on the idea of
one day calling her his wife that the
thought was become second only to his
master passion, wealth getting. Not a
gesture, not a glance, not atone which
passed between the millionaire and his
ward escaped his vigilant and cun
ning eye. Of one thing, however, he
became sure, there was no definite un
derstanding between them as yet,
though he shrewdly suspected that
Draper would try to bring matters to
a crisis during this trip. Well, so
would he!
To this end be set out to make him
self entertaining and at times verged
on being positively brilliant All
through the meal the most trifling lncJ
dents or remarks served to remind him
of a story or a pat Illustration, and he
drew upon bis varied store of checker
ed experience so that he well nigh mo
nopolized the conversation and flatter
ed himself that he was making a good
impression upon Florence. She laugh
ed at his sallies of wit, appeared Inter*
ested In his highly colored adventures
and Joined in his banter. But If he
could have heard her confidential com
ment to Mudge when the two were
alone he would not have felt so elated.
"That man leaves a bad taste in one's
mouth," she said. Wherein she but
voiced Chester's private opinion, which
was that Reuben "did not ring true."
The day wore on. The thrilling as
cent of the Alleghanles was breasted
and the summit crossed ere nightfall
Then came the long descent to the Ohio
valley, and while the party was at
breakfast tho next morning the train
rolled into Indianapolis. While the en
glnep wero being changed every one
alighted for a stroll. Draper and Miss
Grannlss led the way, then followed
Chester and Madge, so that Filley was
left to swear uuder his yellow beard
and be amiable to Mrs. Bradley Hurst.
The astute woman of the world saw
through his discomfiture and took an
especial delight iu detaining him at her
side, so that he had no speech with
Florence, and the situation was un
changed when once more the limited
took up the route for St. Louis over the
Vandalia.
SECOND DAY.
TIIE MAIL AND TIIE TELEGRAPH.
By virtue of that omniscience neces
sarily possessed by every story teller
wo may be permitted to reveal the so-
crctR futrusfetT to some of the IcUcrh
t»ent flying eastward on thnt May morn
ing to their relatives and friends In
New York by the various personages
with whom we are en route for the
great west. First In this series of
glimpses
behind
penchant
the scones comes a
short but weighty epistle from Mrs.
Bradley llurst to her liege lord. The
italics are the fair writer's, not ours:
I.—Mrs. Bradley Hurst to Mr. Brad
ley Hurst, Union club, Now York:
0* BOARD TUB MIRANDA, MAY 12, 1S00.
My Dear Bradley—1 hnvo heard you say that an
ocean voynjre Rave a man more opportunities than
any other situation to shower attentions upon the
woman ho Jiked, but from personal observation
I can testify that a trip in a private railroad
car—especially If that Is wmtr mm—
is qulto
as fruitful in chances to express one's
charmingly
he ju$t idnlUcx her.
handfi.
affectionate
regard.
John has played thu role of mine host
Even the odious Filley
must BCC that against such an adversary he has no
oh*Rco. I cannot understand why John ever made
Mm one ol us. but it will give Florence a glimpso
of tho two men side by side. Girls are go queer
nowadays, und she. is so Belt contained and re
tcrvod that it is
ithposxihlc
A motherless girl ia
mch
a respon­
sibility. How odd it will Fcctn for us to be sis
ters-in-law and 1 old enough to be her mother!
Stranger things have happened I
We cxpcct to be in Denver the day after to
morrow, *nd I will write again upon our arrival.
All of party are well, and Mnd^c sends her
love with mine. EV&r yours affectionately,
II.—Miss Madge Hurst to Miss Fan
nie Hyde, 7-193 Madison avenue, New
York:
INDIANAPOLIS', Wednesday.
My Dearest Fan—Our journey has been just one
delightful picnic ever since we left New York
yesterday morning. I am writing'this very hur
riedly at the cutcst little escritoire you ever saw
in one corner of Uncle John's private car, and If
you do not recognize the handwriting you must
blame the Jigglitig cf the train, not tnc,
If we don't have a wedding before wo get home,
it won't he awnebmitf's fault. 1 told mamma
that it looked as though Uncle John had arranged
tliis trip so that lie could Ifavo darling Florence
all to himself, and then I was In disgrace for the
rrst of the day. lie plays the bc.'iu rhcraJfrr to
perfection, on-i one would never thiak ho was ai
old or older than papn. He seems to antfclpata
her every wish. What she thinks, I'm sure, 1
don't know. When 1' tcasu her, she smiles tba£
superior smile of hers and r/ia/iflc*
Out there's no fun in watching other pcoplo
make love, arid C. 1. says tie agrees with me. Do
you know, Fan, I begin to believe the foolish fel
low really cares for mc & little bit, but what
mamma will say if sift ever suspects 1 dread to
think. Pity he's so j»oor—no, 1 don't mean that—
but I'm sorry ho's not rich, though I'm sure he's
got brains enough for both of us, and I,
My Dear Old Boy—Here 1 am In Indianapolis,
the' second day out from New York, enjoying to
the utmost the first real vacation I have had In
ten years, thanks to Uncle John Draper, whose
guest 1 am. We are reveling In the midst of a
luxury that is simply sybaritic It it were not
for the motion, you would Imagine yourself in
eomc magical palace. You clap your hands, and,
lo,.a black slave appears and spreads a banquet to
which the ends of the earth have contributed
their fatness. You press a button, and unlimited
cigars and cooling drinks arc at your elbow. If
you want a magazine or today's paper, you have
only to ask for it. A bath and a shave may be
had for the wishing. All this while we are anni
hilating space at the rate of 40 or 50 miles an
hour. Truly we Americans aro the greatest rail
road travelers in the world, and we have certainly
6urrounded ourselves with "all the comforts of
home" while rushing over the rails. The quarters
are somewhat cramped, but as Draper's privato
Kcretary and 1 have the better part of an ordi
nary sleeper to ourselves, we can't complain.
01 course there's a fly in the ointment, and
llcubcn K. Filley is Its name. 1 think 1 am pret
ty tolerant toward other men, but I distrust and
detest that fellow, and 1 dare say he returns my
dislike with interest. Nevertheless, we
doubtles flnish the trip without riot or blood
shed. Unless I am mistaken, he evinces a marked
for Miss Grannlss, Uncle John's ward,
whom you have met—and for her money—but he
might as well make love to the statue ot Liberty.
She simply looks over him.
I hope Dennis is getting along all right with
my work. Write or wire mc at Denver If any
thing turns up. Faithfully yours,
CHESTEB IVES.
IV.—Jolin Draper to Edward Gates,
Esq, of Plodder, Gates & Prodder,
New York:
(Personal and confidential.)
INDIANAPOLIS, May 12, 1890.
My Dear Gates—This communication, which will
come to you bearing the Indianapolis postmark,
treats of a subject very dear to me, though it
necessarily partakes of tho nature of a business
letter.
As cotrustee with me of Miss Plorenec Grannlss
I beg to inform you that it is my intention, If
possible, to make her my wife. She is of ago
and henco free to act for herself, but I consider it
only right that you should be advised of my pur
pose. 1 don't imagine that you will advance any
objections. I am old enough to know my own
mind and am certainly as ablo to "support her In
the style to which she has been accustomed" a?
the most jealous parent oould wish. I need
scarcely assure you that her private fortune will
be most rigidly secured to her. When next 1
write, I hope to be able to ask you for your con
grwtulaUons. Cordially yours, JOHN Diursa.
V.—Telegram from Edward Gates,
New York, to John Draper, St Louis,
In answer to foregoing:
Go
in and thin, and God bless you both.
EDWARD QATES.
Illinois Central betweon Omaha and Fort Dorieo
in coonoction with the Minneapolis and St. Louis
botwoenFort Dodge and Minneapolis and St.
Paul, abo to bo Inaugurated January 38, luoo
Lv. Omaha
7.85 p. m.
Ar. Minneapolis
7.80 a. in.
Ar. St. Paul
8.00 a. in.
"THE
LIMITED"
Lv. St. Paul
8.oo p. m.
Lv Minneapolis
8.80 p. m.
Ar. Omaha
8.1G a. in.
A fast vestibule night train, dally, carrying
through Pullman sleeping car and couches.
Lv. Omaha
7.ooa. m.
Ar. Minneapolis
7.00 p. m.
Ar. St. Paul
"THE
EXPRESS'
Lv. St. Paul
9.00 a. m.
Lv Minneapolis
0,80 a. m.
Ar. Omaha
0.40 p. 111.
7.80 p.
SFast
day train, dally oxccpt Sunday, carrying
roughparlor car and coaches.
BEING
HELD UP
Tho person who pays his money out for
poor lumber is in a worse situation
than the one who hands it over to tho
footpad. A grayer injury has beon
dono him than the more loss of money
^presents. Bo sure you invest your
money at tho right lumber yard. To
make assurance doubly sure come to the
Holtgr Liter Go.
Railroad Time Table.
.ILLINOIS CENTRAL.
IllInolnCor.tr.il Tlmo isiblc Xo
[4,
feet Juno v.), ioyo.
Uklnc cr
Main Line Passenger Trains.
WEST llOUXJl
No 1*11:3^
No 3*
No 21 tfliOO
No 23tO:UOa in
No Ult 1:4ft pin
No 7lt4:l5 pin
MAIN LINK
..Fast Train..
Thro Kxprcss..
—Clipper..
Local Express
..Way Freight.
•Thro Freight
KA#»T ltnUKD
No 2* 4:0H am
No 4* .t:tc2p
No22t9:
'25
NOB 21 and 22 run bntweon Dubunuo and Fort
Dodgn.
Nos 23 and 24 run botwoon Dubnquo and Llo.
CEDAR RAPIDS BRANCH.
North Houud I liet^cdnrRpds 1 Month Bound
——Arrive
most
to us all, hut to Florence he has beon
devotion itfcl/. You know my heart is sot upon
their coming together. It is perfectly clear that
1
an »Manchester —LetiVP——
No.824 6:Wip.m
No 322 9:ft a.m
No. 8681:45 p.m
...-»Pnssonster..
..tPasseneor..
.••.tFrelgnt...
No s-a 9:3(i a. in
No 3210:0Tp in
No.ar.l 5:i0 p.
All above traln3 carry passangers.
'Daily.
tDally Except Sunday.
to discover whether
her heart is touchcd. 1 am resolved that John
shall have
cveril chanoc.
It would be such a re­
lief to know that she was happily married and t&
pood
H. G. PIKRCR. Station Agt
CHICAGOGREATWESTERNRR.
"The Maple Leaf Route."
T'nie card, Thorpe, Iowa.
Chicago Siipclal, Daily, Going Ea»t 7:40 11
Day Kxpross dal 5 except Sunday 8:0ipm
Way freightuatly 11:35am
O. West, North and Soutfa.
Way Preigb'. daily
St Paul & Kansas City Exp, doily ...
DKSSIB.
jtctitc.
JOSEPH HUTCHINSON
Manchester,low*
Wffl. DONNELLY, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon,
Proprietor or toe
Ryan Drug Store.
Dealer In
Drugfl, Stationery, Etc.
RYAN IOWA
Compound VaDor and Sham
ooo Baths.
BATHS
-Most all dls-
e&BCB
are caused
by poisonous sec
retlons, which
clog the wheels
of NATURE.
Vapor
and
The name and
tho symptoms
may be different
Shampoo.
but 1116
cause
I You Will Need
a
5:41am
For information and tickets apply to
J. L. O'HAitROW Agent Thorpe.
B, C. R. & N. R'y,
CEDAR KAPIDS TIME CARD.
MAIN L1KK GOING KAST AND SOITTII.
Arrive Loavo
8:80
No. 2 Chicago PaBsenger.... 8:40 pm
9:80 a No. 4Clil.Tfcburlt'n Pass 9:851»
PS0,0ChicagoastLoiUsEx. 8:80 am
12.2W ngt No. 8 Chicago Fast Express. 12:27 ngt
No. 18 Burl. & Davnp't. Pass 4:
OOp
filoencr, free chair car and
coachos to Chicago. No. 6-Pullman sleepers
and through coaches to Chicago and St. Louis.
No. 8—Pullman sleeper and free chair car lo
Chicago arrives Chfcago 7:59 a. in. Dining ear
will sorve breakfast from Jollet to Chicago.
Ngt.—night.
the suttfect."*0
MAIN LINE GOING NOLLTII.
Minneapolis Pass 8:05 a ni
I1
No*8
Kockford Passengor... 8:80
l2:'-8 ngt NO. 6 Minneapolis Express..12:80 ngt
8:45 a No. 18 Chicago Passenger.
11:45 No. 19 Chicago Passenger,
.£?• i—Free chair car and coaches to (Al
bert Lea. No. ^-Pullman sleepers and
coaches to Minneapolis and St. Paul,
DECOUAN DIVISION.
know
Uncle John thinks he'll he somebody some day.
I shall look for a letter from you In Denver,
dear, so don't fuiL Yours, always lovingly,
8*10 in.....DecorahPassenger. .... 8:aoatn
ara
MA DOB.
III.—Chester lyes to Frank Carpen
ter, mauaglng editor of The Daily
Scarifier, New York:
West Union Passenger 8:40T ID
4:06 m... ..Decorah Freight 6:20a nt
IOWA FALLS DIVISION.
8:00 m... -Iowa & Minnesota Pass 8:15 am
12:20 ngt ..Minnesota & Dakota Pass.. 12:80ngt
IOWA CITV, DAVRNPOUT.IIURL. AND CLINTON.
-Bun. & la City Pass 4:00
Itoft,
Dvpt Pass.»...7:15am
7.35a Burl. & la city Pass 8:40
"Trains numbers fi.fi. 8. 13, 10, and Minn &
Dakota Pass run dally, all other trains dally ex
cept Sunday."
JNO. G. FARMER, J. A. LOMAX.
Gen'l l'ass 6 Tkl AKt. Ticket Agwit
Cedar Rapids Iowa.
Henry Hutchinson
Breeder of Thoroughbred
Shorthorn Cattle.
a Pair of Shoes
To keep your feet dry
during during the wet
weather this spring. TVe
can suit you in quality
and price. Also rubbers
of all kinds.
111
No 24t R:10p
Noi2tll:00am
No fi'2*S:10 pin
F. M. FOLEY
RYAN, IOWA.
DELAWARE COUNTY
Abstract Co.,
Manchester, Iowa.
ABSTRACTS?'
REAL ESTATE.
LOANS AND
0:35
pro
DayKxprPBs (Tally except Sunday ..
1:68
pm
ot
disease can us
ually be traced
to the lmpunect notion ot tho millions
ol pores of tho human body. A bath in
accordance with scientific require
ments is the best preventative and
remedy known. Tho methods employ
ed by me are the most scientific ever
invented or discovered for dispeilin"
disease. Results tell the story. Give
me a trial. This is tho Oonant .system
of baths. A competent lady attendant
in charge of the fadies department.
Office and bath rooms on Franklin
street, opposite Globe Hotel
18LF
To Be Continued.
NEW SHORT LI NE
f]
S.
Q. D. QATCS.
BO YEARS
EXPERIENCE
TRADE MARKS.
DESIGNS
COPYRIGHTS AC.
Anyone nending sketch and description mas
quickly nscertaln our opinion free wnothcr an
invention probably patentable. Commuulwi.
tloiiBUtrictly conQUontial. Handbook on I'atontj
aont frco. Oldeut nsoncy for Bocuriiii patents.
1 utouts taken through Munn & Co. receive
tpceial notice,
without choreo, ia tho
Scientific JStn*ricatn?
A handeomoly illustrated weekly. Tersest clr.
culatlon of any sclontlUo lournoi. Terms. *3 a
roar four months, |L Sola by all nowedonlcrs.
MUNN & Co.3BiB'«^flew York
B'Hnrii OlTine. Rft St- WAfhlmr*nr» li.r.
The Old Reliable Blacksmith,
P. J.
Can be found at his ahop oa Franklin strooi
(luring business hours, with a competent
force of workmen to do all kinds of
SI
SMITHING
Horse Shoeing a Specialty.
Corns and Interfering Cured or no pay. Satis*
faction Oaranteed.
Respectfully,
P.J.Roche,
Something NEW IN
LEATHER
ll JEWEL
CASES,
a"
Pocket books, and Calling Card
Cases. Just what
Eyery
Lady
Needs
*3$
We have a fine line
Silk umbrellas
with FANCY HANDLES.
Call and see them.
CONVEYANCING.
Office In First Nationa
Bank Building.
Orders by mail will receive careful
attention.
We have complete copieB of all records
of Delaware county.
ENNIS BOGGS.
MANAGER.
The most complete stock of
Fly Nets
and Covers A
ever offered in Manchester.
Nets from 75c. to $3 00
Covers 50c. to 1.50
Sweat Pads... 37 Jc to .50
Prices lower than ever before.
Come in and I will save you
money.
S. A.
Steadman.
ABSTRACT OFFICE.
J, E. DAVIS, Manchester, ..
Ia., Main St., North ot
Court House.
MONEY.
Vo
?OD°Yn...5
I am making first-class farm loans
at 5 and 6 per cent., with privi
leges.
ABSTRACTS
furnished at a rate meeting
all competition.
J. E, DAV IS. Abstracter,
ALEX SEFSTKOM,
LACKSMIT
Makes* Specialty at
Horse
Shoeing
Interiering and Corns Cured or
no Pay.
Do All Kinds of
Work in Iron—
Machinery and all kinds of Farm Implement!
and Machinery repaired. The best of
rcork guaranteed.
PRICES REASONABLE,
A shoro of the Public Patronage Is solicited*
successor to Petor Mever*
The original paintings valued at
15,000.
Baker's
Monaca
Coffee
Pictures
Beautifully
prfic I "Proauoed
VV in ooloia I
Oni picture given away with every
two pound purchase of Coffee. They
are mounted on artlitlc mat! of dark
neutral tints (ixi J. Thli is the
season's opportunity to decorate
your home. Many people have
already collected the series 8.
Ask your Grocer
for them!
These pictures will positively not be
sold.
a**M*****'iiTrnTiiiiin»iM
For Sale By
J. HARRY STEWART.
HURRAH FOR
First-class Horse Shoers.
Also PLOW WORK and GFN..
ERAL REPAiRINR.
PRICES RIGHT!
CALL AND SEE US! At foot
of Franklin street.
R. w- JIRRILL
Is Loaning Honey as cheap
as any person or Corpora.
tion.
DOUGLASS, the Photo
grapher.
Goto Douglass
For FINE PICTURES

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