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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, November 28, 1900, Image 8

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DUNKLEY
FRUITS
OUNKLEY
FRUITS
A-
in the way
JUST RECEIVED!
A FINE LOT OF
NEW YORK APPLES
TI
AT
TrN. ARNOLD'S.
IT IS A FACT
That PITTSBURG BEST and CLEAR
QUILL flours aro the two Be9t
Brands of flour mado in the United
StateB in fact Pittsburg claima
that their flour Beats the World.
We are selling those two grades of
flour Cheaper to day than you are
paying for the Cheaper Grade.
Our flour trade has almost doubled
in the last six months, although we
have had to compete with cheaper
flour. These two brands of flour
are never mixed,
mmmm
YOURS FOR YOUR FLOUR TRADE,
Cal Atkinson
I IN GLASS JARS
PITTED CHERRIES, STRAWBERRIES,
RED RASPBERRIES, PEACHES.
B1~CANSB»
PEARS, PEACHES AND PLUMS, 8IAJ&
BERRIES: STRAWBERRIES, BLACKBERRIES,
RED AND BLACK RASPBERRIES.
We also carry DUNKLEY'S GENUINE CELERY
SALAD and DUNKLEY'S CELERYTONE
1•-
PREPARED MUSTARD.
J. HARRY STEWART,
KAHX FRANKLIN STREET.
PETERSON BROS
IF YOU ARE
LOOKING FOR THE BEST
of
wagons or any special job
carriage and wagon building.
TEN
to
by making
Hi
v.
Spiffs
mm
DUNKLEY
FRUITS
LOVE LIGHTENS LABOR.
and so dops good soap, washing
powders and
destroyers gene­
dirt
rally. We have the bestJlaundry
supplies that a produced. Ou
getty'S soap
is bevond compare
for making your cotton and linen
goods white and your flannels
sofc. We
have the best kitchen
helps in stove blackings, brass
and silver polish,thatare manufac
hired, andourprices are bed-rock.
Vehicles, Buggies, Spring Wagons and Lumber
this line.
in
WE HAVE WHAT YOU WANT!
Anything in our line that can or cannot be had anywhere else
we can manufacture on short notice.
WORK POSITIVELY GUARANTEED
It must also not be forgotten that we keep constantly on
hand everything
pertaining to a buggy or wagon and do all kinds
of repairing, having expert men in all the departments
yj? POSITIVELY
FIFTEEN DOLLARS CAN BE SAVED
your purchases of us.
WE DO AS WE ADVERTISE
Kennedy BuggyCo.
I
equired for
on every vehicle
OHNN1E is go ill to be awful
disappointed when he gets this
letter, telliu him I can't come
to his weddin. I don't know exactly
how to word it." and Mrs. Eaterbrook
left her pen reposing in the bottle of
purple ink while she stopped a mo
ment to reflect. Writing a. Utter was
an unusual task to her, and the
thoughts came haltingly. Then the
pen BIIOOU. in her feeble hand, and the
lines were uncertain.
But at last the letter was finished.
She sealed it on the very tip end of the
flap of the envelope, where there was a
little spray of red and blue bell shaped
flowers. Then she carefully put the
stamp in the left hand corner and laid
the letter on the window sill. Hnrdly
had slie done so when a neighbor drove
by on his way to the village, anM glia
gave it to liim to post.
"If there had only been some way
that I could manage to go to the wed
din," she said regretfully as she put
the paper and envelopes back into the
worsted worked cardboard portfolio.
"But there isn't, for it would take all
of $10. There is the fare to Providence
and back of $7, and I'd want $3 for
extras certain, no as not to go pinched.
If it hadn't heen for that late freeze,
the currants would have come on well,
and there would have been somethin
from them but as it is, there is noth
in now till I pick the greengage
plums. But it seems to me that I
can't bear the thought no way in the
world that Johnnie's to be married,
and I can't be there."
U/
ill
iff
Hi
0/
xfc
ib
\ii
W
DUNKLEY
FRUITS
She went out through the little lat
tice covered front doorway, where, a
few steps off, ou a flat limestone bowl
der, was an old blue and white platter
of the reddest and richest of preserves.
She lifted the mosquito netting and
save them a good stirring up.
"Somehow I alius think of Johnnie
more'n ever when I do up th« sour cher
ries," she observed. "How he used to
alius be on hand for a lick when I stir
red 'em up. I used to thick I had a
pretty scant measure sometimes when
bows.
Tfie Lafayette Pfatterl
By Rebecca Barrett.
Copyright, woo, by RebtnS"BariiU.
She went into an ndjoining room and
opened one of the glass knobbed draw
ers of a cherry bureau. Tbo quilt was
securely pinned In a pilloTvcase. She
took it out and spread it upon the bed
in the recess to give it a final examina
tion.
"There's not many an old lady of 80
could piece a better lookin log cabin
than that. I'm not ashamed to have
the sewln go anywhere," she said, with
pardonable pride. "I hope Johnnie's
wife'Ii be one that'll prize it. There's
some choice pieces here." she contin
ued, smoothing out the blocks with her
wrinkled and thickly veined hand
"There's a piece of Johnnie's own
grandmother's weddin dress, and she
looked like a picture in it. Folks all
around said that she and Orrln Hutch
inson were the handsomest couple ever
went into old Simsbury meetln house,
and I guess they were right about It
too. That there green In the corner
block is some of his Aunt Eunice's
dress. The very first time she wore it
ivas down to a ball at the Holler. My,
there was no wear out to that dress!
Then there are scraps of three or four
of my dresses In here. That one in the
middle Blssell alius called my gaudy
lleury, and I suspect It was awful gay
for me."
W
$
9)
.5
W
4
9)
She looked at the quilt long and af
fectionately before she did it up. Tears
^listened in the kindly, faded eyes, and
two ran down the soft, wrinkled cheeks
and dropped on the bundle.
Just now out in front of the house
was a platter of sour cherries preserv
ing in the sun nfter the old code of
"pound for pound."
"My, I must go and stir up them cher
ries or they'll all be gettln sugary!"
said Mrs. Esterbrook, suddenly recol
lecting herself and drying her tear
stained eyes on her folded handker
chief.
I come to put 'em in the Jars. He alius
-aid he knew the cherries would never
taste the same If they was made on
any other platter than this old blue and
white one with the landing of Glnernl
Lafayette on It. Queer notion of his.
I declare
it
"An apotheosis pitcher! What a And!
And to think they were keeping soft
soap In It! Even If the nose was bro
ken, the very idea of using a piece of
crockery that dates back to Washing
ton's time for such a purpose! Who
minds driving nine miles through the
country a hot July day, if one can run
across such a treasure and rescue It
from so cruel a fate?" And Mrs. Ridge
way stopped her horse underneath the
shade of a big becch tree that spread
Itself over the road and undid the
pitcher she had purchased, to admire
It anew.
She was a victim of the old china
craze, or to soften It a little, tbo manle
a poterie.
None but the china hunter could have
found any beauty In the noseless
apotheosis pitcher, over which Mrs.
Rldgeway was exulting, as a biblio
maniac might have done at the flndlng
of some rare first edition.
On the pitcher was a hideous repre
sentation of Washington clothed In a
shroud, while Time was lifting him
from a tomb and a cadaverous looking
angel pointed upward.
"Pugh! I can smell the soft soap
now," Mrs. Rldgeway exclaimed, as
she rewrapped her treasure. "It re
minds me of that lovely old delft bowl
I rescued from that family who were
using It to mix up the chicken feed in.
It tnakes me shudder to think of such
desecrations!" And Mrs. Ridgeway's
face wore an expression of righteous
indignation. "How I wish I could run
across some old historical piece for
Laura for a wedding present!" she
added, as she continued her drive.
"She would think more of It than the
handsomest bit of modern china I
could afford to buy her. It's queer we
began our collection at the same time,
and she's hardly got a historical piece,
excepting a Puritan plate and a tomb
of Fpiukliu teapot. But then sho has
plclJed up some beautiful pieces of
Lowestoft, aud the English luster she
has found goes way ahead of mine.
How lovely they'll all look in the cor
ner cupboard she Is to have built in her
pretty colonial dining worn! To think
thnt I've
got
to be
'She
Cued IntoTier suusraiidlngS
COMPLETED
and
'1 em
"Cm
I'd been goin to his weddin
I'd have taken a jar or two of these
for him. You needn't tell me he's lost
his sweet tooth If he Is a grown man
there's too much of the Hosmer blood
In him for that."
lu Chicago and can't
be at her wedding, and when it Is to be
In her own new house too."
.Mrs. Kidgowuy had not gone far
when sho spied the old big cliiranoy
it Mrs. Esterbrook's house and halted
In her drive.
Mrs. Ksleri'i'ooic lind Just come out to
take another look at her cherries. Sho
wore an old fashioned wrapper of a
big palm leaf pattern and a quaint
Muck lace cap, trimmed With purple
the picture. So Mrs.
Rldgevray thought she came up
looJtfnu about to
get
apiece of old
crockery to give to a friend."
path. She was about to make her usu
al inquiry regarding old dishes when
the caught sight of the platter on
which the cherries were preserving.
For all there was only the border of
laurel leave* and blossoms visible
Mrs. Ridgeway's practiced eye told her
that this was a Lafayette landing plat
ter. In imagination she could see the
whole picture—the two steamers and
numerous small boats in the water, the
row of six smoking cannon In the fore
ground and the marshals and sentinels
riding about, while underneath It all,
In dark blue letter*, were the words,
"Lauding of Lafayette at Castle Car
don, New York, Aug 24, 1824." All of
this was as plain to this student of
ceramics as If the platter lay at that
moment before her.
"My dear lady, would you be willing
to part with this old platter for a con
sideration?" Mrs. Hidgeway eagerly
inquired.
"Oh, dearie, DO," Mrs. Esterbrook an
swered, looking up. "Why, that old
blue platter belonged to my scttln out,
and it's every piece I've got left «f th*
set. I never broke 'em myself to apeak
of, but In my younger day* I was slek
a good deal, and hired help do mis*
the mischief with dishes."
"Yes, indeed they do!" and Mrs.
Rldgeway spoke feelingly, thinking of
how many more treasures she might
have gleaned If It had not been for
these same vandals—the hired help.
"I was looking about to get a piece
of old crockery to give to a friend for
a wedding present," said Mrs. Rldge
way, sitting down on the bowlder and
looking at the platter with longing
eyes. "Why, I can't see a nick In It,"
she continued as she examined It.
"Yes, there's one queer shaped one
right on the underside of the rim,"
Mrs. Esterbrosk arpiatmui
the platter.
"If you'd been willing to part with
the dish, I'd have paid you $10 for it,"
Mrs. Rldgeway added regretfully.
"Ten dollars!" and Mrs. Esterbrook
gave a little start. Queer that It should
have been Just the amount that she
had calculated only an hour or two be
fore that she needed to enable her to
go to Johnnie's wedding. Here was a
chance to surprise him. It was a
temptation. She laid down her Iron
spoon and, absently picking up a peony
leaf, frightened some bees that were
gathering about the sweetmeats.
Connected with the old blue platter
were a thousand pleasant memories of
family gatherings, of Thanksgiving
dinners, of wedding festivities. They
all came crowding Into her mind 'now
and seemed to forbid her parting with
this memorial of those times. But on
the other hand was Johnnie's wedding,
and she did so long to go! She pictur
ed his surprise at seeing her when she
had written that she could not come.
"Er—what did you say you wanted
the old platter for?" she asked falter
Ingly.
give to a friend who la getting a
collection of old piece* of crockery,"
spoke up Mrs. Bldgeway eagerly. "This
would be put in a pretty cupboard
with glass doors, where It would be
very ornamental, beside* being so well
cared for."
This put It In a new light to Mrs.
Esterbrook. All of her things were to
go to Johnnie after she was gone. But
it was no ways likely that Johnnle'a
wife would be one who would care at
all for such an old relic as this. Cer
tainly It would be better to take up
with this offer, when the money would
be so acceptable, and be assured that
the platter would be sent where it
would b* so prized. Yes, she would
let It go.
"The cherries are about sunned now,"
she observed as she started to take the
platter Into the house. "Ifs the last
I'll ever do up. But preserves kind
of go a-beggin nowadays, so few drop
in to help eat 'em," she added, as If to
pacify herself.
She felt guilty as she took the $10
bill. And as she put It away In the lit
tle shell snuffbox for safe keeping, it
seemed to her some way as if the mon
ey did not belong to her. Nor had the
feeling disappeared when the follow
ing week she set out for the wedding.
The liackman left her in front of one
of the pretty new colonial houses on
oiio of the fashionable streets of Prov
idence. She presented a very old fash
ioned appearance as she came up the
walk dressed In a very large flgured
black brocade, which was worn oyer
hoops. The dress had been made for
her niece's wedding 25 years befor*.
On her shoulders was a thin gause
shawl somewhat brown with age. She
carried in hor hand a long handled,
black traveling basket containing the
log cabin quilt, a jar of sun cherries,
her beBt cap and a few other articles.
She could hardly wait to Bee John
nie. She half cxpected him to be at
the door to meet her. Instead there
was only a servant, who directed her
to the room above, where she was to
take off her things. She asked her
where she should leave the present she
had brought, but the girl did not seem
to understand and told her she must
see the mistress.
She was Just In time for the ceremo
ny. Oh. how good It did seem to catch
a glimpse of Johnnie again after such
a long time! She stole In qnletly and
took a sent iii a secluded corner. Thus
she remained almost unnoticed, for
after the ceremony everybody natural
ly gathered about the bride and groom
for congratulations. She, too, would I
have gone up at once, only an awful
thought had come to her as she sat
there and made her delay her greet
ing. What If Johnnie should be asham
ed to claim lier as his aunt among all
these rich and fashionable people? it
was best to wait awhile and to sec him
aud his bride after the other guests
had dispersed somewhat Oh, why
had she come? Why had she been so
foolish as to part with the old blue
platter?
Then this was not all that made
tier
cup a bitter one. She could sec Into tha
room where the presents were. There
was such ail array of bright silver nnd
sparkling gluss. IIpw poor and out of
keeping her jrlft to the bride would
$£T'J
Seem among fUeml 'Ho she would ear*
ry the log cabin back home with her.
To think of all the pride she bad taken
In piecing it, and now It was all lost.
She could not bear It.
TTO
Just then a bright faced young girl
touched her on the arm and snUl,
"KaVe yon ht»d a chance to speak to
my sister yet?"
"i—I don't even- know who your sis
ter Is." Mrs. Esterbrook stammered.
"Why, she's the bride! Come, I'll
take you to her."
As they came near to the daisy
trimmed bower John Hosmer caught
eight of his aunt and sprang forward.
"Why, Aunt Rlzpah where did yon
come from? I'm delighted to see you!
But you wrote you could not be here."
He gave her such a greeting that the
brut cap was sadly, disarranged c-.»l
both the hair bracelets and th* bead
bag landed on the floor.
"And this is my l~nira." he contin
ued, introducing the pretty bride at his
side.
"I'm so glad to know Ar.nt Rlzpah,"
she raid, kissing her affectionately, and
holding the black mltted hand tender
ly, "for John has told me sn much
about you."
"If you had only let us know ynn
were coming," he continued, ".vou
would have been the guest of honor
and the first to congratulate lis In
stead of the hist."
This was balm to the old lady's trou
bled soul, and the wounds began ta
heal like magic. But she simply au
swered, "I—1 thought It would be nice
to surprise you."
"It seems Bo time since I used to
spend my summer* with you. Aunt
llizpah." her nephew continued. "This
Is about the time cf the year you put
up the *our cherries, isn't It? An.'l that
makes me think—come with me. 1
want to show you platter ljiura had
among her wedding presents that's
precisely like the one you used to sun
your cherries on."
Regardless of the fact that he was
breaking over a formality In leaving
Ills post, be took his aunt into the
dining rocra adjoining, where, in a cor
ner cupboard, was displayed with
numerous other old dlsh*e, a Lafayette
landing platter.
"Nothing ever tasted so good as those
preserves you used to put up. Aunt
Rlzpah. Will you make me some
some time?" John Hosmer inquired as
he opened the door of the cupboard.
"Hush, Johnnie, don't let any one
hear, but I've got yeu a jar up stairs
in my basket."
"Bles* your heart. Aunt Rlzpah. You
are th* only on* who has thought to
bring me a present, and 1 assure you I
appreciate it."
He took out the platter to show her.
"Why, why, Johnnie," she exclaim
ed excitedly, "just look at this ulck!'
"Nick! Why, that's nothing," said
bar B«pk«w, Itagfelag haartlly. "Laura
la getting a oslleotlon ef eld fashioned
crockery, and you ought to see some of
the things she plckf up. Why, nicks
and cracks add to the value of a dish."
"No, no: but this particular ulck!
Johnnie, that's my old blue platter,
and there's no mlstaklu It. Er—er—
Johnnie, I sold It so as to come here
today. The lady said she wanted It
for a weddin present, and this la where
she's sent It. It does seem as If the
hand of Provldenc* was In It all."
Here was tridy a most Interesting
coincidence. The atory was told to
Laura, and she knew at once, from the
description given of the one who bad
bought the platter, that it was indeed
her friend, Mrs. Rldgeway, her col
league In china hunting.
"Sec tag you are so foud of old fash
ioned dishes, Laury," Mrs. Esterbrook
now ventured to add, "maybe, after
all, you'd like the log cabin quilt I
brought along for you. I was goln to
take It back home with me, for 1
thought It would acem so Uttlo among
all these fine presents."
"So little! Why, you couldn't have
given me anything that 1 would have
liked better. My grandmother willed
me her old tester bedstead, aud I have
been trying to find something that
would be appropriate to put on It, and
now you have brought me just what I
want."
And so the quilt was sent for, and
Mrs. Esterbrook found herself the cen
ter of ad admiring group as she point
ed out the pieces with a history. Then
they all praised her sewing, and, oh,
what a proud moment It was for her,
and how she blessed the sale of the
old blue platter that bad brought her
so much pleasure!
"And now. Aunt Rlzpah," the bride
said as In her traveling dress she was
bidding gciodby to her guests, "you
inust promise to come and spend the
winter with us."
"Yes, aud if you will, Aunt Rizpath,1
the nephew added, "we'll come to visit
you uext summer. We'll come In sour
cherry time, and If I'll bring along the
old blue plntter, will you make us some
sun cherries?"
And Mrs. Esterbrook promised, while
some kernels from the shower of rice
landed In the best lace cap and fell In
the ample folds of the black brocade
dress.
SOME STRONG PINTS.
SOTH SIDES WERE ELOQUENT ON
THE NEW SCHOOL QUESTION.
Pa* PtrklMs, the Po*tninster, Telle
How the Came of Higher Rdnca
tlon Was Knocked Ont In the De
bate at the Jerleha Poxtofllce.
[Coniyight, moo, by c. B. L»WIS.I
Llsh Billings, Abner Jones and
Mose* Plumber hev bin keldin Jericho
back far the last two years from hevln
a new schoolhouse. The matter has
come up almost every eveuln at the
postoffiee and bin hotly argued, but
they couldn't be budged. The other
night a mighty smart lookin stranger
was stoppin in town, and It was ar
ranged that he drop In on the crowd
and take the schoolhouse side and put
the three obstructors on their backs.
The stranger was on hand at the hour
named, and when the proper mlult ar
rived Squar Joslyn speaks up and
says
"Stranger, if you was a resident of
this town, would you be fur school
houses or ag'ln 'cm?"
"I'd bo fur 'em, of course," replies
the man. "I'd vote fur the cause of
education if I had to live on one meal
a day. It Is education that makes a
nation. The less education tho more
vice and wlckcdncss."
"That's Jest the way I look at it,"
says the squar. "I say education be
fore everything else, but we've got
men In this town who differ with me.
You wouldn't think that leadin men of
a town would be ag'ln schoolhouses,
would you?"
"They must be queer sort of men.
Don't they want their chlldreu t» know
who discovered America?"
"Thafs a mighty strong pint, mighty
•trong!" says Deacon Spooner, as he
tunic* his cane on the floor aud looks at
Abner Jones.
"I reckon you're hlttlu at me," re
plies Abner after whittlin away for a
moment, "aud I've got a few words
to any, I'd like to oak this stranger
.here "if ~kt' knowd who disc&ver»4
•xuvrioa."
"Why, certainly, •lr," said the man.
"Han it ever done you any good? Hat
it ever rnude auy difference to y*ou
\Tliether it was Smith, Gre«DT or
Ero'un
"But it is knowledge."
"Yes, it's knowledge, and thatis a
strong piht," whispers the deacon.
"Yes, it's echoolhouac knowledge,M
*aya Abner, "but let me ask you sun
this. What mooch io the year 6'yes
plfcBt pumpkin seeds?"
"Pumpkin seeds! Why, what hats
pumpkin seeds got to do with edue»
tiOB?"
"Quit* a littlo btt, I reckon. This
county ships 'nnff pumpkins every
year to make 3,000,000 10 cent pics. I
don't believe ten farmers kin tell yon
when America, was discovered, but
they know when to plaut pumpkins.
Which Is the beet fnr 'em? I reckon
you kin tell what year George Wash
ington died in, which 1 can't, but d'you
know wliar to fasten a rope when you
want to drive a hog to market?'
"By jingo, but that's a strong pint,
and Ahner'ft got him!" shouts the dea
con as he Jumps up and down.
The stranger appeared to be sort of
confused and taken down, but tried to
lit cut of it by sayin they wero
triflin with the imbject.
"I'm one as isn't oppose*] to schools
and education," save Moses Plumber,
"but 1 don't want too many of 'em*
I'm sayin that everybody orter know
how to read, write and cipher, but
nowadays they want to stuir children
with a heap that's no good to any
body."
"But what man kin know too much?"
asks the stranger. "But fur higher
knowledge how would we know that
the earth revolved on Its axis?'
"But s'pose we didn't know? B'pose
we flggered that the earth stood still?
•Wouldn't we have licked the British
•t Yorktown jest the same, and
wouldn't the price of wheat be the
same as today? I was talkin with
young Jim Benson father day. Be
eould tell the distance to the sun with
in a mile, but he couldn't tell how
many rallB to a rod of fence. Be could
give the names of all the stars, but he
didn't know that cuttiu a hog's tall off
would make him root the harder, prob
ably hopin to find a new oue. He could
tell when every state come into the
Union, but he didn't know that a cow
kicked sideways Instead ef straight
behind."
"By Jingo, JIoseB, but that's oratory
and a strong pint besides!" exclaims
the deacon. "In the face of them facts
I can't see how wu ars to git another
schoolhouse."
"You have been 111 at some time or
other in your life?" queries the stran
ger of Moses.
"I hev. Three years ago I was down
with fevar and everybody thought. I'd
die."
"But you were saved, and how? If
the doctor who was called In had sim
ply known about fence rails, hogs'
tails and the way cows kick, where
would you be today? He had gone
beyond readln, wrltln and Sgurln.
It was his higher education that saved
your life."
"That's a strong pint ag'ln yon,
Moses," says the deacon.
"Yes, but I didn't call a doctor," grins
Moses. "My old woman pulled me
through with herb teas and good nurs
ln, aud you all know she can't figger
the value of two dozen eggs."
"Then the pint is on the stranger,
and I'd like to see him dodge It"
"The stranger was stubbln his toe
ag'ln stones In the road and didn't look
happy, but be baaced up and said in
answer:'
"Let us take a case right here at
home. Here is a store. It had to be
designed by an architect before the
carpenter could build it. Mr. Plumber
kin read, write and figger, but kin he
draw the plans fur a bulldln? But
fur higher education no man could do
it."
"Yes waa a smart bit of work,"
acknowledged Moses, "but I had con
siderable to say to that architect. He
had never heard that thunder would
turn sweet milk sour he didn't know
cows bad only teeth on one Jaw he
didn't know how to stop a heu from
settln, a beg from rootln or a dog from
klllln sheep. He even poked his Anger
into a wasps' nost to see if the critters
was at home. I'm uot ag'ln schools,
but If they Is to tall eur chlldreu that
the earth revolvea en Its axis why
don't they also tell 'em that scratchin
a hog's back with a oorncob will help
to fatten hbn
"Thafs a: Pint, Moses—ifs a pint!"
shouts the' jfMcon as he raps
on
Railroad Time Table
ILLINO'S Of
a
bar'l. "Abner and Mcses hev uitlde
their pints, aud now we'd like to hear
from Llsh Billing*."
"I've got mighty little to say," re
plies Llsh as he sits with his back
humped up like a camel.
"But It can't be that an Intelligent
man like you Is opposed to education?"
protests the stranger.
"That's accordln to what sort of edu
cation It Is."
"I refer to general education. You
look like a man of peace, but perhaps
you have had trouble with a neighbor
some time?"
"Yes, I had trouble with Sam Wheth
er once."
"And you went to law?"
"Yes."
"To go to law you had a lawyer. If
that man had only kuowu enough to
read, write and figure, he wouldn't
have bin a lawyer. He had to hev a
higher education to be a lawyer. Don't
you see?"
"I skassly do," says Lish.
"But yea had a lawysr, and so did
Mr. Wheeler. There was a suit, and
you got Jestlcc."
"Thafs a pint fur the stranger,
Llsh!" shouts the deacon.
"Yes, mebbe 'tis, but lcmme tell him
how it turned out. Sam shet up one of
my hogs with his, and I proved it,
but my lawyer lost the case and charg
ed me $10 to boot. The hog wasn't
wuth over $8, but Sam had to pay his
lawyer (12, and he went home from
the lawsuit to find tho critter dead.
Thafs gineral education. Sam and me
lost and a .hog botweeu us and
was mad at each other fur ten years,
and I'm sayin I've had 'nuff of It and
am ag'ln more schoolhouses till death!"
The deacon Jumped off tho floor and
said it was a pint and a strong one,
and the stranger got down off the coun
ter and said he wasn't feelin extra well
and guessed he'd git to bed early.
M. QUAD.
Knew- tlie House.
Citiseu—Off'sher, can you (hlc) tell
me where I (hlc) live? I'm (hlc) Sen
ator Bigboddy, you know.
Officer—Whr.t's yer cook's name?
Citizen—Mary Ann (hlc) O'Brady.
Officer—Four blocks down aud two
doors to yer right.—Judge.
Metals get tlreil as well as living be
ings. Telegraph wires ure bettor con
ductors on Monday than on Saturday
on
account of their Sunday rest, Hnd a
rest of three weeks adds 10 per cent to
tho conductivity of a wire.
Want of care doe9 us more damage
than 'vrant of -knowledge.
F-TRAL.
Illinois Central me ,ble No I
(eft June 10, loot).
Main
Line
Fnasenger
Trains.
WEST BOITXD
No 1*11:3'.
No 3* U:23 in
No 21 tfi:00
No 23t9:i!0H in
No Hit 1:45 pin
MAIN l.IXE
..Fust. Train..
Thro Kxpress..
....('llp]»nr..
Local Express
-Wwy Freight
.Tiltu Freight
CEDAR RAPIDS BRANCH.
Nortli ttoiuid I Det Cedar Rpds I rtoutli ilootul
Arrive——
1
an Manchester /.»»?»iv»——
Ho.824 5:5op.m
No
No. yg1:4ft|i.m
...-Pussenuer.. No 8v3 ti:3n u.rii
.. tl'assenger.. No 3216 :m pin
... tFrrlgnt.... No.a.-.i r.iiiQ p.
^AH above tralus carry pasaengers.
tDally Exoept Sunday.
H. G. PIEROB. Station Art
CHICAGOGREATWESTERN RY0
"The Maple Leaf Route."
Timo card, Thorpe. Iowa.
Chicago Special. Dally, Going East 7:40 a
nay fcxpress dal 3 except Sunday 3:(»l
Way relRhtr uaily 11:35 ai
West. Nor» hand South.
WayFrelgh- da'ly 0:8ftpro
exoopt Sunday .. l:Mpm
St:Paul Kansas City Exp, dally ... 5:liaa
For Information and tickets apuiv to
J. L. O'HAllRoW Agent Thorpo.
B. C, R. & N. R'y.
CEDAR RAPIDS TIME CAKD.
MAlir LlOTt GOING EAST AND SOUTH,
Arrive .Leave
8:ao No, 2 Chicago Passenger.... 8:40
9:30 a No. 4 Chi. a Burlt'n Pass .9:85
8:10 a No CCbloaco&st.LoulsEx. 8:80am
12:20 n«t No. 8 Chicago Kasl Exprrox. 12:27 net
No. 18 Burl. & Davnp't. Pass 4: oop
No 2—Pullrrian sleeper, free chair car and
coachrp to ChlcHco. No 6— Pullman sleepers
andthr ttpli coaches to Chicago nnd Kt. Louis.
No. 8— unman sleeper and free chair car to
Chicago arrlvs Chicago 7:.r.o h. Dinlngcar
win serve breakfast from Jollel to Chicago.
Ngt.—night.
MAW LIXF r.mxr, NORTH.
7:89 a No. 1 Mtnn»polls Pass 8:0ft am
No.3Rock!nrd Passenger... 8:8npm
12:''3 ngt NO. 6 Minneapolis Express..12:80 Dgi
6:45 a No. 18 hlcaco Passenger.
11:46 No. 19 Chicago Passenger.
No. l-Free chair car and coaches to'Al
bert Lea. No. e—Pullman sleepers and
coaches to Minneapolis and St. Paul.
DBCORAH DIVISION.
8:1°
m... Docorah Passeneer
am .TVestUnion Pasaenger 8:40pm
*.£t DecoraU Freight 6:a)am
IOWA PALLS DTVIBION.
8:00 m....Iowa & Minnesota Pass 8:15 a
12:20 ngt ..Minnesota & Dakota Pass.. 12:30ngt
IOWA CITY, DAVENPOBT,BURL. AND CLINTON.
19:10 pm. ..Burl, a la City Pass 4:00 pm
7:B0 m... Clin., Ia City, Dvpt Pass 7:15 a ni
7:85a Hurl. & Ia City Pass 8:40
"Trains numbera 6.6,8. is, io, and Minn &
Dakota Pass run dally, all other trains dally ex
cept Sunday."
JNO. G. FARMER, J. A. LOMAX.
Gen'l Pass & Tkt ARt. Ticket Agent.
Cedar Kaplds Iowa.
Henr^ Hutchinson
Breeder of Thoroughbred
Shorthorn Cattle
JOSEPH HUTCHINSOLV
Manchester
TOWS
M. DONNELLY, M.
Physician and Surgeon,
Proprietor ot toe
Ryan Drug Store.
Dealer to
Drags, Stationery, Etc.
RYAN TOW
Compound
VaDorand Sham
ooo Baths,
BATHS
l6tf
Most nil dis­
eases are eauscd
by poisonous sec
rations, whict
clog the wheels
of NATURE.
Vapor
and
Shampoo.
to the imperiect aotion ot the millions
of pores of the human body. A bath in
accordance with scientific require
mentB is the best preventative and
remedy known. Tho methods employ
ed by me are the most scientific ever
invented or discovered for dispelling
disease. Results tell the story. Give
me a trial* This is the Conant system
of baths. A competent lady attendant
in charge of the
ladieB
department.
Office and bath rooms on Franklin
street, opposite Globe Hotel
G. D. QATZ3.
OO YEARS'
EXPERI3NCE
TRADE MAFIKS
DESIGNS
COPVNIQHTS &0.
•Anyono Henfling a pftctch nnil deocrlpllon mm
quickly uscortntu ot«r opinion free whether an
irtvQjilIrm la prnbnbly patcntAblc. Community
I IOJIBstrictlyconfidential.
Ilujidhoofcon
1'atenta
acnt free. OMest ncency for Rontirlnp patents.
Pntonts takon through Munu A Co. receive
special notice, without chnrge, iu tiio
A handsomely Ulcstratod woeklr. I-nrcost clr.
dilution of nny sclentiBo Journal. Torins, f3 a
ypjir four months,
FLSUNN CD,36,B™BoldRA»-FLAWYor?newsdealers.ailby"AI
The Old Reliable Blacksmith,
P. J.
C*B
be found at his ahop on Franklin strep
during business hours, wtth
A
force of workmen to do all kinds of
BL IIPK 3B RMITHIHF
Horse
Shoeing
a
Corns and Interfering Cured or no pay. Satis
faction G'-aranteed,
Respectfully,
P.J.Roch
Something
We have a fine line of
You Will Need
a Pair of Shoes
To keep your
EAPT imUSD
Ntti'» 4:0S am
No4* pin
No 1W19: 25 ft 1»
No 241 8:10pm
No S"2tn in
DRY
ftet
in in
'So »n
Nos 21 andzi tun between Dubmiuo ami Fori
DOCIRH.
Nos 28 and 24 run between Dubuque and Lyle.
Weather this sprint*.
WE
can su't you in quality
and price. Also
rubbers
of all kinds.
F. M. FOLEY
RYAN, IOWA.
DELAWARE COUNTY
Manchester, Iowa.
ABSTRACTS?'
REAL ESTATE.
LOANS AND
CONVEYANCING.
Office In First Naliona
Bank Building.
Orders by mail will receive careful
attention.
We have complete copies of all records
of Uelatvare county.
ENNIS BOGGS,
Manager,
S.A.STEADMAN,
MANUFACTURER OF—
HARNESS
The Northern Ohio Blanket Mills.
Deft Hno All Wool rinlilH. Wo ml
particular attention of our cuatomers to
llietioi38t jirad** In quality patterns
ever offered.
RO
8:80 a
otlior
IIIHnd
equal them
in fineness of qaullty, bright aid tmty
culorinps, or rare designs—absolutely
new designs.
THE FIRST PLUSH ROBE
made In America was Uie "Chase," over
thirty yeais »co. it was the plomor,
Ae they were lue first then,
FO
are they
first today, in qu»llt« style, elegance of
deslguand permanence of coloring. They
do not shed. 'J hero are imitations, but
as plush robes aro serviceable for a score
of yeurs. It is economy to buy tho best
THK CHASE.
In point of style and price,never be/ore
could you get such good qualities at jocfc
bottom prices. Stock complete In every
department.
S. A. STEADMAN.
ABSTGiCT OFFK
I
J. E. DAVIS,
Manchester,
la., Main
St., North of
Court House.
TO LOAN R0
•TODAY
MONEY
I
5
0 S
am making first-class farm
at
and 6 per cent.,
leges.
W»th
privi­loans
ABSTRACTS
furnished at a rate meeting
all competition.
J. E, DAVIS, Abstracter.
B.
The name and
the symptoms
may be different
but the cause of
disease can us
ually be traced
ALEX SEFSTROM,
LACKSMJT
Makes a Specialty of
.Horse
Shoeing*
Interiering and Corns Cured or
no Pay.
Do All Kinds
of
Work in Iron—
Machinery and all kinds of Farm Impletoontt
and Macblnory repaired The beat of
work guaranteed
PRICES REASONABLE.
A
share of the Publlo Patronage la solicited.
JUti. Bcffetrom,
Compar* tfat lowest priced
•variety with some of the kind
?ou
cotnn'itsnt
Specialty,
a
NEW IN
LEATHER
JEWEL
CASES,
may be using and judgel
he
highest
priced grades ars
incomparable.
For
iile liy
J. HARRY STEWART.
Also
Pocket book and Calling Card
Cages. Justwhat
Every Lady
Needs
Silk umbrellas
with
FANCY HANDLFS.
Call and see them.
uceib
irwtr
HURRAH FOR
in sum.
First-class
Horse Shoers.
PLOW WORK
and
GFN-
ERAL REPAIRING.
PRICES RIGHT!
CALL AND SEE US! At foot
of Franklin street.
W. TIRRILL
Is Loaning Honey as heap
as any person or Corpora
tion.
DOUGLASS, the Photo
rapher.
Go to Douglass
For PINE PICTURES N-mi

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