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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, December 05, 1900, Image 1

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the CUcmocrat.
PU9LI8HID BVE»Y MEDNC3DAY
anONsoN. S« M. CAR*
BRONSON & CARR.
Editors and Proprietors'
SUBSCRIPTION
IPTION
early, in advance.
If not paid in advance....
ttfta A.
XJ-
I
a. w. DTOHJUL «. B.
..•01 bO
_______
8 00
NOTICE.—On tbe slip of paper upon which
the name la printed, appears the date to which
the paper ts paid for, and a renewal is always
tMpeotfulljr solicited.
^Ths writer's name roust accompany any arti
cle for publication, as an evldeno of good faith
the editor*
STOUT,
k,
Our Business Directory.
ATTORNEYS.
scam
v. a. HOBBIS
DUNHAM. NORRiS STILBS
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AND NOTARIES
£V publlo. SpeolaUpUenilon given to Collec
tion* Insunnoe, Real-Estate and lioan Agta.
Dfflee In City Uau Block. Manchester. la
0. YOBAS. B. F, ABJIOLO. jt. J. YORiK
YORAN. ARNOLD YORAN
'ATTORNEYS AT LAW, and Real Estate
A Acente. OBoe over Delaware Count State
Bank, Manchester, Iowa.
O. E. BaOMlOH. JC. M. OABB.
BRONSON CARR.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. Special attention
given to oollectlom. Office In Democrat
Building, Franklin Street, Manchester, Iowa.
PRBD BLAIR.
A TTORNRY AT LAW. Office In the CltT Hall
A Block. Manchester, Iowa,
PHYSIOIANS.
J. WARD.
Surgeon, will attend to oallt'
1 hours o( tbe day or nig tats
PHYSICIAN
promptly at all
baaoBklowa.
J. J. LINDSAY. M. Dm
PHYSICIAN,
surgeon and Eye Specialist.
Office bours for eye v&seg ana fitting glasses
t:00 to 8:00 p. m. Offloe corner Mala ana Frank
lin streets.
H. H. LAWHBNCfi.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. Special at
•t tentlon given diseases of children. Have
also made a speolal study of Gyneooology,
Obstetrics, and Reotal Diseases All chronic
•diseases successfully treated with the aid of
various Thermal ana Massage treatment. All
staronlos solicited. Consultation free, Offloe
over Work's market. All calls promptly at
tended. Residence on Main'Street. the old Or.
Kelsey property.
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN.
Jifdrugs.MCQKK.
H. D. O. OSTEOPATHY is a
system of treatlnR diseases without the use
of For luformallon call or write. UAY
FBVBBIS successfully treated. Office over
Gregg ft Ward's Drqg store.
OKNTIFTT*.
O. A. DUNHAM D. D. S.
nKNTISira. Offloe over Garhart & Adams'
hardware store, Franklin St. Manohester.
Iowa.
O. W. DORMAN.
r\ENTlST. Offloe on Franklin Street, north
»J of the Globe Hotel, Manohester, Iowa.
Dental Surgery In all its branches. Makes
.requent visits to neighboring towns. Always
at offloe on Saturdays.
C.L. LEICH. D. D. S.
Maoetaeiter Iowa. Telephone 165.
•. •. NEWOOMB,
f\ENTI8T. Office over Clark & Lawrence's
JJ
store on Franklin street. Crown
bridge work a specialty. Will meet patients at
Farley Wednesday of each week. Bttf
VETERINARIAN.
DR. J. W. SCOTT.
XTBTSRINABY Surgeon, and Dentist." Office
V. in H. O. Smith's Drug Store, Main St. At
light oan be found at rooms over Ralph Con
ner's Store.
MAFTUPAOTURINQ.
ANCHSSTBR MARBLB WORKS
TB prepared to furnish Granite and Marble
Monuments and Head Stones of various de
signs. Have the oounty r*^"
Gsave Cover also da
ill Meet all oompetitlon.
I
,.it for Sipe's Pat
er in Iron Fences.
SUM.
WM. MoINTOSH.
THOMAS GIVEN,
Contractorguaranteed.
and builder. Jobs taken In town1
or country. Estimates furnished. First
class work Prloes reasonable.
Shop on Howard street near Franklin,- Man
chester, Iowa. 95tf
If. N. BOIVKMV. J. F. MoKwaw.
BOYNTON MCBWBN.
CX7ATOHMAKERS, Jewelers and Engravers
vV dealers in Watohes, Clocks, Silver and
plated Ware, Fine Jewelry, Speotaoles,Cutlery,
Musloal Instruments, eto., Main street.
A.D. BROWN.
.ealer In furniture eto.. and undertaker,
Main Street.
P. »VB£KMBISTBR,
/GENERAL DEALER IN FURNITURE,
VJ Coffins. Ploture Frames, Etc. A oomplete
stook of Furniture and Upholstery always on
at prloes that defy competiuon.
Si:
1
kept for attendance at funerals Ai
ALLEN STOREY.
CLOTHING and Gents furnishing goods. Cor
nsr Main and Franklin streets.
L. R. STOUT.
/"iLOTHING and Gents furnishing goods,
city Hall Blook, Franklin Street.
KIDDBLL
CO.,
T|BY GOODS, Carpets, ,_w
\J Caps, Boots and Shoes, eto., Main
Millinery, Hate and
Manohester, Iowa.
RAOKBT STORE
GOODSi Clothlng, Hats, Caps.
T\RY GOODS Clothing, Hats, Caps. Boot*
Shoes, notions, eto. West side Franklin
street south of Main.
A. THO^PB,
Pder
ROPRIETOR OF KALAMITY'S PLUN
Store and Dealer In ClothlUK, Boots.
Shoes, Notions, etc. Masonic Biovk Manches
ter, Iowa.
GRASSPIELD BRQ9
(8 jooeisors to Reth Brown.)
BOOTS
AND HHOES of all grades and prices.
Custom Work and fcepalrf—
«^kiSolWlSU:T,,n
ENTERED AT THB PoaromcB AT I
HAKOHSSTEB. IOWA, AS SICOITD-CLASS XARM,
ULSTERS
MEN'S BLACK CHINCHILLA ULSTERS,
heavy, all wool, with best body and
sleeve linings, finely made, verv stylish
and serviceable, with extra high collar.
MEN'S FINE BLUE KERSEY ULSTERS.
cus'om made, silk sewed, with all silk
linings and trimmings, satin sleeve lin
ings, high collar and extra long,
MEN'S BLACK GENUINE IRISH FREEZE ULSTERS.
with worsted or silk linings, satin sleeve
linings, finely made, extra long and
cold weather collar.
MEN'S GRAY OR BLACK CHINCHILLA ULSTERS
made of extra heavy material, with good
linings and trimmings and good length.
The best coat for continuous wear.
MEN'S GRAY OR BLACK ULSTERS,
made of good material throughout and
guarante-. to be serviceable in every way.
-This coat is one of our special bargains.
$18.00
$15.00
$12.00
$8.5oi
$6.5o
CLOTHIER.
IS TODS PROPERTY against
erclonea
and tornadoes In tbe old reliable Phoenix
Iniuranoe Co.. BRONSON ft GARB, Agents.
HOLL1STER LUMBER CO.
UMBRR and all kinds
of building materials,
Posts and Coal. Corner of Delaware an
Yfadtson
MANCHESTER LUMBBR CO.
UMBER Md Builders Materials, Posts and
OmI West RID* near depot.
GEO. S LISTER.
tTARDWARB, STOVES, TINWARE, ETC.
L* Keeps a nrst-olass tinner and does all
nnds of repairing with neatness and dispatch.
Store opposite Hrst National Bank, MalnSt.
THOS. CARKBBK.
A RCHITECT AND BUILDING SUPERIN*
A TENDENT, S. E. Cor. 8th and Main St,
Dubuaue, Iowa
SCHARLBS, THE TAILOR.
KRCHANT TAILOR and Gents FuralrV
_lng Goods. Bradley ft Sherman bldg., ion*
tester,Iowa.
HARRYSTEWABT.
•Wlftta Groceries, Provisions, Fruits,
etc.
Franklin stiyet, Mayhester. fowa.
CAL. ATKINSON,
'TKEALBR in Groceries, Provisions, Fruits, HC.
XJ Masonic Block, Manchester, Iowa.
WM, DBNNI8.
pARPENTER, CONTRACTOR ft BUILDER,
,V I am now prepared to do all work in my
line In a good and workmanlike manner. Satis*
taction guaranteed. Plans and estimates fur
nished. Work taken in town or eountry. Shop
near tbe stand tower on West Side of river.
C. E. GATES.
Am prepared to do all
Moving household goods
niTY DRAYMAN.
"kin my Hue.
and pianos a specialty. All work will reoelve
prompt attention. A share of your patronage is
solicited. Charges right. Give your draylng
to a man who has come to stay.
B. CLARK.
r^RY GOODS. Notions, Carpets, Gents for
nlshlng goods, eto. Franklin street.
QUAKER MILL CO.
COLOUR and Feed, Manufacturers of the oele
bra ted White Satin and White Pearl Flour.
GREGG A WARD.
Tirugglstfl and dealers in Paints, Oils, Wall
PVankH^rfftreet°ner^ *0' ^l00^'
W. A. ABBOTT.
T\RUGS, Wall paper, Stationery, Paints. Oils
eto. City ball blook.
ANDBRS PHILIRP
Dealers
Office over Ander & Phlllpp's Drug
Store Ooraer Main and Franklin streets,
17tt
la Drugs, Wall Paper, Stationery,
Paints, Oils, etc. Corner of Main and
Franklin streets.
PETER BOAROWAY.
Dealer
in flour, feed, hay, straw, Maquoketa
lime, stucoo and oommon and AUascemenL
Telephone us. Lower Franklin Street.
NOBLE ARNOLD.
(tlROOERIES, Provisions, Fruits, eto. First
door north of Delaware Oounty Bank.
PBTBRSOFL. BHOS.
Dealers in Groceries, Provisions, Crockery.
Fruits, etc. Main Street.
T. P. MOONBY.
(Successor to Lee Bowman.)
T3LACK8M1TH and Wagonmaker, Delhi,
Iowa. Work done promptly and la a work*
manlike manner. Charges reasonable. Your
patronage solicited. I5tf
C.E. PRATT.,
estimates oaall work in my line,
at H. C. Smith's drug store
ltry, will gli
i. Leave oraei
U, M. PEARSB.
TUSTIUE OF THE PEAt'E AND COLLECT
O OR. All business entrusted to him given
prompt attention. Office in city Hall block,
second floor.
Mason Work.
I am prepared to furnish estimates and guar
antee satisfaction on all kinds of Mason work.
C.P. MlIXBB,
17tt Manohester, Iowa.
P. F. WILLIAMS, D, E. KEHQB.
WILLIAMS & KEH0E,
AUCTIONEERS,
Hopklntoc, Iowa.
Will cry sales la Dataware and adjoining
counties at reaaonable'ratei. For terms
and dates lnrjulrtj.pertoo^Iy or by letter
of members
of
firm.
4Cbtm
F. P. PETER80N
Manafaotnrerof
WAGONS
And Repairer g:
ot all kinds t»r ve&lclee, and general repalrei
of all Kinds of Wood Work
For Farming Implements and Mscbhisvy
Shop on Franklin Street, Mar the bridge, wltb
Alex Setstroiix, in building' lately ooouplod bj
Peter Meyer. Have bad amr.a years nxper
—'-Bony Ok
Ah Sin', propensity for walking in
w*j8 that are dark has been demon
Btrated in New York's Chinatown
where nine Mongolian merchants and
restaurant-keepers have been arrested
for stealing several thousand dollars'
worth of electric light from the Ed loon
company. The theft was accomplished
through the use of an ingenious device
arranged by an expert electrician, who
farmed It out to the Chinese at $10 per
month.
Hawaii's plaint anent the local trust
has familiar Bound, The mBBter
plumbers and the dealers In plumbers
supplies have combined for the purpose
of regulating prices and sending the
frost
into tbe bones of outsiders. Tbe livery
men have formed an "agreement,"
though they have not advanced prices.
Merchants have combined against
traveling salesmen and several other
little trusts are In process of formation.
The territorial district attorney has
written to the department of justice
at Wasbingon asking what he shall do
about lt-and there's wbere tbe joke
comeB in.—Minneapolis Tribune.
Mr. Charles It. Flint, officer In fifty
different corporations—most of them in
the nature of truBta—declares that the
country Indorsed the trust system at
the last election. There 1B some war
rant for the assertion. It by no means
follows, however, that the trusts have
come to stay, as Mr. Flint declares.
The power that makes can unmake
and e\en if tbe trusts do not fall to
pieces through their own rottenness—a
contingency by no means unlikely—the
power to abolish them always resides
in the people. That is to say, the truBts
do not own the country. They exist
upon sufferance. They can be wiped
out whenever tbe people make up their
minds to It.—Chicago Chronicle. 7:
Ths employees of the Piano Harvestt
Manufacturing Co., at West l'nllman,
Chicago, were told to vote for a "full
dinner pail," which they did almost to a
man, as tbe vote of the ward shows a
n»irly unaminonB vote fur McEinley.
Immediately after election a general
cut was made in wageB all along tbe
line, and wages were placed so low that
it was a question with the men whether
they would work and starve or starve
without working, and they chose the
Ixtter, and have refused to work for the
pittance offered. The result Is that the
I'lxno Manufacturing company has
Bhut down indefinitely. The men who
are thus out of work as winter is just
coming on, are trying to determine in
their own minds the difference between
vlcKinley prosperity and Bryan hard
times—Clinton Advertiser.
Bryan is of the (common peopie^yet
ha ia a very unoommon .man. He is
th* embodiment and personification of
all that is noblest aud best. His sym
pathy for his fellows Is commensurate
with his rare natural gifts. The
seemiog defeat of the cause he repre
sents in the late election does not, sub
due him. Ue is satisfied with the part
he performed He could do less than
be did. He believes in bis cause and
does not regard the postponement of
success aB a personal defeat. His am
bition is inseparable from his cause and
hi" patience aud endurance wait upon
his convictions His love of worldly
go«dB is subordinate In bis love of his
fellows. Smiles of joy upon the bu
•qgn faoe gladden bis beart beyond the
contemplation of the possession of
stately pUea'or broad acres. He vi' WB
seriously the responsibilities of citizen
ship and recognizing tbe present as tbe
connecting link between tbe past and
the future he holds the living as trus
tees obligated to deliver unimpaired to
thn generations tbat are to follow us
thn fruits of the struggle and the sacri
fices of tbe martyrs ana patriots of tbe
pist which descended to us as an lu
-ritance. To paternal instinct inten
8ili-8 his patriotism and commands him
labor in order that those in whose
Ui8 his own blood courses, may to the
id of their lives, bless tbe memory of
bun whom Nature's Uod made the nat
ural guardian of their birthright. Bry
I I'S campaigns are without a parallel
rectrded history. Such forces as
iposed him were I possible before
itive pov-r and machinery multi
plied the power of production and
'ie possible such vast accumulation
of .vealth fa the hands of a single indi
luil. The modern corporation em
ITIUIF thousands of laborers to tend
intehiues driven by steam or electricity
u»s given wealth a despotic power un
Known and undreamed of in other agex.
In no other age did organized and con
derated wealth possess so deadly
weapon to poison and mislead the pub
lic uiind as the venal com nercial press
of our day. Therefore, the forces tbat
1 -veled their shafts against Bryan are a
b'lnilred-fold more mighty than any
trliiune of tne people had to contend
with iu'the past. If Bryan bad faults
they would be exposed. If he made
'nistakes they'would be spread before
(tie eyes of ill. But Bryan, tbe peerless
defender of the great American De
mocracy, stands clean and strong with
out spot or blemish, exhibiting a genius
so superb tbat it forces the admiration
of both friend and foe alike, wbile mar
shalling the inteileot and conscience ot
the nation and forming the plain peo.
pie into a solid phalanx to give battle
to and Bubdue the forces of evil in the
Republic and to preserve the free instl
turl ns Inhetrited from thb fathers of
thn Republic and transmit them anfm
tired to future generations.—National
Watchman.
China (porcelain) "is so vailed because
it was first brought from the Celestial
kingdom. It Is made principally of
kaolin, and kaolin takes its name from
a high hill in China, wbere it was first
discovered. It Is a fine clay, white
when pure, and it Is easily worked, It
has since been found In various plMM,
the United States well
MANCHESTER, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER
7ou Oan't Down Him.
Hike II.'sort o'feller who can stand a
touch defoat
I Ilk. tu s»o lilm scramble outran' git
upon his teet.
Itdoe« me god to listen to bis wild de
fyln* r-ar
"We'll pay you fellers back," he yells
"Jes' wait 'till Nlneteen-tour!"
You'don't catch b'm a-lylng down an'
hotlerln',
enough
Th* [niter that I'm talkln' ot heSatn'tlthct
kind o' stuff.
lie sun o'rubs his head a bit. an'though
he may be sore
He's itn Ills feet a-ynllln'.out: "Jes'wait
'till Nluetoeu-fourl"
He knows he done th' best.be could, he
doesn't stop to tret
He's sure thet with another chance he
could do better yet.
He crawls right out from' neath th' wreck
—a leetle mussed an' lore,
An' shakes his feet an' -whoops It up:
"Jes' wait 'till Nlneteen-fourl"
Cleveland Plain-Dealer.
Shredding or Threshing Com.
C. H. Whltcomb, New York.
I have bandied the corn crop in tbe
dry state, in nearly every way possible.
Running it through tbe old threshing
machine has these objections: You can
do but a Bmsll amount at one time, as
there is no practical way of getting the
fodder from the machine without tread
ing it more or less and this will start
tbe whole bulk heating at once. The
cob is lost in the mow, which we now
grind up with the com. A large per
centage of the g-ain is cracked, which
in a moist time soon begins to mould,
Witb small hUBker with a shredder
and wind stacker arrangement, the pipe
can be placed over any of tbe big beams
In thn old style barns and maile to fill a
hay half nt two-thirds full, without a
man stepping in the bay. ThiB is the
secret of keeping the fodder we tried
it in threshing corn and tound it kept
all right but we had to arrange high
scaffolding so as to shove stalks off
without treading. A mow 10 or 15 ft.
deep will hold perfectly safe if not
trodden.
Those Stalk Fields
As the cattle once more enter the
stalk fields it should be carefully seen
to that they have BCCPFB to »n abundant
supply of good clean water. Every
year there is more or less mortality re
sulting from turning into the stalk
fields. We are inclined to believe that
at least a large percentage of this loss
may be averted by proper attention be
ing given the water supply. Corn stov
er has a greater absorptive capacity for
water than be.s other kinds of rough
feed A given amount tak#n into the
stomach riquireta larger quantity ol
water to moisten it sufilcent for proper
decomposition and digestion to take
place, CatUe.45»r%tg Jnto a Add of:
fresh stalks will often fill themselvl
very full, of this material. If the ani
mal does not have an abundant su pplj
of water to go with this, what there is
in the system will be absorbed, find also
the digestive fluid?, as they come in
contact with 1( will be absorbed and
not alio .v-id to perform the fiinctlon
for which th«y were secreted With
out sufficient moisture to effect trans
location of this material it remains lo
cated In the 8tou*chr and death results
from what is known as impaction of
the runnett. It Is a good plan, too,
along with an ample supply of good
fresh water to keep them well salted
to induce them to drink more.
.I.J. KDGERTON.
Iowa Agricultural College.
Great la the Dairy Industry.
Dairying was practiced in this coun
try in colonial times, butter and cheese
being mentioned among the earliest
of American exports. But in those
days it was only a feature of general
farming, while now it is an important
industry in fact, entire farms of many
hundred acres are devoted exclusively
to it. This progress has all been made
during the last three-quarters of this
century, for in 1823 tbe same crude in
convenient implements for churning
were employed that had been brought
to this side of tbe ocean by the pilgrims
years before.
The following 25ryears, however,
marked a period of much improvement
in the dairy business, and many of the
old fashioned churns were abolished, to
be supplanted by the modern inven
tions. The demand for dairy products
bad materially Increased, the Bmall
towns and cities had to be supplied
witb milk, and there was an extensive
market for butter and cheese. Farm
ers awakened to the fact that there
waB much profit in tbe dairy industry
if conducted properly and went to work
to study the best methods of curing the
cream and utilizing skimmilk In var
ious forms. Better care was taken of
their cattle. Cattle were imported Into
this country from all over the globe
and were scientifically bred and devel
oped into excellent milk cows. Con
densed milk had been perfected, cream
eries were established and there began
to grow a large rt trade. Dairy
organizations were cuiporated for the
mutual benefit of tbe farmer and the
manufacturer, ilixl when tbe war
broke out this business had made so
much headway that skillful 'dairymen
were Bble to meet the demands) of the
time and accordingly became very
wealthy on the profits of a compara
tively new indjistry ln ithe Uniud
States.
They Never Strike.
There is one blase of laborers who
never strike aud seldom complain.
They get up at 5 o'clock in the morn
ing, and do not go to bed.. until 10 or 11
o'clock at night. They work without
ceasing the whole of that time, and re
ceive no other emolument than food
&nd the plainest clothing. They under
stand something
ot
ienaot
every braach of
economy and labor, from finance to
cooking. Though harrassed by a hun
dred responsibilities, though driven
worried, though reproached and looked
down upon, they nevbr revolt and they
wpnlM fat their own proMc-
tlon. Not even sickness releases them
from their posts. No sacrifice is
deemed too great for them, and no in
competency in any branch of their
work is excused. No essays or books
or ^oems are written in tribnte .o their
steadfastness. They die in the harness,
and *re supplanted as quickly as may
be. These are the housekeeping wives
of the laboring men.
If these women had the time to rest
which their hn^iia'iiis spend in dratr
shops and ssipati' ii and if they hud
the inoneT to spend which their hus
bands squander on liquor and tobacco,
they, would brighten their homes with
comfort and sunshine, rear their child
ren In respectability, and cause life's
desert to rejoice and blossom like the
garden of the Lord.—Selected
NOT MUCH OF- AN ORATOR.
Conductor to Whom a Woraii
Gave tlie Wrong Coin.
MIe
this all you're got, madam?" ask
ed the conductor on a North Side car as
lie scrutinized the coin iu the semldark
ness of the tunnel.
"What's the matter with It?" she ask*
ed In such frigid tones that the con*
ductor looked confused.
"Nothing, but"—
"Then ]f there 19 nothing the matter
with it why do you want me to give
you another nickel?"
"Nothing, but that"— he ventured
again.
"Well, then, somebody else must
have given it to you. I didn't have a
penny In my purse."
"Yes, but you did give it to me, mad*
am, and it's all right, but"—
She had got red in the face. The
other passengers were watching the
outcome,# and one youth who was
standing craned his neck and got a
good look at the coin. He grinned.
She saw him grin. That broke what
remained of her dignified and chilling
patience. She testily snatched the coin
from the bewildered conductor. As she
was tossing it Into her open purse she,
too, got a look at the coin. The car
was coming out of the tunnel, and It
was lighter so tbat she could make out
the coin.
"Why, that is a"— but she was too
much confused to finish the sentence.
"Yes, it is a $5 goldplece, madam.
Tou gave it to me."
"You might have said so" she mur
mured meekly as she fished out a real
nickel.
"Well, you see, I ain't much of an
orator, madam," he said and resumed
his march down the aisle, reaching for
nickels.—Chicago Inter Ocean.
WORKING UP A SICKNESS.
The Starr
ot
'""""IS
a H» Who Thomkt
Ha Had Appendicitis.
"A nervflUB uian recently called on
mei" »alds|kvNew Orleans physician,
"and askedT^In what part of the abdo
men ue the premonitory pains of ap
pendicitis felt?' 'On the left side, ex
actly here,' I replied, indicating a spot
little above the point of the hip bone.
"He'went out, and next afternoon
was summoned .In hot haste to the St
Oharles-hotel. I found the planter
(writhing on his bed, his forehead head
ed with jsweat.and his whole appear
ance indicating, intense suffering. 'X
have an attack of appendicitis,' he
groaned, 'and /I'm a dead man! I'll
never, survive an operation!'
'"Where do you feel the pain?' I
asked.
'Oh, right here,' h'e replied, putting
his finger on the spot I had located at
the office. 'I ieel as If somebody had a
knife in me there and was turning it
around.'
'VWell, then, It Isn't appendicitis at
any- rate,' I said cheerfully, 'because
that is the wrong side.'
"'The wrong side!' he exclaimed,
glaring at me Indignantly. 'Why, you
tdld me yourself it was on the left.'
'Then I must have been abstracted,'
I replied calmly. 'I should have said
the right.' I prescribed something that
wouldn't hurt him and learned after
ward that he ate his dinner in the din
ing room the same evening. Oh, yes
he was no doubt in real pain when I
called," said the doctor in reply to a
question, "but you can make your lin
ger ache merely by concentrating your
attention on it for a few moments."—
New Orleans Times-Democrat.
Doing It Well. J1'A,
Half heartedness never wins'in this
world. If a thing is not worth doln£
do not do It, is a good rule. The late
Robert Louis Stevenson was ahvaya
an enthusiast In whatever he under
took, even when at play.
His stepdaughter, Mrs. Isabel Strong,
who was for a time bis amanuensis,
says that Stevenson used to maintain
that no one could write a good story
who was not a good player—who could
not enter fully into the spirit of a
game. He himself threw all his ener
gies into whatever he might be play
ing.
At one time he was visiting a bouse
where a small boy was "playing boat"
on the sofa. When the lad got tired,
he did not wait for the ship to come
to port, but got down from the sofa
and walked toward the door.
Stevenson, who was watching him
eagerly, cried out to him in apparent
alarm: "Oh, don't do that! Swim at
least!"—Youth's Companion.
Tbe Mistake.
"The other day," said Jones, "an old
woman bounced Into our olHco, display
ing a notice that we had written to
her to the effect that a quarter tax on
some property of hers was due. She
swore she had paid it. I had the books
to prove that she had not and suggest
ed tbat she had made a mistake.
"She declared that she had not and
said, 'Don't you ever make any mis
takes
"I assnred her that I did not and
jokingly added:
'The only mistake I ever made was
when I was married.'
"She looked at me a second and then
said: 'No your wife made' that mis
take.' "—Detroit Free Press.
Poet'a Query An.ivered.
"I wonder will they miss me?" wroi
the poet In violet ink on gilt edged pa
per.
And tbe editor as he tossed tbe man
uscript into the yawning gulf at his
side murmured softly, "If they do. they
never ought to be trusted with a gun
mla,"—lanjpa Tal»gruh.
David City, Neb., April 1. 1800.
Geneesee Pure Food Co., f,eRoy, N. Y.:
Gentlemen:—! mnst Bay in regard to
Urain-O tbat there is nothing better or
healthier. We uave used it for years.
My brother was a great coffee drinker.
He was taken sick and the doctor eaid
coffee was the cause of it, and told us
to UBe Gram-O. We got a package but
did not like it at first, bnt now would
not be without it. My brother has been
well ever since we started to use it.
State Bank
CAPITAL $60j000
-DIRBOTORS-
Wm, c. Cawley.
W_. G. Ken|on^
Edward P.
Chas. J.
VOL. XXVI
Remember, that we are selling
Ipifll
sp
Yours Truly,
Liilie Sochor.
W. MILES Profit. P. LBROY, Cashier
B. P. Mi I.KS Asst Oftflhler.
R.
ROBINSON 3d President,
H. c. HAEHERi.K.ist V. President
First National
1
BANK,
MANCHESTER. IOWA.
CAPITAL. $50,000
General
Banking
Bus'ness Tr&uMcrted.
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
SAFETY. DEPOSIT "BOXES
B. BrRobinaon, M. P. LOROF
W. Miles, ,• W. Noma,
E.H.Oarr, M. Beehler,
H. A. Granger, A. H. Blake.
B. P. Miles, H. o. H&eberle,
F. J. Atwater.
COI3-RTBGYOARO.BA.SJ '.LTA.
First National Bank, Dubuque, Iowa.
Central National Bank New York City.
Commercial National Bank. Chicago, ills.
WM. C. CAWLEV CHAS. J. SEEDS,
President. Cashier.
R. W. TIBRILL, C. W. KEAGY,
Vloe President. Asst. Cashier.
DELAWARE COUNTY
H. F. Arnold.
R. W. Tirrill.
G. W. Dunham,
M. H. WiUlBton
Seeds.
C. W. Keagy.
INTEREST PAID on Time Deposits.
Prompt attention given to all business. Pas
senger tickets
from and to all parts of Europe
dlreot to Manohester, tor sale.
T.ONQ TIME Moktoaqe T,PANS
Hade, Bought and Sold.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
For the storage of valuable papers,
etc. for rent
a couch for |6.85
II1P\
Wr
Banking
House °r
See our line ol Couches.
This Coupon entitles th* holder to ono clianco
our Premium Offer
Name....
-i
5 Address
This Coupon wilt appear in all our advertisements
until December 35.
BpOWffl, THE FUFWTUPE )WIAN-
S
Svy-rfc
•i'
&"• ill
W
Henrv Hutchinson
Hutchinson's Building* Manchester. Iowa.
CAPITAL. S7Q,000
JOSEPH HUTCHINSON, OMhier.
1
ELECTIONS
Fxosaptly
DEPOSITS
on Time, Interest Al­
lowed and other deposits received.
DRAFTS
sold on Now York, Chicago
and Dubuaue HISO on Great Britain and Ire
land and European Cities.
TICKETS sold to and from all European
ports via .Cunird or Alien nr White Star
Steamship Lines.
7~
Illinois CentralR
FROM CHICAGO TO
HOT SPRINGS
ARKANSAS, VIA MEMPHIS
WITHOUT CHANGE
The Illinois Central Is now running a through
Pullman sleeping oar o»Hy between Chicago
and Hot Springs. Ark., on Us
f.
muc^
"Mtilt*aU"leaving
Chicago at ft.lu p. m., arriving Hot Spilngs 0 15
tbe next afternoon.
Through reservations Chicago to Hot Springs
can also be secured on the Special." leavlug
Chicago8.80 a. ui. dally. Arriving uc Hot Springs
8.55 the next inornl' g. Ii»i!g-car service en
route. A special folder of tbls new service as
well as full partloul.irs con erning the above
oan be had of agentsot the Illluots Cmtial and
connecting lines.
A. H. HANSON
it
Stye EJtronrai
*ATFCFE
.Feminine Approval
O A 1 if el N
SPACE.
1M
of his jrearing apparel i8 what every self'
respecting man desires, whether he' ad-'
mits it or not. To havo a garment or en
tire suit made ot honest oloth, cut and
fashioned in the latest mode, is the duty of
every man, and is likely to aid htm in
business as well as society. guarantee
material and fit of everything I make.
THE TAILOR.
Q.TTj^IKZIEIR,
tsscjs is 'he name of our now brand of flour. It is made from tdect*
ed hard wheat and the quality is guaranteed. For a limited
time QUAKER FLOUR will be sold in sacks made from
toweling When the side teams are drawn the customer has
a real roller towel, sixty-two inches long-, selvage edges and
red stripes.
XF YOU USDS TOWELS
why not buy QUAKER FLOUR and get your towels free?
Tbe flour costs no more thou our other high grades and not
as
Chester.
*h
O-e 'Qyi
'Pwo inoUt
Three i:cheti.
r'uur ucuea..
Five tnuhes..
14 Column....
JO 0 no
ao a 25
iuo JLKI
»2 51)
8 hO
•I W
75
7 00
8 00
U0U
85 00
5 I*
7 TX)
that is guaranteed in every particular.
np
llti
December ag,
1900.
A. D. BROWN'S CHAIR COUPON.
-10
lf
8 00
Column....
one Column..i
0"
76
10 iltl
18 00
lb 00
2 iv -a, uo
i«oo
moo
30
4(110
ino«
oo
80 00
4 R0
SO
4 60
60
900
mm
40 00
65 00
oo
19 10
18 001
60 00
Advertisements ordered dUoonllnued
tore expiration of ooitrftct wtll charged at.
ooWllng to atomseale.
Business oa
par year.
not exoaedlar six llaaa,
Business locals, ten oenU per Una (or tha first
Insertion, and flva oents per llae for sack rata*
Quent insertion.
W8
a--
saasfsit
the evening by reading tbe
latestaDd mostup to dale Books,,
We have all the latest copy
rights, a ad a large line of the
"WORLD'S BEST "V
fs'V
LITERATURE."
lOAMB
ANDERS
mm ir—*""'
S &
i-V
BOARDS OF AIX 2HNDS.
PHILIPP
mm
CENTRAL PIIARMACY.
some of the inferior stuff that is shipped into
si
-r
We invite you to look orer our
stock.
%3
^li!
Our object is to get you. to patronize your home
mill. It costs you nothing to try our flour—we
money back if it fails to please.
$1,000 REWARD
to you if our huckwheat flour is not pure. Cakes made from
"PURIFIED BUCKWHEAT" taste like buckwheat because it is
buckwheat.
QUAKER
0404040404040404C
as
Man-
give your
MILL COMPANY.

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