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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, December 04, 1901, Image 1

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I
®l)£ democrat.
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY.
E'
11??*°"- o*«"
SROISSON & OARR,
Editors and Proprietors
SUBSCRIPTION PHICE.
Nearly, in advance
If not paid In advance..'.
I
ele roust accompuny any artl
of the eSttorS? 'aa "n
cvllIcnc
gross.
WE FIT THE FEET.
n«-
Pu™o.
O. E. BBOSSOK. jJ. If, CAHH.
BRONSON te CARR.
V. Special attention
MfP
otcoo/ ralth
A Booster!!!
AOttftlS Ot 10
W*
Bumiu'bs
Oflfoe in Dexnoorat
Mariohealor, Iowa.
FRED fl. BLAIR.
... AY
AT
LAW.*
Office In kUoClty Hall
Block. VMcUestor, Iowa.
PHY3IOIAN8.
A. J. WARD.
ill YS1C1AN ami Suruoon* will attond to calls
promptly at all Ltoura of the day or ulght,
C*awoQt, Iowa.
J. J. LINDSAY, M. O.,
PHYSICIAN,
surgeon and Eye Specialist.
Ofllco hours for eye casus and tlttlnu Rlassos
1:00 to 8:00 p.m. Ofllco corner Main auu Frank*
lin streets.
H. H. LAWRENCE.
DHYS1GIAN AND SURGEON. Special at
•L tcntion givon diacaueu of children. Have
Meo made a special study of Gyneocology,
Obstetrics, and Kectul Diseases. All chronic
Diseases successfully Created with the aid o!
"Various Thermal ana Massage troatment. All
chronica sollolted. Consultatloa free, Office
rover Work's market. All calls promptly at
tended. Kesldtmoe ou Main street, the old Dr.
Kelsey property.
ALEX. SEF&TROM.
QKNEUAL BLACK8MITU, liorsealioIiiK
speclulty.
no pay. l'rk
ivorK guarauteod
aje lt» solicited,
the bridge.
... Interfering and corns cured or
Prices reasonable, and the best of
A shaio of the public patron-
Shop ou Franklin street, near
DENTISTS.
O. A. DUNHAM. C. L. LKIOII
OUNHAM A LEIGH.
DoutUts.
Ofllco Id the Adams building on
Frankllu street. Telephone 215.
C. W. DOBMAN,
r\lCNTIST.
Offlco on .franklin Street, north
•L' of tho Globe Hotel. Manchester, Iowa.
Dental Surgery in all lis branches. Makes
iretiuentvlmtsto neighboring towns. Always
•t offloe ou Saturdays.
E. t. NEWCOMB.
ENTI8T. Ofllco over Clark & Lawrence's
store on Franklin, street. Crown
bridge work a specialty, will meet patients at
Farley Wednesday of each week. S2tf
VETERINARIAN.
DR. J. W. SCOTT,
VETERINARY
Surgeon, and Dentist.
Main Street. Telephon 239.
te^.vSr
Booster
Trade Builder,
Friend Maker
A Fine shoo for Dress nt a Popular Price. Gome in and
th,s shoe n,lfl
you will "not be disappoint^'
Our Business Directory.
l^®^^raas^^wrass^^^*ssisKKBiBBBies6jasBs(s
ATTORNEY8.
a. W. DDSlIAM. E, B. STILP.H w.
tt
A.'TKtS^X?
A,T,
tlAW AND
Spoolal attention given to Collec-
I°i'"IllMe,
Koal Estate and Loan Auta.
Dilloe In City Hall Hloolt. Manchester, la.
c. YOIU.N. H. P. ARNOLD. M.J, YOKAN
YORAN. ARNOLD *YORAN
A TTORNEYS AT LAW, and Real Estate
i&SESbJEX! i°^r..1)eiawara
Co™*Sta"1
Bros.
MANCHESTER, IOWA
pAKI'KNTER. CON'TltACTOlt & BUtLDHIt.
,1 now prepared (o do all work In my
line In a Rood and workmanlike manner. Satis
1- ,pl»"s and estimates fnr
oru taken In town or country. Shop
tho stand tower on West Side or river
nlshed.
near
C. E. CATE6,
1ITY DRAYMAN. Am prspared to do all
^, ^ork In my line. Moving household goods
and plnnos a specialty. All work will rm»lvo
prompt attention. A shsire of your patronape
Is solicited. CharRes right. Glvo your draylntr
to a man who Uas come
to stay.
B. CLARK.
DRY
01)S,
501 E
MANCHfiSTER MARBLE WORKS
TS proparcd to furnish Granite and Marblo
A Monuments and Head Stones of various de
signs. Havo tho county right for Slpe'fl Pat*
oct Grave Cover also dealer In Iron Fences.
Will meet all competition. 2tf 94.
WM. MCINTOSH.
W. N. BOitfTOS. J. F. MCEWKK.
BOYNTON & McBWEN.
ri7 ATCHMAKERS, Jewelors and Engravers
tt dealers in Watohes, Clocks, Silver and
Plated Ware, Fine Jewelry, Spectacles, Cutlery,
Muaical Instruments, etc., Main street.
A. D.BROWN.
Dealer
In furniture etc., and undertaker,
Main Street.
P. WERKMEISTBR,
rj.ENERAL DEALER IN FURNITURE,
vJf CofQns. Picturo Frames, Etc. A oomplete
stock ot Furniture and Upholstery always ou i-t /i
hand, at prices that dofy competition. A good spGCIftl 1 drL116r8 Isntltut©, Bli
Ucarao kept for attendance at funerals. Earl- Coroe ill and order them.
vlllo, Iowa.
ALLEN & STOREY.
f^LOTRINU and Gents furnishing goods. Cor
nor Main and Franklin streets.
L. R. STOUT,
C'
iLOTHING and Gents furnishing goods.
City Hall Block, Franklin Street.
HIDDELL & CO.,
T\RY GOODS, Carpots, Millinery, Hats and
L' Caps, Hoots and Shoos, etc.. Main St,
Manchester, Iowa.
A.THORPE,
Pder
ROPRIETOR OF KALAMITY'S l'LUN
Store atii frealer In Clothing. Boots,
Shoos, Notions. Mc. Masonic Block Manches
ter, Iowa.
QRAf'SFlELD BRQS
(Succcfmors to Seth Brown.)
BOOTS
AND SHOES of all urades and prices.
Custom Work and Repairing given special
mention, store In City liall Block.
GEO. S LISTER,
CTARDWARE. STOVES, TINWARE, ETO.
XL Koeps a tlrst-olass tinner and docs all
klndB of repairing with neatness and dfspatoh.
Store opponlte First National Bank. Main St.
T. F. MOONBY,
to Li
Wagoumaker, Dolhl,
BIiACKtiMITH
(Successor to Lee Bowman.)
and Wagoumake:
Iowa. Work done promptly and lnawoi_
manlike manner. Charges reasonable. Your
Patronage solicited.
Jnionuwa
TNSUBE TOUB PROPERTY bl
and to roadoea in the old reliable Phoenix
Oo.i BRONSON ft OABRi Ageiltl,
Notions, farpetft". ionts Fur-
nlsiilUK goods, etc. Fraiililin Street.
QUAKER MILL CO.
I
itLOUUaml Feed. Mamifacturers of tho cole
bmled Whlto Satin ami White I'earl Flour.
LAWRENCE & GREM8.
JiRUGS, Wull Faror. Stationery, l'alnte, Oils,
1J etc. City Hallblock.
PETER BOARDWAY.
EALKlt IN flour, feed, hay straw, Maiuoke
ts lime, stucco, and comnioti and Atlas ce
ent. Telephone 113. I.owor Franklin St.
a/ "iiiu) OHIVI.V. uuti wuiuiiiuu min ai
mont. Telephone 113. I.owor Franklin
PETERSON BROS.
DKADKRS
JN Uroeorles. Provisions. Crock­
ery, Fruits, etc. Main Street.
J. M. PEARSE.
"I LTSTICK OF Till£ 1'EACK AND COLLKCT
*t OR. All busluess entrusted to him civen
prompt attoution. Ofllce in City Hall block,
second floor.
120 Aero Farm For Sale.
Wo areiiL'cnts for the sale of
tho O. A Underwood Farm of
13'. acres, situated about 7 miles
north east of Manchester.
... 'ihere Is a bargain for some
purchaser In this property. Bhonson & CA»m,
House For Kent.
A pood house sltuatod on Franklin street just
Bouth of my residence, now occupied by Burton
Clark. Jos. IIctohinsox.
CYCLONE AND TORNADO
Insurance in first class companies written and
policies issued by Bhonbon & Cakk.
Tiie Jarge and JncreasiDg circulation
of The Iowa Homestead in this county
is a matter for congratulation to the
publishers and to good farming, for, of
all the papers of its class in the coun
try, It is easily the best and most help
ful. Its Special Farmers' Institute
editions, issued with the regular edition
the iirBt week in each month, have been
for years tho admiration of all practi
cal farmers. Written wholly by farm
ers, they are full of actual experience,
and smell of the soil. We have been
fortunate enough thiB season to secure
terms for The Homestead and its Spec
ial Farmers' Institute Editions,together
with The Poultry Farmer and The
Farmers' Jlutual Insurance Journal,
four of tho most valuable farm publi
cations In the country, that enable us to
offer the four iu connection with our
own paper for Sl.flO for tho entire live,
one year. This is emphatically a good
thing, and no fanner in this county
should fail to take advantage of this
offer. For a large line of thoroughly
practical farm reading nothing has
over
been offered before that equals it. A
county paper, a farm paper, a poultry
paper, a form insurance paper and the
^IIApifll T?tll*»Yiara' Tantitnto ..II fQf §1.90
Notice of Appointment of Administra
trix.
STATE OF IOWA, I
Delaware County
notick is iikukiiy given', That the mulei
slgued has been dulyappolutod ami nuulllled as
Administratrix of tho Estate of Jacob Abby
lato of Delaware County, Iowa, decoas
cd. All persons indebted to saldEstatearo
requested to make immediate payment, and
those having claims agulnnt the same will pre
sent thom, duly authenticated, to tho under
signed for allowance.
Dated. November 2,"th, iOOl,
UOSENA ZUMBACIi
KMMA L, ABBY,
Hronson & Carr,
smm
Entered at the PosTorriCK at
MANCHESTER. IOWA, AS SRC0NI-GLASB MATTEB.
ft rent
Seller,
iSotice
Price.
$2.25
isfiSSiS
HOLLISTER LUMBER CO.
LUffi1Ladndrfl,k" .a8
NOIUUS
DUNHAM, NORR1S ft PTIL68.
NOTARIES
01
bu,11"ni!
materials,
iidtttreetS.'C°rn0r
1l
lawar°
oufl
THOS. T. CARKEEK.
A^TENM^V'A^'i »UII.11N SUI'KHIN
lX.b»,Se. im?a!,h-
or"or' a»
.«"iu St.
SCHARLES. THE TAILOR.
MKRCUANTTAlLOUanU
Gents Furnishing
Goods, Manchester, Iowa.
WM. DENNIS,
Administratrix.
Alty's for Estate, 5' 48w3.
Insurance at Cost.
M. 15. itlalr. Secretary of the Delawaro County
l-armer's Mutual Insurance Co., and County
agent for the Iowa Mutual Tornado Insurance
Co. will boat Fred Blair's ollico In Manchester.
Saturday afternoon of each week. 34tf
F. E. RICHARDSON
Real Estate, Loans and
Insurance.
Office over the Racket Store
Manchester, Iowa, •••".•.•
The coming legislature will be asked
to pass a bill giving cltieB and towns
the powfcr to establish industrial schools
for Incorrlgibles at which attendance
shall be compulsory. The bill will be
backed by the elucators of Des Moines
and t-lBewhere. The intention is to
reach oat after that claBS of children
who refuse to attend the public schools
tmt Instead spend their time in idleness
upon the streets, securing neither edu
cation nor any sort of knowledge by
which they may earn a livelihood. This
class the promoters of the bill believe
abound in every city and town in the
state. Such children are looked upon
aB not only a harm to themselves but
to the community at large. It is be
lieved that If each town and city had
the power to compel such children to
attend Bchool and gain knowledge of
industrial pursuits each one would
eventually become self-supporting. It
is destined to become popular and
should receive endorsement from all
cities and towns throughout the state
—Waterloo Times-Tribune. »$a
A Prophecy That Failed "5
In the campaign of 1800 the republi
can leaders denied that their party con
templated a permanent increase in the
standing army. They asserted that a
large arniy was only necessary because
°f '"Butrectioii in UieL.PiiUinnmta4
hltmttiey DOiafy declaredthatthe lnaur-
rection would cease immediately if the
republican ticket was successful. The
democratic platform and democratic
speakers were blamed for the prolonga
tion of the war. "Just re-elect Presi
dent McKinley," they said, "and let the
Filipinos know that they are not to
have independence, and they will lay
down their armB and our soldlerB can
come home."
Well, the republican ticket was elect
ed, and the Filipinos were notified that
they were not to have Independence,
but a' month after the election the
republicans rushed through congress a
bill authorizing the president to raise
the standing army to 100 000. and now,
after a year has elapsed, the insurrec
tion is still in progress and the end is
not yet, Some of the worst losses of
the year have been suffered by our
troops within two months. General
OhalTee reports that the Filipinos have
profited by the deception practiced upon
them when Aguinaldo was trapped.
He says that "insurgent soldlerB iu or
dinary civilian's dreBS lurked about
and among American garrisons," and
ho adds that "with deceptive cunning
they obtained credentials from Amer
ican authorities." We were assured a
year ago that only a small fraction of
the FilipinoB were hostile to the Amer
ican government. We were told that
the great majority of the Filipinos wel
comed the American government and
were glad to be made subjects. The
Times-Herald quotes General Chaffee
as Baying that "the whole people of the
Philippines are engaged in waging war
upon the United StateB." The Times
Ilerald (a republican paper) adds: "The
Filipinos who are friendly to the
United States are Baid to be those hold
ing oflice, and the officers who discuss
ed the situation today assert that their
loyalty will exist only so long as they
have the oportunity of drawing Amer
ican doliors."
If Mr. McKinley was correctly In
formed when he stated that most of the
Filipinos were friendly, then the insur
rection has, according to General
Chaffee, increased rather than dimin
ished.
After the republican victory made it
impossible for the imperialists to blame
the anti-imperiallBts for the continu
ation of hostilities, the republican lead
ers declared that Aguinaldo, actuated
by selfish ambition, was compelling his
countrymen to continue the war. Hut
even after hiscapture and imprisonment
—yeB, even afterhis captors had secured
from bim an address advising his com
rades to surrender—the insurrection
contiuned. How long will it take the
imperialists to learn that we cau never
have peace in the Philippine islands
That we can suppress open resistance
is certain, although the coBt may be far
beyond any gain that can be derived
from a colonial government, but that
we can ever make the l'hilipinos love
ub or trust us while we rule them
through a carpetbag government is
absurd.
If the republicans had read the
speeches of Abraham Lincoln as much
recently as they did in former years,
they would have known that hatred of
an alien government is a natural thing
and a thing to be expected everywhere,
Lincoln said that it was God Himself
who placed in every human heart the
the love of liberty. Lincoln spoke the
truth. Love of liberty is linked to life
Itself, and "what God hath joined to
gether let no man put asunder."—The
Commoner.
WtMt'i'iJi
1. IMS'
mm
01' Man Armateiufs Violin. ...
ain't i»o use t' talk t* mo
'Bout i'adcroosky an' his cla^
**Two Ways of Doing Work.
As a business, farming is just what
the farmer makes it, says an exchange.
He can choose a life of drudgery and
privation or one of comfort and plenty,
Although there is enough work on
farm to please the most industriously
inclined, in order to Eucceed a man
physically lazy may be the better farm
er of tne two. In fact some of the
best farmers wo ever knew were so
pesky lazy that they were continually
planning how to avoid fatigue by pro
curing labor saving Implements and de
vices that would mimimize physical
exertion and studying short routes to
results. Some of our worst farmers
ar§ up before the cock crowe, make
two or three tripB to and from a well
a hundred yards away, then climb
ten rail fence to the horse lot, shuck
the corn for the team, take a plow line
in hand and go out in the field to the
fodder stack and return with the neo
esBary roughage for the plow mulep,
and after a breakfast of corn bread,
fried bacon and black coffee, hook a
mule to a Bingle plow and break an en
tire acre in a single day. To him labor
saving devices are desreputable apolo
gies for laziness, and he hates a lazy
man as a Methodist preacher is sup
posed to hate satan. The 1
with special reference to saving labor.
Wood and water will beat hand with
out the necessity of going out of doorB
to get either, ills barns and stables
will be similarly planned and built.
Therefore he does not have to get up
so early or hustle so fast. Then in
stead af Industriously stumbling over
the clods in guiding and following the
plow, he hiti'hea a fat team to a double
disc plow, takeB his position on the
spring seat, gathers up the reins aud
lazily plows back ami forth until he
has plowed two or three times as much
as his Industrious neighbor knockB off
in a day, or recreates himself with some
light or needed exercise about the gar
den, orchard or elsewhere. All through
the season's operations the Bame differ
ence prevails—the one laboring assid
ously and accomplishing little—the
doing twice as much work with his
head as he does with his hanls and ac
complishes much. It Ib a rare combin
ation if the farmer happens to bo in
dustrious with both head and hands,
and his success Is assured in all he un
dertakes. Hilt if the mind is clear and
active he will a good substitute for the
industry he may lack. No amount of
physical industry cau ever make a suc
cess without the active aid of the brain
that th inketh.
Getting in Readiness for Winter.
By E. R.Towle.
It is always important that a farmer
keep his work well in hand at all sea
sons of the year, but especially is it de
sirable to have everything possible in
readiness for tho winter. Any time af
ter the middle of October we may ex
pect cold or stormy weather, such as
is most disagreeable for the stock to be
out in, hence the necessity for having
the winter quarters in a condition to be'
used as soon as wanted. And they
Bhould be put in the most suitable con
dition too, for here ib where the stock
of all kinds will have to remain most of
the time for half or more of the year to
come. Not only should the stables and
pens be roomy, warm, well lighted and
comfortable, but the barns generally
should be bo arranged as to be the most
convenient for those having the care of
the animals during the winter season.
Much time, travel and labor can bo sav
ed by proper attention to these details,
more than one who has not fully con
sidered the matter is aware of.
There is such a thing as having the
barn arrangements such as will make it
pleasant and agreeable work caring for
the stock during our long winters, or,
olithe contrary,for want of proper arran
gements it may be made most disagree
able and unsatisfactory.
The stables should be sufficiently
warm, but not close and unventilated,
and there should bo plenty of light for
all purposes. A dark, low, bad smell
ing btables is an abomination to man
and beast. And when the nights get
cold or there are bad storms, the cows
will be much .better off In the stable
than out of doors, and will exhibit their
appreciation of such comfortable quar
ters by great contentment and increas
ed yield of milk.
Another thing It is not wise to un
dertake to winter more stock than can
be well kept and cared for, as this is
neither pleasant nor profitable. Young
animals should be kept thrifty and
growing all winter, and cows giving
milk should receive the best attention
In care aud feed, so they may give satis
factory returns at the pail.
Stock of all kinds should come to the.
MANCHESTER, IOWA, WENDESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1901.
1
For when it comes t' classic art
I've got to let It bv me pa
My ears wa'nt trained for them fugons
That make up Mich a dreadful din.
ButI kin listen by tir hour
T'ol'man Armateads violin.
Onco't on a time I
.went to hear
Th'famous Thomas orkesira.
TH. players only sawed and blowo if
An'nary tune I heard emplaj.
Good music? Well, pcrliapi ituu/
T' them who like them sercechy things
But give ino music as it coinos
From ol' man Armstead's fiddle strlng6.^'V'!v
S on at a it
May stilt th'edlkatcd taste,
But on such yowlln' as that Is
I've got no time to sinful waste
Th. music that I love tir best «.
Is them ol' tunes that's locked within
Th' strings strctched tight across th' bridgo
Of ol 'man Armstead's violin.
§81
The independent voter was manifest
in the recent election. More frequently
than usual has come the report of
"much scratching." Party affiliations
have not been so strong. Mote and
more the sentiment is growing to be
independent of party whips, Whenever
a candidate stood for that,.In the miud
of the voter, that did not meet his ap
proval, he was scratched. The inde
pendent voter is not bound by the idea
of voting the ticket "straightt" lie
thinks for himself and votes as he
thinks. He may not always think
right but he thinks. This were better
for him than not to think at all. Some
times he is influenced by personal pre
judices and may not make the wisest
choice, but he does act independently,
and one of the things that counts for
higher and better manhood is inde
pendence. The effect of the independ
ent voter upon the results of elections
is mainly to increase the danger to de
feat to the weak or unfit man that may
be placed upon the ticket. The inde
pendent voter makes it the part of wis
dom to put only such men on the ticket
that can hold their ground against their
opponents without the aid of the inilu
ence of others whose names may be on
the ticket with them,—Atlantic Mes
senger,
An'when my life o' to'! Is done
An' I am suminouod up on high,
I want some music soft au' sweet
T' bear tnc up'ards to th' sky.
I want, when Peter swings th'
1" let ihls weary toller in,
T* bo a keepin' Joyful step
T' ol' man Armstead's violin,
Tho Commoner.
barn in good thrifty condition, as this
is the best preparation for passing
through the long winter in a satisfac
tory manner.
Aside from the 6tables for the cowb
and most of the young cattle, it will be
very convenient to have several pens
which may be used for a variety of pur
poses as needed. This will be found
most convenient arrHncemeiit. We
find it better to tie Calves from si*
months to a year old in a stable, the
same as other cattle. They learn to be
come quiet in this way and cbh be
mote satisfactorily fed than when sev
oral are in pen together.
The water is also an important mat
ter in the care of stock in winter. It
should not be too far away, causing
travel and exposure in bad weather,and
should be warm enough lor tho com
fort of the animals.
These suggestion may appear to ap
ply, a8 they do, more particularly to the
northern part of the United States, but
there is comparatively a small portion
of the United States In which there
Bhould not be suitable provision msde
for the care of stock in winter, us re
gards shelter and food. How often iu
the past hBS it happened that great loss
has been sustained in the west and
south even, for the want of even the
commonest shelter and the means of
feeding stock during the fearful storms
that have prevailed. It will be profit
able, even in the most favored parts of
the country, to provide a suitable thi
ter for animals, as the loss from the
want of it may soon be sufficient to pay
the cost of construction —Farmers'
Tribune.
I feel like going all the time, my
mind Is brighter aud clearer, and, In
fact, my whole being seems toned up.
New York and Its crowds are more
beneficial to me than any resort 1 have
ever struck. After a two weeks' stay
here return home feeling like another
MTOuge/'
sou to wiiom this statement was made.
Do you know New York has upon me
Just exactly the opposite effect. To me
what I might term the surplusage of
life here is depressing. I am by no
means fond of solitude. I have lived iu
a moderate1 sized elty all my life, and
it bores me to stay in the country for
any great length of time, but when I
come to New York and am caught In
the tides of humanity, see the over
crowded tenements and have my ears
assaulted with, the perpetual din of the
streets I become positively melancholy.
'I feel what an insiginlicaut atom I
am, after all—no move than a drop of
water in a great river—and the feel
ing oppresses me. It seems so like
there was nobodj' here who eared what
became of anybody. Tho only relief I
And from the feeling Is in the theaters.
1 go to a show every night while I am
here, and of course I enjoy that Im
mensely. Rut as soon as I have made
the rounds of the shows I am ready to
return home, where I know most ev
erybody aud there are many who care."
—New York Times.
RAILWAY RUMBLES.
Our miles of railroad track exceed by
more than 10.000 all the tracks of Eu
rope.
Tho Dominion of Canada has granted
$S8,S84,557 and 39,725,1^0 acres of land
to railways.
More than 4o,000,000 passengers a
year go through the North Union and
South Union stations in Jjoston.
In most European railways the prin
cipal difference between second class
and first class lies In the color of the
seat cushions, first class being usually
red, second class gray.
Tho average cost of the body of a
modern long electric car Is $2,000, the
average price of a set of double trucks
for such a car is ?000, and the average
cost of the motor is $1,500, making the
total cost of the car $4,100.
Some of the Austrian railways have
followed the German custom of selling
numbered seats In the cars of fast
trains, both first and second class. An
extra charge of from about 25 to 50
cents is made for these seats, according
to distance.
Tho other day, just as a train was
about to leave Kutas, In Hungary, for
Palfalva, an oliicial appeared and put
seals on the wheels of the engine. The
passengers had to got off and walk.
The company was 29(5 crowus in ar
rears In payment of taxes. Next day
the taxes were paid, and the train pro
ceeded.
Why Ilia Clock Watt Sloiv.
There is an Italian fruit dealer, with
well stocked store near one of the
suburban railway stations, who has
adopted a unique device, and ouo
which shows a deep knowledge of hu
man nature, to hold his own in com
petition with another dealer, whose
stand Is some fifty yards nearer the
station tlmn his owu. A commuter
was leisurely peeling a banana In his
store the other day when the Italian
remarked:
"You gotta fiv' minute before your
train."
No twenty," replied the commuter,
glancing at a big clock on tho wall.
'Thata clock fifteen minute slow,"
said tho Italian. "I keepa it slow.
PeepV used come in a-here, looka at
clock, getta excite, go way, not buy.
Time to buy at Pedro's stand, notta
here. Now keepa clock slow, get
mucta trade, fto, I not ictta peepl'
miss train. I tella them after they
buy do bananV—New York Commer
cial Advertiser.
Extravagance is not always alto
gether bad. It leads a people who are
making money to thrust it into circu
lation instantly and thus give tho
needy a grgb at it—Galveston News.,
•iSSto wS*
'MtJl
-s?\
Tho Servian, Iioiimaulan and Bulga
rian railroads are owned exclusively
Mm.--
t&v \u»
s,=K j-.
s. v, J"",
A QUESTION OF TEETH.
Did the Immni-tnl Goorire Wear Ar
tldcinl or .Vntnrnl One*?
"George Washington's false teeth,
which were supposed to have been
made of Ivory, are giving a certain
class of freak historians about as much
trouble as they must havo given the
venerable patriot who wore tliem,"
said one of the professors of tlio
Smithsonian institution to a reporter
recently.
"Many times a year for several years
this Institution has been called upon to
produce these mysterious teetli for the
inspection of persons who insist that
they are here.
"Our matter of fact answer to these
inquiries that Washington had no false
teeth, or at least if lie did, that they
are not in the possession of the mu
soura, seems only to stimulate the in
quiring mind to protest our statement.
They proceed to give us authentic ac
counts of these teeth aud always con
clude with expressing the belief that
they must be in the museum some
where.
Where or how the Idea that Wash-
lngton had false teetli originated is an
unsolved mystery. That it is firmly be
lieved by many is certainly a fact.
There seems to be no authentic record I
of the Father of Ills Country possess-
4
NEW YORK CROWDS.
The Different Wayi la Which They
Ini|»rc»Nfl Two Meu.
"What I like about New York," re
marked westerner, "is its tremen
dous energy- The crowds and bustle
have upon me the exhilarating effect
of a. stimulant. As I move along amoug
the masses on the sidewalks and look
upon the perpetual stream of vehicles
of all descriptions in the streets 1 am
conscious of a buoyancy of spirit aud
an Increased physical energy.
Prussian P8Hway8 whofi»*-
baggage, through no fault of their
own, faiJs to arrive with them can now
have It sent on request free to their
houses.
Tho difficulty of railway construction
In some parts of Africa is illustrated
by the fact that on the Freetown-Mat
Lru line, in Sierra Leone, elevon steel
bridges had to bo built in a distance of
only thirty kilometers.
A representative of the Paris Temps
has been examining railway stations in
Germany, and he declares that those of
Dresden, Cologne, Hanover, Frankfort,
lii'emen, efe.. are far superior to any
of the French except the Parisian.
Pftylnt? a Creditor,
Like many another famous man both
betore his time and since, Talleyrand
exhibited, at least in early life, a great
reluctance to settling with his credit
ors. When he was appointed bishop of
Autun by Louis XVI., he considered a
fine new coach to be necessary to the
proper maintenance of the dignity of
that office. Accordingly a coach was
ordered and delivered, but not paid for.
ome time after, as the newly appoint
1 bishop was about to enter his coach,
bo noticed a strange man standing near
who bowed continually until the coach
was driven away. This occurred for
several days until at length Talley
rand, addressing the stranger, said:
"Well, my good man, who are you?"
"I aiu your coachtuaker, my lord,"
replied the stranger.
"Ah," said Talleyraud, "you nro mv
coaehmakor! And what do you want,
my coaehmakor?*
"I want to be paid, my lord.":
"Ah, you arc my coaehmakor. and
you want to be paid? You shall be
paid, my coaehmakor."
"But when, my lord?"
"Hum," said Talleyrand, settling
himself comfortably among the cush
ions of his new coach and eying his
coaehmakor severely, "you are very
Inquisitive!"
Salad Eating: Good Sense,
Even men are progressing gastrcr.om
ieally. Scientific dietetics has at last
revealed to us the fact that the woman
who eats salad on a hot day In July,
August or September Is displaying
sound gastronomic sense, says What to
Eat. The long haired dreamer in the
restaurant may have been nineteen dif
ferent kinds of a fot upon every other
proposition in life, but he knew what
to eat on a hot day. The human ani
mal needs grass or Its equivalent In
summer. With their oil the salads sup
ply everything a man physically needs
hot weather. All the civilized races
of the world are salad eaters,but Amer
eans eat less than do any other people.
It is not a sl.^n of mental decay or mor
ul degeneracy for a man to eat salad it
Is gastronomic sense.
Harpers Ferry.
Harpers Ferry was named after
Robert Harper, an architect and mill
builder, boru in 1703 111 the town of
Oxford, England. He came lo Amei
lea In 1733 with his brother .lowpli
and located in rhllndelphia, where for
a time he prospered but. failing later,
concluded to Join the Friends of Lou
doun county, Ya. En route to his uev
home he came upon the gup In tiie
Blue llidgc mountains, where he made
his home.
He Liked It.
Wife—How do you like my new lint?
Husband—The Idea of paying big
prices for—
Wife—Big prices! Why, 1 made It
myself.
Husbaud—Um—yes—er—as I was say
ing, the Idea of paying big prices for
such monstrosities as the milliners arc
showing! Now, your hat is a work of
art. Looks fts If It came from Paris,
beautiful, my dear!—New York Week-
*3^
*£•, *4 -J \f
VOL. XXVII—NO.
1
1
ing Ivory teeth, and by a study of the
bust wc havo of him, which was made
but a few years before his death, there
is no iudieatlon of an Indentation along
the line of the gums such as can bo
noticed In persons who have had their
teeth drawn, even thougli they wear
artificial ones. However, wc will con
tinue to answer the same question in
tho same way probably many times in
the future."
According to some biographers
Washington lost his teeth durlug his
service as commander in chief of the
Continental army and had a set of
Ivory ones made. These teeth, it is
also stated, gave him much trouble be
cause they did not flt.-Washington
Star.
$
RAILWAY RUMBLES.
Ireland claims the honor of the first
electric railway iu the Uulted King
dom.
&
It is said that the cheapest railway
fares in the world are to be found in
Hungary.
Denmark has a government railroad
system of 1.107 miles and 325 miles of
private railroads.
$$*
1
anteed.
gfafci",.
El)c
•0*040*0»000*0*0*0C00.
^+0+0*0+0+0+0+0+0+0+0+0+040
We Have Just Received
another lot of those Elegant Genuine Karpen
Guaranteed Construction Couches. All of
the latest and handsome designs in cover
ings are shown on these goods. .-V!
Karpen Guarantied Couch
If you want the best made, you will not fail
to come to our store and see them. Our.
$6.85 Couch is a Trade=winner.
A. D. BROWN,
The Furniture Man.
°«^0«^0W0^#0«4»(WH04IH0404«l
^THE BEST ADVERTISEMENT IS A WELLi
PLEASED CUSTOMER.
JJ ou^effoVtB Tre°™ppreciated.8'
JUemocrat.
gATES OP ADVERTISING.
BPACK.
One inch
Two Incljen
Thr^Jm:he«.
Pour inches
P'lve lnohi«
ci oo
1 50
00
3 50
3 00
4 FIO
660
I9 60
Column
4 Column....
One Column..
per year.88 car*8,
Wh'°h reco8uitlon
»e)4
abl6ubed,'allW
t0
T*? rectinn of»^
1?
and these are good values at
Respectfully,
FINCH & LILLIBRIDGE.I
-f....,, 1
READ THE DEMOCRAT
For Clothes thatf
Fit Call on
SCHARLES,
The Tailor.
Wolff Bros. Old Stand,
Corner Franklin and
Fayette Streets,
Sure to be acceptable to any one who writes.
WATERMAN'S IDEAL
FOUNTAIN PEN.
Pens to suit every writer, andJevery pen guar-
FOK SALE BY
The Leading Druggists.
'"^^^^^Te.ephone
wmmmm
(T
S10 00
IS 00
00
25-»
40 00
05 00
126 00
uot
exceeding six lines M.00
Inaenion*1ViSfc.cllts Por "no 'or the first
"eiU in»" °"'!JHvoconts''er tine for oach sub.e
*J"ki
5
I
A
4
Bhows
y°U
th®
REX
?F Lounge and 4 ft. in. in one piece with wire serine
u^e w^' a"
M,®ny other
pieces left from the old stock
tho prices we will make you.
Elding CoUCh
your needs in this df-
SoT tanX1^'ey Comniode i8 equal 1
new and attractive pieces of furnishL
V.r?u?,b_0l!r.
lar8e
stock, We have but a few
9
S-
•.-*5
i.
•.
%i
'Jmi
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