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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, December 18, 1901, Image 8

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038306/1901-12-18/ed-1/seq-8/

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We Have Received the
New Fall Styles in
Hats.
a guarantee that insures a perfect
wear. The nev/ stvVw 'or Fall
and Winter are numerous in variety
and very pleasing.
Call and See
Them at
wagons or any special job in this line.
A SAVORY AROMA
that is an appetizer, as well as a
tickler of the palate, arises from the
rich and nourishing soups that ate
made lor the edification of the epi
cure and will suit the pocketbook ol
the economical. Our fine canned
soups, as well as our choice canned
goods of all descriptions, are of the
best brands, and all of recent can
ning, fresh, nourishing and palatable.
Mill
Company's
1 1 1 1
'clothing MO0SE
IF YOU ARE
LOOKING FOR THE BEST
the way ol Vehicles, Buggies, Spring wagons and Lumber
WE HAVE WHAT YOU WANT!
Anything in our line that cm or cannot be had anywhere else
we can manufacture on short notice.
WORK POSITIVELY GUARANTEED
It must also not be forgotten that we keep constantly on
hand everything pertaining to a buggy or wagon and do all kind?
of repairing, having expert men in all the departments equired for
carriage and wagon building.
POSITIVELY
TEN to FIFTEEN DOLLARS CAN BE SAVED on every vehicle
by making your purchases of us.
ip WE DO AS WE ADVERTISE
Kennedy- Buggy Co
Ladies!
Do You Contemplate
-v^sr*swsapr#
-J
If You Wear a
Longley Hat|
you will have the correct
style, shape and color, and
gjCleaning Your
Lace Curtains?!
W**&
We guarantee to clean them, Make Them Look As!
Good As New, and not damage them in the least, and the price
will be right at
Vl 1
uV_
The Manchester Laundry.,
!^§g§8gggg3^SSSS^gg^^
scc«ee«ce££
,J /*»». *t ii
lC
PETERSON BROS
ALL THE NEWS IN
The Democrat,
$1.50 PER YEAR.
3M«0*0»0*0*0»0+0»0*0*0*0*C'K)*0*0*0+0*&tO<»0«{3»0+0*0*0
OH!=HO!
Good hot buckwheat cakee for brraktast, th« kind midis from Q'uliet
•t Purified Buckwheat.
Our buckwheat flour iB milled by our new process from the finest [email protected]
grown, and we guarantee every sack to be absolutely pure and free from
adulterations.
Skeptics Take Notice!
$1000 OOfo you If you can prove that Puriiied Buckwheat Is not pure.
Cakes made from PURIFIED JJUCKWHEAT tasle like Buckwheat?
because it is Buckwheat
For Sale at the Principal Groceries.
QUAKER MILL COMPANY.
W40404040404040^040f(H0^04040404C34cy04H^*^je4(H1
1
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OOOOOOOOGOOOCOOO'OOOOOQOQOO
THE HEART
OF FORT
OoOo&oQc~joGoOQoQoOoOo£)oQoQ
At luncheon be surpassed himself.
Even Merovinge gave place to him.
The others had also their orders and
were as comparatively silent as it is
given to Frenchmen to be. They al
lowed Francois to take the floor, so to
speak, and he availed himself 6t the
chance in a manner that thrilled his
compatriots, llo was magnificent. He
sunned himself in the smiles of the
fair, he told stories of the duels he had
fought and the dangers he had braved,
be dwelt on his approaching departure
with a point and a quiver of feeling
that won him many compliments later
on round the mess table on board, and
all the time Cordelia's attention never
flagged. She sympathized and looked
terrified in the right places, lu fact,
she satisfied even the exigent vanity of
her admirer.
Francois, however, directed most of
his conversation to Pat Cannon, whose
labored politenesses delighted Cordelia,
for in spite of all Cannon was as jeal
ous as a red haired man has a right to
be. He was a young fellow of parts
and sagacity, but he was very human,
and Cordelia, like many another wo
man, dealt hardly with an affection of
which she felt secure. Colonel Len
nard understood the various elements
of the scene wonderfully and smiled
from time to time grimly enough under
his heavy mustache.
At length lunch and Francois' tales
of his own prowess came to an end.
It was still too early in the day to go
upon the roof, and Cordelia proposed an
expedition by some sheltered passages
to the fort, where In a cool gallery,
with embrasures open to the sea breeze,
the men might smoke and saunter for
awhile.
There was a pause. Then Colonel
Lennard slowly agreed to the proposal.
Canuon demurred a little, but his ob
jection was overruled, and Francois
led the way with Cordelia, his heart
beating in his throat as in imagination
he saw himself beiug decorated for his
achievement.
Cordelia had put on a big white hat
that only made a frame to enhance the
beauty of her face.
What Francois said during that mem
orable hour, his eloquence, his pathos,
can never be written dowu, but he cun
ningly led the fascinated girl hither
and thither, past endless sentries, who,
however, stood only rigidly stupid as
the couple paced the length of the for
tification. It may be added that Cor
delia herself was astonished at the ex
traordinary number of men on guard,
the fact being that Cannon had no idea
of allowin her to be tor one moment
out of earshot alone with her enamored
companion.
After a time a favorable opportunity
offered, and Francois made the request
he had bee working toward since he
arrived in Tcheu bay.
"Dear mademoiselle, you will permit
me a recollection?" he said, with eager
ness, as he produced his camera. "I
scarcely dare to ask so much, but in
the lonely moments at sea, when per
chance the last storm that 1 am des
tined co hear is blowing, I will take
one last look at that exquisite face.
You cannot refuse me?"
Cordelia's eyes were alight Never
had she looked so beautiful.
"To place with your mother and sis
ters?" she demanded, with what Fran
cois deemed to be a shy delight. That
was as it should be. She had clearly
no suspicion of his real design.
They were on one of the bastions.
Two old sun warmed guns frowned in
nocently out over the gleaming water.
Francois begged Miss Lennard to place
herself by one of these, turning an apt
compliment out of the contrast. He
was inclined to be a little contemptu
ous of the girl's blindness and her fa
cile responses to his flattery arift ad
vances. Moreover, he largely despised
the British, who could look with com
placency upnu these obsolete pieces of
artillery 01 remain ignorant of the
very patent fact that the whole forti
fication would be about their ears in
ten minutes under the shells of a man
of-war, against which they must be en
tirely helpless, as none of the ancient
specimens of cast iron he saw about
him could throw any projectile more
than 100 yards and that crooked. And
then he turned with zest to take a look
at the opulent island to the south, one
small corner of which could be descried
from the spot where he stood. Ah, the
future!
&
snrufseeeoS
jeceeecSS
He placed Miss Lennard and, retir
ing got his focus. In many places and
In divers positions he photographed her
and with her the fortifications coveted
by the war office at Paris.
As his professional outlook bright
ened the more warmly glowed the
words of the inflammable Gaul. At the
first picture she was "chore mademoi
selle." Before the last she was— But
never mind. Miss Lennard might read
this story, and then where should I be
If told?
That evening Merovinge 6aid:
"My friend, let me embrace you. You
have achieved a success. You have
achieved an immense service to France
and to me. Be trauquil. You will have
your reward."
Francois responded as was expected
of him, but his heart was unreasonably
heavy, and, though he tried to persuade
himself that the great desire he felt to
develop his plates was only the outcome
of professional zeal, that it had noth
ing whatever to do with the human in
terest contained in the photographs, he
was obliged before long to own that
his motives were not purely patriotic—
were, in fact, a little mixed.
8o the Loup-garou put out to sea, and
Francois, gazing back at the receding
fort crowned ridge, acknowledged to
himself that he had indeed conquered,
but the conquest had left a sting in his
memory. As the shores of China were
growiug with every moment more in
distinct there came across the ame
thyst water a dull, reverberating noise,
and then again, and yet again. It was
almost as if blasting were going on.
Captain Merovinge opined that the Eng
lish were probably trying to fire a sa
lute from "those guns!"
On the Tonquin station, it Is very
difficult, almost impossible,'to get leave
of absence, and so a weary montli wore
on while Francois yearned to return to
Chiua. The photographs aud informa
tion had been duly sent to the proper
authorities in Paris, and upon their an
swer Francois built hopes of securing
time to return to Fort Tcheu, for that
desolate spot he now knew had au Ir
remediable hold upon his heart. Judge,
then, of his feelings when a letter ar
rived for him bearing upon it the uu
forgotten handwriting of mademoiselle,
lie claspcd it to lijs heart and retired
tfyKl'-JWSy*
$**%&&
to his cabin to read its contents. Good
ness only knows what he expoctcd
them to be. What they actually were
is given here, together with the com
ments of the gentleman to whom they
were addressed.
S
O
E
By...
E. and H. HERON.
Copyright, 1001, by HaeHctti Prllchanl.
Dear M. Francois—1 hope you have not quite
forgotten Fort Tcheu and ourselves, (Nevairc,
mademoiselle!) Do you remember those photo
graphs which you took while you were here?
(Francois cast his eyes upon one of them which
hung over the locker.) I am going to ask you a
favor. (It is already granted, ma belle!) 1 was
very fond of the old fortifications, but our stupid
government had condemned them as effete. (Moii
Dieu!) 1 don't know whether 1 mentioned that
to you when you were here. (What perfld.v!)
They were destroyed the day you left. There are
new ones on the ridge looking toward the Is
land, but though they may be much more useful
they arc not nearly so picturesque as the old, and
1 should feel very grateful to you if you would
let me have a copy of one or two of the views
.vou took that day. My husband sends his com
pliments to ail on board the Loup-garou. And,
thanking you beforehand, 1 remain yours sin
ccrcly, CORDELIA CAKNON.
O
IIOTT
to Broil and itonHt Birds.
The directions for broiling are the
same for all small birds. Bear in mind,
however, that for the extremely small
ones a very hot, bright lire is ueeded.
as the birds should be only browned
consequently the time required for
broiling them Is very brief. Sluge and
wipe the birds, then split down the
middle of the back, remove the con
tents, pound the birds lightly to flatten
the breastbone and wipe thoroughly
with a damp, clean towel, taking care
that everything Is removed aud the
birds are left, perfectly clean for cook
ing season with salt and pepper, rub
thickly with soft butter and dredge
with flour. For squabs or quails about
ten minutes are required for broiling.
Smaller birds require less time.
To roast bird:* draw and wash quick
ly. wipe dry. season with salt and pep
per and pin a thin slice of pork on the
breasts put the birds In a shallow pan
in a hot oven and bake for 15 or 20
minutes. Partridges require 40 min
utes. Serve on toast with currant jel
ly and with bread sauce, which is
made in the following way: One pint
of milk, one half cupful of fine bread
crumbs, two tablespoonfuls of chopped
onion, one tablespoonful of butter, one
half tea^poouful of salt, one-half salt*
spoonful of white pepper, two-thirds
of a cupful of coarse bread crumbs
and auother tablespoouful of butter.—
Sal lie Joy White in Woman's Home
Companion.
Tfee Life of Coal Miner*
First, the boy of eight or ten is sent
to the breaker to pick the slate and oth
er impurities from the coal which has
been brought up from the mine. From
there he is promoted and becomes a
door boy, working In the mine. As he
grows older and stronger he is ad
vanced to the position and given the
pay of a laborer. There he gains the
experience which secures hiin a place
as a miner's helper, aud as he acquires
skill and strength he becomes, when in
the height of his manhood and vigor, a
full fledged miner.
If he is fortunate enough to escape
the falls of rock and coal, he may re
tain this position as a miner for a num
ber of years. But as age creeps on and
he Is attacked by some of the many
diseases Incident to work in the mines
he makes way for those younger and
more vigorous following him up the
ladder whose summit he has reached
He theu starts on the descent, going
back to become a miner's helper, then
a mine laborer, now a door boy, aud
when old and decrepit he finally re
turns to the breaker where he started
as a child, earning the same wages as
are received by the little urchins who
work at his side. There is no incen
tive for ambition in the average min
er's life. He cannot rise to places of
eminence and wealth. Only 1 in 500
can even be given place as a foreman
or superintendent, and these are posi
tions which few miners care to bold.—
John Mitchell in Cosmopolitan.
For Ilia Reputation, 9SOO.
The proprietor of a large dry goods
store had decided to tear down the old
6uilding and erect a uew one in its
stead. In furtherance of this plan lie
was* removing his goods to temporary,
quarters in another building.
The goods were nearly all out of thr
old structure when from some un
known cause it caught fire. The de
partment was promptly on hand and
soon had a stream playing on the
flames, but the merchant was wild
with excitement. Uunning up to the
chief, he urged him to greater haste.
"Never mind the goods!" he shouted.
"Save the building! I'll give the boys
a cheek for $300 for their pension fusul
If they don't let tin? fire spread beyond
that floor!"
"Why, you're going to tear the old
building dowu anyway, aren't you?"
asked the chief.
"Yes," he said, "but do you suppose
I want the insurance companies or any
body on eartli think that's the rea
son why it caught fire?"
By great exertion the fire was ex
tinguished with littie loss so far as the
building was concerned, and the mer
chant was as good as his word.—
Youth's Companion.
Queer Creatures.
There aie microscopic creatures
which live in roof gutters and on the
bark of trees and are known as water
bears and wheel auimalcuhe. If allow
ed to dry up under the microscope, they
can be seen to shrivel into shapeless
masses, which may be kept for years
uninjured in the dried state.
On being placed after this long inter
val in water they gradually plump up,
resume their proper shape and move
about In search of food just as if noth
ing had happened. Much the same is
true for the minute worms which from
tlie substances in which they live are
known as paste and vinegar eels. Well
known is the famous ease of the desert
snail, which, ivtracted into its shell,
was fasti'iird 10 a tablet In the British
museum and showed uo sign of life for
seven years, when one morning it
found crawling hungrily about the
gluss case that formed Its prison.
('L 111M Sleeve.
At the batil of Omdurman a soldier
belonging io a Scotch regiment was
nearly killed [y bullet which struck
the ground Just In front of him while
he was firing in a reclining position.
On rising to move a few feet forward,
something came dov/n his sleeve. It
was the bullet. IIow It got up his
sleeve without inflicting damage can
only be accounted for by the fact that
it must have been spent by the time It
struck the ground lu front of him aud
the course of its flight up his sleeve
was Its last billet.
PlorlNta' Lives Are Short.
"It Is commonly supposed that the
men who. work In the mines or those
whose occupations necessitate the
breathing of poisonous fumes and gases
are the .shortest lived," said a promi
nent physician. "This Is a mistake,
^nd It will surprise many to learn the:
the highest death rate is found among
a class who breathe In the sweetest
odors—florists.
'The reason Is a simple one. The flor
ist lives at once in the torrid and the
frigid zone. From a greenhouse atmos-
W W
phere of nearly 100 flegrees lii llie win-1
ter months be must step out into one
that is nearly always below freezing
point and often below zero. In sum
mer he has change to encounter, too, as
in the spring and fall. By force of hab
it he grows careless and often works
without his coat in the hot, artificial at
mosphere, and this Increases the dan
gers to which he is exposed. Lungs
and throat and stomach diseases, ag
well as rheumatism, find in the florist
the least resistance."—Galveston News.
Two Clrcnn Pent*.
'A great deal of unnecessary sym
pathy Is wasted upon the circus man
who stands up proudly in spangled
tights and lets another circus man
bring down a sledge hammer upon a
rock placed upon his head with force
enough to break it." says an old circus
man. "This Is spectacular, but is en
tirely painless and calls for no gerat
strength or endurance. Upon the cra
nium of the strong man Is put an iron
contrivance weighing about 150 pounds
and provided with cushions both above
and where It rests upon the head. A
pretty good sized rock Is used, and the
hammer Is a heavy one, so you can see
that the blow that cracks the rock is
really a serious one. But most of the
force Is taken up by the rock and the
rest by the Iron and cushions, while
the only sensation felt by the subject
Is a gentle tap.
No more difficult than this Is the
act whereby the hero of the canvas
tent permits a rock to be broken upon
his chest with a blow from a sledge
hammer. So long as the subject's back
Is free and docs not rest against any
solid object the trick is perfectly sim
ple. A little illustration: Take a board
up and let It lie freely In your hand
and hit It smartly with a hammer. It
Is difficult to hurt your hand, and the
thicker the board the less the sensa
tion. But now put your band on the
table and hit the board. Hurts, doesu't
It? Well, it's the same with the rock
on the chest"
How Our Ancestor* Quarreled.
A study of mediaeval rural life Is apt
to give the Impression that the princi
pal part of the life of the people was
spent in quarreling or In the commis
sion or prosecutlou of offenses. Our
ancestors certainly were a very liti
gious and a very disorderly people.
The records teem with instauces of men
and women drawing knives against one
another, of breaking into houses, of
prosecuting one another for slander.
Then we have such entries as these:
"It Is ordained by common consent
that all the women of the village must
refrain their tongues from all slander
ing." "Thomas, sou of Robert Smith,
is fined 12 pence because his wife Ag
nes beat Emma, the wife of Robert,
the tailor, and Robert, the tailor, six
pence because his wife 12mma swore at
Agnes the wife of Thomas." "It 1s en
joined upon all the tenants of the vil
lage that none of them attack any oth
ers in word or deed, with clubs or ar
rows or knives under penalty of paying
40 shillings."
Such entries, frequently occurring. In
addition to the Innumerable instances
of individual attack, slander, petty
theft and other Immorality seem to
show a community of far from perfect
virtue.—Llpplncott's.
Italians Love Tomatoes.
Italians more than any other people
value tomatoes, and each oue that
comes to perfection is as carefully teud
ed as though It were an apple of gold.
Not only do the housewives delight in
the fresh vegetables themselves, but.
generally speaking, those home tended
are better than any purchased at the
market, and so each one is jealously
saved to make tomatoe sauce for the
spaghetti, without which no Italian
Sunday would be Sunday. One soapbox
gardener one season sold enough toma
toes to give her quite a little pin money.
No one who knows the Itallau well will
be surprised to learn that many of the
boxes are devoted to peppers, for they
in truth furnish much of their spice of
life, and even the little Italian girls
know how to stuff and cook theui 1:1 a
dozen different ways that tempt the
palate.—Boston Transcript,
Coloring of Flowers.
A florist says that the law governing
the coloring of flowers makes a blue
rose impossible. According to this law
the three colors red. blue and yellow
never all appear lu jhe same species
of flowers. Any two may exist, but
never the third. Thus we have the red
and yellow roses, but no blue red ami
blue verbenas, but no yellow: yellow
and blue in the various members of
the viola family (as pansies, for In
stance), but no red red and yellow
gladioli, but no blue, and so on.
llohbcr 1'lniits.
Many plant growers become annoved
because the older leaves at the uase or
their rubber plants turn yellow and
fall off. This Is a natural process. It
does not indicate any defect In the
plant It Is simply the rlpeulng of the
old foliage, which cannot be retained
indefinitely. Sometimes, however, the
loss of foliage results from the want of
root room, but In such cases the plants
refuse to grow.
Railroad Telegrams.
When a traveler lu the grand duchy
of Baden, (jermany, wants to send a
telegram while be is in the train, he
writes the message on a postcard, with
the request that It be wired, puts on a
stamp and drops It Into the train letter
box. At the next station the box Is
cleared and the message sent out.
Matrimony and ISyes.
An old man was rallied by Ills friends,
nn his marrying a young wife, on the
inequality of their ages. He replied.
"She will be uear me to close uiy eyes."
"Well," replied a friend, "I've had
two of them, and they opened my
eyes."—Exchange.
WKJ
Suiart Girl.
Her Mother—Edith, don't you think
you are getting too old to play with
little boys?
Edith—No, mamma the older 1 get
the better I like them.—TIt-BIts.
The Consultation.
"My wife always consults me about
every article of attire she buys- frocks,
hats, shoes, gloves, everything."
"My wife does, too—that is. she /lylce
me for the mouey."
He Was Too Slow.
Magistrate —Your husband charges
you with assault
Madam—Yes, your honor. I asked
him If he would always love me. and
he was so slow In answering that I hit
him with a mop. 1':^ only a woman,
Judge, and a woman's life without love
Is a mere blight.—Illustrated Hits.
Quite llvnllstlo.
"This," said the eminent artist.
my famous study of the 'Cows lu the
Clover.'"
"But where is the clover?" was ask
ed, none appearing in the picture.
"Oh, the cows have eaten It, you
know."—Baltimore American.
ilillll
Vfr'nt
House and Acres of Land in Man-1
Chester for Sale.
I will sell on reasonable terms my place in
Manchester, which consists of ?H acres of land.
The Improvements ar- a live room dwelling
hnu-e, A bam, bujrey sln-d. cliiekon house, ice
house o»y other small imlMlnus. i-'or jtirtlcu
lai'S enquire on the premise* of
4(J tf. ALEX. PUltVtS.
HOFFS
GERMAN
LINIMENT
The
Short Cub I
Cure
For Pain
Of 1
Any Name
As nuro n8 It is sure. Abso
lutely white—docs not soil tho
cloiblng. Cures Hhcuinutism
nndull weakness and pains of
limbo nutl muscles. For
sprulnK, burns, euU it is uu
oqimlled by any other remedy
In the world. Relieve# neu
ralgia and nervous hendnebo
almost infltnnlly. Taken in
ternally, It cures
eolds, coughs,
croup, ote. Tho pain of warts,
corns aud bunions is Imme
diately allayed and quick
euro cflecled.
Sold l»y ull 'Irnppiflta,2&c anrlfioc
Company
A
ymn-aiuiot jtrocurc it.
write for IxjoKlet to
GOODRICH & JENNINQ8
Anoka, Minn*
Richer in Quality than most
!0C Cigars
VHVIS'
SINGLE
BINDER
STRAIGHT54CIGAR
Compare them with other Cigars and
you find good reasons for their costing
the dealer more than other brands
FRANK LEWIS, PEORIA,IU.
ORIGINATOR TIN FOIL SMOKER PACKAGE
Ra and sweat
have effect on
harness treated
with Eureka Har»
ness Oil. It rc
sists the damp
keepsthelenth
cr soft «nd pli
able. Stitches
do not break.
No rough Mir
facc to chafe
and cut. The
harness not
only keep
looking like
new, but
wears twice
loncby the
useof Kurcka
Harness OiL
Sold
everywhere
|n cans—
flllsins.
Made by
Standard Oil
PATENTS
50 YEAR8'
EXPERIENCE
I RADE MARKS
DESIGNS
COPYRIGHTS &E.
Anyone sending a nketch and description ma
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
Invention Is probably patentable. Communica
tions strlctlyconUdontlal. Handbook on Patents
Bent free. Oldest agency for securing patents.
Patents taken throuiih Munn & Co. receive
special notice, without charge, in the
Scientific American.
A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir
culation of any sclentltlc Journal. Terms, $3 a
year four months, 8old by all newsdealers.
MUNN & Co.36'8"""1^NewYork
Branch Office, G25 St* Washington, D. O.
We are specialists in
coffee and pride our
selves on "quality at
a price"
fits
coffee
wise
palates
and smoothes the break
fast frown
For Sule by
L. G. WELLS.
R. W. TIRRILL
Is Loaning floney as cheap
as any person or Corpora
tion.
DELAWARE COUNTY
Abstract Co.,
Manchester, Iowa.
ABSTRACTS^
REAL ESTATE.
LOANS
AND
CONVEYANCING.
Office In First National
Bank Building.
,!is
Orders by mail will receive careful
attention.
We bare complete copies of all records
of Delaware county.
ENNIS BOGGS.^
•1 "^NAaBB.
*'S-4wV "Vi'Sw
•p
Railroads.
Manchester & Oneida Ry.
TIME TABLE.
Train No. 2 leaves Manchester at ft a. m. ar
rives at Oneida at r»:3o
a. tn connects
with west bound C. (J. W. No. 5.
Returning leaves Oueida at r:83 a.m.
arrives at Manchester atti U5a. in.
Train No. 4, leaves Manchester at 7 15 a.
arrives at Oneida at 7:45 a. in., eon
ueets with east bound U. \Y. No.
(i. HeturniiiK leaven Oueida at 7:Rfl
a. m.. arrives at Manchester at 8:20
a. in.
Train No. C. leaves Manchester at 3:45 a. m.. ar
rives at Oueida at 9:14 a.m. Con
nects with the north bound C. M. A
St. P., No. 22. lteturulnK Ieave3
Oneida at 0:20, arrives at Manchester
atl):G0 a. in.
Train No. 8. leaves Manchester at 2:R5p. m..
ar
rives at Oneida at 2:35 p. m. Con
nects with 0. u. W., No. 4, east
bound,and No. 9. westbound, lte
turniug leaves Oneida at S:20 p. ro.,
arrives at Manchester at 3:G0 p. m.
Train No 10, leaves Manchester at 4:20 p.m.,
arrives at Oneida at 4:40 p. in. Con
nects with south bound G.
(J14DAK KAPIDS BKANOH.
North Bound
-Arrlve
No.8tw Oiiop.tn
No »82 8:40a.in
No. 300 1:80 p.in
lict (Jt'dar Rpd& I South Bouud
an.« Manchester Leave
...t Passenger.
..tPHRsenger..
... tFretgnt...
Gong West, North and South.
Way Freight, dally 11:80 am
Day Express dally except Sunday. U:2Gpm
St Paul & Kansas City Exp, dally ex
cept Sunday 5:41 am
For Information and tickets apply to
W. T. Brander, Agent Toorpe.
B, C. R. & N. R'",
CEDAR RAPIDS TDIE CARD
MAIN LINK GOINO KA9T AND SOUTH.
Arrive Leave
8:2o No. 2Chicago Passenger.... 8:40pm
y:80 a No. 4 Chi. & Uurlt'n Pass 9:85 a ai
8:10 a No. Chicago & St.Louls Ex. 8:80 a in
12:20 ngt No. 8 Chicago Fast Express. 12:27 ngt
No. 18 Burl. & Davnp't. Pass 8:2&p tn
No 2—Pullman sleeper, freo chair car and
coaches to Chicago. No. 15—Pullman sleepers
aud through coaches to Chicago s.nd St. Louis.
No. &—Pullman sleeper and iree chair car to
Chicago arrives Chicago 7:00 a. m. Dlnlngcar
will serve breakfast from Jollet to Chicago-
Ngt.—night.
MAIN LINE CJOINO NORTH.
7:85 a No. Minneapolis Pass.. 8:05 a
12:10 No. 8 Itockford Passenger... 3:30
12:i# ngt No. 5 Minneapolis Express..12:30 ngt
6:45 a No. 18 Chicago Passenger.
11:55 No. 19 Chicago Passenger.
No. 1—Free chair car and coaches to Al
bert Lea. No. 5—Wide Vostlbulid Pullman
Buffet sleepers and coaches to Minneapolis and
St. Paul.
DBCOBAH DIVISION.
8:10 Decorah Passenger 8:80 a
9:20 am West Union Passenger 3:40 in
4:05p Decorah FreUht 6:20am
IOWA PALLS DIVISION,
':30 pm....Iowa & Minnesota Pass 8:15 a
12:20 a. m..Minnesota & Dakota Pass..l2:80a in
IOWA CITY, DAVENPORT,BUHL. AND CLINTON,
13:10 m~ Burl. & la City Pass 8:25
7:45 m....Clin.,1aCity, llvpt Pass-....7:16am
7:35a in. Burl. & la city Pass -8:40
"Trains numbers 5.6,8. is. 19, and Mlun
Dakota Pass run dally, all other trains dally e:
cept Sunday."
JNO. (J. FARMER, J. A. LOMAX.
Gen'l Pass & Tkt Agt. Ticket Agent
Cedar Rapids Iowa,-
-jg More Cheap Excursions.
On the First and Third Tuesdays of
October, November and December Low
Rate round trip excursion tickets will
be on sale to all poiute on the JJuriing
ton, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railway
north of and including Abbott, Iowa
These ticketB bear a 21 day limit, there
by giviog ample time to look the situ
ation over thoroughly.
On same days there will be on sale at
ail B. C. R. & N. stations round trip
excursion tickets, with same limit and
privileges, to points in various other
StateB aud territories!
JNO.G.
-•R:-^TF7NATLCNAL,
M.a
No 8*69:00 H.m
No AM 0:25 p.
No.858 5:0U p. ill
All above trains carry passengers.
•Dally.
tDally ExceptSunday.
H. O. PIERCE, station Act
Nos 6 & 6 run between Dubuque and Aloert
Lea.
Nos. 81 & 82 run between Lyle and Dubuque
with connection through to Ft Dodge by train
No 81.
New train 4 iraVes same stop* cast of here as
No, 2 except that east of ltocKford It stops at
East Rockiord. Genoa & lolenmn, This train
Is a through vestibule train with dining
car from Omaha to liockford. No 2 & 4 only
stop at Dyersvllle between Manchester and Du
buque.
No 3-4-G-1-8 & 31 Run dallv (Sunday Included
NEW SHORT LINE
and 1 Pat
Illinois Central between Omaha and Fort Dodge
in connection with the Minneapolis and St. Loum
between Fort Dodge and Minneapolis and 8t
Paul, also to be Inaugurated January 28, 1900
Lv. Omaha
I 7.85 p. m.
"THE
LIMITED"
"THE
EXPRESS'
Lv. St. Paul
8.00 p. m.
Lv Minneapolis
8.30 in.
Ar. Omaha
8.15 a. m.
I
Ar. Minneapolis
7.80 a. m.
Ar. St. Paul
s.oo a.m.
A fast vestibule night train, dally, carrying
through Pullman sleeping car and couches.
Lv. Omaha
7.00 a. m.
Ar. Minneapolis
7.00 p. m.
Ar. St. Paul
7.80 p.m.
Lv. St. Paul
9.00 a. in,
Lv Minneapolis
9.80 a. m.
Ar. Omaha
9,40 p. m.
Fast day train, dally except Sunday, carrying
throughparlor car and coaches.
CHICAGOGREWWESTERN
FARMER,
A. G. P. & T. A.
B. C. R. & N. Ry..
44w7 Cedar Rapids, lowt
Homeseeker's Excursions.
The Chicago Great Western railway
will sell ticketB to various points in the
west on October 15tb, November 5th,
and 10th, and December 3rd at one fare
plue two dollars for the round trip. For
information applv to any Great Wes
tern agent, or J. P. Eimer, G. P. A.,
Chicago, Illinois. 41-Bw
Business Opportumtes For All.
Locations tn Tows, Illinois, Minnesota
and Missouri on the Chicago Great
Western llailfoad the very beBt agricul
tural section of the United States where
farmers are prosperous and business
successful. We have a demand for
competent men, with the necessary cap
ital, for all branches of business. Some
special opportunities for creamery men
and millers. Good locations for gener
al merchandise, hardware, harness, ho
tels, banks and stock buyers. Corre
spondence solicited. Write for maps
and Maple Leaflets. W. J. Reed, In
dustrial Agent, 004 Endicott Bld'g, St.
Paul, Minn.
18$.
LIVE EIOCK
EXPOSITION
At Chicago, Nov. 30th to Dec. 7tU^p
For this occasion, round trip tickHS"*'
ut very low ratts will be sold at alt
stRtiuns on lino of the iiurlingtou,v
UrUui IiajMth kt Norllu-iri Ry. Tlie
service vin this line in very lii.e sud the
time la ton. Apply to JJ. C. It. &
agents lor lull trit'ortnutlon.
JNO.
8.
FARMER,
A. G. P. & T. A.
B. C. R.
Nasal ft
CATARRH
1
44w7 Cedar Kapids, Iowa.
One Fare Plus $2.
Thoi. ire 8lUt tumm good lande in
northwestern Iowa, euuth ureter
Mitiueboiu uod ^outh Dakota, aud If
you are expi-ctiug to nmku a change lu
location, you phouJd lake Havaotupe of
on a in O
tbQ first and third Tuesday of t-ach
month ©ccursiuu tickets, bearing 21
days' limit, can be purchased to all
points on the liurlington, Cedar Kapids
& Northern Hallway, north of and
including Abbott, bhell Hock and
Waverly at One Fare Plus 82,
JFrdl information relative to these
lands will be cheerfully given upon ap
plication to Messrs. Xlten & Brooks
our Industrial and Immigration Agents,
Cedor Rapids, Iowa.
St.
P.. No. 21. KeturolnR leaves Oneida
at 4:55 p. m., arrives at Manchester
5:25 p. in.
JOHN L.8UMJVAN,
Gen. Traffic Manager.
ILLINOIS CENTRAL R. R.
TIME TABLE.
Main Line Passenger Trolps.
WKST BOUND* MAIN LINK
NolMU:18 a
No a* 3:15 pm.
No 31 tti:22
No5 +8:5ia
No Hit 2:05 m.
KAHT BOUND
..Fasi Tralu..
Thro Express..
Clipper..
Local Rxpress
~W»y Freight.
.Thro Frelght-
N«2* 8:30 am
No 4* 8:15
No S'2+8: r5 a in
No lit 8:40pin
No'J2*ll:45am
No tiC»8:UG
If yon are thinking of making a trip
to any pqjnt in Alabama, Arkansas,
Arizona, British Columbia, Canadian
Northwest, Colorado. Florida, Georgia,
Idaho, Indian Territory, Iowa, Kansas,
Kentucky, Louisiana, Manitoba, Minne
sota, Michigan, Missouri, Mississippi,
Montana, New Mexico, Nebraska,
North Carolina, North Dakota, Okla-
homa, Oregon, South Dakata, South
Carolina, TennesBt e, Texas, Utah, Vir
gtavc, W iBhington, Wisconsin and
irtUerct Michigan aud Wyoming, cal
on agents of the "Cedar Bapids ltoute'
for rates, etc., or address
-I
JNO. G.FAUMKU, A. G. P. & T. A..
B., C. H. & N.Hy:'
Cedar Uapids, la
LOW-RATE-EXCURSIONS
Twice each month, on specific dates, the Illi
nois Central will sed at ureatly reduced rate
from points on its line north of Cairo, roundirip
Homeseekers' Uxcurslon tickets South to cer
tain points on or reached by Us lines In Ken
tucky, Xennosseee, Mlsslshlppi, Louisiana and
Alabama. Also to certalu points West and
Southwest In Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota,
South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma
and Indian Territory Particulars of your 1111
nois Centrulageuts.
For a freo copy of tbo Homeseekers' Guide
describing the aavat tages and resources of the
fe-ouih. address J. l'\ Merry, A. U. 1\ A.,
1.0 K.
Dubuque. lova. For Information regard
Inc landn in the famous Yazoo Valley of Miss
issippi, address
4*:
K. 1'.
Skene, Land Commissioner
Y. & Si. V. It. It Chicago.
For Homeseekers and Land
Investors.
The passenger department of the Illi
nois Central railroad has just received
I rom the bands of the printer, a new
folder in the interests of llomeseekero
aud Land Investors. MuLy are look
ing for new homes and for land invest
ments. This folder furnishes brief but
reliable information aB to the resources
and possibilities of the states of Ken
tucky, Tennessee, .Mississippi ""and
Louisiana. The opportunities for in
vestments in the above mentioned
states are unsurpassed in any part of
thiB great country. UomeBeekers' ex
cursions to points within these st tea
are run by the Illinois Central the first
and third Tuesdays of every montb, at
a rate of one fare plus $2.00 and these
excursions should be taken advantage
of by everyone in search of a home or
investments in timber or farm lands.
For a free copy of tbis, address the
andersigned at Dubuque, Iowa.
J. F.
35tf
Rt
"The Maple Leaf Route."
March s, 1901.
Time card, Thorpe, Iowa.
Chicago Special, Dally,
Going East 7:37 a
Day Express dally -2:28 pm
Way Freight daily 11:30 am
MERRY,
Asst. Genl. Pass. Agent,
Illinois Central Railroad.
California.
The through tourist car for Californ
ia will run every Thursday via. tbe
Chicago Great Western railway and
Santa Fe route to LOB Angeles. New
Wide Vestibiiled I'ullman Tourists can
are furnished and these are personally
conducted west of Kansas City,. For
rates, reservation of berths, etc., applv
to J. P. Elmer, G. P. A., Chicago, III.
4121-w
ELY BROTHERS, 60 Warren Street, New York.
DATERS^T&k TRADE-MARKS
rA I EN 1 oanoCcd°T®hts
ADVICE AS TO PATENTABILITY pniBp
Notice In Inventive Age h|f fc
Boole "How to obtain Patents"
Charge» nioderate. No fee
F. M. FOLEY
RYAN, IOWA.
gOYNTON I M'£WEN
HAVE
Ladies and Gents Gold Watches
in all sizes kinds and styles,
Ladles, Gents and Chrlldrens Rings
from DIAMONDS, OPALS, EMER­
ALDS, PISARLS, ETC ., down to
PLAIN GOLD BANDS.
WEDDING RINGS.
—*,6m—
SOLID STERLING SILVER FORKS,
TABLE, DESERT and TEA SPOONS,
NAPKIN RINGS, ETC., ETC., ETC,
Also large lino of Best Brands of—
SILVER PLATED SPOONS, FORKS,
KNIVES, TEA SETS, WATER SETS,
CAKE BASKETS, BUTTER DISHES,
ETC., ETC.
CARVING KNIVES and FORKS, LADIES
GUARD CHAINS. GENTS VEST CHAINS,
EMBLEM RINGS, CHARMS, LOCK-
ETS. GOLD SPECTACLES, MAN
TEL CLOCKS, SILK UMBREL
LAS, GOLD PENS.
Come and see the many thitigs we
hau) not space to list.
hau)
32-21-'
io
YNTON & M'EWEN
1
I
I
r-rmR
In all Its Btages there
should be clcaulincas.
Ely's Cream Balm
clcanscs, soothes and heals
tbo diseased membrane.
It cares catarrh and drives
away a cold In tho head
quickly.
Cream Balm is placcd Into the nostrils, spreads
over the membrane and Is absorbed. Relief is in
mediate aud a cure follows. Jt Is not drying—docs
not produce sneezing. Largo Size, 60 cents at Drug
gists or by mail Trial Size, 10 cents by maiL
I
till patent Is secured.
Letters strictly confidential. Address,
E. Q. 8IGGERS, Paten) Lawyer. Wa&hlngtor. 0, C.
Ton Will Need
a Pair of Shoes
To keep your feet dry
during during the wet
weather this spring. We
can suit you in quality
and price. Also rubbers '.
of all kindsi
.a

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