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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, December 25, 1901, Image 1

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€l)c Democrat*
PUBLISHED EVEftY WEDNESDAY.
O E. BFtONSON. I, M. CARR.
BRONSON & CARR.
Editors and Proprietors.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE.
Yearly, in advance. W 60
It not paid In advanoo 8 00
NOTICE.—On tho Blip of paper upon which
the name Is printed, appears the date to which
toe paper is paid for, and a renewal la always
respectfully BolWod.1
The writcr'a "XTVUJV any arti
cle for publieat! 4Qu*ffl "*t
of the editor*".
Ladies' Comfort
Slippers, Juliette
style "Black Fur
trimmed, very neat
and pretty, only...
1
olate, Blnck and
1
Green. The best
ion the market from
$1,25 to.
PHYSICIAN,
"Laugh and Sing and Give Good Cheer for
Christmas Comes but Once a Year."
GRASSFIELD BROS.f
Headquarters for Christmas
Footwear.
Ladies' Juliette Pelt Slip
pera. Pur trimmed, Red, Choc-
S :iv-
House
WE FIT THE FEET. MANCHESTER. IOWA.
tarrrftTtiTrtjYrrrrrrffrfrii mmmm
Our Business Directory.
ATTORNEYS*
B, B, STUdta W. a. NORBIB
NOKRI8 & STILES.
A TTORNEYS AT LAW AND NOTARIES
cV-PubUo. Special attention given to Collec
tions Insurance, Real Estate and Loan Agts.
Dffloe In City Hall Blook. Manchester, la.
,0. YORAN. H. F. ARNOLD. M. J, YORAS'
YORAN. ARNOLD YORAN
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. and Real Estate
Agents. Office over Delaware County State
Bank,Manchester, Iowa.
O. E. BRONSON. i£. M. CARR.
BRONSON ft CARR.
A ATTORNEYS AT LAW. Special attention
given to collections. Office in Demoorat
BuUdine. Franklin Street. Manchester. Iowa.
FRBD B. BLAIR.
PHYBIOIAN8.
vf A. J. WARD, /4
TjayslOlXN and Surgeon, will aittnil to call*
JL promptly *x hours ot the day or night,
Oraont, Iowa.
D.,
J, J. LINDSAY,
suygoon and Eye Specialist.
Ofttoetaours (or eye vases ana fitting glasses
1:00 to 8:00 p. m. Office comer Male ana Prauk
,Un streets.
H. H. LAWHKNCR.
TDHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. Special at
Jt vtentloi
also -m&a§
ntlon given diseases of children. Bave
apeoial study of Oyceooology,
id Rectal Diseases All chronic
Obstetrics, and Rectal Diseases
Diseases successfully treated with the aid of
Various Thermal ana Massage treatment.
ohronics solicited. Consultation
over Work's market. All calls promptly at*
tended. Residence on Main street, the old Dr.
Kelaey property.
ALEX. 6EF8TROM.
a:"ispecialty.
KNERAL BLACKSMITH, horsesboing
Interferrins and corns cureiror
no pay. Prices reasonable, and the best of
wont (guaranteed
age is solicited,
the bridge.
DENTISTS.
O. A, DUNHAM. 0. L. LEIGH
DUNHAM & LEIGH.
\entists. Odlce in the Adams building on
Franklin street. Telephone 215.
D6
C. W. DORMAN.
at office on Saturdays.
£. 8. NEWCOMB.
Office over Clark ft Lawrence's
..... on Franklin street Grown
orldge work a specialty. Will meet patients at
Farley Wednesday ot each week. 82tf
DENTIST,
store
VBTBRINARIAN.
& DR. J. W. SCOTT.
VBTBKINABY
Sure«m, and Dentist.
MoINTOSH4
W- N, BMKTOH. J. F. MoEWBlfc
BOYNTON ft MoEWBN.
n/ATOHMAKERS,Jewelers and Engravers
VY dealers in Watches, Clooks, Silver and
~Piated Ware, Tine Jewelry, Speotaolea, cutlery,
vMufllcsl Instrument, eto. Main street.
A.D.BROWN.
ealer In furniture eto., and undertaker.
Main Street.
ENTBKVD AT TBS POSTOFNCE AT I
MAncmtarrER. IOWA, AS SEQOND-CLASS MATTER.
Men's Velvet House
Slippers. Patent leather
trimmed and imitation
Allligator slippers only
Ladies' Patent Leather Strap Sandals
For Dress Wear
Ladies' Fine Dresss Shoes,'
patent leather scroll face stay.
Patent leather tip,
very pretty, new
style last. Ask to see
them. Only
iGrassfield Bros.
and Feed. Manufacturers of the eel*
brated White Satlu at:ti White^earlFJour.
LAWRENCE & 6R6M8.
DRUGS,
Wall Paper. Stationery, Paints, Oils,
etc. City Hall block..
PETER BOARDWAY.
DEALER
A sbaie of the public patron
Bliop on Franklin street, near
IN flour, feed, hay straw, Maquoke
ts lime, stucco, and common and Atlas ce
ment. Telephone 113.' Lower F/anklin St.
... All
free, Office
aptly
eold
PETERSON BROS.
DEADERB
r*ENKBAt. DEALER IN FURNITCRE, one year. Thls_is emphatically a good
(j ooJSns. Picture Frames, Eto. A oompleto thing, and no farmer in thlB county
Bhould fail to take advantage of this
F. WERKMEISTBR.
stoekot Furniture and Upholstery always on
hand, at grloes that defy competition. A (rood
Rears, kept for attetadanoe at funerals. Earl
rille, Iowa.
ALLEN A STOREY.
riLOTBINQ and Gents furnishing goods,
ner Main and Franklin street*.
A.THORPE.
Pdjr
BOPBIBTOlt OP KALAMITY'S PLUN
Store aii'l Dealer In Clothing. Boots,
t)ho», Notions, tic, Masonlo Dlotk Manches
ter. Iowa.
GRASS FIELD BROS
(SuocfsnorstoSethBrown.)
BOOTS
AND SHOES of all grades and prloei.
Custom Work and Bepalrtng given speolal
attention, store tn Cltr Hall Blook.
QEO. S LISTER,
HARDWARE. STOVES, TINWARE, ETO.
y'/ XX Koeps a tirat-claaa tinner and does all
-1 ktods of repairing with neatness and dlspatoh.
Store opposite First National Bank, Main St.
T. F. MOONEY
(Suooeinor to tee Bowman.)
BLACKSMITHdone
and Waeonmakor, Delhi.
Iowa, Work promptly and in a work
manlike manner. Oliarget rjwonahle. Your
Patronage solicited.
1Bti
IN' Groceries, Provisions, Crock­
ery, Fruits, etc. Main Street.
J. M. PEARSE.
OF TUB PEACE AND COLLECT
OR. All business entrusted to him glyeo
prompt attention. Office in City Hall mock,
sccopd floor.
tr--''-"
ISO Acre Farmfor Sale.
We are agents for the sale of
the O. A underwood Farm of
ISO acres, situated about 7 miles
north east of Manchester.
Therq, Is a bargain for some
purabaser in this prdperiy BHONSON & CAHU
House Tor Bent.
A good house situated on Frauklin street just
soutit of my residence, now. occup ml by Burton
Clark. Jos. HUTCHINSON.
CYCLONE AND TORNADO
Insurance In first class companies written aud
policies Issued by BBOVSON ft CARK.
Deroc Jersey Swine.
A few fine male pigs for sftlo, pedigree fur*
nlthed with each pig.
L. SNYDER,-8H miles southwest of Man
chester, Iowa.
There area sufficient number of lawjj
yers clected to the next general assem
bly to keep the laws in a stale of hope
less confusion.—Cedar ltapids Gazette.
Allison On Schley.
In speaking of the Schley verdict
Senator Allison said: "Out in th west
sentiment is all one way, and I know
that nothing would inluce the people
in my cection of the country to
change their vie we as to the practical
results achieved by Schley at Santiago.
They do not consider the tactical mis
doings of Schley prior to the battle, and
they attach greater importance to what
J)ewey says in his brief report than
they do to the findings ot the other
members of the court.
"There would be a division of opin
Ion among the. friends and the enemies
of Schley, In spite of a congressional
investigation. Therefore I cannot see
how either Admiral Schley or the navy
can be benetitted by prolonging a
controversy which never need have
been started."
Rural Mailers Have Right to Register
Letters And Packages.
For the information of those living
on rural routes the following card of
instructions has been given out by tha
post oQice department:
S
HOLLISTER LUMBER CO.
LUMBERand
and all kinds of building materials.
Posts Coal. Corner of Delaware ana
Madison streets.
TH08. T. CARKEEK.
ARCHITECT
ANI
KUILDINCJ SUPERIN­
TENDENT, S. E. Corner, 8th and MUTII St.
Dubuque, Iowu.
SCHARLES. THE TAILOR.
^I'EUCilANT TA1LOII arid Gents Furnishing
Goodi), Maucbester, Iowa.
WM. DENNIS.
CARPENTER.
CONTHACTOK & DU1LDKH.
I am now prepared to do all work in my
line In a good and workmanlike manner. Satis
faction guaranteed. Plans aud usttiuates fur
nished Work taken in town or country* Shop
near the stand tower on West Side of river.
O. E. GATES.
CITY
A XTOKNEY AX LAW. Office lutheCllyHftU
A Qfoefe MuahMter, low**
DRAYMAN. Am prspared to do all
.work in my line. Moving fxviMehold good*
and ^Uuioaaipitfr&Tiy. All ,.work\will receive
Brompt
attention. A share of your patronaee
soliolted.vChargesi1ght.Ver
solfolted. vCharges right.
to a man wte has come to $tay.
-rr-
lveyour draylntt
B. OLARK.
J^RY GOODS. N«UonsuCarpets]
nlshlng goods, etc.
vat|mw. Gents Fur
Franklin Street.
QUAKER MILL CC.
FLOUR
All valuable letters and parcels sent
in the mails Bbonld be registered to in
sure tbeir safe transmission and cor
rect delivery.
Rural carriers are prepared to regis
ter mail matter on every trip. The
registry fee is only eight cents in ad
dition to the postage, and both muBt be
prepaid with stamps aflixed to the ar
ticle registered, or in money paid to the
carrier, who will write the amount in
the receipt given you.
45*8
Theiarge ana mcreastng circulatiou
of The Iowa Homestead in thls eounty
is a matter for congratulation to the
publishers and to good farming, for, of
all the papers of its clasB in the coun
try, It la eaBlly-the best and most help
ful. Its Special Farmers' Institute
editions, issued with the regular edition
the first week in each month, have been
for years the admiration of all practi
cal farmers. Written wholly by farm
eiB. they are full of actual experience,
and smell of the Boil, We have been
fortunate enough this season to secure
termsfor The Homestead and its Spec'
ial Farmers' Institute Editions,together
with The Poultry Farmer ana The
Farmers' Mutual Insurance Journal,
four of the most valuable farm publi
cations in the country, that enable us to
offer the four In connection with our
own paper for 81,90 for the entire five,
601 E
Main Street, Telepbon 239.
MANCHESTER MARBLE WORKS?
T8 prepared to furnish Granite and Marble
i. Monuments and.Head Stones of various de
slims, Have the oounty right for Slpe'a Pat
ent Grave Cover also dealer in Iron Fences*
Will meet all competition, BtfM,
neev wmujwwwvu.
offer. For a large line of thoroughly
practical farm reading nothing has ever
been offered before that equal^ it. A
county paper, a farm pa]
ir, a farm insurance
ial Farmers' Isntitm
Specl
Com
fome in and order them
dor
L. R. STOUT.
SibOTHING and Seats, furnishing goods.
City Sail Blocks Franklin Street.
HIODELL A CO.
TkBY GOODS, Carpets, Millinery, Bats and
Caps, Boots and Shoes, eto., Mala St.
M.ncbostor, Iowa.
a poultry
per and the
all for 81.90
te, al
Of Benefit to ToUy-i
D.S Mitchell, Fuiford, Md.: -'During
a long illness I was troubled with bed
sores, was advised to try DeWitt's
Witch Hazel Salve and did BO with
wonderful results. I was .perfectly
cured. It is th9 beat salve on the mar
ket." Sure cure for piles, sores, burns.
Beware of counterfeits. Smith Bros.
Insurance at Cost.
M. E. uialr.
Secretary of the Delaware County
Farmer's Mutual iusurance Co., and County
agent for the Iowa Mutual Tornado Insurauce
Co. will boat Fred Blair's officeJu Manohe&te
24tf
'8 office lu Manohe&ter.
Saturday afternoon of each week.
I'
F. E. RICHARDSON
Real Estate, Loans anil.
Insurance.
Office over the Racket §tore
Manchester, Iowa.
Letters and parcels to be registered
must: 1. Be plainly and correctly ad
dressed, 2. Bear the name and ad
dress of the sender. 3. Be Inclosed
in envelopes or wrappers strong enough
to carry contents to destination. 4.
Be in perfect condition.
Each rural carrier will give you a
receipt for each letter or parcel at the
time be accepts it for registration. A
second receipt, signed by the addressee
or his authorized agent, wili be mailed
you when the letter or parcel is de
livered.
If a letter or parcel prepaid at the
letter rate of postage, registered at a
United States postofSce, or by a rural
fcoe delivery carrier, and addressed to a
UnitedStatilpst office, be lost 'in the
maiiBaW suohletter or parcel or its
value be not recoverable the postofllce
department will make good its value up
to ten dollars.
The Manchester Press, which is just
now discussing tariff revision, replying
to a contemporary which holds up the
steel trust as an example of tariff op
pression, makes the following state
ment:
"It Is true that steel and iron pro d
ucts have advanced materially in price
but It has been conclusively shown that
the advance has been caused, in a great
measure, by tbe unprecedented demand
for these products incident to the extra
ordinary industrial activity of tbe time."
It must be that the Press editor
wrote tbe above sentence abstractedly
While his mind was mainly dwelling
upon greater phases of tbe sacred pro
tective policy of which he is a valiant
champion As an economic proposition
increased demand and increased pro
duction does not and should not in
crease the price of manufactured pro
ducts. On tbe other band, tbe raw
miterlal'belng plentiful, increased de
mand should result in cheaper prfces
for the finished products. Factories
that are working tbeir men aud ma
chinery to tbeir utmoBt capacity and
facilities, are issuing tbeir products at
ihe least possible tax upon Invested cap
ital, and consequently may enter a com
petitive market certain of being able
to bold their own. There should be no
advance in prices under such condi
tions.
The United States steel trust needB
no championship at the handB of re
publican newspapers to protect itself
from foreign competition. It ii amply
able to take care of itself. The stu
penduousnesB of this corporation cau
hardly be realized. It not only owns
Its manufacturing plants, but it draws
the ore from Its own mines by its own
lines of steamships and railroads, al
most absolutely controlling tbe market
because of Its ability to control the
article from tbe raw state to the finish
ed article. If there were a scarcity of
the raw material from which iron pro
ducts are made, then tbe statement of
Ibe Press would be good, but tbe cor
trary Is the fact Great beds of iron
ore are being brought to light nearly
every week in the United States and
Canada, almost limitless in quautity
and mined at a trifling cost.
Tbe iron industries of the United
States were wisely fostered and bene
fitted by tbe protective policy of the
republican party, and they have erown
from an inconsequential infancy to an
amalgamation that baB created one of
the greatest trusts In the world. As
one of tbe combinations of trusts which
are seeking to control the world's mar
kets, the steel corporation is one of the
menances which will have to be dealt
with la the future and economists and
legislators are giving grave consider
ation to the eubject.
Manufacturers, corporations nor
truBts are more entitled to usurious
profits than Is the money lender to
uaurous Interest upon his gold. If the
iron manufacturer can invade foreign
markets and undersell his competitor,
then he Is still more capable of doing
as well at borne. It Is unjuBt to hlB
borne patron that by means of a pro
tective tariff he Is rendered excusable
for charging the latter an
profit.—Hopkinton Leaderi^.-,,
A,
mmum
'.C ~. W
The Most Profitable Horses For Farm
ers to Raise.
[Tho following a paper road before the
Delaware County Fnrmo's Institute by J. C.
Nelman.
Here is a subject that has engaged
the attention of farmers for many
years, a subject that has been discussed
by many shrewd farmers for the last
decade with diversity of opinion.
Many yearB since, the prevailing opinion
was that the general purpose horse was
the horse for the farmerB to raise and
what they called the general purpoee
horse was an old fashioned horse, about
1,200 pounds, rather leggy, plain in con
formation, usually long in the back,
with light bone, a sort of a half way be
tween the driver and the work horse,
therefore hardly suitable for either
uses. This horse the farmer used for
workiag and to drive on the road, and
called him a very good horse. No doubt
this kind of a horse answered the pur
pose of years ago, but circumstances
have changed a different demand has
arisen. This kind of a horse at the
present day is the most unprofitable
horse tbe farmers can raise. He is no
market horse, and proves a poor In
vestment when ottered for sale, lie is
not sought after as a farm horse any
more. The idea of a general purpose
horse was exploded long ago. The
farmer wants class horses of the better
quality, higher class. What is known
as Class No. 3, the omnibus or express
horses, Class 4, the light and heavy draft,
is a far superior horse for the farmer in
all general use, and is also one of the
two most salable classes of horses that
is ottered in all markets, both for ex
port and all American uses, and is two
of the strictly class horses that are in
strongest demand, and sell readily for
the best prices. These are two very
profitable classes of horses for farmers
to
raiBe.
A great change has come over us in
these later yearB. During the last ten
years the horse industry has been en
tirely revolutionized. Since '93, the
great export demand has been introduc
ed, for the best classes and quality of
American horses, and this demend
which has been the life of our trade,
hsB been the great outlet for our horse
market, and at the same time has fixed
specific type and demand for export.
The American demand has eo changed
the evolution of tbe last ten years, as
since the early UO'e, the same classes
that are in demand for export'are the
only kinds that are profitable to raise,
for American as well as export, mar
kets. ..This great evolution of the last
t^n years, has cbanged'tbe whole' horse
breeding problem, and although a cost
ly leBson to the farmers and breeders of
horses that had large stocks on hand ,at
that time, has not been altogether
without Its benefits.
It bas taught us one continual leBson
for all those years while this change has
been going on that horses must be bred
strictly of tbeir own class,and every class
a distinct type of its class, and any vari
ation from strictly class system, means
failure in horse raising. While in form
er timeB breeding was done promiscous
ly, without proper training or fore
thought, of the kind of horse the mar
ket demanded, and in this way all kinds
of horses were produced, from the best
down to the inOBt worthless, small,
plain, ordinary and rough horses, com
prised the larger percent of the num
ber of horses bred and raised.
The effects of this promiscous bleed
ing without any system of forethought
can be Been ail over our country. True
the class horses of the better quality
have been culled out by horse buyerB,
and bave gone to market, but the
scrubs, culls and misfitq are still left in
tbe conntfcy. -iJut a very small percent
of horBes all oVer the country, far and
near, that are now left on hand, will
ever make market horses. Breeding
has commenced now in a small way
throughout the country, on a more true
principle, and farmers and breeders
bave a few young ones coming on, that
they have started right, or started on
the class system, and will be high class
horBes when old enough to market. At
the same time wherever you find horses
throughout the whole country that
have Bge, enough for the market, as a
rule you will find the most worthless lot
of culls that the country could be infest
ed with. Go into any part of the horse
raising section through tbe middle
west, and you will finda very low grade
of aged borses, that is aimost a disgrace
to the farm they are owned on. Go to the
best horse raising sections tn Kentucky
and Tennessee, and there you will find
a very small percent of the right kind!
and class of borses, tbe balance being
the most worthlees lot of culls that are
eating up the feed that ought to be
used in raising and feeding a better
class of stock.
But tbe farmers have had a severe les
Bon and are beginning to profit- by It by
breeding a better class of horses. Their
experience has taught them that every
horse should be bred of a certain type
and of specilio class, with all the size,
shape and quality that the market de
mands. The Bmall horse is a thing of
the past. He has proven a very unsat
isfactory Investment. Tbe grade has
been raised higher every year during
the last few years, and each successive
year requires a larger horse, and one of
better quality to meet tbe demands of
the market, and he must be a horse of
his own class, an up-to-date market
horse.
Farmers' institutes and breeding as
sociations for tbe last few years have
taken up this Bubject, and tbey have
done a most wonderful good work, and
breeders of all kinds of stock have been
aroused to a sense of duty to the great
benefit of improving their flocks and
herds, and especially the farmers who
have seen by their past failures, that a
different method is required with more
system. The old system of raising
.usurious sorub horses was so unprofitable. The
new system of raising class horses of
MANCHESTER, IOWA, WENDESDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1901. VOL. XXVII--NO. 52.
the highest quality they could possibly
produce, is proving very profitable. No
kind of domestic stock will begin to pay
the profit that a high class horse will,
if bred and raised and matured for
market of the proper quality,it strictly
good horse of bis own class. The in
terest that is be'ng taken by farmeis
throughout the country, in the breeding
of good horses, no doubt will result iu a
few years, in a great deal higher class of
borses, than there ever bas beeu seen in
this country betore. It Is a well estub
lished fact, and acknowledged by all
dealers, that all borses to be most eulu
ble and profitable, must be bred and
raised and fitted for tbe market, decid
edly of one of the following clusseB,
which are'known as the export classes
of horstr, and at the same lime tbey
are the moBt salable and pruiitabie fur
all American markets, aud any horse
that is strictly of one of the following
classes, will prove a good investment
when put upon the market:
Class No. 5, tbe American trotter or
road borse.
Here is a type set for the farmer to
produce. A proper study of these types
will aid the farmer to meet the de
mands of all markets. Tbe great secret
of success in breeding horseB for tbe
market is lint to know what the market
demands to know what tbe market
borse is. Before going extensively into
tbe breeding business, tbe farmer
should post himself on ail the points
that make up a good traiket horse, and
also on the different classes that the mar
ket demands, that he may make no mis
takes and breed strictly tbe market
borse, of a specific class and type, and
for a particular use, and be sure that
tbey are of tbe kind that is in strongest
demand when be comes to market.
Tbe breeder engaged in the live stcck
industry, to secure the top prices in the
open market, for his finished product,
should well consider tbe price tbat his
goods will bring, when In proper con
dition for the mar et, for what tbey
bring in tbe market, determines the
proband loss on the investment.--
Tn nearly all tbe industries a special
course of education is necessary before
embarking la tbe business. The mod
ern druggist must be a professional
pharmacist the surgeon must be en
dorsed by a diploma from some medi
cal college, to obtain tbe confidence of
bis clients. But in raising borees for
the market too many have engaged in
the enterprise witb no previous train-
Ing or experience. Under such condi
tions it iraio marvel that so many nov
ices have failed In the breeding Indus
try. Theifarmer should realize that hiB
model Is the market horse, which fills
tbe publio wants and is iu urgent de
mand.
The breeder should visit the open
market and learn the type of animal
tbat sells for the best prices, and having
decided tbe kind of a horse to breed,
strive by undaunted perseverance and
methodical elections, to produce a per
fect horse of tbat particular clsss. A
correct ideal and continuity of nrpoce
are neceBsary to acheive success in
breeding tbe market horse. The
farmer should not attempt to conduct
an establishment comprising the whole
range of borse breeding, but concen
trate his capital and energy in breeding
the highest standard type of one of the
special classes. The breeder should
conBult his finance and natural inclina
tion when choosing the kind of horse
he would raise, lie muBt be inspired
by an inate love of bis art, aud possess
an intuitive reception of bis model
animal tbat be is striving to produce, or
he will not acbeive success. He must
be an enthusiastic student of tbe animal
kingdom, and bave a humane concep
tion of tbe comforts and natural wantB
of the youngters In his charge, or tbey
will never develop Into extra choice ani
mals tbat top tbe market.
Now here is the parting of the wajs
which the breeder of the market horse
must choose, what class of horses he de
sires to produce for tbe market, wheth
er it be of tbe harness class, or whether
it be of class No. 3, tbe omnibus or
express horse, or class No. 4, tbe heavy
draft borse. For tbe average farmer
who wishes to raise horBes for the mar
ket, I believe there is no more profit
able class of horseB for him to produce
than the heavy draft. The breeding
stock to produce tbem is available. If
he wishes to raise draft horses for the
market, he will llnd it most profitable
to raise feed, and fit the heavy draft
horseB for the market. If he haB not
the proper kind of mares to produce
tbem,he can readily buy them. Two hun
dred and fifty or three hundred dollars
will buy a first-class draft mare, which
should not weigh less than 1000 to 1800
pounds. This mare should be of the
proper conformation, good bone, style
and action, should be very active and
quick on her feet, the best disposition
and perfectly sound, above all be free
riom side bones, and a first class mare
every way, with all tbe quality he wish
es to produce, medium or dark gray no
objection. Then mate her witb the
best horse available be sure, if posBible
to select one with all the quality and
size that you wish to produce. In this
way you should raise a colt that when
matured should make a market horse
tbat usually weighs from 1800 to 2200
pounds. This kipd of a colt is very
salable at any age, from one to five
years old, and if well cared for, with all
thjs feed necessary from his mother's
milk nntil he Is right for the market,
mtinaed on 2nd Page.
The Commoner.
(Mr. llryati's Paper.)
The Commoner has attained within
six months from date of the lirat issue
a circulation of 100,000,a record proba
bly never equaled in tho hietory of
American periodical literature. The
unparalleled growth of this paper dem
onstrates that there is room In the
newspaper field for a national paper
devoted to the discussion of political,
economic, and social problems. To the
columns of tho Commoner Jlr. iiryan
contributes his best efforts and his re
view of political events as they arise
from time to time can not fail to inter
est thoee who study public questions.
I
Class No. 1, the road, carriage and
coacb horse, 15 and a half to 10 hands,
weighing from 1030 to 1200 pounds.
Class No. 2, the cab horse, 15 and a
quarter bands, weighing from 1050 to
1100 pound.
Class No. 3, the omnibuB horse or ex
press horse, 15 and a half to 10 hands,
weighing lrom 1250 to 1400 pound
Class No. 4, the draft horse, 10 to 17
bands weighing from 1500 to 2000
pounds.
-W -W -W
uaiis,
ill
The Commonei'Bregular subscription
price is 61.00 per jear, We have ar
iriKKl with Mr. Uryan whereby we can
furnish his psner and the Democrat for
one year for 82 20. The regular price
of the two papers when subscribed for
separately is $2.50. tf.
M. & O. R. R. mid the
eomlpetion of our new
coal sheds oil that line,
we shall he in position
to offer specinl induce-
meuts to the users of
Indiana Block Coal.
Other grades of Soft
mid Hard coal delivered
promptly.
HOLLISTER
LUMBER
COMPANY*.
Manchester. Iowa.
For ill
Harness,
Saddles,
5-1 Blankets
Robes,
Whips,
Prices Right.
11 Eaton.
0404040*0*040404040*0*0*0^
YOU CAN PUT
YOUR
In our rubber footwear,
this fall and winter at a
Lover Price
tlinn we have been able to make
you for several years.
!lie Beacon Falls"
er liooas,
absolutely the best on the mar
ket, have the biggest percentage
of pure ^um of any brand made.
Don't forget the kind, and where
to get them.
11 CHAMBERS.
1
For Honest Footwear.
er will npprecint
I
CoaL 1
With the'advent'of the
Yours for a Merry Christmas
4
Cf)e JUemacrat
9 00 4 50 00 IS
Column...
I BROWN, The Furniture Man's
SPECIAL HOLIDAY FURNITURE SALE, I
and a Happy New Year. jg
BROWN, The Furniture Man.
Can show you something new at very mod
est prices this week. Art Squares, 7x9 to 9x12,
India Lace Curtains, all different shadings $1.00,
to $1.50, per pair, Couch Spreds and upholster
ing patterns. Don't forget the fine selection of
Pictures, Frames, Moldings, and a store full of
sensible Christmas Presents.
:ro»HnmwwmHHmn»n»mwm'wwTmfmmm»winmwwmnTTHT»mnwnTmmn9
The Up-to-date'
mm
mm
Holiday Stock,
Come nnd look. Your judgment is all wo ash. If you
want to buy right, if you want to be treated right, make our
store your headquarters for your Christmas buying. Below 3
we give you a partial list of what, we carry 111 our immense
stock, comprising nil the latest styles in a
Celluloid and Ebony Goods, Baleric Gold Novel
ties, Including Candelabras, Candle Sticks, Ori
ental Vases, Moorish and Nubian Figures,
Busts, Etc. Also a variety of many useful arti
cles for young and old.
and popular BOOKS.
READ THE DEMOCRAT
r'"'
1
Eor Clotlies that|
Pit Cairion
The Tailor.
Wolff Bros. Old Stand,
Corner Franklin and
Fayette- Streets,
ft
Wt?
RATES OF ADVERTISING.
One Inch
I wo inches..
1 liree inches.
"our iuthes,.
Fivo fnches..
hi Column....
1M 3M 6M 1Y
II 00 91 fiO (S 50 (4 50 $850 $10 00
1 50 S 3 50 5 75 100 15 00
2 (10 on 4 no 7 00 is 00 so 00
S SO 8 7u 5 75 10 00 1610 2G 00
80 00
CO •-'0 00
2G 00
80 00
4 fiO 6 AO (K) 15 00 DO 40 00
6 51) 900 13 00 26 00 0 00 65 00
One Column..
18 80 1? 00 25 00 50 DO foon 125 00
uruort'n aiscoDiiuuea DQ-
for* expiration of contract will be charged ac
cording to above scale
Husiness cards, not oxceodinc six linos SfiOO
per year.
"ur.lnoss
l0?*ls' te» L'cut8
per lino for tho firs',
JsifnJ *1? Ave cents per line foreach subfio
quent insert ou.
Will continue for
—,..,,1 ,1„ 1
several days yet, and
there are nuuvy Rare
and Exceptional Bar
gains in Furniture,
which the close lniy-
Specitd prices will prevail in nil depnrt-
meuts, the week between Christmas and Now Veni
Anew lut. of those
Genuine KAllJ'KN
unninteed const rue
fion Couches m'e in
nnd they are Boun
ties. Come in and in
spect our stock nnd
prices, and you will buy the Lfoods,
?SS:'v
I
We carry all the new
Up-to-date line of Gunther's Gaudies and Palmer's Perfumes.
\JSP
Si
W.
ft
»1

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