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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, January 29, 1902, Image 8

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Rheumatism.
MATT J. JOHNSON Co.,
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that is an appetizer, as well as a
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i'.r
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l^ckwheat cakes for breakfast, the kind made from Quaker 5
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Our buckwheat Hour is milled by our new process from tbe finest grain
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ever'
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been on the Rain ever since.
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guarantee, 6088, to be free from all opiates, salicylates,
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W..
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A Flag
7
Do You Contemplate
Cleaning Your
Lace Curtains?
IF SO, We guarantee to clean them, Make Them Look As I
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The Manchester Laundry.!
A SAVORY AROMA
Of Trace
By MA.UTHA
MCGULIJOCH WILLIAMS.
Copyright. 1:.H,
By :v Ciill(i-!i WHllama.
^^SC'OOOOCOOOOOC^'
Fur answer the mulatto flung off his
cent and baml Uls back. It was mark
ed all over with cruel crimson welts.
•Nobody ever dared io touch me befo\"
he said. "1 was a house nigger, and I
don't belong to tbe nian that done it."
How came you In the army?" Flow
tow asked suspiciously.
The negro looked full In his eyes and
said: "I went to take keer of my mar
ster's son. He—he's dead now. I want
ed to go, and they tried to make me
stay."
Humph! Who is your master?"
Flowtow asked.
"Major Hilllard—that is, he used to
be major. He's colonel now under old
Mr. Forres'. If he had been there, no
body would 'a' dared to touch me," the
negro said. "That's how I come to
know all this country so well. I used to
live at Wake Fores'."
So!" The exclamation was one of
pleasure. "Then you may be worth
keeping, if you will be a true guide."
Flowtow said, pursing his lips, then
brutally, "This major—he is your fa
ther, too, ehV"
"I hears 'em say so," the negro said,
looking down. "Please, sir, take me to
wall on you. I can cook"—
"1 may have better use for you,
Flowtow interrupted. "Ride you here
beside me a little. If you serve me
well, you shall have money aud free
dom. If," with a stern look, "you try to
trap me, then I will cut you alive into
little teeny bits."
"I don't want money, only to be free
and to learn readiu and wrltln," the ne
gro said. "As to trapplu you, no nigger
caiu't do that. You are too smart for
even our white folks."
So Yellow Ned came to be free of
Flowtow's quarters, following the colo
nel like a dog wherever he went,
crouching patiently beside the hearth
while Flowtow wrote or talked, alert
for any service, but seemingly heedless
of all he heard. He had found an old
notebook and stub of pencil. The sen
try at the door had set him copies of
letters aud figures. These he repro
duced In a thousand unheard of combi
nations. The sentries as they changed
were much amused at his efforts and
said oue to another Yellow Ned must
be crazy—you simply could not teach
him that two and two made four or
that A was not Z.
It was mid-May four years from the
month when Colonel Ililllard had sent
the Hlntons away. Old Nat had come
back very soon after the Federal vic
tory. He claimed indeed to have a mys
terious connection with those In au
thority and swaggered among the other
fisher folk as to the vengeance he
meant to take on the slaveholdlng aris
tocrats who had formerly oppressed
him. A year of riotous living had wast
ed the HiUJard money. Luce and Prude
now chose to go their own way, but
Swan came with her father because
her mother came perforce.
With the wreck and remnant of their
sudden wealth old Nat had chartered a
-trading boat, miRRrnUa cr»YTOiiio»-Af
fair, which was towed up or down
stream as occasion served. Ostensibly
it was a sutler's boat. In reality it en
gaged In all manner of contraband
trading. A cotton cargo once Bafe un
der hatches meant more profit than
many weeks In camp. Old Nat had
planned to smuggle such a cargo
aboard before the Lucy tied up at
Wake Forest landiug. He had slipped
outside the lines, spying where best to
seize it. leaving his wife and Swan in
charge of the boat.
Soldier villages gossip even more
than ordinary villages. Everything at
headquarters is soon the common prop
erty of the camp. Thus Swan came to
know very soon all the particulars of
Yellow Ned's arrival, she pondered
what she had heard a day, then just at
sunset startled her mother by saying:
"I'm goin over ter the outpost. Funny
I never thought o* Jt before, but there is
my chance ter see the inside o' Wake
Forest."
There was no protest. Mrs. Hinton
never wasted breath in trying to turu
Swan from her purposes, but some
thing, she knew not what, made her
kiss her daughter once shyly, fearfully
once, as she felt Swan tremble at her
touch, out of the fullness of her mother
heart.
"I wish I could take yer, too, but that
would spoil everything," Swan said,
patting her check aud almost running
away. She had rummaged out her old
fiddle and put on a short frock, much
frilled and spangled, which she had
worn in the days of the band. It was
black and came low in the neck, so she
threw over her shoulders a blue artil
leryman's cape, disposing one end so
the scarlet lining would show. At the
very last she turned back and thrust
something deep into her bosom, saying,
with a lazy smile, "Yer don't never
know what may come in handy when
yer go 011 a possum huut this time o'
the year."
As she picked her way through the
compaiij' streets there were hulls from
every hand—cries of admiration, invita
tions to supper, banters for a tune, just
one—but she staid for none of them.
Words she flung back in plenty. Her
tongue had gained in license, in piquan*
6y and point. A very young officer,
riotously full of beer, ran out and tried
to kiss her in the face of all, but was
rapped smartly over the nose with the
fiddle bow and ran back howling with
pain.
As 6he came to the outpost the pick
ets made a feint of halting her. She
stuck the fiddle under her chiu, played
three discordant bars and said, "Let me
through or yer'll hear worse than that."
All the camp knew her. She had in
deed the freedom of more than one
army corps. She was kind in sickness
or trouble, a good comrade in health,
square—every man of them would have
slaked his life on that—and straight for
all her freedom, both of speech and ac
tion. So she won easily to Colonel
Flowtow's door. She would have pass
ed the Bentry there as she had passed
the others but that Flowtow himself
was just coming out, with Yellow Ned,
as usual, at his heels.
"You! What do you do here?" he
said roughly, catching her arm In a
hard grip.
"Me? Oh, I just came ter find out ef
yer all were dead," Swan said jauntily.
"1 didn't know but 'Mr. Forrest's crit
ter company' had slipped in an made
crow's meat o' the lot."
"What is that to you? Women are
not for lighting," Flowtow said, still
roughly. Swan laughed an airy, happy
laugh.
"Noi Women are ter kissin," she
said. "I'll kiss yer. Colonel Flowtow,
an play yer a tune inter the bargain ef
yer'll do just one. little thing I wont"
rti
NfiJl'j u^ui Vl/"""lli!^,^''l»l
.*» •IWirfltfi.J'lr .J.vr
*v
Ohol I am to be bribed—in race
of the articles of war!" Flowtow roar
ed. "Well, bribe me, Swanchen. I will
hear what It Is about—afterward."
'Sfer shall take the tune first," Swan
said, throwing off her cloak and settlug
the fiddle beneath her chin. Before
Flowtow could protest she had struck
up "Run, Nigger, Run!" looking as she
played straight at Flowtow's new serv
ant Without a break she glided into
another strain, almost an Improvisa
tion, full ot swelling chords and soft
walling minors. She had played it first
upon her weddiug uight. Morris had
suatched the bow from her hands and
had dragged her breathlessly away
with Ulin to find a minister.
"My kiss! I cannot wait!" Flowtow
said, clutching her bare shoulder.
"Mauy things impend, Swauchen. Pay
now—good measure, mind. When they
are settled, I will hear what it Is thou
hast paid for."
But maybe yer'll bo dead. Mr. For
rest is a bad man, a mighty bad old
man," Swan said, fending her lips.
Flowtow pushed her hands aside aud
took a long kiss. The next second a
stunning blow stretched him full length
upon the floor. As he sprang up, livid
with rage, he saw Swan struggling vio
lently with the mulatto, who was
gasping and had the blazlug eyes of a
pautlier.
"Oh, yer Dutchman! I never thought
that little love pat would knock yer
down," she cried. "But look nt this nig
ger, will yer, tryin ter murder me?
Must be he thinks ycr're like his white
folks—tco good ter bo touched by the
common sort. That's whut all the high
toned niggers think. I know. I used
ter live down south. Where did yer
skoer him up. IJutchy? Did yer have
him made special fer yer guardian an
gel?"
Come agaiu, wild Swanchen, and
you shall hear!" Flowtow said. "Or,
.valt! 1 shall come back before the mid
night. We shall drink together and
have much games, and you shall play.
As Cor the man. 1 shall send him to
company with his horse. The darkness
shall teach him better manners."
'Ho! I'll teach him myself!" Swan
sold to the sentry as Flowtow galloped
pff, stepping past him to the edge of the
veranda. There she began to play gay,
rollicking tunes that very shortly drew
all the idlers about her. Presently she
liung down her fiddle, whirled about on
tiptoe and said, sniffing vigorously:
"Wait till 1 come back, everybody. I
feel It in my bones that there's things
ter drink close by."
She darted away, followed by a cho
rus of uproarious laughter, but she did
not seek the cellar. In half a minute
she had reached a picketed horse and
was whispering to the man standing
beside It: "Morris, get away, fer God's
sake! Old man Nat will know yer. He
has come back. He is eomin here ter see
Flowtow this very night. That was
why I—oh, why didn't yer keep quiet?
What did er kiss more or less matter?
Yer have bought yer freedom."
"Some things one cannot buy," Mor«
rls said, breathing hard. "Swan, I shall
stay until you agree to go with me."
"Yer are crazy—crazy as er loon!" she
cried. "First ter come here then all
those papers—I know whut they are.
So will old man Nat. He taught yer, re
member, the Murrel clan cipher, so yer
could write all sorts o' things ter me.
Go away, I tell yer. Flowtow will lian
yer at sun up as sure as he finds out
how he has been fooled."
"If you will come with me," Morris
said, springing into the saddle
Swan thought a minute, then waved
him down. "I must ride an lead yer
with a halter." she said, "or wo shall
"Jl/orrte, get a way, fer Qort'e mtkc!"
never get past the pickets. 1 will eny
I'm drlvln yer out o' camp, back ter
yer own side, because 1 hate yer. Then
when we are outside"—
"You will Lave to keep on," Morris
said doggedly. Swan shivered faintly.
"We will bettle that as happens," she
said.
"You are my wire still. I will never
let you go back." Mortis said when the
last picket was 200 yards behind.
.Swan had slipped from the saddle and
was unbinding his hands. She had
driven him unmercifully, flourishing a
hilvvr mounted derringer above his
l.ead. The pickets had laughed at ber.
but had not tried to stop her. It was
only one of Swan's freaks, and Swan in
their eyes could do no wrong.
The two halted in a broad clear road.
The moon shone so bright it was nearly
as light as day. As the last knot came
loose there was a elir in the bushes at
the roadside. (.1.1 Nat's ambling mule
sprang thronrh them, and old Nat him
sell cried: .er've been er-spyln—eh,
Morris- an ye wife's hclpin yer out?
.Mighty nice game, but I'll block It,
though I r: in't stop yer now. I owe yer
lather er day in harvest. I reckon the
time's eoniiii when I can pay In full."
The last words came faint. He had
set the mule off in a headlong gallop.
Morris sprang Into the saddle, leaned
down and snatched Swan up before
him. She tried to writhe out of his
anus. In three minutes at most the
mounted pickets would be alter him.
How couid he escape with his horse
doubly weighted?
"Be quiet! Give me that pistol!" he
said, his mouth close to her ear.
"Weight! You don't know Black Doug
las as I do. They could uot catch him
jaded. Tonight lie is a wild horse. He
has had nothing but little niggling trots
since his run the other duy."
"There! I told yer they were eomin!"
Swau cried as they caught the souud of
shots behind and of hoofs gathering in
volume. .Morris laughed grimly and
shook his reins. Black Douglas knew
what that meant. lie went away at a
long stretching gallop that quickened,
quickened into the plunging full ^un.
His head was low his stomach almost
touched earth as he stretched himself
a ifjiNinwiiaii Mi
long, leaping Uounils. .Now mid
1
again he snorted disdaiufully. ouce
there was a keen whinny of defiance.
"Blood tells. He knows it is a race,"
Morris said, patting the satin shoulder.
With one arm he held Swan close
against his breast. Her weight, thus
over the withers, hardly told on lite
gallant beast. They had left the cluise
a mile behind. Morri« was about to
pull up and turu Black Douglas' nose a
minute to the wlud when they heard
sabers jingling down a crossroad a
hundred yards dead ahead.
"There is.Flowtow himself." Morris
said under his breath. "Hold tight,
Swan. Now we have got to ride for
our lives."
lie had neither whip uor spur. He
must trust solely to the speed and cour
age and Intelligence of h.s horse. Lie
filcked the reins gently and gave a soft
low whistle. Black Douglas reared as
he heard it, then lunged forward ami
tore along the road, devouring it as
flame devours dry stubble. He shot
past the crossroad's mouth while Flow
tow and his men were 30 yards away
from It. They cried halt and fired after
him. The shots only urged bim to keep
at his best speed. So did the thunder
of their hoofs behind.
Flowtow was nearly as well mount
ed, but his horse had been ridden hard
before the chase began. Still, he press
ed forward, urglug his gray with whip
and spur, beyond the speed of all but
two of the best horsed troopers. They
had emptied their carbiues without ef
fect Flowtow had a revolver, but the
rauge was too great. Besides, he had
recognized Swan as she flew past and
yearned to overtake her and tear her
bodily from the arms of the man who
had tricked him.
Rage over the tricking wholly swal
lowed up apprehension. He knew the
chase led him straight toward the Con
federate lines. On, on he rode, the
wind singing in his ears, liis eyes fixed
In straining gaze on the space between
him and his quarry. It had lessened.
In a little while he would come up with
the black, would taste the savage
sweetness of vengeance. They could
not a second time escape him, those
audacious ones. He could not doubt
now that the woman had been full
partner in the scheme.
He gained on them swiftly. They
were Just 30 yards in front. He rose
In his stirrups to cry halt after them.
But the cry was drowned in a louder
noise, the blurring boom of cavalry
guns heavily charged. The flash came
straight in front a little way down the
road. Undervoiclngthesound,hecaught
the stifled murmur of many men
sprlnglug suddenly to arms. It was not
a picket post but a vauguard he had
surprised. Wrathfully he fired his six
shots In the air, then wheeled and rode
for life toward his owu camp.
"Morris! Oh, thank God we didn't
touch you!" the captain of the guard
said as Morris leaped from Black
Douglas. Morris had no word for him.
Swan lay inert in his arms, and ho
felt her head drop prone against his
shoulder and knew that the bullet
which had stilled her heart was In
tended for Ills own.
The next day but one Colonel HI1
liard walked into General Forrest's
headquarters to say: "My dear gen
eral, please send in a flag of truce.
My son's wife has died very suddenly.
We wish to bury her at Wake Forest
beside his mother."
As he spoke, so it was done.
-aud
SHOULDERS
over all|4
other
CURES
FOR
PAIN
IS
IT
CURES
ALL
THE WAY
DO
It Is pnre white—doe* not soil elothintr.
Sold bv most dri'KKlrts in 56c.
and 6tx\ boi
tU«. ltuokln on application.
GOODRICH & JENNINGS, ANOKA. MINN.
ssnS
The big tree Sequoia gigontea is na
ture's forest masterpiece, and as far as
I know the greatest of living things,
says John Mulr'ln The Atlantic. It he
longs to an ancient stock, as Its re
mains in old rocks show, and has a
strange air of other days about It, a
thoroughbred look, inherited from the
long ago, the auld lang syne of trees.
The Pacific coast In general is the par
adise of conifers. There nearly all of
them are giants and display a beauty
and magnificence unknown elsewhere.
The climate is mild, the ground never
freezes and moisture aud sunshine
abound all the year.
Nevertheless, It is not easy to ac
count for the colossal size of the se
quoias. The largest are about U00 feet
high and 30 feet In diameter. Who of
all the dwellers of the plains and prai
ries and fertile home forests of rouud
headed oak and maple, hickory and elm,
ever dreamed tlmt earth could bear
such growths—trees that the familiar
pines and flrs seem to know nothing
about, lonely, silent, serene, with a
physiognomy almost godlike and so old
thousands of them still living had
counted their years by tens of centuries
when Columbus set sail from Spain
and were In the vigor of youth or mid
dle age when the star led the Chaldean
aages to the infant Saviour's cradle?
As far as man Is concerned they are
the same yesterday, today and forever
—emblems of permaneuce.
Soniid of Gun..
A remarkable instance of tbe far
rcacliing power of souiul is irlven in the
interesting diary written in Latin in
the seventeenth century, admirably
translated by tbe Hov. liohert Isiiani,
of Mr. Thomas Is'nam of Lamport Hall.
It is there stated that durins the naval
engagement between the English and
French combined fleets on the one hand
and the Dutch on the other in 1(J72 the
report of tbe guns was distinctly beard
at Brixworth, Northamptonshire. It
was in this action that Lord Sandwich,
the admiral, wq^ blown up in bis ship
with 800 of Ills men, though the Dutch
were defeated aud were pursued to the
coast of Holland by the English fleet.
If this story be correct—aud some
may be tempted to say "Credat Ju
dseus"—the voice of the cannon mus(
have traveled a distance of over 120
miles, Soutliwold, where the battle
took place, being at the mouth of the
Blythe, 28 miles northeast of Ipswich.
In 1827, during the battle of Navarino.
Mr. John Vere Ishani, then quartered
at Corfu, distinctly heard the tiring at
a distance of nt least 200 miles, aud on
tbe naval reception of the sultan by
tlie queen at Portsmouth the Bound of
guns discharged on the Welsh coast
was plainly distinguished at Ports
mouth.—From "The Pytehley Hunt."
Five Day. It V.'n».
A Canadian soldier told a story of an
Incident In South Africa between Lord
Kitchener and Colonel Girouard, the
Canadian engineer, which recalls some
bridge building exploits of the Union
army in our civil war.
Lord Kitchener wanted a bridge
which had been blown up by the Boers
repaired In Ave days. Colonel Girouard
said It would lake ten days to make the
bridge as it was.
"I said five days," said Lord Kitchen
er In his most decisive tones. "I shall
use the bridge then."
He turned on his heel without an
other word, but in live days his men
were marching over Hie bridge. Colo
nel Girouard never quilted the-scene
of operations during tin. five days.
The faults of tlie superior man are
like the eclipses of (he sun and moon.
He lias his faults, and all men Bee
them he changes again, and all men
look up to him.—ConfucJiw,

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PATENTS
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COPYRIGHTS AC.
Anyone sending a skotch and description may
quickly ascertain our opinlou free whether an
hu'cntion Is probnb)?patentable. Comtnunira
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sent free. Oldest agency for aeculing patents.
Patents taken through Munn &
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receive
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Scientific
A handsomely illustrated weekly,
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MUNN & Co.3e,B"»i1"*'- New York
Branch Office, 635 BL, Washington, D. C.
The Choice of Coffee
Wise People is the Choice
Baker&
Monaca
Coffee
Received Fresh Daily.
For Sale by
WELLS.
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DOUGLASS, the Photo
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Go to Douglass
For FINE PICTURES
DELAWARE COUNTY
Mac! Co.,
Manchester, Iowa.
ABSTRACTS. •?,
REAL ESTATE.
LOANS AND
CONVEYANCING.
Office In First National
Bank Building.
Orders by mail will receive careful
attention.
We have complete copies of all records
of Delaware county.
ENNIS BOGGS.
KAMASBB.
riam
Railroads.
Manchester & Oneida Ry.
Tlivre TABLE.
Train No. 2 IOHVPS Mwuhcstfr at fi ft. m. ar
rireaat *t.vaoa.M} Coaaeela
villi wW h.'Unil W. No. 6
fcotumlny I Oneida at n:85 a.in,
arnvi'bat Manchester atG 05n. in.
Train No. 4, loaves Manchester at 15 a. ro
arrives at Oneida at 7:45 a. in., coo
nects with east bound 0. O. W. No,
a&s 6. Returning leaven Oneida at 7:50
a. in., arrives at Mi
&> a.
Train Nc
Manchester at 8:20
C, leaves Manchester at 8:43 a.
in., ar
rives at Oneida at u:t4 a.m. Cou
tiectswltli the north bound C. M.&
St. P., No. 22. JieturjiiDR leave*
Oneida at 0:20, arrives at Manchcstei
at9:50a. m.
Train No. 8, leaves Manchester at 2:o&p. m., ar
rives at Oneida at 2:1G p. m. Con
nects with C. \V„ Nit. 4, east
bound,and No. 9,westbound, lie
turning leaves Oneida at 8:30 p. ni.
arrives at Manchester at 8:50 p. m.
Train No 10, leaves Manchester at 4:20 p.
arrives at Ouelda at 4 4«J p. m. Cot.
nects with south bouud C. M.& St.
P.. No. 21. heturnlng leaves Oneida
a*. 4:6rp. m„ arrives at Mantihesln
5:25 p. m.
!fp
..ILLINOIS CENTRAL R. R.
TIME TABLE.
Main Line Passenger Trains.
WKST BOUND- MAIN L1VR BAST BOBND
NO 1*12:13 a
No 8* 8:10 pm.
^081*6:22 pm
No5 18:5.1 am
No 9it2:U5pm.
.. Fast Train..
Thro Express..
....Clipper..
Local Kxpress
..W»y Freight.
.Thro Freight.
UDA RAPIDS URANCH
North itound
Arrive—
Bet Cedar Rpds South Bound
an Manchester Leave——
No.800 6:tup.m
No K828:40a.m
No. 8661:80
p.m
.. .'Passenger.. (No 8- 6 9:00 a.
..tPttAienger.. iNo3JJ 3:125p.m
... tFrelgi)t....|No.8r8fi oup
NaL'e.6
8
6 & run between Dubuque and Albert
Nos. *1 Sc 82 ran between LyJe and Dubuque
with connection through to Ft Dodge by train
No 31.
New train 4 irakes same stops cast of here as
No, 2
except that *ast of Hockford it stops a:
East Rocuord. Genoa & oleman, This tra!i
is a through vestibule train with dltilng
car from Omaha to Kockford. No 2 & 4 onl\
stop at DyersvUle between Manchester and L)u
buque.i
No 8-4-6-1-3 & 81 Ruu dallv Sunday Included
NEW 8HORT LINE
CHICAGO GREATWESTERN RY.
|p "The Maple Leaf Route.'
March 3. tool.
Time card, Thorpe, Iowa.
Cblcaso 8ieclat, Daily,Going Eaat.....7:3? a
Day Express dally 2:28 tn
Way Frelghtoally ll:8oam
(i rg West, North and South.
WayFreigh- daily 11:80 am
Day Express dally except Sunday. 8:20
St Paul a Kansas City Exp, dally ex
cept Sunday 5:41 am
For Information and tickets apply to
W. T. Brander, Asont Thorpe.
B. C. R. & N. R'w.
CEDAK RAPIDS TIHE CARD.
MAIN LIKE GOING JEA0T AND BOOTH.
Arrive Leave
8:3o No. 2 Chicago Passenger.... 8:40pui
9:80 a No. 4 Chi. & Burlt'n Pass -9:85 a
8:10 am No. Chicago & St.Louis Ex. 8:80 am
il:45 ngt No. 8Chicago Fast Express. i2 0Gogt
No. 18 Burl. A Davnp't. Pass 8:25 pin
No 2—Pullman sleeper, free chair car and
•ouches to Chicago. No. 0—Pullmau sleepers
md through coaches to Chicago »ud St. Louis.
No. 8—Pullman sleeper and free chair car to
Chicago arrives Chicago 7:59 a, m. Dlnuig oar
will serve breakfast from Jollet to Chicago.
Ngt.—night.
MAIN LINE GOING NORTH.
7:85 a No. 1 Minneapolis Pass 8:05 a
12:10 No.8Rockford Passenger... 8:80p ro
i2r 6 ngt NO. 6 Minneapolis Express..12:80 ngt
*:46 a No. 18 Chicago Passenger.
No. 19 Chicago Passenger.
No. l—Free chair car and coaches to Al
bert Lea. No. 5—Wide Vestlbuild Pullmau
Buffet sleepers and coaches to Minneapolis and
*t. Paul,
DSCORAH DIVISION.
8:10 pm DecorahPassenger, .... 8:80am
»:20 am -West Uulou Passenger 8:40pm
4:05 Decorah Freight 6:'*ia
IOWA PALLS DIVISION.
7:30 m....lowa& Minnesota Pass 8:15 am
:45
X.
BAKE BAKEHS
a. m..Minnesota 6 Dakota Pass..
12:80 a ni
IOWA CITY, DAVBNFOBT.BUUL. AND CLINTON.
rt:l0 m. Burl. & la City Pass 8:25 pin
7:45 m... Clln.,laCity, DvptPas8~....7:i5am
7:85a in. Burl. & la city Pass ~8:4o
"Trains numbers 5.0, fe, is. 19, and Minn &
Dakota Pass run dally, all other tralus dally ex
cept Sunday."
JNO. G. FARMER, J, A. LOMAX.
tien'l Pass & Tkt Agt. Ticket Ag nt
Cedar Rapid* Iowa,
One .Fare Plua $2,
Ther^ ire still some good lands in
northwestern Iowa, southwestern
Minnesota and South Dakota, aud il
you are expecting to make a change in
location, you should take advantage ol
the low excursion rates in effect. On
-he first and third Tuesday of each
3iontb sccursion tickets, bearing 21
days' limit, can be purchased to all
points on the Burlington, Cedar ltapidt
& Northern Railway, north of and
including Abbott, Shell Rock and
Waverly at One Fare Plus 82.
Fail information relative to tbese
lands will be cheerfully given upon ap
plication to Messrs. Ilten & Brooks
our Industrial and Immigration Agents,
Ceder Rapids, Iowa.
If you are thinking of making a trip
lo any point in Alabama, Arkansas,
Arizona, British Columbia, Canadian
Northwest, Colorado. Florida, Georgia.
Idaho, Indian Territory, Iowa, Kansas,
Kentucky, Louisiana, Manitoba, Minne
sota, Michigan, Missouri, A1 laefssfppl,
Montana, New Mexico, Nebraska,
North Carolina, North Dakota, Okla
homa, Oregon, South Dakata, South
Carolina,'Tenne66t e, Texas, Utah, Vir
ginia, Wisbington, Wisconsin and
Northern Michigan aud Wyoming, cal
on agents of tbe "Cedar Rapids Route'
for rates, etc., or address
JNO. G. FARMER, A. G. P. & T. A.,
B., C. R. & N.Ry.
Cedar Rapids, la
Homeseekere Excursions.
Tickets to nearly all points in the
United States on Bale at all ticket
cilices of the Chicago Great Western
Railway on tbe first and third Tues
Tuesdays of January and February at
the low rate of one fare pins $2 00 for
the round trip, GooJ to return in 21
days from bate of sale. For detailed
Information address an Chicago Great
Western Agent, or J. P. ELMER. O.
P. A., Chicago, 111, 3w6
LINOIS CENTRAL R. R.
0 I A eulral excursion lo
wO/n Cuba will leavo Chicago, Si.
1 oul. i. iliitiKtft.l Uiulsviiie Juuuary afitli
re ic lug soim- on the r«iuro Kebrn
jyu. A delightful vojago across the Gulf t(
Mexico,a six daw* stay ou lh« Island of Cuba,
including a visit to Havana, Mrtanzas, the Val
ley of Yiirmt, the caves of Bella Mar and other
iHtereMl- polnrs unl« the escort ot the Airer
IRHII Tourist Asaoiilhtion. Rate from the points
mentioned will be $155.00, f. tha round trip,
which amount will Include all expense «very
*here. itineraries, giving full p, rtlculars, of
your local Illinois eatrui ticket agent.
MARDI GR AS »,'£
leanson Fetru*ry to and U. 1008. Forlt, excur
sion rates will be lu effect to New Orleans on
speclfh? dates \vhl your local ticket agent will
be anle to advi»e you.
Full Particulars
ageb of the Illinois Central, or by addressing
the nearest of the undurs tiued representatives
of the cutntl:
A.H. HANSON.U, P. A. Chicago, III.
J. t-. A. G. p. A., J'ubuque, Iowa.
NEW ORLEANS LIFT
fully uulque city tor the touilst to visit Winter
tourists rates now in enect. 1-oubte dally se r
vice and lust a eatn heated vestibule trains with
through Bleeping cirx, buffet library smoking
car service and all meals eu route in dining cars,
MEXICO
JOHN L. SULLIVAN,
Gen. Tratllo Manager.
derlht: auspices of the
CALIFORNIA
HAMMOND
No 8* 8:30 a
No 4* 8:iGpm
No 3*J+8: fifi it
No tit 8:40pm
No 02*11:45am
No 6G*2:U6
1
and 1 Pan
If
A?
-i
jntral between Omaha and
connection with tbe Minneapolis and St.
!oiip
twoenFort Dodge and Minneapolis and St.
tul, also to be Inaugurated January 28, ifoo
Illinois Central between Omaha and Fort Dodge
in coonec"
between
Paul,
Lv. St. Paul
8.oo p. m.
Lv Minneapolis
8.30 m.
Ar. Omaha
8.t5 a. m.
Lv. Omaha
7.85 p.m.
"THE 1 Ar, Minneapolis
LIMITED" 7M a. nT
I Ar. St. Paul
8.00 a.m.
A fast vestibule night train, dally, carrying
through Pullman sleeping car and couches.
Lv. Omaha Lv. Ht. Paul
7.oo a. m. 9.00 a. m.
Ar. Minneapolis 1 Lv Minneapolis
7.00 P.m. 0.80 a.m.
Ar. St. Paul Ar. Omaha
7 80 p.m. I 9.40 p.m.
•THE
EXPRESS"
Fast day train, dally except Sunday, carrying
throughparlor car and coacnes.
1
Ask for au Illustrated book on New Orleans.
Tour of all Mexico via
the Illinois Cen ral un
auspices ot the American T*urlst As
sociation, wH leave Chlcag .January 98th, ll«2.
Tlcki'ta include all expense. Railway Bleeping
aud dlniugcar, fa e. hotels, carriages, etc.
conducto^
weefcl) excurslou cars through to Los Angeles
ai^d B»u Francisco as to.lows: Ma New Or
leans aud the south* ro route every Wednesday
from Chicago: every Friuay from rinolnnati.
Vla Omah..'and the scenic route every Friday
night from Chicago.
lnond, Louisiana
as a winter resort, a beautifully illustrated fold
er showliig a fi of the winter atirat Mona in
aud about Huuiinond, copies of which will bo
mailed lree on application to J. F. Merry, A.
O. I'. A. lll.Cout.it it., Dubuque, Iowa,
KERS
It.. Jubumie,lowa. lor a free o't»y of a folder
entitled "For Horaa ekvrs and Laud Investors "v«
It furnishes briel but reliable lufimiatlouas to
the rest-ource and pot-blbllHIetj of the states o{
Kentucky, Tcnnusuee, Mississippi and Louis
iana.
PI ADinA Through "Dixie Fly
I L. Vli
1M er" sleeping car lines,
.*t. uouu to Jacksonville, and Chicago to
Ja kaouvllle. Route via. Nashville- Chatta*
nooau aud Atlan.a.
U)
All above trains carry passengers.
•Daily.
tDally ExoeptSuoday.
i'raM
H. G. PIERCE. Station Afft
Illinois Central Through to Florida:
Beginning Monday, January G, 100S, the llllno
Cent alwlll ruu a through sleeping car between
Chicagoaud Jacksonville,Flotilla, via Nashville,
Chattunooga^inJ Atlanta, it will leave Chicago
daily at C:i0 p. nt.amt arr ve at Jacksonville the
aecuud morning, running over the celebrated
"Dixie Flyer'" scenic route. This Is an exten
sion of Itsall-the-year-round Chicagoaud Nash
vlile sleeping car line.
For Homeseekers and Land
Investors.
The patEeugt-r dt-panmeniof tbe Illi
nois Outrul railroad tiuu just received
I rum tbe buudb of the printer, a new
(older In the interests of Homeseeketn
and Land Investors. Mauy are look
ing lor new homes and for land Invest
ment#. This tolder furnishes brief but
reliable information as to tbe resources
and poF.Bibllities of the states of Ken
tucky, Tennessee, Mississippi and
Louisiana, The opportunities for in
vestments In the above mentioned
states are unsurpassed in any part of
thisgreal country, llomeseekers' ex
cursions to points WIDIID tbese st tea
are run by the Illinois Ontral the first
and third Tuesdays of every montb, at
a rate of one fare plus $2 00 and these
excursions Bhouid be t&tien advantage
of by everyone in search of a home or
investments in timber or farm lands.
For a free copy of this, address tbe
undersigned at Dubuque, Iowa.
1
MEHUY,
Asst. Genl. PasB. Agent,
Illinois Central liailroad.
S&tf
LOW-RATE-EXCURSIONS
Twlcn each mouth, on 8pe"Me dates, the I1U
110I& t'entr&l will sel at ureatly reduced rate
trorn point* on its line north ot Cairo, roundtrtp
HomesBekerB' Kxcur.lon tickets Mouth to cer
f«ln poltit«onor reached by Its Uaea In Ken
tucky, Teuuenseeo, Mlsslbgfpiit, Louisiana and
AlsibHinu. A IbO to certain points Westund
fcouthwest In Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota,
South Jmkow, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma
and Indian Territory. I'urtlcuiars of your Hit
nols Centralagents
For a free copy of the Homeseekers' Guide
describing the a«va. tages and resources the
•outh. address
V.
Merry, A. U. P. A., 1, C. R.
K,lubumie. Io a For Information regard
ing landf in the famous Yazoo Valley of Mias
lsslnpi, address E. Skcue, Land Commissioner
V.&M V. U. .Chicago.
Don't Live Together.
Constipation and health never go to
gether. ueWitt's Little Early Risers
promote eaay action of tbe Dowele with
out distress.
ul
have been troubled
with costivenesa nine years," Bays J. O.
GrewijiA-pauw'jtnd.,"! have tried many
remedies but Little Early Hisers give
b*»Bt results."—Smith liros.
BEACOM'S
GrrieLBflR
TM« ansaT MiBioat. aiaeovaav
Cures ECZEMA, SALT RHEUU,
ALL 8KIN ERUPTIONS AND PAOI
BLEMISHES. IT HAS NO BQUAL.
Bold by druggists or sent express pronald
ntwi
receipt of price 75c. Address
F* N. BEACOM. Manchester TOW*
Sold by
Denton & Ward, Manchester, Iowa*
Johnston, Delhi, lowa,
H. Livingston. Hopkinton. Iowa.
J.P.Strelgol kyaii.lowu.
K- If. Mulvehlll, Masonvillo.fowa.
C. A. Kendall, earlvlll0, low».
Kerper & Meyer*, r^rsbui-g, Iowa
T. Armstrong. Ureeie}, Irva.
P. H. Knyden, Kdgewood, loirt.
Wheeler® Kutou. Lament, Iowa,
Jamas Mussflr, Almoral, Iowa.
V. Bush, Colesburg, Iowa.
E. B. KMtfgj.-& Co., Dundee, Iowa.
Nasal
CATARRH
r-revoj
In all its stages there
A
should be cleanliness.
Ely's Cream Balm
cleanscs, soothes andhcala
the diseased membrane.
It cures catarrh and drives
away a cold In tha head
quickly.
Cream Balm Is placcd into the nostrils, spreads
over tbe membrane and Is absorbed. Relief Is Im
mediate and a euro follows, it is not drying—does
not produce sneezing. Large Size, 60 oents
at Drag*
gists or by mall Trial Size,
10 cents by mall.
ELY BUQTUEUS, 50 Warren Street, New York.
ClIEAP—Residence Property in this city.
Enquire of Bronson fii Carr.
PATENTS^®.!
DESIGNS
TRADE-MARKS
FREE!
AND0CB°T®hts^
ADVICE AS TO PATENTABILITY
Notice in Inventive Ago' I
Book "How
to obtain Patents" I
You Will Need
a Pair of Shoes
To keep your feet dry
during-during the wet
weather this sprint We
can suit you in quality
and price. Also rubbers
of all kinds.
Cj»v
it-ai.
F. M. FOLEY
RYAN, IOWA.

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