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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, February 05, 1902, Image 8

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A Harmless Care.
It Cares all Kinds
of
APUCE
for grt
a law.
Wii
What a Prominent Oshkosh Man has to say of
MJlTT J. JOHNSON'S
6088
SIXTY EIGHTY-EIGHT.
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WILSON BROS.
fletale Manufacturers of ,, .t
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Great Blood and Rheumatism cure. 6088, of my druggist, a3 1 have been a grf.at sufferer
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mended it to Alderman A.Giiuz, and be says it helped him. Yours truly, P.. N. WILSON.
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FOR. SALS AND GUARANTEED ONLY BY
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Pi?ilL'J-'-'t1 \!i,l"
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AN IMMORTAL
By James Barnes.
Cor viuQHT, 1C01, 11Y JAMBS BARNES.
I
in
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I have a full line
MILK
CANS.
#T*-Vo
was Paris. My room was on
the tcp floor of the Hotel Dinda.
1 rouhl look out across the little
couityard at au uuiutorestiug
row of yellow chimney pots ris
prainrt a dim yellow evening sky
and below three vows of lighted win
dows and still below an iridescent glare
from the glass kiosk that extended
from the cafe.
It was very still, but now and then a
laugh or a few words blew in at the
window. I had just finished dressing,
and before I left the room I stepped
across and stood there for a minute
gazing down at the courtyard. A fig
ure sitting at a little metal table in
the corner caught my eye—a young
man with a silk hat pushed back from
his bead. His legs were crossed, and
he was moving his foot nervously back
and forth. A cigarette was in his fin
gers.
There was something so familiar in
the pose that I looked closer, and as I
watched him without appareut effort
the cigarette left his hand and de
scribed a fiery arch across the court
yard.
There was only one man that I knew
who dould catapult a cigarette or a
cigar in that remarkable fashion—my
old chum Charlie Cummings. 1 lenu
ed over a sill and, making a trumpet
of my hands, called, as I bad often call
ed up at his windows in the old col
lege days:
Hel-l-l-l-o, Charlie Cummings!" in
a distinct whisper. Mind you, it was
ten years since I had done this and
surely seven since I had last seen him.
The effect was electrical. The nerv
ous motion of the foot stopped. He
extended his hand before him. the mus
cles rigid with a gesture of silence and
attention.
"Hello, there!" he answered without
lifting his head and without any sur
prise being manifested in bis voice.
It was very amusing, and I went on
trumpeting a whisper down to him:
I've come to see you. Don't you re
member me, you villain
Now it was my turn to be astonished.
I saw Charlie's hand reach for the tall
glass on the table. He-paused with it
at his lips and then drained it to the
bottom. The light in the courtyard
was just sufficient for me to catch a
gleam of the color. Again he spoke:
"Leave me alone," he said distinctly.
"Absinth!" thought I to myself.
That's what's the matter with Char
lie's sense of humor."
Hurrying down the stairs, I stepped
out on the marble flagging. There he
sat with his back toward me in the
same attitude. I would have known
him in a minute. As I approached he
hurriedly struck a match on the bot
tom of the table and lit the fresh ciga
rette between his lips.
Hello, old boy!" I said. "Well met,
by Jove!"
He started quickly. The lighted
match fell blazing on the table, and he
whirled in his seat without rising.
"Good God!" he said hoarsely.
"Where did you come from? Did you
speak to me just now? I say, did you
call me by name?"
He caught me by the coat, and I no
ticed that his hand was trembling ex
citedly.
"Yes," said I. "I called to you from
the window. You still have your old
tricks with you, Charlie."
He laughed.
"I have learned several new ones,
too," he said—"beautiful tricks. On.
I'm a great success. Eh—won't you sit
down?"
I beckoned to a waiter, and he
brought me one of the spider legged
iron chairs.
"What have you been doing with
yourself. Charlie, since I saw you
last?" I asked cheerfully.
It was a stereotyped phrase, and hia
reply was noncommittal.
"Nothing," he said tersely.
Years ago he and I had been as thick
as thieves, but now somehow there
was a strained feeling, and his nerv
ousness was pitiful. He bad been one
of the most enthusiastic of men, espe
cially in his greetings, but the man
ner in which he had received me made
it almost awkward.
Where have you been, old chap?" I
inquired, trying to make things easier.
"Knocking about. I haven't been to
America for four years, you know," he
muttered.
But that doesn't answer my ques
tion. What have you been doing?"
Charlie turned and looked at me
without replying, and then I perceiv
ed how great had been the change that
had come over him. He had been well
knit and straight when at college, with
a wiry strength aud a determination
in his movements that had won for
him a position in athletic circles. He
was the fiercest tackier I ever saw.
Now his hand had the transparency of
an old woman's, his wrist was atten
uated, and beneath the flesh of his
face the bones showed plainly. The
pointed Parisian board could not cover
the hollows In his cheeks. But his eyes
were bright in a way that was almost
frightening. I have seen such bright
ness in the eyes of fever patients in the
hospitals. I am a physician. In fact,
it had been my purpose in making this
trip to Europe to attend the lectures
of the great Professor Charcot. Alas.
I had but been in time to walk in his
funeral!
Insensibly I began to diagnose the
case acros the table, aud in making
such diagnosis a physician is apt to for
get everything in the abstract interest
of determining disease.
"When are you coming back?" I
asked, more to listen to the tones of
his voice than for the s^..o of securing
information.
"Never," said Charlie laconically,
"never"—then ho looked across his
shoulder at me again, and for an instant
only his glance met' mine—"if I can
help it," he added.
"Pardon me," he said suddenly,
arousing himself. "A longer residence
here should entitle me to the position
of host. What will you have?"
Not once had he addressed me by
name. I had noticed this, but now had
ceased to wonder at it. As the waiter
shuttled up (why is it that when a Pari
sian waiter passes 40 years of age ho
shufilcs?) I asked for a glass of light
wine, and, as 1 expected, Charlie re
newed his order for the insidious green
liquid.
"Charlie," I said as he dripped the
water musically into the glass, "that's
something you had better stop, old
man."
"It makes one forget things," he re
turned.
"That's just it," said I. "It has made
you forget my name, for Instance.'
He looked at me with something ap
proaching amusement
IfiSl
tell your naitie from Adam."
"Try," said I. "You remember where
you've seen me.*'
Oh, yes," he said. "You see, 1 am
not trying to put all that away, but
that I hate forgotteu your name gives
me hope."
"Hope for what?" I interposed.
"Oh, that I cau forget other things."
He had said this In a cynically calm
way without a touch of feeling. There
was no trace even of bitterness In his
tone. I saw that It would bo foolish to
be offended.
'What do they say about me over
there?" he asked suddenly, gulping
down the absinth, the pungent medic
inal smell of which rose strongly in my
nostrils.
They say you are spending your
money as fast as you can. That's all I
have heard—cuttiug a swath, playing
the very devil, and so forth."
'Yes, aud I have had some help at
it." Charlie went on. "There are chaps
over here who follow that for a profes
sion. I've done a land office business
with them," he continued, half laugh
ing. "Did you ever hear of the little
Duke de Marsigui?"
"Can't remember," said I.
"He ran eveu with me for three
weeks or so. Then they put him where
he couldn't get away. lie will stay
there, too," he added, with a chuckle.
But somehow 1 can't make it out.
Poor little Maurice! He thinks he Is
the caliph of Bagdad. Odd to remark,
that is just what he's cut out to be.
Now, there's happiness."
It was apparent to me now that this
was the strangest case that had ever
been brought under my observation—a
man perfectly sane, or at most only a
third wasted, wishing to sink. If pos
sible, the rest of him in the oblivion of
dementia, an impending position gen
orally so frightful to the threatened
that It causes them either to hasten
their own defeat by melancholy or to
tight it bravely and undiscovered to the
end.
I remembered a strange thing about
Cummings In college and what had
been said about him during his first
years after graduation—he bad never
been drunk that any one could remem
ber. I myself bad seen him wax mel
low, jovial, enthusiastic, and had seen
his wit grow clearer and quicker, as if
alcohol were a fuel only to his mental
machinery. When the others had reach
ed the period at which they wished to
sing, light or go to sleep, according to
their natures, then Charlie would arise
and saunter over to his room to read
Schopenhauer or Browning, as the case
He started ijulc'ilv t.w the ll'jhtcd match
fell
blaziwj on the table.
might be, or sometimes to swing his
imagination to the verge of poetic in
spiration.
Even now I saw traces of this in the
effect of the absinth upon his nerves.
His uilnd grew steadier, and he had
stopped the nervous movement of his
foot.
I recollected an occurrence the facts
of which were not generally known,
but which" in my mind had accouuted
for some of Charlie's later actions. He
had been tremendously fond of nn
elder brother, from whom, by the way.
he had inherited most of the money
that enabled him to pursue his fancies.
The elder Cummings had intended to
do something with his life and hnd
taken up the profession of surgery, in
pursuance ot bis studies he had gone to
Vienna and there one day had been
found dead In a fiacre with a curious
stab wound In his heart. 1 well re
member now how his brother's death
affected Charlie. He was in New York
at ihe time and had been studying law
in a desultory sort of way. but at once
he had given It up, sought new pas
tures and cut his old acquaintances
right and left. Then he had gone away
to the country, no one knew where, for
a short time. Ue returned to New York
aiul in three days had hastened to Eu
rope. All this 1 went over in my mind,
but my thoughts were interrupted.
"Where do you dine, old mail?" Char
lie asked suddenly, breaking the long
pause.
"Nowhere," 1 replied—"that is, I have
not decided."
"Come and dine with me."
"SVhy. thanks. I will."
Cummings was smiling. I remember
ed that smile very well. It generally
anticipated some little humorous anec
dote or recollection, something that had
appealed to his artistic side, and Char
lie could talk his thoughts out loud bet
ter than any man 1 ever knew.
I say, Denny (1 noticed that my
name had returned to him), will you
ever forget"— And here Charlie detail
ed one of the adventures of the care
less undergraduate days. It was most
enjoyable. I could hardly Imagine he
was the same man. Ail at once, howev
er, he stopped In the middle of a sen
tence and drummed with his fingers on
the table.
"Well, well, well!" he said. "It must
have been a devil of a mystery."
I paid no attention to his digression
and tried to recall his thoughts to what
he had been sayiug. There was no re
sponse, and Charlie hurriedly arose.
"Come, old eliap, let's go and chase
some food," he said In his old inanuer.
I followed him out into the courtyard
and down the street to a little restau
rant that I knew well. The tables had
marble tops, leather cushioned scats
ran along the walls, and mirrors
stretched from the low wainscoting up
to the ceiling. Queer people came in
here. Strange, haggard looking women
in brilliant colors and uncanny, ragged
headed men, students and writers aud
poets, sad devils and gay, bickered or
laughed, with their reflections doubling
and trebling about them in the angles
nf the mirrors.
There was only one person in the cafe
when we entered. The dining room
was farther back. 1 recognized the
high, bulging forehead, the death head
face, the mothy. straggling beard of
Paul Verlaine, murderer of iustincts,
recorder of the beautiful! I had never
met him, although once be had been
pointed out to me in a place where
"You're right, flj/iifiij couldn't Inigre curiosity leads no oue twice. To ten utiles.
•%,.
auuure and detest a character is a com
plex feeling. 1 had never wished to
place myself in a position to be subject
:otbe Insults which this mau seemed at
liberty to throw at those who spoke to
him.
But, wonderful to relate, the poet,
looking up, caught Charlie's eye aud
smiled-^smiled eagerly.
"Ah, mon ami!" he exclaimed iu a
tone of thorough welcome, rising from
his corner.
Charlie stepped forward. If they had
been two confreres who had exchanged
thoughts along some of the ilower la
den banks and meadows of Verlaine's
imagination, the welcome could not
have been more true or heartfelt. They
grasped each other's hand across the
table. Charlie presented uie. Verlaine
honored me with a suarl aud a gruut.
I sat down at the table.
Now, I speak French—that is, the
French of the stranger—but 1 could no
more follow the conversation than I
could follow the debate of an ludiau
couucll. The drinks were ordered, aud
Charlie drank half a hand's width of
absinth as if it were the lightest
Freuch wine, and the older man meas
ured glasses with him. I observed
them as if they were characters in a
play. I even studied the reflection of
the back of Verlalne's head in the mir
ror— great head, broad and noble.
At last I caught the substance of
their talk. I am neither squeamish nor
old fashioned, but 1 declare, upon my
soul, I shuddered. I could stand it no
longer.
Are we dining together?" I inter
rupted, pulling my friend by the elbow.
I'm beastly liuugry."
I feared Cummings was about to
make some rude remark, but he check
ed himself.
"Of course," he said. "Come."
Verlaine arose. He bowed politely
to Charlie, as If somehow the latter
had obtained command of his respect.
I was forgotten In the parting, at
which I much rejoiced.
"You are very chummy," I said to
Charlie as we seated ourselves at a
table.
Well," he said in answer, "to me he
touches his hat, although they call him
master.' You see, 1 told him a story
once."
I knew well if I showed my curiosity
I would defeat myself, so 1 begau to
talk about old times. We drank cham
pagne with our meals aud afterward
brandy, such brandy as you cau get
nowhere else except at this particular
cafe. It was smooth as the purest olive
oil, but it produced a fever that rashed
the skin as might incipient poison. I
touched It sparingly, but if it had been
the last bottle on earth and Charlie the
thirstiest man he could not have gone
about it with more fierce delight.
His tongue was gradually loosened,
ind before we had lit our cigars he was
rambling slightly, jumping from one
subject to another. Carefully I sought
to bring him back to the last days in
New York, but without success. He
parried all my attempts with skill, and
I gave It up at last and pushed back
from the table. Then Charlie looked up
at me over his coffee cup.
Did you ever see a man guillotined?''
he asked suddenly, apropos of nothing.
No, :t I was a surgeon witness at
an electrical killing at Danuemora," I
returned.
I say. tell me about It," Charlie put
in eagerly. "I've been to all the execu
tions here." He called at least six off
on his fingers.
I bad seldom talked on this subject,
but Charlie's interest appeared so ear
nest that I began.
I described the process of placing tne
electrodes, strapping the arms and feet,
testing the current, and so forth, and
as 1 looked across the table I saw that
Cummings had assumed the position of
the victim in the great wooden chair,
his head thrown back, his muscles stiff
ened, the jaw dropped and the eyes be
neath the half lowered lids shifting
from side to side. It was quite horrible.
At last I stopped, leaned over and
shook him.
Enough of this grewsomeness
Come, talk of yourself," I said.
He aroused and, leaniug both elbows
on the table, spoke iu a low voice, half
inarticulate.
"If you'll listen and afterward for
get, I'll tell you a little tale. It may be
strange or new or old. It may amuse
you. Think what you choose, you know
But one thing, don't iuterrupt or make
comment. Promise me?"
1 nodded.
"You know, after I left college,"
Charlie went on, "I tried to settle
down." It might be fair to state 1 had
not known this.
Then followed a silence of a minute.
Charlie rested his face in his hands
and placed the tips of his little lingers
over his sunken eyes. At last he spoke
again. I had to lean forward to catch
what he was saying.
"I was very fond of my brother. We
were much alike, save the speech—I
mean in feature—and when 1 heard
that he had been murdered, damna
bly murdered, I could not sleep. I
drank for It. My arms from wrist to
elbow were seared with the markings
of the needle. I ran the gamut—co
caine, laudanum, morphine. Oue day
awoke, so to speak, in a hospital. I
was strapped down, much as the man
you were telling me about just now.
I staid there for some time and slowly
regained my strength. You see," said
Charlie parenthetically, and I was
afraid he had side tracked his Ideas,
"my will has never left me. I could
start tomorrow and sit with a fishing
rod in my hands on the banks of the
Seine, a bottle of cold tea beside me.
for the rest of my life. Man, I could
do it and never touch a thing but
bread and cheese. I could live in a
tub if I made up my mind to do it.
[TO I1E CONTINUED.)
Voice Traveling
Eighteen miles is siiid to lie the lon
gest distance on l-ecm-d it which
man's voice hits been lie::nl. Tills oc
curred in the UrniKl ranycin of the Col
orado. where 0110 man shouting the
name Hob at one end his voice was
plainly heard nt the other end, which
is eighteen miles away. Dr. Young re
cords that at Gibraltar the human
voice has been heard at a distance of
feiyi'ntr vw
'0£(U
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where farmers are proFperoua and busi
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Choice ofHiree.
The Chicago Great Western Railway
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You can make your har
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and aa tounh na wire by
using Eintl£KA liar*
noHS Oil. You can
lengthen Its Jifc—mukelt
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EUREKA
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znnkcfl a poor loofe
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Bold everywhere
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your morning solace.,
It makes a delicious
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1
Well, listen. I determined when 1 left
the hospital to give up everything.
The doctors told me I must if I wished
to live—they know little about that,"
he sueered—"so I went to the Adiron
dacks. I rowed and paddled and lived
In the woods. I grew strong and keen
on life. I built castles to no cud. I
Imagined returning and showing people
what I could do. Tor six months 1
touched nothing in the way of stlmu*
lants. I had put morphine away for
ever. I wish now to God I hnd not."
"Well"—Charlie was speaking slow
er now and breathing harder^-"! re
turned to town. It was late in the
spring or, better, early summer. I
wont to my hotel. You know the one
I mean." Indeed I remembered it aud
how often we had sat there ou our col
lege vacations and watched those won
derful nymphs trying to draw the sun
browned satyr down into the water.
Railroads.
Manchester & Oneida Ry.
TIME TABLE.
Train No. 2 leaves Manchester at 6 a. m. ar
rives at Oneltta utrcftOa.m ('onnecta
with west bmind G. *. W. No. 0
Returning leaves Mietda at 5:85 a.
m,
arrives at Manchester aiG 05u. in.
Train No. 4, lenveti Mauctiemer at 15 a. in
arrives Ht Oneida ut 7:45 a. in., coo
lima wlili east bound u. W. No.
11. Returning leavep. OupUta at 7:50
arrives at Manchester at K:'2Q
Train No. c. leavee Manchester at 8:4* a.m.. ar
rives at Oneida at 0:14 ii. 111. t'on
nectswlth the north bound C. M.ft
It. P., No. 22. KetutnitiK leavev
Oneida at 0:20, arrive* at .uauchusiur
att):GQ a.m.
Train No. 8. leaves Manchester at2:vHp. in.,
ar
rives at Oneida at 2:115 |. in. Con
i-j nects with C. \V„ No. 4, east
bound.and No. 0,westbound. He
turning leaves Ouelda uttt:Sop. ID
arrives at Manchester at 3:50 p. in.
Train No 10, leaves Manchester at 4:20 p. ni
arrives at Ouelda at 4:4t p, m. Cot
nects with south bound C. M.& St.
P.. I^o. 21. heturDiug leaves Oneida
'•k'l'v at 4:55 p. in., arrivea at Mancliest
5:25 p. m.
JOHN L. SUI.l.I VAN,
ILLINOIS CENTRAL R. R.
SI TIME TABLE. 'V
Main Line Passenger Trains.
WBST BOUND- MAIN LINB BAST BOUND
NO 1*12:18 a
Nos* 2:icpm.
No81t6:U2 pm
No5 18:61 a
No 91t 2:05 pm.
..Fast Tralu..
Thro Express^
....Clipper..
Local Kxpress
-Way Freight.
.Thro Freight.
IfiDAR RAPIDS BRANCH.
North Bound Bet Cedar Rpds I South Bound
Arrive an Manchester Leave
No.806 8:iop.m
No 882 8:40a.m
No. .S861:80p.m
...-•Passenger,.
..tPassenger..
... tFrelgnt
All above trains carry passengers.. .v -.
Nos 5 & 6 run between Dubuque and Albert
Lea.
Nos. Si & 82 run between Lyle and Dubuque
with connection through toFf
No 81.
"THE
LIMITED"
50 YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
TRADE MARKS
DESIGNS
COPYRIGHTS
Slc.
Anyone sending a sketch and description mar
outckly ascertain our opinion free whether an
Invention is probably patentable. Communica
tions strictly conUdentfal. Tlandbookon Patents
sent free. Otdcst acency for securing patents.
Patents taken through Muun & Co. receive
special notice, without charge. In the
Scientific American.
A handsomely illustrated weekly. T-nrceat cir
culation of any scientltlo journal. Terms, $3 a
year: four months, (L Sold by all newsdealers.
MUNN&Co.3e,B™,«'- New York
Branch Office. G25 BU Washington, D. C.
coffll
Bakers
Monaca
Coffee
Received fresh daily.
For Sale by
L. G. WELLS.
17Wtf
R. W. TIRRILL
Is Loaning Honey as cheap
as any person or Corpora
tion.
DOUGLASS, the Photo
grapher.
Go to Douglass
For FINK PICTURES
DELAWARE COUNTY
Abstract Co
Manchester, Iowa.
ABSTRACTS.
REAL ESTATE.
LOANS AND
CONVEYANCING.
Office In First National
Bank Building.
Orders by mail will receive careful
attention.
We have complete copies of all recorde
of Delaware county.
_ENNIS BOGGS.
«$£ MANAGER
A fast vestibule night train, dally, carrying
through Pullman sleeping car and couches.
Lv. Omaha I Lv. St. Paul
7.00 a. m. I 0.00 a. in.
THE
Msle bj STANDARD OIL CO.'
EXPRESS1
Ar. Minneapolis 1 Lv Minneapolis
7.00 p.m. 9,8(ja. m.
Ar. St. Paul I Ar. Omaha
7 80 p.m. I 9,40 p.m.
Fast day train, dally except Sunday, carrying
throughparlor car and coaches.
CHICAGO GREW WSIERNRI
a a
March 3, 1901.
Time card, Thorpe, Iowa.
Chicago Special, Dally, Golog East 7:87 a
Day Express daily -2:28 pm
Way Frelghtually 11:30am
O 1 West, North and South.
WayFrelgh daily 11:80 am
DayBxpreaa daily except Sunday. 3:2Gpm
St Paul & Kansas City Exp, dally ex
cept Sunday 6:41 am
For Information and ticket* apply to
W. T. Brander, Agent Tnorpe
B. C. R. & N. R'».
CEDAR RAPIDS TIME CARD.
MAI If LINE OOINO BABT AND SOUTH.
Arrive Leave
8:*Ju No. 2Chicago Passenger.... 8:40
9:80 a No. 4 Chi. & Uurlt'n Pass 9:85 a 21
8:10a No. Chicago fit St.Louls Ex. 8:3oam
11:45 ngt No. 8 Chicago Fast Express. 12 05ngt
No. 18 Burl. & Davnp't. Pass 8:25p
No 2—Pullman sleeper, free chair car and
coaches to Chicago. No. G—Pullman sleepers
aud through coaches to Chicago and St. Louis.
No. 8—Pullman sleeper and free chair car tu
Chicago arrives Chicago 7:59 a. m. Dlntngcar
will serve breakfast from Jollet to Chicago.
Ngt.—night.
MAIN LINE GOING NOBTH.
7:85 a No. 1 Minneapolis Pass. 8:05 a
12:10 No.8 Rockford Passenger... 8:80p
ri: 5 ngt No. 6MluueapollB Express..12:So ngt
•:46 a No. is Chicago Passenger.
il:&8 No. 19 Chicago Passenger.
No. l—Free chair car and coaches to Al
bert Lea. No. 5—Wide Vesttbuitd Pullman
Buffet sleepers aud coaches to Minneapolis and
St. Paul.
DKCOBAH DIVISION.
8:10 Decorah Passenger 8:80 a
9:20 am West Union Passenger 3:40
4:06 m'. Decorah Freight 6:20 a
IOWA FALLB DIVISION.
7:30 pm....Iowa& Minnesota Pass 8:15a
11:45 a. m..Minnesota IU Dakota Pass..
12:80 a
IOWA OITY, DAVBNFOBT.BUBL. AND CLINTON
18:10 m. Burl. & la City Pass 3:25
7:45 m....Clin.,1aCity,DvptPass......7:15a
7:36a m~ Burl. & la uty Pass .8:40
"Trains numbers 5,6,8, 13, 19, aud Mlun
I-
fiftUUfiblilii
LUNOIS CENTRAL R. R.
I I A Ibinuis (entra! excursion to
W UDM
a
Dakota Pass run dally, all other tralus dally ex
cept Sunday."
JNO. G. FARMER, J. A. LOMAX
Gen'l Pass tU Tkt Agt. Ticket Agent
Cedar Rapids Iowa.
One Fare Plus $2.
Therj ire still some good lands in
northwestern Iowa, southwestern
Minnesota and South Dakota, and if
you are expecting to make a change in
location, you should take advantage of
tbe low excursion rates in effect. On
the first and third Tuesday of each
month excursion tickets, bearing .21
days' limit, can be purchased to all
points on tbe Burlington, Cedar RapidB
& Northern Kail way, north of and
including Abbott, Shell Bock and
Waverly at One Fare Plus $2.
Fall information relative to these
lands will be cheerfully given upon ap
plication to Messrs. Ilten & Brooks
our Industrial and Immigration AgentB,
Oder Baplds, Iowa.
If you are thinking of making a trip
to any point in Alabama, Arkansas.
Arizona, British Columbia, Canadian
Northwest, Colorado. Florida, Georgia,
Idaho, Indian Territory, Iowa, Kansas,
Kentucky, Louisiana, Manitoba, Minne
sota, Michigan, Missouri, Mississippi,
Montana, New Mexico, Nebraska,
North Carolina, North Dakota, Okla
homa, Oregon, South Dakata, South
farolinB.'TenneBsi e, Texas, Utah, Vir
ginia, Wishington, Wisconsin and
Northern Michigan and Wyoming, cal
on agents of tbe "Cedar Bapids Route'
for rates, etc., or address
*5
JNO. G. FARMER, A. G. P. & T. A.,
B., C. R. & N.Ey.
Cedar Hapids, la
HomeseekerB Kxcursions.
Tickets to nearly all points in the
United States on sale at all ticket
ofllces of tbe Chicago Great Western
Railway on the first Bnd third Tues
TuesdayB of January and February at
the low rate of o^e fare pius $2 00 for
the round trip. Gooi to return In 21
days from bate of sale. For detailed
information address any Chicago Great
Western Agent, or J. P. ELMER, G.
P. A., Chicago, 111. 8w5
Cuba will leavo Chicago, St.
1 oul». 1 li clonati und Louisville Jauuary 8O1I)
iwi3, react itig sume points on the return Febru
ary u. A delightful vnjatfe across the Gulf of
Mexico, a six ciav»' stay on tho Island of Cuba,
IticludltiK a visit to IlavHiia, Mrtanzas, the Val
ey of Yurml, the eaves of Bella Mar nud otber
merest! poln-s und the escort of tl.e Amer
ican Tourist Association. Hate from the points
mei tlonen will be$155.1)0. f.-r the round trip,
wntcb amount will include alt expense every
where. Itineraries, giving full particulars, of
your local lhiuols eutrul ticket agent.
MARDIGRAS I.hK
leans on Foi ruiry 10 and It. 1SHO. Forit.excur
slon rates will be in effect to New Orleans on
specific dates whit your local ticket agent will
be ahie to advise you.
NEW ORLEANS
fully unique city foi the tourist 10 visit Whiter
tourists rates now In effect. I'oubio dally ser
vice and fust 81
earn heated vestibule trains with
through sleeping earn, bullet library tnu-king
car service and all meals en routt^in dining cars,
Aak for an Illustrated book on New Orleans,
MEXICO
Tourofall Mo'lco via
tin* lllluols Cen ral im-
derthe auspices of Iho
Gen. Traffic Manager.
auspices ol iho American IVurist As
sociation, wil leave Chicag .Jauuary 38th, 1WJ.
Tickets Include all expense, hallway {sleeping
night from Chicago.
HAMMOND
Ne 2* 8:39 a
No 4* 8:i5pm
No 3218: 55 a
Noet 8:40pm
No 92*11:45 am
No 66*2:05
v,
•Daily. :.
tDally ExceptSunday.
H. G. PIERCE. Station Agt
j--
Ft Dodge by train
New train 4 traces same stops east of here as
No. 2exi ent that east of Kockford It stops at
East Rockrord, Genoa & Coleman, This train
Is a ihroutfh vestibule train with dining
car from Omaha to Rockford. No 2 & 4 only
stop at Dyersville between Manchester and Du
buque.'
No 8-4-6-1-3 & 81 Ruu dallv Sunday Included
NEW SHORT LINE
"I
and Si. Paul.
Illinois Central between Omaha aud Fort Dodge
lu connection with the Minneapolis and St. Louis
between Fort Dodge and Minneapolis and St.
Paul, also to be Inaugurated January
88, tuoO
Send for Ham
moud, Loulslaua
as a winter retort, a bc.uiiiul)y illuatratea fold
er showing a n-w of the winter attractions in
and about llanitnoud, copies of vblchwhl be
mailed ireeou application to J.F. Merry, A.
G. P. A. lll.Cent.lt It., Dubuque, Iowa,
HOMESEEKERS
bei.d to J. Meu, A 1*. A 111. Ceu, R.
R., I'utiunuft, Iowa. lor a free o. |y of a folder
eutltled"For Hums- ckers aud Laud Investors."
It furnishes briel but reliable Information as to
tbe resi-ource and poAuibltities of the siutes of
Kentucky, l'enues&ee, Mississippi atid Louis
iana.
Through "Dixie Fiy
or" slei-piug car lines,
FLORIDA
No 8-5 9:00 a.m
No J&J 0:25p.m
No.8585:00p.
i.ouit* to Jacksonville, aud Chicago to
Jacksonville Route via. Nashville, Chatta
nooga and Ailan.
a.
Illinois Central Through to Florida.
Mouday, January 6, liKK. the Illinois
Cent ai will ruu a through sleeping car between
Chlcagoand Jacksonville, Florida, via Nashville,
Chattanooga an Atlanta, It will leave Chicago
11 Particulars
Lv. St. Paul
8.00 p. m.
Lv Minneapolis
8.80 m,
Ar. Omaha
8.15 a. m.
Lv. Omaha
7.86 p. m.
Ar. Minneapolis
7.80 a. m.
1 Ar. St. Paul
I 8.00 a.m.
1
3
1
and dmtf.gcar, fa e,hotels, carriages, etc.
Personally
conducted
weekly excursion cars through to Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA
1
and Snn hranclsco as toilows: la Sew Or
leans and the south* rn rouie every Wednesday
from Chicago every Frluay from riocinuati.
Via Omaha and the sceulo route every Friday
1
1
dally at G:1U p. m.aud arr ve at Jacksonville the
aecoud morning, running over the celebrated
"Dixie Flyer" scenic route. This is au exten*
slon ofit&ali-ihe-yoar-round Ch.tagoand Nash
ville sleeping car llue.
agei.ta of tbe Illinois entral, or by addressing
the nearest ot the undersigned representatives
of the eutrul:
A. II. HANSON, P. A. Chicago, 111,
J, fr.MEKRY, A, G. P. A., Dubuque, Iowa.
:or
Homeseekers and Land
Investors.
The paBseogtr department of the .1111
Lois Central railroad hut* juet received
irom the htjndb ot Lhe printer, a new
folder in the intereete of llomtBeekern
aud Laud Investors. Mat.y ate look-'
lng tor new tiomeB and for land invest
ments. This folder furnishes brief but
reliable information bb lo tbe resources
and possibilities of the states of Ken
tucay, Tennessee, Mississippi and
Louisiana. Tbe opportunities for in-.
vestments In the above mentioned
states are unsurpassed in any part of
is re at 1 1
{A
fx-
curnions to points witbin these st tes
are run by the Illinois Central the first
and third Tuesdays of every month, at
a rate of one fare plus 82 00 and these
excursions should be taken advantage
of by everyone in search of a borne or,
Investments in timber or farm lands.
For a free copy of this, address the
undersigned at Dubuque, Iowa.
J- F.
MERRY,
fes&Asst. Genl. aas. Agent,
35tf SfSI Illinois Central Kailroad.
LOW-RATE-EXCURSIONS
Twice each month, on specific dates, the Illi
nois central will selat greatly reduced rate
from points ou us line north of Cairo, roundtrip
Homeseekers' Excursion tickets South to cer
tain poluts on or reached by Us lines In Ken
tucky, Tenuesseeo, Mississippi, Louisiana aud
Alabama. A ho to certain points West and
Southwest in Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota,
South iiakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma
and :ndiun Territory. Particulars of yourllU
nois Ceutralageuts
For a free copy of the Homeseekers' Guide
describing the auva taxes and resources the
South, address J. b\ Merry. A. G. P. A., 1. R.
R., Dubuque, Io a For information regard
ing liuide in the famous Ya7.no Valley of Kiitts
lsslupi, address E. Skene, Land Commissioner
". & V. R.lt .Chicago.
House and 7^ Acrea of .Land in Kan
cheater for Sale.
I will sell on reaxonahie rms my place In
Manchester, which consists of acres of land.
Tho improvements are live room dwelling
hou e, a barn, b-. ggy shed, chicken house, Ice
bouse any other small butldlugs. For particu
lars enquire on the premise* of
46 tf. ALEX. PURVIS.
BEACGM'S
CUTieLEHR
TMB QRIAT MBDIOAb •ISOOVSAV
Cures ECZEMA, SALT RHEUM,
ALU 8KIN ERUPTIONS AND FACE
BLEMISHES. IT HAS NO EQUAL.
Sold by druggists or senl expre.y prepaid upon
receipt of prit'o 75o. Address
F« N. BKACOM. MANOUES'/'KU- IOWA
Sold by
Denton & Ward, Manchester, Iowa.
Johuston, Delhi, Iowa.
Dr. H. Livingston. Hopklnton, Iowa.
PATENTS
I
$
&
J.P.Streigel ttyan, Iowa.
E F. Mulvehlll, Masonvllle.'owa.
0 A. Kendall. I-arlvill°, low
Keiper & Meyer?, r^rsbwg, Iowa.
T. Armstrong, tireejej. I-vs.
F. \V. Itoyden, Kdgewood, JOTT*
Wh«eler&Katon, Lamout, Iowa,
James Musser. Ahuoral, Iowa.
V. Bush, Colnsburg, Iowa.
E. Brlggs & Co., Dundee, Iowa.
CATARRH
ASK
Druggist
for
10 CENT
TRIAL SIZE
8WS
Hy':CnuSt!iit
Uivea Relief at once
It cleanses, soothes
and heals thedlse«sed
mombrane. It cures
catarrh and drives
away a cold lu the head iui'. |y It in absorb
ed Heals and protect* the ttcmhratie Re
stores the Senses of Taste and Smell. Full size
50c.: Trial Size inc. at druggists or mail.
COLD'N HEAD
ELY BROTHEHS.56 Warreu Street, N.Y
CHEAP—Residence Property tn this city*
Euquire of Bronsou & Carr.
DESIGNS
TRAOE-MARKS 4
I AND COPYRIGHTS
OBTAINED
ADVICE AS TO PATENTABILITY
Notice in "Inventive Age" piHaHSlB
Book "How to
obtain Patents"
Oharqet moderate.
HHBBI
No fee
till patent is secured,
Letters strictly confidential. Address,
*6.6. SIGGERS, Patent Lawyer. Washington, D.C.*
You Will Need
a Pair of Shoes
To keep your feet dry
during during the wet
weather this spring. We
can suit you in quality
and price. Also rubbers
of all kinds.
'1
F. M. FOLEY
RYAN, IOWA.

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