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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, July 30, 1902, Image 1

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,VJ.\* °-1«D KVKRY WEDNESDAY
BR0N8ON, I, M. OARR.
BRONSON «, OARR.
Editors and Proprietors.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE.
'early, In advance II EO
If not paid in advanoe 9 00
NOTICE.—On the slip of paper upon whJoh
she name is printed, appears the date to which
we paper 10 paid for, and a renewal Is always
respeotfully solicited.
The writer's name must acoompany an'
ele for publication, as an evldeno of good
of the editor*.
a
WE PIT THE FEET.
AT OUR
CLEAN SWEEP
SHOE SALE!
$2.50 per pair. Our Special Sale
Price only ^2.00
Men's Fine House Slippers, imitation alli
gator vamp with Patent Leather backs,
also velvet slippers worth 75c now only 5^
KkYWL*0 collections. Offloe in Democrat
«. Franklin Street. Manchester. Iowa.
*R*fr*£Sn-Am.
IY AI UV. -Offloe In the City HaU
A. J. WARD,
id Surgeon, will
all hours of the day or night,
J. J. LINDSAY, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN,
surgeon and Eye Specialist.
Office hours for eye cases ana fitting glasses
1:00 to 8:00 p. m. Office corner Main ana Frank-
lis streets.
G, C. BBADLEY, M. D. H. M. BRADLEY, M. D.
BRADLEY & BRADLEY.
PHYSICIANS
DBNTISTS*
O. A, 1UXHAM. C. L. LBIOn
DUNHAM & LEIGH.
Demists.
Office in the Adams building on
franklin Street. Telephone 216.
C. W. DORMAN,
i^ENTlSl, Offloe on Franklin Street. north
Lt of the Qlobe Hotel, Manohester, Iowa.
Dental Surged in all lis branohes. Makes
requent visits neighboring towns. Always
at offloe on Satu*uw,
6. HBWOOMB.
DENTIST.
Office ^ver Clark ft Lawrence's
store on FraMuio street. Crown
bridge work_a «S«lalty. will.meet pattents.at
Parley Wednesday of eaetweek* 82tf
VBTBRINANAN.
DR. J. W. SCOIT,
Surgeon, and icntlst. 501E
Main Street. Telephon 289.
MANCHSSTBR MARBLE WORKS
TS prepared to furnish Granite ai* Marble
Monuments and Head Stones of vuous de
signs. Have the county right for Slp& Pat
ent Orave Cover also dealer In Iron t\noes.
Will meet all oompetltion.
A. 1), BROWN
ealer in furniture etc., and undertaker,
P. WBRKMEISTBR.
/GENERAL DEALER IN FURNITURE,
VX Coffins. Pioture Frames, Etc. -A complete
•took of Furniture and Upholstery always on
hand, at prloes that defy oompetltion. A good
Hewse kept for attendance at funerals,
vllle, Iowa.
yj ner
Main and Franklin
GILDNER BR08.
B. CLARK.
DRY
GOODS, Notions, Carpets, Gents Fur
nishing goods, eic. Franklin Street.
QUAKER MILL CO.
FLOUR
and Feed, Manufacturers of the cele
brated White Hatln and Wliltu I'earl Flour.
KIDDBLL CO.,
f\BY GOODS, Carpets, Millinery, Hats and
IS Caps, Boots and Shoes, etc., Main St.
Manohester, Iowa.
A.THORPE,
TROPBIBTOB OF KALAMITY'S PLUN
xdsr Store and Dealer In Clothing, Boots,
shoos, Notions, ole. Masonic Block Manches
ter, Iowa.
QRASSFIELD BRQS
(Successors to Setb Brown.)
AND 8IIOKS of all grades and prices.
Custom Work and Bepafrlng gi
attention. Store la City Hall Blook.
y'_ '-v
fsa?&-33a
We are closing out
our Men's Patent
Calf Shoes, new and
pretty styles, every
pair worth $3.00.
Sale Price
only
6
$2.00
Men's Fine Low
Shoes for street or
dress wear, worth
r* iV 'lipg
E. T. Grassfield
(Successor to Qrassfield Bros.)
Vr
Our Business Directory.
ATTORNEYS.
W. DOTVHAJf. X. B. STILK& W. H. flORBIS
DUNHAM. NORRI8 STILES.
A TTOBNEYS AT LAW AND NOTARIES
PWlllfc- Specif attention given to CoUee
on» IunuMHle, Real Estate ana Loan Agts.
M&CQ in City Hall Blook. Manchester, Ia.
C. YO*A». H. F. ABSOLD. M.J, YORAIf
VORAN. ARNOLD ft. YORAN
A TTORNKYS AT IiAW. and Beal Estate
'£». Agents. Office over Delaware County State
1
Bank/Manchester, low*.
•0. S. BBOWO*. ts. M, GARB.
BRONSON CARR.
A TTOENKY8 AT LAW. Special attention
-a, *9 7
MANCHESTER. IOWA.
HOLLISTBR LUMBER CO.
LUMBER
and all kinds of building materials,
Posts and Coal, Cornor of Delaware and
Madison streets.
THOS.T. CARKEEK.
A^
RCHITECT AND BUILDING SUPERIN
TENDENT, S. E. Corner, 8th and Main St.
Dubuque, Iowa.
8CHARLES. THE TAILOR.
MERCHANT
TAILOK and Gents Furnishing
Goods, Manchester, Iowa.
WM. DENNIS.
CARPENTER,
CONTRACTORS BUILDER.
I am now prepared to do alt work in my
line in a good and workmanlike mauner. Satis
faction guaranteed. Flans and estimates fur
nished. .Work taken in town or country. Shop
•near the stand tower on West Side of river.
C. E. CATES.
CITY
DRAYMAN. Am prspared io do all
work In my line, Moving household goods
and pianos a specialty. A1I work will rbcelve'
{B
/PHYSICIAN and Surgeon, will attend to oalls
a
Cdunont, Iowa.
romnt
attention A share of your patronage
solicited.- Charges right. Give your draylng
to a man'who has comu to stay.
LAWRENCE
&GREM8.
TVRUGS, Wolt Paper, Stationery, l'aints, Oils,
fl) etc. City Hall block.
PETER BOARDWAY.
DEALER
AND SURGEONS. Franklin
street, Manchester, Iowa.
IN
Hour, feed, hay straw, M&quokc-
ts lime, stucco, and common aud Atlas ce
xnont. Telepiioue 113. Lower Frauklin St.
A. E. PETERSON.
DEADER
IN
Groceries, Provisions. Crock
ory, Fruits, etc. Main Street,
J. M. PEARSE.
TUSTICE OF THE PEACE AND COLLECT
O OR.
AH
business entrusted to him glyei
prompt attention, OtUoe In City HaU block
second floor.
ALEX. SEFSTROM.
G1ENEUAL
BLACKSMITH, horsesholng
specialty. Interferrtng and corns curea or
no pay. Priced reasonable, and tite best ol
work guaranteed A share of the public patron
age is solicited, Shop on Franklin street, near
the bridge.
Business Opportunities For All.
Locations in Iowa* Illinois, Minne
sota and Missouri on tbe Chicago Great
WeBtern Railway the very beBt agri
cultural section of tbe United States
where farmers are prosperous and busi
ness men successful. We have a demand
for competent men, with the necessary
capital, for all branches of business.
Some special opportunities for creamery
men and
mlllerB.
WM. MCINTOIH.
W. N. BO\KTOH. J. F. McEWBi,
BOYNTON MoBWBN.
CTTATOHMAKERS, Jewelers and Engravers
dealers in Watches, Clooks, Silver and
Plated Ware, Fine Jewelry, Speotaoles, Cutlery,
Musleal Instruments, etc., Main street.
Good locations for
general merchandise, hardware, harness,
hotels, bankB and stockbuyers. Corres
pondence solicited. Write for Maps and
Maple Leaflets, W. T. Reed, Industrial
Agent, 604 Endicott Building, St, Paul,
Minn.
Tbe large and increasing circulation
cv The Iowa Homestead in this county
is matter for congratulation to the
pub(shers and to good farming, for, of
all tb* papers of its class in the coun
try, It easily the best and most help
ful. Its Special Farmers' Institute
editions issued with the regular edition
the first week in each month, have been
for years
l,he
larl-
ALLEN STOREY. terms for The Homestead and its Spec
piLOTHLNG and Genu
turaishtag goods.
Oor
ng given special
QBO. S. LISTER,
(TABDWARE. STOVES, TINWARE, ETC.
111 Keeps a first-class tinner and does all
kin4s of repairing with neatness and dispatch,
•ton opposite Fust National Bank. Main St.
T. P. MOONBY.
(8uocessor to Lee Bowman.)
LAOK&MITH and Wagonmaker, Delhi,
Iowa. Work done promptly and In a work
manlike manner. Charges reasonable. Your
Patronage solicited. lttf
DBE YOUR PROPERTY against cyclones
'he old reliable Phoenix
admiration of all practi­
cal farmen. Written wholly by farm
ers, they aw lull of actual experience,
ana smell of tbe soil. We have been
fortunate enough this season to secure
ial Farmers' Institute Editions,together
streets. with The Poultry Farmer ana The
'•F a a In an a
four of the moBt valuable farm publi-
(1LOT&1NQ and Gents-furniBhing goods, cations in the country, thatjenabie us to
City HaU Block, Franklin Street. offer the four in connection with our
own paper lor 81.90 for the entire five,
one year. This is emphatically a good
thing, and no farmer in this county
should fail to take advantage of thiB
offer. For a large line of thoroughly
practical farm reading nothing has ever
been offered before that equals it, A
county paper, a farm paper, a poultry
paper, a farm insurance paper and the
Special Farmers' lentitute, all for 91.90
Gome in and order them.
CUCUMBER,
... .id
e-hlei' Flower Cream is tho best protec
tion for the faco from tho Sprlne Winds, Heal
ing and soothing, it keeps away black heads and
other blemishes.
Guaranteed pure and will not grow hair on
the face.
All kinds of Hair Work dono to order.
MKS. C.M. EATON,
Over Harnoss Store, Main Street.
IStf Manchester, Iowa.
F. E. RICHARDSON
$6.
Real Estate, Loans and^
:'v'-V
Insurance.
Office over the Eacket Store
Manchester Iowa.
Wl rftjg
$»•
$?£*
p&W
j*
ENTERKD AT ME POSTOFflC* AT I
MANCHESTER, IOWA, AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER.
A delogate convention of the Democrats of
tho state of Iowa will be held at Des Moines,
Iowa, on
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3,1002,
to place la nomination candidates for the fol
lowing offices, to wit:
Secretary of State,
Auditor of State,
Treasurer of State,
Attorney-General,
Judge of Supreme Court,
Clerk of Supreme Court,
Reporter of Supreme C(
Railroad
Supreme Court,
Reporter
»T1 ml
Dlfttln.<p></p>Commlsloner,
_• ,,
4
Railroad ^uiuunifiouer, .-7
and to transact such other business as may
properly come before said convention.
The ratio of representation will be one dele
gato-at-large from each county and one dele
gate for each 900 votes or fraction of 100 or over
cast for the Democratic candidate for governor
2* the last general election. The several coun
ties of tho state-will bo entitled to the following
delegates:
THIRD DISTRICT
Blackhawk
Bremer
Huchflhan
Dubuque
Franklin
Hardin
Wright
1
Butler
Delaware
nn
All voters who endorse the principles of the
Democratic party are Invited to participate in
the selection of delegates to this convention.
By order of the Democratic State Central
Committee. S. F. MCCOXNELL,
N ROBERTS,
1
a a
Secretary.
The crown prince of Siam is to visit
the United some time before Septem
ber 1st. The government is arranging
to give him a cordial reception.
Some of the papers speak of reduc
tion of tariff schedules as a "conces
sion to the people." That Is good, very
good. Who have all the rights in this
case, please? Protective tariff in any
amount is a direct gift from the people
to the beneficiaries, and the people have
the right to stop giving when they ar
rive at the conclusion that the beggars
have money in the banks while they are
still working for a living—Cedar Rap
ids Gazette. i"~
Farmer Victims.
Concluding his prediction tbat the
corn crop of 1902 will be a record
breaker, Paul Morton has this to say
about the farmers:
There is no gainsaying the fact that
the farmers as a class are fast growing
rich, and the time will come in my
judgment when they will be the richest
people in the coqptry, taken as a class.
Furthermore, the time is coming when
the farmers of the Mississippi valley,
and I use this term in its broadest
sense, will be the richest farmers in the
world.
This used to be true even df the,
farmers of the stony, hilly, and sterile
lands of the east, Covetousness of the
wealth of the American farmer is what
furnished tbe ebergy with which the
protective tariff conspiracy against him
was pushed. He fell into the trap that
was set for him and from his toil and
savings have been amassed many of tbe
stupendous fortunes which the monop
oly tariff has rolled up.
Actuated politically as they now are,
the farmers of tbe west are likely to
continue an easy prey to the exactions
the tariff cormorants, which will
eep pace with the wealth which they
covet.
Wk
The lawyer's Duty,
The law schools are now turning out
another crop of lawyers, and it is as
important that the young attorneys
should understand the duty of the law
yer aB it is that they should be learned
in their profession. Some imagine tbat
it is the duty of the lawyer to Becure
for his client any advantage within his
power, and often he is not scrupulous
about the means employed. No one
who understands the foundations of
justice, or appreciates the importance
of the lawyer's part in tbe administra
tion of justice, can bold such a view.
The lawyer is an officer of the court,
and it is his place to assist tbe court to
understand the facts in the case at bar
and the law applicable to those facts.
Usually there are circumstances that
weigh on each Bide of a contested case,
and it is tbe duty of the lawyer to see
tbat his client has tbe benefit of the
law and the benefit of such circum
stances as affect his rights, liut tbe
lawyer who' goes beyond this, and
prides himself upon hiB ability to se
cure for his client that which his client
does not deserve, or to shield his client
from a punishment which his client
merits, will find that he cannot thus
prostitute his ability and his learning
without ultimately feeling tbe affect
of it upon his own moral character.
Those find justice who search diligently
for it, and when one accustoms himself
to concealing justice, he
The young lawyer who enters upon hiB
profession with high ideals add a de
termination to be worthy the respect of
those among whom he lives, will find
that in the long ran his Ideals will de
termine his place at the bar and in tbe
community. Ho wlU be respected by
others in proportion as he preserves
bis seit-Nfpeot.—Commoner.
RO
Why should you dread tho morrow,
Ana thus despoil to-day?
For when you borrow troublo
You always have to pay.
It Is a good old maxim,
Which should be often preachedr
Don't cross the bridge before you
Until the bridge is reached,
You might bo spared much sighing
If you would koep In mind
The thought that good and evil
Are always here combined.
There must bo something wanting
And though you roll In wealth, ..«?.. r
ou may miss from your casket
That precious jewel—health
And though you're strong and sturdy v:
iou may nave an empty purse,
(And earth has many trials
Which I consider worse)
But whether joy or sorronr
Fill up your mortal span,
'Twill make your pathway brighten
Tosmlicwheno'eryou can.
—Selected...
The Value of a Dairy Cow.
The statement has been made that
the average dairyman knows more about
the subject of bacteriology than he does
about selecting a dairy cow. This is due
to the fact that creamerymen have re
ligiously insisted on compelling farmers
to avoid allowing their milk to become
contaminated from any source what
ever. In order to emphasize this it bas
been necessary for the creamerymen to
explain in detail tbe characteristics of
the organisms which develop injurious
flavors in milk. The care that is now
taken in tbe cleaning of milk utensils
indicates that tbe dairyman is aware of
tbe fact that organisms left in poorly
washed
vessels
mutiply at an exceed­
ingly rapid rate when they are allowed
a milk culture to work in. Of course,
It cannot be said-that the average
dairy
man hBB attained perfection along these
lines, although there is no denying tbe
fact that he is quite well poBted on these
matters.
It is now high time, however, -that
more attention was given to the selec
tion of the dairy cow. There Is quite a
general belief that a dairy cow Is worth
about $40 or $50, and so long asan anl-
is, therefore, apparent that th$
value of
a dairy cow depends entirely upon her
ability to produce buttpr fat., Soma are
able to make as hlgb as 350 orieven 40Q
"pounds^of bntterlna. year,,while onflia,
Other ha£d there are CQwe whlcb
not be made'trprodac8 ISO go'
batter fat, even with the best kind of
feeding and treatment. Tbe latter,
therefore, as a dairy animal has no
value whatever, and her selling price
can only be based on what she would
bring on the market as a canner. Bat
a cow that will produce 300 or 400
pounds of butter during one year woald
be a bargain at $100. Such an animal
when properly fed would pay 40 per
cent on the first cost pluB tbe value of
her teed every year. There is the typi
cal dairy form which one may be guided
by in purchasing a dairy animal, but
even this is sometimes deceiving. Some
times the animal with a typical beef
form turns out to have wonderful abil
ity in the production of milk. After all.
the milk pail and the test furnish tbe
most accurate means of determining tbe
real value of the dairy animal.—Home
stead.
Value of Shredded Fodder.
The problem of harvesting tbe corn
crop in such manner as to utilize the
full feeding value of the fodder is one
that demands earnest consideration.
Chemical analysis at several of the lead
ing experiment stations has shown that
nearly half the feeding value of the
crop is in the fodder. This makes our
neglected fodder crop tbe second most
valuable crop produced in America
worth more than our wheat, oats, cot
ton, hay or any other crop excepting
the corn itself. Until a few years ago
it was commonly supposed that there
was very.little value In tbe fodder.
Even in the east, where corn was gener
ally cut and shocked by hand, the fod
der was looked upon more as a filler to
be fed to cattle or
Bheep
out doors after
they had been given their regular feed
of hay and grain. In the,west we did
not dream of the neglected fortune that
lay concealed in our snow-covered stalk
fields.
This misconception regarding tbe
value of fodder was due in part to tbe
fact tbat the fodder really has but little
feeding value if it is allowed to stand
gradually uncut in tbe field until after the work
loses his power to discern it, and in the of husking can be finished, it is like
end, not only becomes a different per- timothy and clover in this respect. The
son himself, but becomes less useful to best meadow would be worth but little
his client. if allowed to stand for months uncut,
Not only does the lawyer owe It to to bleach and rot in the sun, winds and
himself to maintain his Integrity, but
he finds in this integrity his most sub
stantial gain. The words of a lawyer
are of little value except as they have
behind them a character to give th^m
weight. When a judge learns thai) a
lawyer does not deceive him—that
when he states a legal proposition he
has no mental reservations—he will try
to rely upon tbat lawyer's judgment.
When tbe members of the jury are con
vinced that the lawyer is trying to as
sist them In understanding the case and
not trying to mislead or deceive them,
his'wordB will have great weight in
their determination. No capital is so
valuable to a lawyer as the confidence
of the people, and that confidence Is
never earned nor enjoyed by one who
gets the reputation of being tricky,
rain. Grass must be cut at just the
right time befoie it gets too ripe, in or
der to make good hay. Tbe same rule
applies to corn fodder. If cut at the
right time before it getB dead ripe, It
makes good, nutritious feed which anal
ysis shows as practically equal to timo
thy hay. If it stands too long It dries
up and gets as woody and palatable as
a plank, and there 1B also a mechanical
loss in tbe'dropplng of the dead leaves.
Another reason for our failure to un
derstand the value of the fodder crop is
that about half the feeding value of
average fodder is in the body of tbe
stalk, which cattle and sheep cannot eat
wben It is fed to them whole. The
statement bas been made by one of tbe
experiment stations that half the feed
ing value of the entire fodder is in that
part of the stalk below the ear. We
know from observation that a consider
able part of the stalk above the ear is
not eaten and when It Is run dry through
a feed cutter most of the butts are left
in tbe manger.
The introduction. of (husking and
shredding machines baa made It possi
ble to prepare-the fodder 4t a minimum
•Wiiii mi I I ill
I
ft#
MANCHESTER, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, JULY 30, 1902.
Democrat State Convention Smile whenever You Can. expense, so that practically tbe entire
stalk 1B eaten, by sheep BS well as cattle,
and even horse* seem to relish the
shredded "corn hay" and do well on it.
When things don't
to suit you
Aud the world seems upside down,
Don't waste your time In fretting,
Rut drive away that frown:
Siuce life is oft perplexing,
'Tls muoli the wisest plan
To bear all trials bravely
And smile whene'er you can
Some of the statements made by practi
cal dairymen who have been feeding
shredded fodder for years seem almost
Incredible. They say that as a practical
milk producer it is far superior to tlmo
thy hay, and many maintain tbat it is
better than clover, if fed with a well
conBldered ration of grain, to supply the
protein, in which fodder is deficient.
Many of tbe leading dairy and Btock
men in northern Illinois and southern
Wisconsin have quit cutting hay, plow
ing up their meadows not needed for
pasture and using shredded fodder as
their sole forage crop, a system that cn
ablee them to make a large Increase in
their output of beef or butter.—Dairy
and Creamery.
THE RICE TABLE.
A DlntlncH-ve and Remarkable Meal
Herred In Java.
"At 1 o'clock," says a correspondent
5f
the Kansas City Star, "every hotel
In Java serves a most distinctive and
remarkable meal called the rice table
(rljst-tafel). A large, flat, bowl shaped
dinh Is placed In front of you, which
you fill with beautiful, white, flaky
rice, borne about in dishes holding fully
a quarter of a bushel. Then comes a
seemingly never ending stream of na
tives, each bearing a dish containing
tome different meat, vegetable or con
diment, from which you take a small
portion and place it on top of the rice.
"After you have had a little of every
-thing you mince it up with a knife and
fork-and mix It well with the rice and
then fall to with a large spoon. A list
of the aide dishes, with an ordinary
rice table, would read something like
:th!s: Fried eggs, omelet, fried chicken,
broiled chicken, stewed chicken, beef
steak, sausage, fish, fritters, a mixture
Of vegetables stewed with a mustard
dressing, raw cucumbers, liver and ten
6r twelve different spices and relishes,
•besides pickles.
Many a stout Dutchman have we
seen take a liberal helping from each
^dlsh in addition to almost a quart of
mal is young there is bat little allow-1**0® for a background of 'table.' Statu*
ance made for her real ability .to pro
dace milk at a profit. It is seldom real
ized that many cows are dear as a gift
tbat they are kept at an annual Ion
when the cost of their feed is set over.
against the value of their product. Jfei if. Hu.r of jgi« i.ie
.... .J. .L.ifi A. iMlllv avaw A«in mna^ mm
rally every,one must go to sloep imm'ej
[Tjdiately after such a meal, and all$6|ii
.. rass is suspended for several'-b'oura:
•The dinner In the evening at 8Vcl6i*
a.very simple metl."
a
Mam.
In the Isle ^Man, aa ln Sytjjuid,
luch of the Bumor dependa,
[urus of expression. "If ayeL
iven, pas^n'Mtp&raon), said
rieh clerk, "l£{l be ugjler
otion tfere-
future' state,
as depicted by a man who
had seldom been outside his own par
ish, or the' humor may consist merely
In the unexpected use of some partic
ular word.
A queer old character who. had been
given a new muffler and kept It care
fully wrapped up'In paper, instead of
using It, replied to 'all remonstrances,
"I'm not goln fur to make a hack of It
at all." Upon another occasion he re
marked to a visitor, who had been
much benefited In health by a residence
in tbe island, "You Iss a much batter
gentleman now till you wass when you
came," with which may be compared
the courtly minister's "who puttcth
her ladyship's trust-in thee."—London
Saturday Review.
JL Lord In a Dltcb.
Lord Muigrave was distinguished by
a singularity of physical couforuiatlou,
having two distinct voices, tbe one
strong and hoarse, the other weak and
querulous, of both of which he occa
sionally availed himself. So extraor
dinary a circumstance probably gave
riso to a story of his having fallen into
a ditch on a dark night aud calling for
aid In bis shrill voice.
A
countryman
coming up was about to help blm, but.
Lord Muigrave addressing him in a
hoarse tone, tho peasant immediately
exclaimed, "Oh, If there are two of
you In the dltcb you may help each
other out of it."—London Tit-Bits.
Invention ot the Fire Engine.
Toward the close of the seventeenth
century M. Duperrler in France, Herr
Leopold In Germany and Mr. Newshaui
In England introduced almost simul
taneously fire engines havidg an air
chamber, which rendered the stream
ot water continuous and uniform. In
addition to this, these engines wero
equipped with flexible leather hose. In
vented by Jan Van der Helde and his
brother^ which was Qrst put Into
practical use In Amsterdam in the year
1072.
Dnliles and Monkera.1'^-''---"
A frequent action with babies is to
turn tbe soles of -the feet sideways, op
posite to one another, while the legs
remain straight. Just this attitude
would be assumed by a monkey when
climbing a tree or walking on a brancb
In order to grasp the stem with its hind
legs.
The inherited effects of thus grasping
tree. trunks or liuibs with tbe hind
bands are often very marked in young
babies. The bow legs, which are a
feature of infancy and a matter of
some anxiety to mothers, arc no more
than the relics of tbe tree climbing,
stage, aud tbe mother need not be
frightened about this character any
normally healthy baby will grow out
of It soon enough.
Then, if a young baby be held so that
its feet touch the ground, one may seo
that the feet are not put flat to the sur
face. Instead, tbe outer portions of tbe
feet rest on the ground, while the soles
of the feet are more or loss opposed to
one another they have the bough
grasping attitude. Pearson's Maga
zine.
'Twa. Easier. *.
"So yon are going to Europe?"
"I am," answered the young man.
"Why don't you stay here in Ameri
ca, where there are so many opportu
nities to make a fortune?"
"Well, I've concluded tbat the other
side is easier. Of course you can make
a fortune if you will stay and work for
it, but people are always more liberal
when they are away from home. I
have concluded that it is ranch easier
to go over there and let the other
Americans'bring it to me."—Washing
ton Star.
illinium mi I
I
I
I
il
HEART STIMULANT.
fold Application. Superior to Draft,
of Aleohol.
There Is a deep seated belief amount
ing almost to a superstition that alco
hol is a very Important heart stimu
lant, especially when this organ Ul
weak. Winternitz, the great authority
on hydrotherapy in Germany, has
often toid us of the very great value
of cold as a heart stimulant or tonic
and that It Is far superior to alcohol in
this respect. Dr. Kellogg gives the
method of application as follows:
"The application consists of a com
press applied to the portion of the
cliest wall over the heart. This com
prises the space bounded by the second
rib above, the right border of the
sternum, a line falling a half inch to
the right of the nipple and the sixth
rib below. The compress should be
large enough to cover this space and
to extend at least two inches outside
of it. Ordinarily the .best effects are
produced by employing water at a
temperature of about 00 degrees. The
compress should be wrung moderately
dry and should be very lightly covered.
It Is desirable that cooling by slow
evaporation should be encouraged and
bo continued for some time."
Dr. Kellogg continues: "In Germany
and France it is the custom to adminis
ter nlcohol to the patient just before
putting him in a cold bath. Some prac
titioners, as Winternitz, administer but
a very small amount, a single mouthful
of wine, for instance, while others
give brandy in considerable quantities.
A few American practitioners employ
brandy freely with the cold bath. The
unwisdom of this practice will be ap
parent ou due consideration of the fol
lowing facts:
"One purpose in administering the
cold bath Is to seenre a true stimulant
or tonic effect by arousing the vital
energies through excitation- of the
nerve centers. Alcohol was once sup
posed to be capable of effecting thlg
and was used for this purpose in ty
phoid fever and various other morbid
conditions accompanied by depression
of the vital forces. At the present
time, however, it is well known, and
with practical unanimity admitted,
that alcohol Is neither a tonle nor a
stimulant, b&t-i' narcotic that it de
-rtesses -and .tiqersu)t eiclte *tbaHt
-lessens and.-doe»: ndtlncreasetlierao
^rffyofiJhsner^wAtejg, .apdfthiA
thlt ls true of j»mali aa~ywejl as,"
doses, as has bSen sbowa/by.
searches of (arpfui invesUgafon^*—
Health.
VWViM#LXWR**
B» 'i .^-*4
PECULMmTjgBrQF SOUND
rfce
Kin* ot ti&fc
I"0»sr"'l&ii»e
madiHHrt
k-taio«ti%lUfcle.
rtoqgjr. often
And the same result has been arrived
at in another way. The peculiar cry of
the Alpine guide, which Is, in fact, of
that nature which Professor Smith ad
vocates, has doubtless been taught by
the exigencies of his situation, where
his voice Is required to carry across
broad and deep ravines. Nature has
taught the same lesson In the Austra
lian wlids, where the characteristic
"Cowl, cowl!" appears essential to pen
etrate the deep woods.
Nor Indeed need we look farther for
an example of the same kind than our
own village lanes. The high pitched
voices of children ore very farreaching.
Their shouting can be heard farther
away in the sky than that ot man. and
In calling to their fellows they always
employ a trick of the voice taught
doubtless by experience. The child
will summon her playmate from far
away with a well practiced "Sally,"
the first syllable, high pitched and pro
longed, giving place to the second syl
lable uttered abruptly In a yet higher
note. And this mode of calling Is uni
versal.—Nineteenth Century.
Tbe Wrong Room.
^_"While spending a vacation at Bed
ford Springs, Pa., some years ago,"
said a Baltimore lawyer the other day,
I went late one night to my room, as
I supposed, unlocked the door and was
Btartled by a woman's screams. I re
alized at once tbat I bad got Into the
wrong room. You may be sure I did
not waste any time getting out into
tbe corridor, locking tbe door again
and entering my room, which happen
ed to be the next one.*
"While I was doing this the woman
continued screaming, alarming the
whole hotel. A crowd soon gathered,
and when the woman could be per
suaded to open the door she declared
there was a man in her room. Of
course no Intruder was found, and, as
the door was locked wben the crowd
gathered, the lady was told that she
must have had a nightmare and imag
ined she saw a man in her room. I
kept quiet, and every one else in the
hotel was convinced that the lady's Im
agination bad worked upon her fears."
-Baltimore Sun.
No one can read the Bible out loud
in the same voice in which he would
read a selection from a newspaper.—
Atchison Globe.
Vulnnhtc Advice.
Young I.iul.v -A friend of mine is en
gaged to a mau, and now be refuses to
marry her. What would you advise her
to do?
Old Lawyer—is the man wealthy
Young Lady—No. He hasn't a
ling.
Old Lawyer—Then I'd advise ljer l,o
write him a nice letter of thanu.—
London Telegraph.
1T
VOL. XXYHI—NO. 31.
THE HERRICK.
1
.4,
M«in?KS?kel''he °nly
a
Shoe*.
Wief*
may be missed by momentary Inatten
tion. The reed horn waa the more effi
cient Instrument as compared with
guncotton cartridges over London. The
siren would probably have been yet
more efficient as also doubtless a horn
capable of producing two notes differ
ing, say, by th'e Interval of a third or a
fifth, a conclusion arrived ataman
years ago by experiments which havo
been unhappily too much lost sight of.
Professor Plazzl Smith found by Mal
that a high note was generally more
penetrating as a signal, bnt advised
that such a note should not be used
•lone, assigning as one reason that In
dividuals possess note deafness similar
to color blindness, so that no one note
could be trusted. ExperlmentB went to
prove that a sound varying between a
high and a low note best arrested at
tention at long range.
san"»WRefrlger.
'«^??c^use iA *l®?a continuous circulation cf
i2JSi««l??i £lRoep8
foocl
Pure
aQd
come tSnted or foul"
KS2?*eJftornu«le-
(Ask your Icman.)
Itnpt in Fh?^??_str?n.g
Mld
"Kf foods can be
ffi.1u!S!iWori'Rr!f,?rator
wlthout 0,0 8,ronK
6^- Baca^e it has from 80 to 50 per cent
thBD
any Kefrigerator on
®Qual outside dimensions.
n-L!V...F»?ca4seno Poisonous zinc In Its
construction to corrode. Have you ever nuticed
drops of water collect in a dead-air, zlno-lined
Stoneware.
fwr?-
Ten Reasons why the Herrick is the Best
Refrigerator Made:
REDUCTION 5ALE,
on Ladies' and Men's Oxfords and Childrens' Slippors.
Men's $3.50 Oxfords reduced to
•"t
rf A.V «if J*'
€he ^Democrat.
RATES Or .ADVERTISING.
SPACE.
tw
One inoh....
Two Inohes..
Three Inohoa.
Fourlnohos.,
Flvo Inohoa..
Si Column...
1M
Column.
8M Of IT
•160 •9 60 •410 MM) •10 00
UU6 8 60 5 TR 9»n 15 00
(10 4 no 7 00 :s no 20 00
8 75 676 10 00 itm 25 00
4 SO 7 00 1800 WHO 80 00
60 800 16 (Ml trno 40 00
^Column..
D00 18 00 »(Ml 4000 :68 00
18 00 26 00 60 00 80 00 126 00
va Advertisements ordered discontinued be
^SS,-pto
l?ilon
01
co,ntroct
will be cbarxed ac­
cording above scale.
Buslneai cards, not exceeding six lines IS.00
per year.
Business locals, ten cents per line for the Bret
Insertion, and Ave cents per line for each anbua
THE HERRICK IS KING.
OLD STYLE.
For the eighth
season we present
the merits of the just
ly named "King of
Refrigerators." We
call attention to
ZINC •UNCO
DEAD Am
3HOHt
refrigerator? Do you want this to drip on
your food?
8th. Because the walls are lined with mineral
wool, a substance neutral to heatand cold. Con
sequently the warm air is excluded and the cold
air confined, reduoing tbe consumption of loe to
a minimum.
sweet,
mould'corrode- b*"
neo»u«e It consumes less Ice than an*
Qth Because scrubbing is not necessary to
keep It pure, dry and sweet, Herrick refriger
ators In use for 7 years amtoday as dean and
sweet as the day they were first used.
10th. Because severe tests have proven them
to be the best preservers of foods known to tbe
world today. Would the Hernck Tie endorsed
and adopted by physicians, colloges, hotels,
medical and state Institutions unless It had true
merit?
BROWN, The Furniture Hail.
I Get Your Foot 8
-A.
criJi I
Cpv^tTLoulB'„So.
Peters
pnees' on all' loie
ehave
^BotWeet $2.00j
.a -j —-7--
thst will suit you.
il of it. This aboe
-jot. It is a' Fetert
^Here's a
'amend .Brand, ihade^tfjH
i*
Is
or MICROBES III
,, s.
J* tfj
We have everything in Stone
ware from a two pound jar to a
30 gallon jar. Prices that will
please you.
P. S.—Try us on Groceries,
and all kinds of Canned Goodsi$?
Ladies' S3.00 Oxfords, reduc
ed to
$2.25
Ladies' §2.00 Oxfords reduc
ed to $1.65
Men's $5.00 Oxfords, best
grade, reduced to
Children's Slippers, red or blue, sizes to 8, reduced to
Children's Slippers, black, sizes 10 to 12, reduced to
Misses' Slippers,' black, sizes 12J to 2 reduced to
All our stock of Men's, Women's, Misses' and Children's shoes
are included in this reduced price price sale, excepting only our
Ladies' Princess Oxford.
KINNE & MADDEN.
JL
IS
ft
•I
*5$
•.
A
-'Km
4?
1
J\
^4
1
$3.85
$2.75
75c
90c
$1.00

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