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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, October 11, 1905, Image 1

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«l)C Democrat.
f»U«t «H«D IVRRY WEONI&DAY
I.
•HONSON.
oarii.
S
HUBERT OARR.
HINRY BRON&ON.
8R0N30N. OARR 4. SON8.
Editor* and Prtpristerr
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TW'"
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to
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The writer's name must
aceompany any artt
®l6^or^abUeaVon,ae an evldeno ofroodfatu*
I The First National Bank
MANCHESTER, IOWA.
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS. $60,000.
ESTABLISHED 1B8S.
We Invite you to k«ep your bank account and do your business with
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modatlons consistent with safe banking.
ft DIRECTORS
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Piirsonnge,
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IV
^SISE
Manchester Democrat.
A statement was
CAItlt,
II. A.
von
Oven,
F. LEHoy.
M, P. LlROY. PRB8IDKNT. H. A. GRANGER. CA8HICR.
a
In the
made the other
day, and not denied, that although
tho tax levy of the city of Boston
amounted to
$22,000,000 the coun
cil of sevbnty-five councilmen and
thirteen aldermen contribute only
$750. The
cause of this in Boston,
as well in other cities of the country,
is not far to find. Very few prosper
ous, well-to-do busmcsB
or profess
ional men will take the city offices
and a comparatively Email number
take enough Interest in the election
of the same to go to the polls.—
Chattanooga [Tonn.] Times.
biographical memorial of
General Daniel liutterlield is related
an incident illustrating Abraham
Lincoln's ever-present senBe of hum
or. An immense amount of cor
respondence had been sent to the
president, in which were many
accusations and counter-accusations,
letters and explanations concerning
the failure to
GET the
indorsed the papers with
the following sentence: "In my opin
ion, Lee caused this trouble.
Dr.
Ileinrich
C.
ly
Leonharut
supplied almost
The makers
Colesbnry
L. M. Jamison, Ryan,
Dr. Fitzgerald, Coggon,
E. Brintnall, Winthrop.
SIMON & ATWATBR.
of
the
Thus one of the most successful of
ihe
various subterfuges which are
.-amnion in the business and social
life of the United States may be
bi
ought to
an end.—Hartford
Ti NUS.
of
noticed in a Philadelphia paper an
article which stated that the offiicial
organ
of
They All take wing
Every beautiful thing.
Birds of
Uih
They all take wing.
pontoons to
Fredericksburg in time for Burn
Ktde. Mirny
thought Mr. Lincoln
would remove or court-martial some
body.
He
recent­
the whole
Tonnwanda,
city of
N. Y., with young trees,
lie bought thousands of young elm,
maple and chestnut trees, had them
shipped to Tonawanda and stored in
.1 nursery there. Then he announc
ed that all who would might have
trees by applying at tho nursery.
The effect was wonderful. Streets
that never' would have had trees
were soon filled with- flourishing
young
saplings that
in twenty years
will be priceless-a magnificent mon
ument to one man Two thousand
trees were distributed in an incred
ibly short time.
Lesie'S Weekly: Will gold ulti
mately become too plentiful for use
as money? Some persons think it
will. The world's gold output was
$254,000,000 in 1900, $262,000,000
in
1901, $295,000,000 in 1302,
$325,000,000 in 1903, and $350,000,
!00 in 1904. It
will be
U00
in
1905. How do
the $400,000,000 mark will be
reached
in
1905?
Because
in
Jerseys seldom
of patent medicines
which are merely whisky in a thin
disguise are to be compelled to pay
taxes to the United States
govern
ment as rcctifiers and liquor dealers,
it is said that there are at leaBt a
dozen of these "medicines" advertis
ed which contain 25 per cent or more
whisky. As many as 300,000
iiottles of
one of these concoctions
have bcon sold in Massachusetts
alone in a recent year. The demand
for intoxicants in prohibition com
munities is largely suppliod by these
so called medicines, and when the
manufacturers are compelled to take
out a government lisense as rectifiers
and dealers in alcohol they will no
longer be able to conceal the true
L'liaracter
(Conn.)
An Englishman who has lived in
this city a number of years, but who
has not yet been
naturalized, an
nounced his intention of becoming
an American
citizen last week. His
reason for this step is unique. Dur
ing his residence in America he lias
been firm in the belief that anything
English was exactly right and would
admit
no contradiction. Among
his favorite English notions was the
spelling of honor, color, labor, etc.,
which are spelled by many across
the pond honour, colour, lobour, and
so on.
A short time ago the Briton
English conservatism, the
London Times, had adopted the
American spelling. He was at first
amazed, then he doubted, and at last
he took the trouble of writing to the
Times. Upon receiving an affirma
tive reply he was so disgusted that
he said it was no use being an
Englishman any more when Britons
were becoming Americanized.
ot
So
he took out his first papers.—Phila
delphiaRecord.
One of the striking manifestations
of the times
IN the tendency
of
America's young manhood is at
work not in the hospitals or the
courts but in iron foundries and
slaughter houses. The younger
Vanderbilts are firemon and engine
ers. Tho younger Armours slay the
protesting swine. The professions,
beginning by being overcrowded,
have become unprofitable,
and soon
they niay be sadly neglected. The
law does not ofTer'sucli prizes as the
c:umcd goods trade
or copper-smelt
ing. The ministry is not compar
able, in point
oE
profit, with frenied
finance or the mail order
MANCHESTER, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1905
AfallSo.ng.
brake and the wood.
Leaving but h:*lf understood
secrets of song and of climes
Wbttber they wander betimes.
Birds of tiie va'ea ami the heights.
Donnas of desolatH night#.
Priests of tho mom a* the day,
Follace nvtlled gav.
Shelter if hnmeaud of neat,
LeAvesb the autumn carresHed,—
Linger, nnd waier t.nd full.
All but my lov-«lor ihetnall
All but my fear lest tho leaf
Hendf red Itt stay all too h*lef
All but my fe»r lest the bird
llastene the last song
1 heard. I
Off, where p%!metto-boughi swlt g.
Tbou and I.
I^ore.l would have tv pr nstbft now Is, white
And pure on hli topi t'i»* wlninr day.
Tbou shouldtt have sorer Iau rule, the spirit
sway
Of beauty, wld* and nb nlnv as tlie light.
Thou sbouldit be the ovenlbg star Is. bright
As heaven can make It a Uiv Mtianrer *ay
The melodies of June should slug anl play
lathee the darling t»iedny*ni ulght.
But I would have then uin^u first nnd last.
Oue not untouche'i by trooble. sought of fin.
Thine Innocence not ccid- nt but oholce
Fit. then, my service I should have no past,
No future u»«ly wonld my life begin,
Obedient to tte mu»io ol tby voioe.
Deterioration of Corn Fodder.
As our
readers all
know from
Where our readers shred their
fodder, the quicker it is done the
better. They do not need to wait
until the fodder is perfectly dry.
Just as soon as the corn is
fit
to crib
the fodder should be shredded and
stored away. Two tons of fodder
shredded as soon as.the corn is safe
to crib is worth three tons at least
of fodder shredded in February,
pro
vided, of course, it is shredded when
free from dew
or rain.
It
is .not the
remaining sap that deteriorates fod
der, because
it does not have in it
the bacteria that cause ferment and
decay. It
is
$400,000,-
the chief
gold fields of the world are more
productive thus far in 1905 than they
were
1904. Last year the United
States led all the countries, with an
output of $80,000,000. This year
we are breaking all
the records for
this country.
the bacteria that como
in from rain that do
the damage
either in clover hay or corn fodder.
One
of
we know that
the great advantages
mild-eyed
stop to ask
where
these gentle cattle came from. Yet
they have a history and a long one.
Normandy in France is a land of ro
mance, which has figured extensively
in song and story. Who has not
heard the "Chimes of Normandy,"
the beautiful opera in which is set
forth the plaintive "Legend of the
Bells," the barcarolle of the boat
man, the
saucy music
of the gossip
ing Serpolette, the love-making bal
lads of
Gerinaine
and the queer do­
ings of old iniser Gospard in the
depths of the haunted chateau, It
was in this
land
of merry
peasants,
of moonlight and mystery, that the
little Jersey cattle were first known
and there Jeanette and Jean, Pierot
and Shouchon learned to love them
FOR their
soft
stuff they deal in.
tempers and gererous
abundance of milk. It is not known
exactly when the Jerseys were im
ported to England, but it was prob
ably during the first half of the
eighteenth century. About that time
they were found in the Channel Isles
between France and England, from
one of which they derived the name
by
which they have ever since been
known. A French writer in 1845
gave an interesting explanation as
to how the Jersey obtained
it s' su
periority to other cattle as a dairy
animal. It is attributed to the fact
that a few farmers constantly at
tended to raising stock from
cows of
the best milking qualities, which
attention prosecuted for a long num
ber of years in a small country like
the Isle
of Jersey, where
such
su
perior qualities would soon be
known, led eventually to the excel
lence of milking and butter yielding
properties in the race at large. In
other words it was by careful selec
tion and breeding, which by heredity
gradually centered the good quali
ties and transmitted them to descend
ants. This could not have been
done in any extended country and
thus the breed originally coming
from Normandy, was greatly im
proved in its new home in Jersey.
The Jerseys were imported
young
men to seek opportunity in the worlc,
of
business rather than in the pro
fessions. Fifty years ago every
well-to-do father'of six sons made
one of them a preacher, one of them
a physician, one of
them a lawyer
and one a politician or a soldier.
Only the black sheep, the harum
scarum and the unstuaious
were sent
into counting houses
and factories,
Today behold the change! The FLOW'
er
business.
—Baltimore Herald.
FEAST OF THE B0NKU
WW JAPAN'S GREAT SUMMER HOU
DAY IS CELEBRATED.
JJ
Ik nt Once nu Ocmslpn For Femt
,(1111: the Spirit* of-the Departed and
jnn Opportunity For Marvelona
jDlMplay of Lmitcrns.
TIHTC arc no Sundays in Japan, but
tfie people enjoy ninny legal nud re
Htfous holidays. Tho most notable
if all is that elaborate summer fes
.iv.tl which lasts for four days in the
liiu'Uo of .Inly and has ko many sides
I th.it it kuown hy heveral mimes.
ly it was styled Urabun today
*.L usually called the Feast of Bou,
»r !.-:unia(suri. or the Honku. It is
'•l on -e a time for feasting the spirits
the departed nud an occasion for a
marvrioutf display of lanterns. Mauy
iiui-jp.'an.- call It Uic l'enyt of I.an
teruH. Speaking sirictly, it may be
deiumlnated the Japauese Kcstlvul of
All Souls.
lu Hal Nippon religion and pleasure
go hand lu hand, and this extraordi
nary season of homage to friends who
liave passed away is an occasion of
iiost siugular and exceedingly pic
turesque natioual festivities on a uni
versal scale. The popular doctrine Is
fliat during these four days of the
^ear the spirits of ancestors take a hol
iday from hades and visit tho fa
miliar scenes of past terrestrial life,
^specially the temples and shrines
"tvhere they used to worship, and that
tliey expect to bo cordially and de
voutly welcomed and generously fed.
These shadowy visitors also look for
amusement, and it is abundantly sup
piled.
ex­
perience, corn fodder deteriorates
very rapidly during the winter sea
son if
left standin'g in the shock,
especially if the shocks are small and
not properly built or tied, thus ex
posing a large amount of the fodder
to the fall and winter rains. The
reason why the
cow does not take as
kindly to corn fodder in the spring
as in tho fall
is
because it has de
teriorated, often very rapidly, in
quality.
Tokyo Is gay sight indeed on the
morning of July 13. The flrst cere
mony is the Kawa Blruki, or opeu
ing of the river. Processions of pleas
ure boats Rtart down the river So
uildu. They are exquisitely decorated
with flAgs, ribbons, colored paper and
flowers In profusion, the lily being
most In evidence, as this blossom Is In
Japan the emblem of purity The
jc:ple wish their ancestral invisible
guests to believe that they are living
Immaculate lives, whatever may hap
pen to be the truth of the matter. At
flight all the river craft will agaiu sail
In procession, and the gayety will be
at the climax.
of
shredded fodder is that it enables
us, when done in time, to prevent
this rapid deterioration of corn fod
der which always takes place in the
shock and for which there is no
other remedy.—Wallace's Farmer.
Origin of the Jersey.
The thouaands
of men and women
engaged in milking the
During the daytime the religious rit
ual Is sedulously observed. For many
days numerous hands have been busily
Reaving new mats of the finest rice
straw, and now these are brought to
the Buddhist shrines and spread upon
the altars aud inside the temples. In
every home also a similar preparation
for tho festival worship is observed,
tho spotless mat being devoutly laid
In the domestic "butsudan," as the
little home shrine is termed where
mocnlug and evening prayers are of
ter^d before the ancestral tablets or
tiicrlptTon*.
Of courso the feeding of the ghostly
guests is the most essential item lu
the programme of preparation. Tho
dietetic commodities which these vis
itors from the unseen world are sup
posed to prefer are somewhat numer
ous therefore the viands are offered
In many tiny portions. Fresh lotus
leaves are procured, If possible, and
on these the food is placed. The mor
sels are all delicious, and the ban
quet is indeed a tempting one, suppos
ing that the hadcan epicures have
really any appetite for these mundane
delicacies. They are supposed to be
specially fond of bits of the choice
Japanese fruits called "saikwa" and
"url." They are offered plums and
peaches. Little slices of muskmelon
and watermelon are in evldeuce. The
cggplaut fruit is never missing.
Somewhat more substantial are the
contributions in the shape of "gozen"
(carefully boiled rice), "somen" (a kind
of macaroni) and "dnngo'* (a miuute
flour dumpling). Various delicate
specimens are added, but no kind of
animal food is ever offered, nor Is a
drop of wine included. SucU com
modities would shock the reflued spirit
ual tastes of the guests. Clean water
Is constantly sprinkled 011 the shriue
with a branch of the sacred mishohagl
bush, and all day once an hour tea is
freshly prepared for the ghosts. Chop
sticks arc laid by the offerings, the un
seen visitors being treated just as liv
ing beings.
The proceedings ludoors of course oc
cupy much attention, and some member
of the family must constantly bo lu the
home, but the doings out of doors arc
full of interest and charm. All kinds
of fascinating features characterize the
public celebrations on land, on the
liver aud by the sea. Iu all rural Ja
pan the lively Bon Odorl, or dance
of souls, is- kept up durlug the three
days. It couslsts of a performance by
the villagers in a great circle. The
dancers go round, posturing in a great
variety of attitudes, a few lu the cen
ter being the musicians. In the cities
the Bon Odorl Is now a professional
exhibition of skill by pretty and popu
lar geisha girls. As always in Japan,
the dancers tell a story by their move
ments.
into
tho United States during the last
century, but it
was not until a com
paratively recent date that they were
used extensively. With the exteii'
sion of our dairy interests, they were
found incomparable for the purpose,
their marked peculiarity being the
quantity and quality of cream pro
duced from the consumption of a
given quantity of feed. Their di
minutive size also makes in their
favor, especially with those in cities
and
towns who
desire to keep
and have only limited space for her
accommodation. The lady of the
house, may almost store her
cow in
the box devoted to her bonnet
Wonderful everywhere in .the land is
the scene at nightfall. The "mukaebl,"
or welcome fires, are kludled on the
flrst evening of Bommatsurl along the
rivers and the shores wherever any
town or village stands. The Japanese
do nothing promiscuously, so they light
In every place exactly 108 of these
flres. They are Intended to guide the
spirits If any need Illumination to And
their way to the homes and Bhrines
they are seeking. And, with a like
aim, every householder at sunset Axes
before his portal several torches. Be
sides these flaring and fragrant sig
nals, beautiful lanterns are ^ipended
over each entrance. For the poor
ghosts who cotne to earth for the Bom
matsurl, but have no friends, and so
would be hungry and disconsolate,
very special provision Is made by the
priests In the temples. This Is a spo
t-la! function of the third uiglit.'
a cow
or
house her in a dry g^ods box,where
as the heavier cattle need
range and
stable room not to be had except on
farms. Normandy still
has her
pippins and fane cider, besides some
other good tilings to boast of, but
great
was her
loss when she allowed
the producers of the golden cream
to escape to the shores of England
and the dairy farms of far distant
America.—American Farmer.
The com crop is well out of the
way of frost,
and the yield will
The "sayonara," or farewell ceremo
nial, is the final sceue, and a pathetic
performance it Is. On the last night,
the evening of the 16th. the spirits
must all return whence they came to
earth for their brief visitation, aud
nothing has beeu neglected In prep
aration for their departure. Sweet
poetical messages of love and good
.will have been written with assiduous
care and real reverence. These lovo
letters have )een placed in beautiful
be
the largest gathered for years past,
iifSBfttitiiir mriiiWhtmrfti'ifii
little boats made of barley straw, to
gether with delicate morsels of various
kinds of food for the Journey also
miniature lanterns are deposited In the 1
tiny craft, for the departing friends
will need light on the mystic way.
The boats are about twelve inches in
length. Another tiny lantern Is attach
ed to the prow. This is lighted, and In
cense Is set aflame lu the stern. Then
the little craft Is lauuched on crcek,
canal, river or sea. Ami far into the
night, as these phantom fleets glide
along, tho waters gleam with the spar
kling of the stmuge little craft, the
"shoryobune," or boats of tho btessed
ghosts.—St. Tames* Gazette.
Xenoplion n« a Don: Fnnclcr.
Xeuophon opens his disquisition on
hounds by an enumeration of all the
defects, physical aud moral,, wlil.h a
hound should not possess, wherein it Is
easy to recognize all the failings wii'ch
are still anions us. Le^xy hu^uls,
weedy hounds, flat sided hjunJs. ilat
footed hounds, undersized luuuds,
headstrong hounds, flashy hounds,
sulky hounds, dwellers, bahbli rs, skirt
ers—all are faithfully portrayed an I un
compromisingly coudemued. "lljunds
with such faults as these, whether due
to nature or to bail training, are of lit
tle worth. They are enough to disgust
even a truly keen sportsunsu."
A good hound should have a light,
small, sinewy head, a long, round, flexi
ble neck, broad chest, free shoulders,
straight, round, wiry fore logs, straight
knees, round sides, muscular loins, full
flanks,but not too full. Histhlgbsshould
be flrm, compact aud well let down, his
feet round aud his stern long, straight
and taperlug. Such Is Xcuophon's de
scription of a good hound. It seems to
ns not amiss for the fourth century
before our era.
Chicory*
"The reason that the root of chicory,
tho blue flower which covers waste
places all over tho northwestern states,
is not a good substitute for coffee is
thrift we have no alkaloid In chicory,"
said a Chicago chemist. "Moreover,
we have no oil. Chicory contalus a
quantity of resinous matter and a
quantity of matter closely resembling
the narcotic principles obtained from
the common lettuce. The milky juice
contains a narcotic element. Although
not eligible as a substitute for coffee,
chicory can be used for adulterating
coffee, and many people who get accus
tomed to the taste of the mixture pre
fer it to pure coffee. In former times
the prejudice against chicory was so
great that English laws were passed
against adding it to coffee', but I be
lieve there is no restriction lu Kt^iand
or elsewhere now. The use of chicory
never got enough foothold in America
to make It significant in the volume of
trade."—Milwaukee Free IMess.
The iii-oatemt 9tutxe:
Probably the most remarkable siuger
of all time was FarlnelH, the ucauty
of whose soprano voice remain* un
equaled. It was of largo compass,
'three and a IiaJf octaves, exceeding the
tK-iJlnary range by six or seven notes.
Ills debut at seventeen at Koine In
17U2 was extraordinary from his com
peting with a trumpet player lu sus
taining ucd swelling a note of aston
ishing length and power. For fifteen
years he Traveled extensively, and he
reached Spain iu 1737, intending to
stay a few mouths, but remaining
twenty-five years. Philip V. of Spain
had fallen into a profouud melancholy,
and the queen found Farlnelli's voice
the only remedy.
Doabled Initial* For Plural*.
Under the rule that the luitlul letter
of a word is sometimes doubled to sig
nify the plural, bb would be a proper
abbreviation for barrels. Probably
some one, unfamiliar with the rule aud
thlukiug the abbreviation too concise,
as it might be mistaken for an abbre
viation for boxes, bundles, bags or
butts, made It bbl. for oue barrel, and
theu, still ignorant of the rule, added
an for the plural, making it bbls. for
more than one.—Boston Transcript.
Clcero*M Wive*.
Cicero had a shrew uamcd Torentla,
who made him do as she pleased, lie
was under great obligations to Clodlus,
but when the divorce suit of Caesar
against Pompllia came up for trial Te
reutla compelled *i'icero to appear
against Clodlus. Tired of Tereutla, Cic
ero got a divorce aud married a rich
girl named Publilia, left her and lived
alone until his death.
Pity tho Widower.7.
From the Cork Constitution: "Tho
friends of a respectable young widow
want to get her housekeeping in a re
spectable widower's family. Under
stands her business." There scams a
certain w&nt of finesse iu this latter
statement.—Loudon Punch.
VOL. XXXI—NO. 4.1.
tforpen
UPAOT*
r« rnlivrs
IIOAfiO
I
She Told Hlw.
S
De Bore Is Miss Lllllwhlte In?
Truthful Domestic She's out. Do
Bore—Hum! Whom is she out with?
Truthful Domestic—Out with you.
$
$
If thou art a master, be sometimes
blind If a servant, sometimes deaf.—
Fuller.
It Is the girl who'marries a rougn
diamond who ofteu rots the most reu#
diamonds to wear.—Life.
In the District Court of Iowa, in »nd for Dela
ware County.
1 Notice
In the Matter of tbe Estate To Pt-rsoos lu
of teresied In the Es
James McLaughlin, I tatoof James Mc
deceased. Lauuhiln,deceased
To the heirs at law of Jawcs McLaughlin, de
ceased. and all others whom It may coucoru.
NOT1CB Is hereby given thai James Mc
Laughllu, a resident of said cu n*y. died in
testate at Dubuque, Iowa, on or about tho 30th
day of June A. D. 1905. That on or about the
0th day of July, 1900, the uuderslttned was by
the district oourtof said Delawaie Cuutitt duly
appointed administrator of the est ito ot said
decedent.
That the undersigned has no knowledge that
said decedeut left surviving him any heirs at
law, and It there are no such heirs, th property
belonging to said estate will escneut to the
state.
That tbe properly belonging to said estate
consists of personal property of not to exceed
One Huudred dollars in valu»*. aud the follow
ing desorlbed real estate in Delaware Couuty.
Iowa, to-wlt: Lot No. 80 of the City ot Man
chester. Iowa.
This notice is given in compliance with Sec
tions 8389 aad 8893 of the Code of Iowa, aud all
persons interested In said property and estate
are required to take uotlce of the same and
govern themselves accordingly.
Dated this 2nd day September, D". iooq.
J.J. O'MEAKA, Administrator.
Dronson. Carr & Sons,
Attorney! tor Estate.
11 Is hereby ordered in conformity with Sec
tion 8390 of the Code of Iowa that the foregoing
notice be published for eight consecutive wcoks
In tbe Manchester Democrat In *ld Delaware
County. A. S. KLAIU,
36w8 Judge ot the 10th Judicial District of Iowa.
Pliohe 213
Jp#
A GREAT DRIVE
ON
.. FURNITURE ..
AT THB STORB OF
BROWN, THE FURNITURE MAN.
Our Special Annual Fall Sale of II igli Grade
Furniture la now on.
ltecord-breaking prices prevail.
Every purchase must plfaBe, or your money
back.
AUSTIN D. BROWN.
FURNITURE and UNDERTAKING,
MANCHESTER. IOWA
ESTABLISHED 1867.
Capital $60,000.00. Surplus $35,000.00.
DELAWARE CO. STATE
Manchester,
Quaker
Democrat
HATES OF AOVC'/tTISINQ.
SPACE. 811 •M IT
Oneinoh 91 i.l 91 99 AO 94IKI |«R0 910 (10
Two Inchos.. 1 n) Ml 9 75 voo 15 00
Three InchoH. HI 'A 4 7 (Ml 12 00 ft) 00
Four Inches.. JM 8 7ft 75 1000 1800 «5 00
Five Inches.. 00 4 50 1 00 18 00 SO 00 80 00
Colump.... 60 A wt 8 00 1500 GO 40 00
Column.... A W) 0 (HI 1.1 00 00 40 00 85 00
One Column.. mo 18 00 sr. 00 5000 80 00 125 0
|#~AdvertlsomcniH oidered discontinued be*
foro expiration of contract will bo cbargod ac
cording to above
scalo.
BuBlnosscards.notexceeding ilx lines I6.C0
per yoar.
Business locals,ten conti per line (or the firtt
Insertion,•andjtive.cents per Une for eaoh subse
quent insertion.
owa.
Wm. C. CAWLEY, President. CHAS. J. SEEDS, Cashier.
R. W. TIRRILL, Vice Pres. C, W. KEAGY, Ass't Cash.
INTEREST paid on "TIME DEPOSITS" at current
rates.
Said deposits
may be made in any amount from
A progressive and conservative banking institution which
offers superior facilities for the transaction of
your banking
business.
Absolutely Pure.
Milt
Is always the
Lf JG
BANK,
One Dollar
up.
Flour
same—not
good one day and
bad the next, but excellent all the time.
BHAN'DS:
White Pearl, White Satin, Big Loaf and Idol.
Idol is a new winter wheat flour,
erate price. There is more
in Manchester
WINCHESTER
School Books
AND
SSchool Supplies.!
wwmy:v:
I DENTON & WARD,
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Pure Home-made
Prm, Jellies Marmalades
TRY THEM.
at a mod­
Idol
flour sold
than any other brand.
Quaker Mill Co.
"Leader" and "Repeater"
SMOKELESS POWDER SHELLS
Carefully inspected shells, the best com*
binations of powder, shot and wadding,
loaded by machines which give invariable
results are responsible for the superiority
of Winchester "Leader" and "Repeater"
Factory Loaded Smokeless Powder Shells.
There is no guesswork in loading them.
Reliability, velocity, pattern and penetra
tion are determined by scientific apparatus
and practical "experiments. Do you shoot
them If not, why not They are
THE SHELLS THE CHAMPIONS SHOOT
J. H. STEWART.
Successor to Stewart & Lawrence.
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