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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, January 20, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038306/1909-01-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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p. Bron»on, Hubert Carr
M, Carr, Henry Bronson.
BRONSON. CARR & SONS.
Editor* and Proprietor*.
SUBSCRIPTION
Vearly, in advance
not paid in advance
NOT1CIS—On the slip or paper upot
which the name Is printed, appears tin
date to which the paper is paid for
and re
tfclled.
The writer's name must accompan
n^iy article Tor mililic&tioii, a« an cvi
co of good faith to the editors.
The big man who appliesV\\a big loan,
Competition
4^^
CONSIDERATION
The child wltl) her penny savings bant(,
The small boy with his snjall change.
1 he lady witl) l)er pii) mo- savings, -?r
The small man witl) sroall roll,
The big man with his bi\Volli^ U*
The man wfyo applies foY VmolHoar),"'
The lady wit!) Ijer'churcl) subscription list,
The snjall boy wltl) school entertainment tic kets,
The ctjlld with society entertainment tickets.
profitable banking.
IT
are each accorded the same considerate attention and ex­
tended the most liberal treatment consistent with good and
Misses' and Children's
%School
V-
ENTKUKD
AT
INIHT
5S"»
I
1
The First National
J*
WiTt'1! O L-Js.
Bank of Manchester,
OFFICE
Shoes.
"We have given tin school »hoe problem onr careful attention
Now we can offer you one of the tinest selections of Little Folk Shots
on the market today.
Infants' as low as 50c. Children's 5 to 8 per pair 65, 75, 85 90c
Children's SJ to 11 per pair, $
1.15, fl.35, 1.5(0.
Miasms' 11$ to 2, per pair, $1.25, fl.35, $1.5Q, |].75.
PI F. Madden.
Let
«s call on you
/V grjtX'x
Our prices if^ou can
We ask is a chance to meet
1
far
Eclipse Lumber Co.
Phone 117
Tank
®lpi
*. 1
'~m
v*Ws»B«o
J**
l^-s'2'Vv
m.
^'v
AT
MANCIIKMTKH. low A.AH SKOOKO-CLAKS MATTKII,
..
a. -s*£
Heaters
Vi
5',-®
and is the only Heater made in which coal can be
burned without grates to give trouble.
Call and see it.
Carhai
A. E. PETERSON
Sulla you iliii \n?at SEA.L S9IP I\
lilue Pon oysters,
TV
Pit for the table of a King
AccJpt no other thau Seal Shpi
Oys era. they are not water uoakeJ,
The Best In Flavor,
?f^9
VKa an, -~1
handle the only tank heater made in Dela
ware county and we make it the only heater that
will cause a circulation of warm water throughout
entire tank, thereby causing uniformity of tempera
ture neither too hot nor too cold but Just Right for
st'ck to drink. It is called the

'.w
A. B. G. "Circulating Hot Blast"
X+
SSI
A
•r:
-V -v
fttlt
7
ti
&
5
Always Fat Solid Measure.
A. E, Peterson
103 Main St. ^Manchester, Iowa
SStm
Nye.
MANCHES-
HEALTH TALK—A BEGINNING
What I shall say in these Ieison Make new frl nl
talks will be largely an outgrowth of Those ar-'fl'v r.l,
work with an organization Newnnde rl.,'jil-':*»olil:
women, who meet once week „,,lC
physical improvement. jTlmoandchiDK^.
It is. easy to assume that we are Brownny wrlnkip. huttjgih,
all members of a class, ready to be- jFriendrfhlpnryerow
gin. Women naturally first ask for
exercises that will correct some per
sonal defect, cure some Individual
ailment. But it is better to start
with a wider outlook.
The distinguished educator, Mr. C.
Hanford Henderson, places gymnastic
training first in the new order of ed
ucation.^ Because "good health and
abounding vitality are the foundation
of all excellence." And because it
has the still larger educational pur
pose, *o add to the body beauty, grace
and usableness to make It an admir
able tool for the admirable purpose of
heart and mind.
While we must sometimes work—
and work hard— for correction of bad
physical tendencies, both acquired
and inherited, we must never lose
sight of this higher mission of bo(V
ily education, "good health," abound
ing vitality," "usableness," "the ad
mirable tool for the admirable pur
pose."
Women especially are inclined to
think that health is preserved by
care. The only way to strengthen
the body is by use. A certain amount
of physical strength is necessary to
experience the joy of living, as well
ax to endure the hardships ami the
strain of life. This Js the philosophy
that will control all our efforts for
physical betterment.
And now one slinplej homely exer
cise, for strength, beauty, and usable
ness:
Stretch and yawn not a suppress
ed yawn, but a great big natural
yawn. Stretch as a cat stretches. Sit
ting in a stralgh chair or lying flat
on the back, gradually energize the
whole body, stretching to the top of
the head to the end ot the toes, and
to the finger tips^ at the same time
opeptag the mouth wide, drawing in
a great big long breath, filling the
lungs full, getting a splendid sense
of freedom then relax and feel "the
perfect rest of letting go.
Repeat several times. And then re
peat ,at least once each day of life
hereafter. We can stretch and yawn
away more small troubles In a minute
than we can argue) out of mind in
a week.—Mrs. La Follette In La Fol
lett's Magazine. /:fr
I
SON CASE.
When judges administer the law,
their decrees, though manifestly cr
ronoiis, should be respectfully obey
ed. This is necessary to good order.
But i£ judges usurp authority, their
lawless edicts should be ignored.
This Is necessary to the preservation
of liberty.
For that reason, Samuel Gompers,
John Mitchell and Frank Morrison—
executive officers of the Am. Fed.
of Labor and editors of "The Ameri
can Fderationist"—are worthy of all
commendation for having ignored a
judge's injunction which assumed to
control their public utterances. They
stand in this, respect, not as labor
leaders merely, but as editors and
American citizens jealous of their
fundamental rights of editorship and
citizenship. By ignoring an injunc
tion destructive of their constitution
al rigt to print and publish upon re
sponsibility only for abuse of the
right, and solely to a jury, they have
been vindicating constitutional guar
antees of the first Importance. Tlie
fact that it is a judge instead of an
executive whom they have thereby
disobeyed make* no difference.
Judges may be tyrants, too and it
is as true of them when they usurp
power, as it is of every other kind
of tyrant, that disobedience to a tyr
ant is obedience to lie law.—Louis F.
Post in the Public.
1
WHY CONGRESS HATES
VELJ.
Des
ROOSE-
The New York Evening Post sum
marizes the reasons why congress
shows such intense-hatred of lloose
velt as follows:
"It Is in a word that Congress does
not believe in President Roosevelt's
moral sincerity. It thinks him hypo
critical. He has lectured it and the
country on truthfulness, yet nine out
of ten Congressmen fcelieve Mr,
Roosevelt himself to be habitually
untruthful. He has posed as a cham
pion of fair play, yet Congressmen
believe him to fight foul. The
ture him as living in and delighting
in an atmosphere of suspicion, in
trigue and calumny.
His talk of the square deal they
scoff at as sheer pretense. They say
that he protects favorites, such as
Paul Morton and the Steel Corpora
tion, while furiously prosecuting his
enemies or those whom he thinks
he can make political capital by at
tacking. hi short, Congress Is
thoroughly convinced that all the su­^
perior moral exhortation Wihich it has
had from President Roosevelt has
some from a man who allows in him
self the thing he condemns
others."
®SS-
SPECIAL LINCOLN STAMP.
WEDNESDAY
For mid old fr:eads kin r:
We once tiMru our uifli
Out aUsI old fr fin Is nni'
New 'ftenriH mil.1 tin: pi
Tlien I'Vrl-li fr cndttlilu lu
Mow Is Bond. I, "I'i Is liH-L
Makenoir li lcml«, but keo i\
Those are l:vcr. Ill kd ira eat.
SpTHE RIVER OF DF
As
Therv.rof tr,im- «'tiom.'yT,
And I tMck
seems
To b* morn th IihH marie up or rireait^
F-tr Its CIIHUK'IIKeight* ftDd Itspass ne
And Us mornlrg hopes nud lis m'dnlgtit''
Are lefi behind t»ih* vanl»hfd year*.
Onward, with E1BSO'G&SMTT'oti.
The life itreain llows (lie «C«HH.
And wefollow ih« ti le, t.wnko oras'ppj).
Till we see the tl iwn oi love's sre -t «l ep,
Th-n ihfbaratthe harbrmuth i-»cr.» sod
And the river of dreams latin *ch li *t
—Henry van 0)
DEPARTMENT ON TUBERCULOSIS
BOARD OF CONTROL OF STATE
.INSTITUTIONS. 4
Eradicatio'n of Tuberculosis. Trained
Health Officers Essential. Diag
nosis Must be Early/
.Moines, January 15—Though
very much him been done to educate
the people of our state with reference
to tuberculosis as a prnventable di
sease, yet but desultory and feeble
effort has been made along prevent
ive lines. .Much has been said and
written concerning the control and
final eradication of tuberculosis
which has been "inspired by but sup^
erflclal Investigation. Tuberculosis
is a disease of the masses and any
method to combat It must incorporate
a reformation of our present social
conditions. Tuberculosis is a result"
of conditions in modern life which
weaken physical resistance of the hiu
man body and prepare a fertile flek*'
fcr the cultivation of the seeds of (8
eease and death. Some of the devit
alizing influences in modern society,
which must be reckoned with ar#
overcrowding in centers of popula
tion due to increased cost of living,
overwork, and underfeeding—espec
ially in mothers and children—uneaA
itary, illventilated and uuwholesomi
f&awn mSMHWiiii
sipatlou. Poverty and want induce
this disease with reckless abandon.
That the education of the masses
on the, transmlssable character ol'
tuberculosis is an exceedingly im
portant thing cannot be doubted. It
is preliminary and necessary to any
well defined action. It is, metaphor
ically speaking, the marshalling and
massing of fighting forces jn aggres
sive combat against the disease. But
it little matters what a splendid army
we may have at our command, if we
do not crush the enemy in his strong
hold. We may in a desultory way
here and there win an occasional vic
tory, but so long as society tolerates
conditions as they are today, tuber
culosis will recruit its forces indefi
nitely. Any scheme of combat there
fore which does not involve social
reformation must in the very nature
.o' things prove abortive.
As a step preliminary to the final
eradication of tuberculosis, registra
tion of all persons suffering from
this disease, is -believed to be the
most important. Such registration in
no wlsa contemplates the publicity ot
the name or residence of afflicted
persons. Indeed health officers alone
would have charge of such records
and the records would never be open
to public inspection under severe pen
alty. Both Maryland and New York
have such laws which have proven
valuable and efficient. It is not ar
gued here that laws applicable to
those eastern states would be avail
able for Iowa, but the necessity for
the control of our tuberculosis pop
ulation cannot be a subject of ser
ious debate.
Such a registration law would oper
ate to change the social conditions
which now perpetuate tuberculo-iis it
would establish visiting nurses "as
sociations and day camps it would
build retreats and sanatoriums and
care for the consumptive "at the
right time, in the right place and iii
the right way," thus robbing this di
sease of much of its terror.
Moreover such registration would
secure the early recognition of thi«
disease. It would bring to the task
lealth officers especially trained in
the pathological changes of early tu
berculosis men skilled In the tech
nique of diagnosis and treatment
men with a broad general understand
ing of scientific and efficient meth
ods men of culture, sympathy, honor,
and good judgment.
In the treatment of tuberculosis the
method must originate with the phy
sician, but in any event if the con
sumptive Is to get well lie must have
the knowledge and experience of a
vcl trained physician. At this time
early detection, registration, and hos
pitalization of tuberculosis seem? to
be the trio most potential in its erad
ication.
In commemoration of the 100th an
r'versary of the birth of Abraham
Lincoln, the House of Congress, last
Wednesday authorized the postmaster1i*ijie board, cf supervisors, at a meet-
general to Issue a special Lincoln jing
MINKLER RE-APPOINTED.
F. L. Minkler was reappointed stew
ard at the Delaware county farm by
0
::ear future. the approval of the people.
that body held Tuesday after-
postage stamp of the denomination noon. Mr. Minkler has been an ef
of 6 cents. This stamp will be placed.fluent and painstaking officer
on sale at all postal stations in the the action of the board meets
.TAN ITA li.A 20,
PEMPTS NORTHERNER
RAILWAY
FRIENDS
••No, there is nothing new th
morning," said H. G. Pierce, city
senger and ticket agent o£ the Illi
nois Central :it the local depot, last
Wednesday morning, "but I ky"
just received a number of circulais
ar.d reading matter from the 6enel"l
nl offices at Chicago.
"Vlere
is one about
'wonderland.
tourists'
the Central, the Southern
and the National Lines ot
Pac'fic|^n(1
Mox", we(ik
Through tickets to Mexico City admUlweeK'
o£ stopover privileges at New
TOUnd.trip
Bra secretthtluo o«»kintrs 1 ?can" ,.
Hal the sou' Hv« son ti'O dre-i^ •cago Is $89.Do, and a
Throujc'i the g, ru bili?l»t o,4 nine months.
browo jOur company
fonn time* th our
rate from Chi-
lro
•«.
offers service
good uo Cuba is
o^fe:
leans or Ty, either via New
t0
r|da
... I
point. California I
At beginning lor this
viVner go by,any people^ would
C:iy and then of the
Central and Union and So
clfic lines are a great aecom7n
on the 0
r-l"|
The rate is just half for slee^0"! ^"eaulboats, 1 v.u* profo'iiudlj
than it would be in a Pullmai.arcI
desires. The Illinois Central offers
splendid service on its southern lines
and our business to New Orleans for
•Mardi Gras is growing each year."
FREIGHT CAR SERVICE.
On account of the commencement
of immigration traffic to the west
and other parts of the country, rail
rrads are rushing freight cars to
their various divisions to supply«the
increased demand. While accommo
dations are frequently denied ship
pers, yet for the most part, the rail
ways are able to furnish satisfactory
service. Box cars are more scarce
than those in which "stock are hauled.
The UG-foot car is oftentimes more
desirable than the 33-foot car. The
Milwaukee and Great Western report
ed.last, week a scarcity in fr^sji^^pH,-.
ing stoclf while the Illinois. Central
was able to supply its patrons and
admitted that box cars were "a drug
on the market." The Illinois Central
has been sending empties to its west
ern and northern divisions in rapid
succession, which would signify that
the demand is about to begin
"V
MILITARY DRILLS IN COLLEGES
The government assigns to. each of
nearly one hundred colleges in the
United States an officer, active or re
tired, from the regular army, to con
duct the cadet corps drills and rifle
practices. It also makes appropria
tions for supplies and ammunition.
Reports indicate that military train
ing in the various colleges is making
no progress. A lack of discipline la
noticed by the inspectors, and no pro
vision is made for rifle range prac
tice. The state papers have taken
the matter up, and declares that in
stead of foot ball teams and fra
ternities, the High schools should
have their cadet corps and be in
structed in marching movements and
military tactics.
CHURCH TRIAL AT TAMA.
Charges have been preferred
against Rev. J. B. Wyatt of Kenwood
Park, a well known minister., in the
Upper Iowa conference of the Meth
odist Episcopal church. The hearing
was made Thursday at Tama before
Dr. W. F. Pitner, superintendent of
the Marshalltown district, and for
merly pa&tor of the Methodist church
ut Manchester. Three ministers al
lege that Rev. Mr. Wyatt did not
pay his just debts, and among these
luuking the charge was Rev. C. \V.
Rogers of Strawberry Point. Rev.
H. O. Pratt of Tama, also a former
pastor of the church in this city, was
cno of the jurors before whom the
trial tf&s heard.
BOSTON DISLIKES THE COMIC.
The decision of the Boston Herald
to abandon its comic supplement pub
lished with the'Sunday issue, renews
the discussion of this journalistic pol
icy. The paper explains editorially
that "a great newspaper no longer
needs a clown'' and states that the
comic supplements have ceased to be
comic. "They have become as vulgar
In design as they are tawdy in color.
There Is no longer any semblence of
art in them, and if there are any
ideas, they are low and descending
lower" adds the Herald.
ONE ON PAT..
The Independence Conservative is
authority for this story: Martin
Sheeley, a popular Illinois Central
brakeman, tells of the following con
versation between two Irish section
hands at a station between Manches
ter and Waterloo. They were in a
car house during the noon hour and
engaged in a friendly game of poker.
Pat drew a card. Mike said: "Yeze
drew a spade." "How the divil d'ye
nnfi know it was a spade?" asked Pat
with "Because I saw ye spit OH yer hands
[whin y^ze picked it up," replied Mike.
K.'
CATTLE AND HOG SHIPMENTS
The past week was
or
alnary liveliness in local stocU
PH shtmn6nts The
XXXV.-NO
more
top prices at which
shipments.
cattle and hogs were selling and be
ins bought were taken advantage ot
the
Delaware county *4hWpW,' sev-!
whom are
,n
receipt ot amts
on Uu(t accoU
BlliDP
Mexico, the
This country
may be reached via New Orleansi and|
nt. W. V. Child.-,
e(i
a
car load of catilc iuirt one
1
Thill*:.'.
of hogs t3 the Chicago ninrktjt Thnrs
,'ilday. Clarence HUller dispcs^jl,
of'•
of cattle anrt M.
.1. B: TUch-
two cat"5' during tliw
ANTI-PROFANITY MOVEMENT.
good!
A conductor on the Great Northern
railway has organized a non-swearing
club, and the membership now ex
to
Mna and Central America,
le.nassengers by way of New
Fnritl from thence by the United
Busii am?hip liies to destination
We]
Or-
ceeds six hundred trainmen. The pro
raoter uses Ills profession as a means
of gaining new members, by distrib-
,anvU,nrle«yUtlng cards among the passengers on
usually Pre«H..n ,ralns
whlch he
to that o^fer a choice of _™u^a^ this stamp can operator the
imoral effects upon the community
onc llne and d0
"reE.' i-ldlug on
,-n Pa- Walking about the sti eoty, iimut
"""."J* dowfi the
stnlck by the unrest
cars are upholstered in rattan161 jjjeir intense hatred of emperor ani!
nisjiingj, and are fitted with cooki!
I empress. One day I .uigijt a .giimpsc
devices, making it possible for a tra pf Roehefort, ca»%»ed
eler to prepare his own meals if hehrtnllors
among thj.people
vnVipnt
,n°,J
0
•ous'lug the Boulevard Saint Michel
.'ever raw a man looking so lie.p
frightened as did -.the
In the
fouudo
Lanlen-.e, then Ui. it^ priir.t
he feared the polite or. a mi
but his terror was ati
know.
of
Wtae
I do -l
ject.
lmmer time the cmjterai
paid a vi |Hfl-iuvais. Oil liv
chance of s-mg ninterlul..foU.av ar
tlcle acceptab. j,OIidoi -I journey
thither-with, iVitU who wen
down as i'opro.seLt|Vft of the Moviiin
Star. The prince flpntil.aocompuuie
the emperor, who di tbrfUfiU, living
lanes of people sti* bi^gt' from tU*
roadway- to the open Uidows^of
topmost chamber. Thej 'to so.
but they would not rcnj. to^ctieor
The occasion was the pros utafiou ol
prizes gained at the local Lj ue^yTlv
head prize was never delivered,, th'
winner* a lad of fourteen, declining to
accept It from the hand oif the^ hate,
emperor.—H. W. Lucy ,ln ./Cornbll
Magaxine.
ADJUSTED HIS CAME.
Then the'Man From Berlin Explainer'
Why He Did It.
A man stood before a sliop wlndov
with his cane sticking out from uudei
bis arm. A stout, blond geiftlemau i:
passing stnick the cane smartij1 wltl
his owu, .restoring it from Itsi Qb£truc
tive horizontal position to the propo
vertical one.
"Say, what's the matter with you'
You're the freshest guy I ever saw
Are you looking for trouble?"
Thns said the man whd&e caiie ha'
beeu tapped. But he who bad tapped
it, speaking with a German accent, an
swered gently:
VWby, sir, I did nothing but restore
your cane to its right iuelinalioq. Ab
sently you were holding it under yoir
arm. It was jabbing people lu tin
breast, the back, even the eye, and ye*
a a
"Well, I stopped tliat nuisance, which
you were unconsciously committing. Ii
Berlin It Is the custom always to stoi
It so. And no one takes offense. On
the contrary, iu Berlin the .correction
received with a smile and a word of
thanks. Isn't it so here?"
"No, It isn't," said the other, "but it
should be. I thank you, sir, mveelf- and
I apologize."—Xew York Press
Shop.
"Well, well, well! Is this Bill Snoo
per?"
"Yes,, and this is—let 'me see—can
this be my old friend Tom Qrl^json?"
"That's who It Is. I havcii't seen
you for—for"—
%'J..
"Twenty-seven years."
"That's right. Twenly-seven years!
Well, well! What are vou doing now,
Bill?"
"Frn a traveling evaugelist.. Are you
a member of any church, Tom?"
"Nut yet. I'm a life insurance solic
itor. I represent the best company in
the world. Carrying all the Insurance
you want, Bill?"—Chicago Tribune.
The Cheapest Sport.
Falconry Is about the cheapest sport
in existence, so there Is no reason why
the workiugmnn should uot enjoy It—
that Is, when there Is common land.
It is also the most humane blood sport.
The pursued has always the advan
tage. Then, when the end does come,
how ofteu death is instaiitaueous.
There Is, too, no escaping with an
ugly wound. If escape at all is ef
fected the quarry gets away unharm
ed.—Fry's Magazine.
Recognizing His Limitations.
Chollyi'-Let me see—what's that quo
tation about a nod being as good as a
wink and so forth? Freddys-Why—er
—I can't think— Cholly—Olu .I know
that I'm asking yon lo try to* remem
ber.—Chicago Tribune. -i
x-:- ,3,
Too Inquisitive. A*'*-
Magistrate—Why did you strike the
telegraph operator? Prisoner—It wuz
like this, yer honor. 1 give him a mes
sage to send to tue gal, an' I lie feller
'started to read it. Then l^wiped-him.
—London Telegraph.
The Honest Man. $iiV
Nearly every man lu the crowd looks
as If he were trying not to blush with
.modesty when some oue observes that
aq honest man Is the noblest work of
God.—Ohio State Journal..,
SPECIAL
We
is In charge. If
goo'l. what ir
hin(]er organizations
being
Creace
."lgreat
a f. Oklahoma and-st througi. T«*i
formed and 'rSBult In
service
to the human family.
the
Los Angeles ™a and'finally|^
liey v.hen return vi^n Francisco.
orthern point up in ?ba
or
Esthervllle Democrat.
tn0
E,BU'
some!
THE SECOND EMPmt.
la Minneapolis. The ijngton andl Period
jducted excursion sleepingiaH'
con"1
Two Picturesque Episodes
are
to make our qunlity:
ot similar
QIDC kPcnwcwv
EATFS'OFADVEWTISlhu
Snace
SI 50 & 60 §0
One inch
I'wo liiehos
Three Inches
Four incUeo-i
Fire inches
eolurrm
column..
2 2T 3 50 5 75
3 0° §°U ?8
3 75 ft 76 W
4 90 0018
9 0013 OOIK
^n^XV»mf
n«nlrntlOn
Cards, not
lines *5.00 Per year. line, for
Bu?!?s\S8|n°Antt,L,r«vePec«ntS
r*i.
BEDROOM FMTUBE.
making Special Prices on Bedroom Furniture
Suits, Dressers,
Dressing Tables,
Commodes, Beds
SaNY
IN O \K MAH$
and
PIKDS-EYE
Accurate Construction, Good Fittlfand Easy Running
Drawers,I Proper Finish Througnout,
First-class Trimmings.
W a or in iv
opportunity
we will show you.
Sells Cedarine Furniture Polish.
Phone 113.
Hf'
ltefluenient which carries us away
from our fellow men is not Qdd's re
finement.—Ri'CCher.
?b:
tV»',
Phone 107
MAPLE.
BROWN, The Furniture Min
New Feed end Goal Store.
W. 1..VO opened fig
0*H. rTir »nd
wants with all kinds of
Established 1807.
HARD AND SOFT COAL
HUR""fLOUr!" Evtry sack guaranteed
solicit a share'of your patronage.
Delaware County
I'
GEO. E. PACKEP
TELEPHONE 171
Been
Doiog a Commercial and Saviogs Business.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
Wm. C. Cawley, President. R. W. Tirrill, Vice President-.
Chas. J. Seeds, Cashier. C. W. Keagy, Asst. Cashier.
Jos. Hutchinson, M. H, Williston, J. F. Merry,
2»«c*o*04o«m.**o*o»o«e40«o*»o«o*o*o*e*o«o«oto*o»og
DEALERS IN
and Hardwood
POSTS, WOOD, ETC.
GAY STREET, MANCHESTER, IOWA.'
040+0+Q+04040+*0+0*0*0*0+0+0+0*0+0*0+0*0+0*0*0*i
Farmers, Take Notice.
Having installed a Grist Mill, I am
prepared! to do custom grinding at
reasonable prices. Can grind your
grist while you do your trading.
Bring in your grist,any amount from
one bushel up, to the Corner Feed
Store, west of Court House.
C. H. PARKER.
TOWSLEE'S
EXCELSIOR OINTMENT
TRIED-SURE--VALUABLE
A reliable application for Cuts, Sores, and
Bruises. Made and sofd only by
R. A. DENTON.
k.
ffi on
li2 SOllB OOte .i
noois&oo
bt!
{^ooitWct'wmI1|be,1^»rgL
SslX
Vr
line for each insertUffl_aner
A BIG
*-Vt
Call and Bee us. We
here,41
te
iester. Iowa.
II. F. Arnold, Geo. W. Dunham. isf"
CAPITAL, $100,000 SURPLUS AND PROFITS, $25,000
Your business solicited on a strictly business basis.
f-'lS
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