OCR Interpretation


Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, August 25, 1909, Image 7

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038306/1909-08-25/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

I.X
I
NORMAL INSTITUTE CLOSES
|'Attendance Good Week Is.Very 8uc-
A':'
cessful.
I'" The thirty-seventh annual session
of the Delaware county normal infetl
tulo closed Saturday afternoon. The
I attendance, as Is given below, num
I bored nuai'ly one hundred and thlrty
I five, and the registrations gave ad-
'7
arid' several in neighboring coun
I dresses £rom every town in the coun
I ties'.
Supt. P. D. Joseph, as conductor
[of the Institute, had arranged for
lone c£ the strongest and most inter
1 eating courses of study ever held in
this county. The selection o£ Instruc
[tors was good and each one of the
teachers has given his or her class
es much, help and many suggestions.
Uho department-of music under Mr.
Karl Buren gtelri of Chicago, was
Ifclghly interesting. \Mr. Stein teaches
[both solo' anft chorus singing. His
method Includes sight reading which
Tie easily learned by children, who are.
I Entering the rural and grammar
(schools. Professor Benson of iMInne
lapoHs, In a lecture to the institute
(Friday afternoon, laid especial stress
it^bn the. necessity of teachi'ng chi\
I dren the proper form for business let
Itors, and deplored tiie loose stand
arids permitted in the average so-call
^ed liusWess college.
The department of agrlclture creat
ed no. little uhare of the week's study
friSf. -C. M. Evans of Lenox conduct
led a veritable short course study
and 'the judging of farm animals
I •was given attention. The ,entire
I
wftek Wf help and very successful.
'First Year.
Mamie Annla,. Manchester.
Grace Aumis,. Manchester.
AhlHr-AY&rd, Manchester.
L.! nt Kehrll. Manchester.
.Etut Kteraan, Earlvllle.
hy\ jy Botrtnan, Manchester.
Rose "-Weasel. Colesburs.
Ijyclia Wlrltman, Manchester.
XteVella fflaus, Colesbure. .. ...
Margaret Dolphin, Kynn.
Anna: Summer,'. Kyan.
Nellie Preston, ltiyan.
Noll' Matthews, Earlvllle.
Delia Hoberts, Karlville'.'
Orace Simons, Delhi.
•i
"VV-
ose ilaker, Dyer&viUe.
telle Armistead, Manchester,
lertlia Putz, EdBow.ood.
"ayme Donahup. Kyan.
azle Dolphin, iiyan.
klary Coonnid, Dundee.
PVa3t& Toda, Manch
Lulu Higinan, '-Mancl
Dora Crosier, Manchester.
_Ada Cramer, Manchester.
KErma Cummingg. C.oguon.
better,
cheater.
KI4XS-.
EMargaret Granfleld, Waterloo
fMd-bel Moore, Masonville.
»Graco Snyder. Masonville. :-,-. "i,
Hdna Holcomb, Coggon. -w\'.
i-Wdi-dd Smith, Dundee. &
_. Jlrinle. Barnts, Dundee. S-
Myriile Stanger, Hopkinton.
*LHMma Becker. Lamoht.
^Kathryn 3?ruce, Iowa Falls.
CIRCUS ENTERTAINS
SANDS.
...
Mildred' Kenyon, Lamont.
Nettta Mullun, .Hopklrtton.
Jlrfflo .CumminKK, Coupon.
Blanche Swindell, J5pworth.
EHon FunH, Edgewoo'd.
i: Mntlio-i,Murloy, lfculvllle.
ARelia MiirR'y, KurlviUc*.
OteLra Ban*. Maiwheyteiv
Sue IJich Mm choatcr.
i*««5nc\-•Sul|ivai», I« M^r,
yjuK Wiut"Insi or.
i*t anlsm. MaivJ.cf-tor.
BUnvilifi Kdhnln^r, Uyom'illc-.
Clarence .Doti3o», Manchester.
-,^1'it'b, Ko.-.vlile.
Etftyl Brcckon,. Oneida.
I Vlra CollingS Manchester,
ft NtsuieAI. Stewart, Manchester.
I Sadie Bellv Greeley.
Stella \V4Har3, Hopkinton.
I '^Artna Welch, Masonville.
J.'It. Inman, Manchester.
My: Antonlette Strelt. Dyernvtlle.
-H61eii Uohlenkohl. Dyersvllle,
-Lixzle.Maftoney, CoggonV•'
Hilma Sefstrom, Mancliester.-1
Marie,V.. Robinson, -Uyan.
'-'"f 'Second Year.^: 'r- -.
Srace* NJblo, Greeley. --k
KmilyBrown. Manchester.
Editlv Sheppard, Manchester.
Pearl Cox,, Oneida.
OJaf Beeman, Manchester,
if- Floy Haxre, Manchester.
)^rtl» Jordan,-Dundee,
Margaret Aimers, Dundee.
M^el Davis, Greeley.
B^itherlrie Schmelder, Greeley.
Tereaa O'Brien, Hopkinton.
MitiQie Zouch, Hopkinton.
Mary O'Brien, Hopkinton.
Maty Farmer, Greeley.
:V
Mary E. O'Brien, Ryan.
s, Al)le "Whitney, Central City.' :C,
Ser
1-f"
Helen Cramer, Hopkinton.
Bthol: Carson, Masonville.
Josephine Kaders, Masonville.
Ethel-Iteed, Coggon.
Carry Grapes, Hopkinton.
Third Year. )\i.
AJlce^Pierce, Mdnchester. C'C
Myrtle Marshall-, Manchester.-'
Elsie 'Ciute, Earlvllle.
Bertha Hrdwn, MillviUe.
Ada FerHS, Millville.
I Ethel Itous, Manchester.
I- AVla Oakley, Manchester.
*v -Myrtle Grapes, Hopkinton.
Anna Theel, Lamont.'
4
Kthel V{in Anda, Earlvllle.
LUIle Binning, EarK'llle.
Bessie Harris, Hopkinton.
M«ud Shoppard, Hopkinton.
Emma Mikota, Strawberry Point.
Genevieve O'Brien, Hopkinton.
'Martha Brookmeyer. Coleaburg.
Bessie LeClere, Hopkinton.
.v Hele^ Schneider, Greeley.
!-v Verna Kilng, Manchester.
m* May Taylor, Dundee.
Eva* EH
Ivou Thomp8on»'Strawbqrry Point.
Louise Kffgiman, Man(5heater
_. Stella Blair, Hopklntoh'.
m,y Lillian Kelley, Mjanchester.
Tay
__ Wtzpatrlck, Stmwborry Point.
JjpiuerjKenyon, Lamont.
Edyth Lyttie, Coggon.
Ajris Grommon, Manchester.
Latira Hyde, 'Manchester.
Elsie Case, Manchester.
Mary Calfahan, DyersVllle. •i.#.''
Cla Baft»rth, Earlvllle.
Genevieve' Cavanaugh, Earlvllle. vi
Rnth PHgrim, Manchester.
A^nes McElroy, Masonville.
Mao Carrothers, ltyan.
Irfene .McDonough, Sand Spring.
Allie 'Sntfth, Manchester.
lUlUe Ltndanl, Coggon. .«
,Elsio Jones, Greeley.
Minnie Sheppard, Manchester.
Nell Mulligan, Ryan. ,,.
Nellie Coleman, Coggon.
Agnes Coleman, Coggon.
Fourth Year.
Nellie Mullitn, Hopkinton. .r
Genevieve King, Delhi.
Hazet Hamblln, Minchester.
Nlnj}* Guthrie, Hopkinton.
Mao McCrea, Ryan. ..••••
Daisy Davis, Sand Spring.
fBlancho^Cair, ,Lamont.
Spring.
Jlose Albrook, Coggon.
Aubie Stewart, Manchester.
jGwendolln Gavin, Hopkinton
Genevieve Evans, Hopkinton.
William Jones, Greeley.
Alda Hyde, Manchester.
Beul&h Larrabeo, Dundee.
.Emily Cocking, Manchester.
Hazel Green, Manchester.
Lulu Curran, Greeley.
SCelld Clute, Manchester.
Grace Jones, Greeley.
Kathryn Haltmeyer, Manchester.
Bessie Tunison, Rockford, 111.
Blanche BlAop, Manchester.
Myrtle RuWerford, Manchester.
Jennie TJmin, Manchester.
Alta Hart, Earlvllle.
Alberta Hoyt*, Earlvllle.
Mabel Matthews, Earlvllle. Jf
Mary Earhart, Earlvllle. %r-
THOU,
Yankee Robinson! 3hbws Give Two
Performances on Saturday.
With two hundred and sixty people
employed to 'serve but one end—that
of making the Yankee Kobinson show
interesting and entertaining, a spe
cial train of fifteen cars, containing
the circus,..pulled into the Illinois
Central, passenger depot Saturday
morning, arriving from Galena, Illi
nois. A largo tent, menagerie can
vas, and' near those the dressing
™4ms, the livery and blacksmith
shop, and one of the most important,
the dining hall and cook tent, were
in place and the gaudily painted can
vas displayed in front of the side
show and began to attract the first
few stragglers and then the two thou
sand people which came from the
country' and nearby towns and also
from our own village. Everyone seem
ed to want to go and go they did,
buying tickets at a heavy wagon and
becoming confused and embarrasses
as they passed the old ticket taker
at the central gate who has been In
the business for forty years.
The circus pitched its' tents In the
park on West Main street. The
grounds were the scenes of many in
teresting sights and "human nature"
stories. /Through \he courtesy of F.
M. Shortrldge, a representative ol
the Shows, and a young man of ex
perience In circus and the trlcal busi
ness, a number of visitors were told
some -of the inside workings of a
large traveling circus. One of the
women bare back riders, is past the
half century mark, hafing lived her
life underneath the big white tents
since a young girl. Many of the art-,
ists work upon the vaudeville stagS
in the winter, booking with the Ma
Jcstic circuit from October untii
spring.
The clowns were a ridicuously fun
ny lot of performers. Their entertain
ment was highly amusing and thrill
ing, as well. The Japanese tumblers
and jugglers received the hearty ap
plause of nearly three thousand peo
ple as they performed hair raising
stunts. One little Japanese fellow
manages more than thirty of his fel
lows, and sells them to different cir
cuses in the United States. The
girl twins, who marvellously twine
themselves through trapeses and
ropes, were recognized by many in
the audience as having appeared in
the city before with a previous show.
And those daring aero twirlers, who
hurtle through the air from dangling
rapes, haying as their support only a
mouth piece which they cling to with
firm and solid molars and front teeth
won deserved appreciation for their
work.'
The entire show was satisfactory
and void of the characteristic fraudu
lent features which too often are ac
cessories to- the average circus. The
evening performance was largely at
tended, and at 10:30 o'clock, the spe
cial train was loaded and on its way
to Storm Lake, where these perform
ers continued to entertain folk on
Monday.
Vic Hugo and William Collier,' the
atrical and vaudeville managers ol
Cedar Rapids and Waterloo shaw
houses, attended the afternoon show,
arriving in the morning in a touring
car from the Parlor City.
LIBRARY NOTES.
It may not foe generally understood
that the advantages of using the
Carnegie public library are the
same to all pupils of our schools. It
Is estimated that one-third of the
attendance at the High school
comes from the rural communities,
and these pupils are entitled to a
drawer's card and all privileges of
the reading room and referehce de
partment, while the latter. is
free to ev/.'yone. "Tag (lay" is to be
September 2. Teh money relaized
from such a benefit will be used In
re-bindlng worn out books at the li
brary.
'a,'
4-
Ruth Schailer, Earlvllle. i\
iMinnle De tShaw,. Hopkinton
Helen. Swanson, Hopkinton
Gladys Kenyon, Lamont.
Bess Anderson, Manchester.'
Irene Warren Dyersvllle.
Abbie Hiekey, Masonville.
Mabel Allyn, Miandiester.
Lucille Schaffer, Manchester.^
,i" RAIN WAS WELCOME.
A driving rain storm swept over
[eastern Iowa Sunday morning, wel
•corned by the farmer and truckman,
|The shower was preceded toy display
lot vivid lightning and accompanying
(thunder. The weather Indications
[yesterday promised more rain, for
Ithe clouds were heavy and the Hon:
|J. iPldvlus Is reported to be at home
(from a vacation of several weeks. It
Mb also understood that the crops and
^•people In southern Texas are suffer
ing from a continued drought, no
rain having fallen since October in
certain parts of the great state,"
LAY CONCRETE CULVERT.
A concrete culv.ert Is being con
structed across Franklin street on
Butler. A wooden' hatchway has
been carrying the drainage water
from the east end of town to the
river for several years, and it was
found that a more serviceable and
permanent culvert was needed. Street
Commissioner Whitman and his work
men began excavations Monday morn
ing, and the work-should be complet
ed within a fortnight. ff-
ANNUAL SHOOT HELD TODAY.
The annual registered shoot of the
Manchester Gun club is being.held to
day at the Fair grounds, and closes
this (Wednesday) afternoon. The
club has issued a large number of
invitations to amateur and profession
al gunners, and several trophies will
be contested for. There will be four
teen bird matches both afternoons,
and a seventy dollar Ithlca gun 'will
be featured as a special prize.
DELHI PICNIC PROGRAM AND
ENTERTAINMENT GOD.
Delaware county people are prom
ised a good time and abundant enter
tainment at the annual picnic to be
held at the county farmnear Delhi
Thursday of this week. A number of
speeches of various county men will
be heard and good music off.ered.
FORENOON*.
10 to 12—Inspection of Experiment Sta
tion.
1U to 1:30—Picnic dinner.
AFTERNOON.
MuhIC
Address of Welcome—II. J. JJixby.
llcsponse—W. B. Ingersoll
Music—Band.
Ton minute speeches by—E. C. -Terkins,
Preg. Heed and E. M. Evans.
MubIC—
Address—A. E. Nelson of Ames.
F. L. Durey, President of the bhort
Course will bo present and take
chargo of the program.
CASTOR IA
For Infants and Children.
The Kind You Have Always Bought
Bears
the E53T
Signature of
GALLOPERS HAVE
INNING AT JOLIET
Two Races Daily With Six on
Saturday For Runners.
MEETING MAY BE CONTINUED
Horses Carded to Start Today Include
.Malediction and Gllvedear, Which
Figured on the Canadian Circuit, and
Others Equally Well Known—If Ex
periment Proves a Succcsi Programs
For Next Week Will Ee ^cr Thor
oughbreds Only.
Jollet, 111., Aug. 24.—Great Interest
is shown in the liarhess and running
races being held here in connection
with' the Jollet fair. The entries for
'the events for gallopers are:
One mile, purse $200—Malediction,
122 Frank Flasher, 122 llary Can
dlemas. 120 Young Slater, 122 Giles,
121 Roseberg II., 114 Port Royal,
122 Point Lace, 109 Gilvedear, 124.
Five-eishths run. purse $150—Youth
ful. 121 Pimpantie, 113 Mae Hamil
ton, 119 Cassowary, 118: Bitter Miss,
119 Haminatrlcal, 118 Uncle Jimmy
Gray. 118: McDale, 115 Vinnie, 121.
Many of these horses performed on
the Canadian circuit and are regarded
ns pretty good racers. This meeting
is looked upon as an experiment to
determine whether the" game can be
revived in Illinois. It has not flour
ished since betting was stopped years
ago at the famous American Derby
course, Washington park, Chicago.
The feature of the harness events
was the 2:07 pace, which Ailed well
and enough good horses were In the
2:20 pace and 2:20 trot to Insure good
contests.
A similar program will he sched
uled for each day until Saturday, when
six running events will be the day's
card, including the Joliet Derby for a
$500 purse.
In the event that the racing should
prove a success it is Intimated that a
meeting for runners only will be held
all next week, continuing Indefinitely
Several hundred head ofh.orseshave
been shipped to the race track known
as Ingalls park, and a full card can
be made up each day.
At the Ilawthorne track in Chicago
there is unmistakable signs that run-,
nlng races are in sight for the follow
ers of the horses. An army of carpen
ters is at work putting the big grand
stand In shape and mowers, sernners
and rolling machines have eliminated
the weeds that have covered the track
for years.
WORTH $50,000, BUT
»WILL STAY ON BEAT
Former Ballplayer Messerly Heir
Small Fortune,
sfpl
'-©fits
Chicago. Aug. 24.—When Patrolman
John Messerly .gets the $50,000 In*
heritance reported to have been left
to him. It will be used in doing some
thing worth while, he declares.
"I will not gtve up the force because
I have some money coming," he said.
"I believe in every man doing some
specific work whether he has money
or not. None of your idle rich bus!
ness for me.
*'I shall continue' to travel my beat
and do my duty as a policeman just
the same as evfer.
"I used to be a professional baseball
player before I was a policeman. I like
the game ant| maybe I'll invest In a
club of my own."
TO COLLECT $2,000,000 FINE
Highest Bidder Will Get Waters-Picrce
Property In Texas.
Austin, Tex., Aug. 24.—Robert J. Eck
hart, receiver for the Waters-Pierce
Oil company, has filed an inventory of
the corporation's Texas property.
The holdings aro valued at $2,000,
000, which is the amount of the fine
imposed for alleged' violations of the
anti-trust statutes.
The property Is to be sold to the
highest bidder.
TWO WOMEN DEAD IN
TRAIN-AUTO COLLISION
i\
Caboose Lilted With Jacks to
Take Girl From Wreckage.
Kankakee, III., Aug. 24.—Mrs. George
Granger, wife of a retired Kankakee
merchant, and Miss Genevieve Rabig
of Chicago, were killed instantly and
five other occupants of a touring car
seriously injured when the machine
was run down by a Big Four train.
Miss ltabig was a teacher of elocu*
tlon at St. Xavier's academy, Chicago.
Jeanettc Granger was rescued Jhirty
minutes after the accident. Jacks had
to be used to lift the caboose before
she could be extricated frcm the
wreckage.
TROOPS FIGURE IN FEUD
Hurried to a Town Factions Dcclarc
They Intend to Rip Apart.
Natchez, Miss.. Aug. 24.—Com
panies 1) and C. Third roslment of tint
state guard, left hero for Meadville.
Sheriff Jones of Franklin county called
for the troops in anticipation of serious
trouble arising front the attempted
assassination of Chancery ClcVk Ernest
Newman.
Friends of Newman and of the fac
tlon believed responsible for shoot
ing have been arriving in Meadville
and threatening to "tear the town up."
SPAIN CLOSES 94 SCHOOLS
Condemned Because Seditiously In
clined In Course of Instruction.
Barcelona, Aug. 24.—In connection
with the movement to stamp Out revo
lutionary tcndeucies the government
has closed ninety-four schools and cen
ters of teaching on the ground that
they aro seditiously inclined in their
course of Instruction.
Several alleged'anarchlsts have been
expelled from the country.
HARRIMAN ARRIVES TODAY
He Expccts to be at His Magnificent
Country Place Tonight.
New York, Aug. 24.—Unless hi3
schedule is amended, Edward II.
Harriman by tonight will be at Ardcn,
his magnificent country place, wher^
an army of workmen have been toll
ing night, and dny in an effort to have
the building)* and grounds ready for
the wizard of finance and railroads.
Reports by wireless from the Kaiser
Wilhelm 11 early today were that
Mr. Huniiuan appeared on deck afior
remaining indoors practically all the
way across. Also it was reported lio
still looked greatly* fatigued and in
need of rest.
STRATHC0NA TO MEET HILL
Two of the World'8 Greatest Finan
ciers Will Exchange Greetings.
Winnipeg, Man.. Aug. 21.—A meet
ing of two of the world's greatest
financiers and railway magnates will
LORD STRATHCONA.
take place here tomorrow when .Tames
J. Hill comcs to meet Lord Strath
cona.
Both wore pioneers in the develop
ment of this country thirty-five year?
ago.
The coi.fcrcnee will have an im
portant bearing on the relation be
tween. the (Y.nadian Pacific and the
Great Northern In western Canada.
ASKS GUNS COSTING
$600 FOR ONE SHOT
Naval Secretary Meyer Favors
Fourleen-lMh Rib
Washington, Aug. 21.—Se?retarv of
the Navy George Von L. Meyer will
recommend that on the next two bat
tleships fourteen-inch guns be used tn
stead of the twelve-inch guns, as on
the ships now building.
The new "fourteens" will be the
most powerful naval weapons in the
world. They will be more, than fifty
feet long. The projectiles will exceed
seven feet in length. They will havo
an actual range of sixteen miles. It
will cost $(00 to fire the fourteen-inch
gun once, using an armor-piercing pro
jectile.
SPERRY RETIRES SEPT. 3
Admiral Who "Took the Fleet Around'1
Will Be Sixty-Two Next Month.
Washington, Aug. 24.—Rear-Admiral
C. S. Sperry, who took the Atlantic
battleship fleet on its cruise from San
Francisco to tho Philippines and
through the Suez canal to Hampton
Roads, will be placed on the retired
list Sept. 3.
He then will have reached the age
of sixty-two.
NEW DESTROYER A FLYER
Flusser In a Trial Spin Attains Speed
of 31.03 Knots.
Washington, Aug. 24.—Record spfied
was made by the torpedo boat destroy
er, Flusser, in her preliminary trial.
The vessel scored S1.03 knots per
hour, her contract requirements con
templating but 28.
This sots a now mark for destroyers.
SLAIN STRIKERS INTERRED
Peonage Charges Against Pressed
Steel Car Co. to be Investigated.
Sehoenville, Pa.. Aug. 24.—Today
was held the funeral for the Pressed
Steel Car strikers who were vie*
tims of Sunday night's rioting.
The strikers' bodies rested in state
at. the Polish Catholic cathedral In Mc
Kee's Rocks. Then headed by the
strikers and their sympathizers, the
cortege moved to the little cemetery
just outside of Sehoenville.
If an investigation of the allegations
made shows that prosecution is war»
ranted, new suits will be drawn mak
ing separate charges of peonage
against President Hoffstot, Foreman
Cohen and the Pressed Steel Car com
pany, as a corporation.
CRABTREE'S TRIAL IS BEGUN
Corporal Charged with the Murder of.
Captain John C. Raymond.
Omaha, Aug. 24.—The trial by gen
eral court-martial of Corporal Leslie
Crabtreet of Troop B, Second United
States cavalry, on the charge of killing
his company commander. Captain
John C. Raymond, at Fort Des Molnea.
June 19. began at Fort Crook, near this
city.
Colonel Gardner of the Sixteenth in
fantry is president of the court, and
Captain F. E. Buchan, judge advocate
of the- department of the .Missouri-
acting as judge advocate.
H^W1-1
7 THE MARKETS
Cash Grain Market.
Chicago,. Aug. 23.
Winter wheat by sample: No. 2 red,
$1.03%@1.07% No. 3 red, [email protected]$1.02
No. 2 hard, $1.02(T&l.Cr» No. 3 hard, 98c
£-$1.01. Spring wheat by sample: No.
2 northern, $l.'o.f?i,02 No. 3 spring,
flr,c#$l.01. Corn by.uamplo: No. 2, 09
fft°72c No. 2 white, 7lc No. 2 yellow,
[email protected]%c No. 3, CS^^Tl^c No. 3
white, 70,/£(&)7le No. 3 yellow, 72c
No. 4. Oats by sample: No.
2 white, 37%c Xo. 3 white, [email protected]}«c
No. 4 white, W/87e standard, 37-l.i
@•3 Sc.
Chicago Live Stock.
Hogs—Quotations nmged at $S.10^»
S.15, for choice heavy, [email protected]
In.tehcrs, $7.0^^/ 7.1)0 light mixed, 5S.00
fi'8.20 choice lir.ht, $7.4007.05 heavy
pp.cUing, $0.7517:7.80 good to choico
pigs.
Cs ttle—Quotations langcd at $7.r»0^
Y.S0 for choice t: prin.c steers, $6.G0y
7.23 good to choice steers. [email protected]"
cood to choico loaf cow:?, $4.5011 ti.00
good to choice heifers. vS.25^0.00 good
to choice calves, $4.».~i$/5.15 selected
feeders. $4.00^-1.10 y.ood to chcifco
Ltockcrs.
Shot-p—Quoii.tlcns ranged at $7.25§)
7for £,ood to choice Iambs, $0.2557"
7.:") fair to gocd spring lambs, [email protected]
5.00 good to ciuuco wethers, $5.25(??
5.50 good .to ihol.-jc oarling wethers,
-».25C£4.50 good choice ewes,
Potttce?.-
Choico to .:iey, 5C#5Sc fair to
sood, 52f5'55c.
N
East Bufi^lo Live Stock.
Dunning & Sieves, Live Stock
CcmmlSFion Merchants, East Buffalo,
X. Y., quoto as follows: Cattle—Re
ceipts 150 cars mari:ot 10 cents low
er. Hogs—Receipts cars market
steady heavy. $S.oO^8.60 Yorkers,
[email protected]'0 pigs. $S.30. Sheep and
Lambs Receipts 30 cars market
strong best lambs, $7.75 yearlings,
$5.00£t'5.GC wethers, $4.75(^5.00: ewes,
$4.30© 4.CO. Calves Best, $4.50(0)
10.00.'
Elgin Butter Market.
Creamery, extra, 27c prints, 29%e
extra firsts, 2Gc firsts. 24%c dairies,
extras. 24l^c firsts, 221,&c packing
stock, 20%c.
ONE OF IOWA'S FINEST
GAINS IN LAND.
I also have a 50 barrel water pow
er grist mill all in the best of re
pair, will trade for a go6d farm, or
sell for cash, this mill belongs to
a widow woman whose husband has
just died and she is unable to run
it. and does not care to rent it.
Tho mill can be had for $8,000, and
this is less than half what the mill
Is worth. Enquire of
1'
i*
PRIEST CALLED BY WIRELESS
Reaches Liner In Time to Perform
Last Rite For Dying Woman.
Now York, Aug. 24.—Summoned by
wireless, Father Dooley of Fordham
university boarded the Atlantic trans
port liner, Minuetonka, to give the rite
of extreme unction to tho wife of Rear
Admiral Robert Potts, retired.
The woman died shortly after the
priest performed the service.
I
Jerome a Candidate For Reflection.
New Yorli, Aug. 24—District Attor
ney William Travcrs Jerome will be
a candidate for re-eloctiou this fall,
running independently.
Five Killed by Explosion of Gas. I
Geneva, Switzerland, Aug. 24.—Five
persons were killed and twelve Injured
by an,
explosion at the cityrgas works.
J. WAGNER,
Lansing, Ion a,
34-tf
/V
TTiTiTiitI
vVTC
TOASTED
CORN
FLAKES
I ntsisMi riMt'i
\-%te
Jfc
*2?
BAR-
No. 44.
200 acres of land, 154 acres in
cultivation, and balance is timber
and pasture, has a good house, with
six rooms, barn 36 ft 44 ft., gran
ary 14 ft 20 ft., corn crib and
machine shed 25 ft 30 ftr. and
many other out buildings all in good
repair, has two wells and a living
spring, and this farm is all fenced
and cross "fenced and lies 4 miles
from town, and one and one half to
a church and one miletlo school, and
can be bought for $37.00 per acre.
Ths land is cheap at $50. per acre,
but this man is bound to sell on
account of his health, have many
other bargains arranging from 40
acres to 775 acres and arranging in
price from $20.00 to $70.00 per acre.
Write for any size farm you would
want and I will send you same.
Race
Offer No. 1.
Success Magazine, 10 cts a copy, months
Pictorial Review, 15 cts a copy,months .40
World To-Day, 15 cts a copy, 3 months v. .45
Youth's Companion, 5 cts a copy, 3 weeks .15
Pacific Monthly, 15 cts a copy, 3 months .15
Modern PriRcilla, 10 cts a copy, 3 mouths .30
Vim Norden Magazine, 15 cts a copy, 3 months .15
Littla Folks, 10 cts a copy, 3 months .30
Total Single Copy Price .. .. .... ^285
All of the above for three numbers and
The Democrat for one year for $2.10.
Offer No. 3.
Pictorial Review, 15 cts a copy, 3 months
Modern Priscilla, 10 e'.s a copy, 3 months
Youth's Companion, 5 cts a copy, 3 weeks
Van Norden Magazine, 15 cts a copy. 3 months
Mothers' Magazine, 5 cts a copy,'3 months
Little Folks, .10 eta a copy, 3 months
Pacific Monthly, 15 cts copy, 3 months
Health-Culture, 10 cts a copy, months
'V Total Singl» Copy Price :$255
All of the above for next three numbers
and The Democrat for one year for $1.80
$
K,'"t
r:
4v fr-fv
/A* ,«
-. ..
,n
V,

Ctd
Look for
This
Sjaatme
KELLOGG TOASTED CORN FLAKE CO.. Battle Crock, Mich.
Purses,
$15,500
Three Grand Concerts by the Liberati
band of sixty pieces, each day.
New $100,000
•Amphitheater and
New
Track
Completed
See the Million Dollar Live Stock Show.
BiS
C. E. CAMERON,
President.
Keeping Up tiie Same Old "Gate"
Its the flavor that set the gait for the imitators—It's the same flavor that
still bars them, and keeps Kellogg's in a field by itself. No one has been able
to even approach ic in either taste or tender crispness. There's a good reason
for this. -va
DES MOINES, AUG. 27-SEPT. 3.
'//M
*Vv
".30
.45
.30
.15.
.15
.15
.30
.45
.30
Genuine
This great of:cr is open to everybody. It requires no money—nothing to buy—
nothing to cell. Wo simply ti best—the most perfect ears of corn that
Read The Democrat.1
CffiEAT MAGAZINE OFFER
The following extraordinary rates on standard magazines are available for a limited &
time to all old or new subscribers to: this paper. The prices quoted will at once
ni/ed as remarkably cheap by all who are familiar with these standard
their regular subscription prices.
The next three issues of all the magazines named in Offer No. 1 and the Man
chester Democrat for one year will be furnished for
The next three issues of all the magazines named in Offer No. 2 and the Man
chester Democrat for one year will be furnished for
The next three issues of all the magazines named in Offer No. 3 and the Man
chester Democrat for one year will be furnished for
MANCHESTER DEMOCRAT.
11
Offer No. 2.
.Success Magazine, 10 cts a copy, 3. months $ .30
Sectorial Review, 15 cts a copy," 3 months 15
jVan Norden Magazine, 15 cts a copy, 3 months .45
Youth's Companion, 5 cts a copy, 3 weeks .15
Metropolitan Magazine, 15 cts a copy, 3 months .45
Modern Priscilla, 10 cts a copy. 3 months .30
Pacific Monthly, 15 cts a copy, 3 months .45
Travel Magazine, 15 cts a copy, 3 months .45'!
Total Single Copy Price $3.00*s
•All of the above for next three numbers
and The Democrat for one year for $2.10'
All magazines must go to one
address.
No Canadian or Foreign subscrip
tions accepted.
Offers limited to September 30,
1909.
a*
,-,_^T.,'r-W«'«.-
4
CORNFLAKES
is the original the fiist flakes made from corn. The process of preparing has been kept
secret. So t!:u iniitetcrs could net prorfucc in a few months what took us years to perfect.
$1,000 sit GoM fof t&e Best Ears ot Corn
produced. All you need to do is to get your best sample to Prof.
Crossley, Iowa State College, Ames, la., before January 5th, 1910.
Here is an easy v/av to win a cash prize. If further particulars are
desired, watch t''1 •paper for other announcements.
&
f^g' FAIR AND EXPDSITIOM
Six=Day Race Meet, Commences Aug. 28.
fc"
TOASTED
CORN
[FLAKES)
-J--J'v
jf
X\
Stock Premiumsr$2£oooTcasirOfl^^
S- ,*2.
commences Aug* 2o.
The best the world has of Cattle, Horses, Hogs and everything for the farm.
PUN'S NEW SPECTACULAR "BATTLE IN THE CLOUDS."
7
Iowa Brigade Band'of Oskaloosa and the
56th Reg't Band of Ft. Dodge.
11
Every Department Complete and-Unexcelled.!
tt TT
W/ J. SIMPSON, Sec'y,
nil
'3
S?*
Evening: 'A
Hippodrome and
Horse Show in
Mi-
1
ii Stock Paviliam 'l*
39
1
vv4%|S!
L, Vgg$-
"'r
V-
*i
41
&
Iowa's Great Summer School' Kwfi
of Agricultural Industry
'1
$2.10
$2.10
§1.80
Mil
f£'
1
be recog-faa
publications and J'
A
WMtm
1-vW
*ii
v'-V.ir".
'si
f- it
1
.'
f*
$
6
rtl
I

xml | txt