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Manchester Democrat. [volume] (Manchester, Iowa) 1875-1930, September 18, 1918, Image 4

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038306/1918-09-18/ed-1/seq-4/

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Vhe ffawfcater Bnmcrat
/.•''•'.afjFs i' Official Paper of County and City.
/.' Subscription Rate Per Year,——2.00
B. M. Carr. Hubert Carr, Fred W.
Hirmann, Editors and Publishers.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1918.
"CUT OCT" AND "SAVE."
(Herald-Examiner).
In these days any average household
can save enough money to invest in a
Liberty Bond. Easy to say, say you,
yet it is easy. Here are only a few of
the ways to save pennies that dollars
may come to you:
CUT OUT unnecessary lights and
the heating of unused rooms.
CUT OUT gasoline by eliminating
all unnecessary use of motor cars.
CUT OUT visiting "over the tele
phone." The government needs the
phones for war uses, and your time
might be employed to better advan
tage.
CUT OUT unnecessary clothing by
wearing out your old clothes, and save
material needed for war work.
CUT OUT unwholesome and un
necessary amusements. There are a
hundreds of opportunities for inex
pensive pleasures.
CUT OUT having somebody to do the
things that you could do yourself, for
thereby labor will be released for war
work.
CUT OUT -the making of unnecess
ary repairs and do only what is
necessary to keep things from going
to pieces.
CUT OUT waste by saving tinfoil,
bottle tops, tubes, old rubber,
papers, twine. They have a war value
I- and can be disposed of in your own
locality.
•V- CUT OUT shopping oftener than is
necessary. Plan your buying in ad
vance. Carry home what you buy and
a a a
I equipment
CUT OUT useless servants. They
are needed in war work, in factories
and on farms to take the place of
fighting men.
CUT OUT evasions of the Food Ad
ministration rules. Teach thrift to
your children.
1/ That is enough advice for one day.
$
If you do these things you will be a
richer, happier, better American citi-
fw' zen. And that, after all, is the real
test of men and women and children
r-y,- to-day.
It was your President and ours who
-J.' said: "I suppose not many fortunate
by-iproducts can come out of a war,
but if this country can learn some
thing about saving out of the war it
will be worth the cost of war. I mean
the literal cost of it, in money and re
sources."
PRUSSIAN KULTIJR AND BLOODY
SAVAGERY.
Prussian Kultur is below morality,
reason and science. It is the en
thronement of savage hate aided by
science. The extracts copied, below
are from the pen of the German poet,
Heinrich Vierordt. The text appears
in "Out of their mouths", published
by Appleton In 1917. Here are the po
ets of hate:
"O Germany, hate! Salvation will come
of thy wrath.
Beat in their skulls with rifle-butts
and with axes
Let your clenched fist enforce the
judgment of God
Afterwards thou wilt stand erect on
the ruins of the world,
Healed forever of thine ancient tnad-
«Or this, from the Hymn to the Ger
man sword:
1 have slaghtered the, old and the sor
rowful:
1 have struck off the breasts of women
•And I have run through the body of
children
Who gazed up at me the eyes of a
wounded lion.
"These are no parodies. They are
Teal poems of the soul, a soul pervert
ed, and as black as hell itself* They
speak not the philosophy of the mo
ment, the product of a state produced
by war but of philosophy which runs
through Prussian history from the
beginning even to the end, which we
hope is well-nigh here."
NEWS FROM THE "HOTBED."
(Dubuque Times Journal.)
During the last Liberty Loan
Tlrive the city of Dyersvllle made a
wonderful record. Recently it has
completed Its war savings stamp
drive with a big success in which itB
neighbor, New Viena, shared. Dy
ersvllle, and New Vienna, too, are
peopled largely with persons of
German descent. When America en
tered the war It was predicted by
many tlyit Dyersvllle would be a hot
bed of disloyalty. After the Third
Liberty Loan campaign we ventured
the assertion that Dyersvllle was,
indeed, a hot-bed—a hot-bed of
Americanism. It was not only the
great over-subscription to the Lib
erty Loan which showed Dyersville's
patriotism. The great farewell dem
onstrations when the county con
tingents left, the attitude toward
disloyalists evidenced by the great
mass of the citizens, the eager spirit
of voluntary patriotic effort showed
where the people stood on the war.
The success of the war savings
stamps drive was merely confirma
tion.
REPUBLICAN PARTY IN ARKAN
SAS TO HAVE NO STATE
TICKET.
At a meeting of the republican
state central committee held in Little
Rock last week a resolution was un
animously passed "adjtorning poli
tics" in the party for the next bien
nial period at least. The resolution
set forth that the task of winning the
war* is the most important thing con
fronting the American people, and be
cause of tile fact that every citizen
must contribute his best efforts to
this end the republican party in Ar
kansas will hold no convention in
,1918, nominate no candidates for
estate office and conduct no state
^paign.—Van Buren County (Ar
ises) Democrat
-•V.-:, 5:':.
r*'\-'r''
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Tvv v-v'-"^^\ -V -""-v'^ •.
BITS OF SARCASM.
(Cedar Rapids Republican.)
Now the reports are that the ex
czarina has been slain. Well, the poor
thing, what was there left in life for
her? Nor is her death much of a
loss to the world in which she played
so prominent a part at one time, but
stripped of her royal robes she was
not as much as the humblest of her
former subjects, for she did not know
as much—the peasants at least were
not duped by a black priest, called
Rastupin, nor were they duped by,
German Intrigue of any other kind.
Of course it would not occur to a
German even when he is in retreat
that he might receive better terms
and be more esteemed in the world of
the future, if he would omit his usual
atrocities before giving up the Btolen
lands. What god does it do him to
burn the cottage of some poor peasant
of France? What harm has that peas
ever done that stupid Prussian mili
tary blockhead.
The soldiers chew gum also and-an
order for two millions of packages has
just been placed by the government.
That order might as well have been
increa£ed to 2,000,000,000,000,000—
for what are two millions of packages
for two million men—hardly an hour's
chewing in them, if they happen to
be a bit gxdited and nervous?
NOT A LOSS.
"'should anything happen to me,
just think of me as a Liberty Bond,
not a loss, but an investment." Pri
vate Charles R. Oliver, Co. G, Eleventh
Infantry, "A. E. F.
Well, suppose that I do go before, and
beyond?
What of that? I am a part of the
cast.
Yes, I!m an investment—a Liberty
Bond!
So who shall consider me "lost"?
We have chipped in these years of our
vigorous prime
And each of us fellows who fall
Are the Liberty Bonds of our country
and time,
And our cod pons are freedom-for
all.
I shall live if I may, I shall die if I
must
And it wont make you any less fond
If you think of your soldier-boy, pledg
ed to his trust
Not a "loss," but a "Liberty Bond."
There's never a value, but someone
must pay
And we—we are proud of our place
Which may give those who love us the
license to say
"He invested his life for his race!"
—Cedar Rapids1 Gazette.
ITALY'S AID VALUABLE.
(Rock Island Argus.)
When the war began the Krupp gun
works were the largest of their kind
in the world—employing 96,000 people.
It bad taken Germany 100 years to
build the Krupp works.
Italy at the end of her third year
in the war, had built up a number of
enormous ordnance factories—one
employing 80,000 people. Italy In
three years did what it took Germany
100 years to do.
Italy is our ally. When you mention
allies, don't forget the people of that
sunny land.
LARGE
FORTUNES
v.^v- 1-i
PAY
Also Tax on President Wilson's
Salary Upheld by Houae.
New Surtax Rate* on Incomes Over
$5,000 Expected to Raise
$1,068,000,000.
Washington, Sept 18. President
Wilson, federal Judges, state, county
and municipal officials must pay in
come taxes on theif salaries under the
18,000,000,000 revenue bill. Rejection
by the house of amendments to exempt
salaries of these officials Is declared by
congressional leaders to be the final
decision on this phase offthe revenue
measure.
The provision Increasing the normal
tax for individuals to 12 per cent, with
the proviso that the rate shall be only
6 per cent on the first $4,000 of income,
was approved without opposition. It
will raise some $414*000,000 In taxes
from several million taxpayers.
The new surtaxe rates, ranging
from 2 per cent on incomes over $0,000
to 06 per cent on those over $0,000,
000, also were approved. They are
expected to raise $1,068,000,000 and
succeed rates from to 18 per cent
Representative Cannon of Illinois
called attention of the house to the
fact that the ways and means com
mittee had not adopted the plan agi
tated by some for complete confisca
tion of large Incomes.
"The committee agreed that the
rates are just as high as It Is safe
both for business and for the market
ing of government securities," said
Chairman Kltchin, referring to the
arguments made for taking all in
comes of $100,000 or $200,000.
"It is just and equitable," be said,
"to make the large fortunes pay the
larger per cent of taxes. We have
done that."
MARINES, IN TRAP, KILL 20
Escape With No Casualties When Am
bushed by Dominican Bandits,
Says Report.
Washington, Sept 18.—Dominican
bandits ambushed Ool. George Cyrus
Thorpe and ten men of the United
States marine corps at a ford north of
Des Rlos September 7. A brief report
on the incident reaching marine corps
headquarters said in 20 minutes' brisk
fighting 20 bandits were killed and the
marines suffered no casualties. An
other report told of the killing of three
bandits by the Dominican national
guard, officered by marines. In a skir
mish near Hlguey on Sept. 9. Colo
nel Thorpe's home Is at Northfleld,
y- '!r5
WILSON SCORNS
AUSTRIA'S PLEA
FOR PEACE MEET
Has Already Stated Terms Upon
Which U. S. Will Con
sider Peace.
SPEAKS FOR ALL THE ALUES
President's Reply to Hun Meesage
Made Public Half Hour After
Swedish Minister Delivered
Text of Vienna's
Note.
Washington, Sept 13.—Unqualified
ndorsement of President Wilson's re
lection of Austria's proposal for secret
and nonblnding peace discussion was
liven in the senate by Senator Lodge
if Massachusetts, Republican floor
'3ader and ranking minority member of
be foreign relations committee. Sena
or Lodge said- the president's prompt
nd curt refusal was right and wise,
.nd that he was sure it would receive
universal approval. He said he be
lieved the president's action would
put an end to loose and feeble talk
helpful to Germany about Austro-Hun
garlan peace terms.
Washington, Sept. 18. President
Wilson flatly rejected the Austro-H«n
garlan government's proposal for a
peace parley.
His reply is perhaps without a pre
cedent In history. It was made public
within half an hour after the Swedish
minister delivered the official text of
the note to the state department. The
president's answer was Issued In the
form of a statement from Secretary of
State Lansing and reads as follows:
President's Reply to Austria.
"I am authorized by the president
to state that fee following will be the
reply of this government to the'Aus
tro-Hungarian note proposing an un
official conference of belligerents^
"The government of the United
States feels that there is only one re
ply which it can make to the sugges
tion of the imperial Austro-Hungarian
government. It has repeatedly and
with entire candor stated the terms
upon which the United States will con-«
slder peace and can and will entertain
no proposal for a conference upon a
matter concerning which it has made
its position and purpose so plain."
Saw Through Hun Trap.
Chronologically the answer consti
tutes tie fastest chapter in this coun
try's w^r history, and there is a reason
for this. It is that the United States,
In common with its allies, saw through
the hypocrisy of the Austrian note and
the thin veneer that hardly hid Ger
many's hand In the proposal, and there
fore wished to dispose of it as rapid
ly as possible.
It was 6:20 o'clock last night when
the Swedish minister, W. A. F..Eken
gren, arrived at the state department
with the note. Two minutes later be
left the office of Secretary of State
Lansing, and 83 minutes later Mr. Lan
sing gave an audience to newspaper
correspondents and made public the
president's reply.
"No Talking In Working Hours."
Throughout the tabloid drama was
enacted in much the same manner as
desired by a certain American citizen,
who sent a telegram to the White
.House.
His message was addressed to the
president and said:
"Sincerely hope your answer to Aus
tria's peace proposal will be that we
Americans do not talk during working
hours."
The President's Terms. ..
These terms, referred to in the reply
dictated today to the Austrian note,
were clearly set out In President Wil
sons Fourth of July speech at Mount
Vernon, as follows:
"1. The destruction of every arbi
trary power anywhere that can sepa
rately, secretly, and of its single choice
disturb the peace of the world or, if
it cannot be presently destroyed, at
least Its reduction to virtual Impo
tence.
"2. The settlement of every question,
whether of territory, of sovereign, of
economic arrangement of political re
lationship, upon the basis of the free
acceptance of that settlement by the
people immediately concerned and not
upon the basis of the material Interest
or advantage of any other nation or
people which may desire a different
settlement for the-sake of its own ex
terior influence or mastery.
"8. The consent of all nations to be
governed in their conduct toward each
other by the same principles of honor
and of respect for the common law of
civilized society that govern the in
dividual citizens of all modern states
in their relations with one another to
the end that all promises and cove
nants may be sacredly observed, no
private plots or conspiracy hatched, no
selfish Injuries wrought with Impunity,
and a mutual trust established upon
the handsome foundation of a mutual
respect for right.
"4. The establishment of an organ
ization of peace which shall make it
certain that the combined power of
free nations will check every invasion
of right and serve to make peace and
Justice the more secure by affording a
definite tribunal of opinion to which
all submit and by which every interna
tional readjustment that cannot be
amicably agreed upon by the people
directly concerned shall be sanctioned.'*
For Postal Card Users.
According to decisions of the post
office department, anything written or
printed on the address side of a gov
ernment postal card, except the ad
dress itself, that is, anything in the
nature of a message on the address
side, renders the card unmallable.
OM Weod a tparfcmafcsr.
Old wood Is apt to send sparks oat
into, the room, bat wood that Is sound
wfll bun wltbout this difficulty,
THE MODERN SPIRIT
of co-operation, the spirit which animates all suc
cessful business, prevails in the organization of our
Federal Reserve Bank.
We own stock in it. We keep our reserve
in it.' We have a voice in electing its directors and
through them choosing its management. It is our
bank, and its resources enable us at all times to
meet the legitimate banking requirements of our
community..
You, in turn, can co-operate with us in main
taining the Federal Reserve Banking System, and
at the same time share in its benefits and protection
by becoming one of our depositors. 3
First National Bank
The Only National Bank in Delaware Cetmty.
Send for Booklet, "How Does it Benefit Me?"
Iowa Farm Mortgage Co.
MANCHESTER, IOWA.
Authorized Capital $50,000.00 Just Organized.
WE ARB a new company having funds on hand for immediate in*
,, TO(»tment
WE HAVE an outlet for choice loans at lowest current rates.
WE HAVE an outlet for heavy loans, not acceptible to insurance
companies.
WB CAN figure with you on a new loan or on the renewal of yonr
present loan at a rate that is attractive.
Rates are going up, In fact, there has been a steady rise since
last December so deal now and deal with a company that fur
nish the money at once.
Iowa Farm Mortgage Co.
O. H. DUNHAM, Manager.
Offices Over Security State Bank. TELEPHONE (99.
THIS IS IN RUMOR CLASS
London
BTamand
Hie
Abdicated.
London, Sept. 18.—It was learned
here that rumors are current In bcjjpi
der countries that the German kaiser
either has abdicated or is about to ab*
dlcate. The rumor was of the vaguest
sort, but it was regarding some trou
ble in the Hohenzollern family.
There Is absolutely no confirmation
of it here.
One report was that the entire Ho
henzollern dynasty had' abdicated bir
would abdicate.
8lx Killed 15 Wounded In Paris Raid.
Paris, Sept. 18.—Six persons were
killed and 15 others were injured in
Sunday night's air raid over Paris, ac
cording to the lists given by the new*
papers.
THE MARKETS
Grain, Provisions, Etc.
Chicago. 8«pt. 17.
Open- High- Low
Corn— ing. est. est.
Sept 1.66 LM% L6W 1.1
Oct 1.6SK-62% IMU 1.52
Nov 1.49V4-49 1.49% 148 1'
Oats-
Sept 7IK -72* .71% .72*
Oct 7S-TH4 .78% .72% .7SU-U
Nov 74-7S% .74H -TStt .74-71%
FLOUR-The United States food admin
istration flour standards are as follows:'
Per bbl., In Jute, 96 lb. sack basis: Barley
flour, S8.00 cprn flour, ttt.K wMte rye
Hour, flA.S): dark rye, (9-90 spring wh«at,
9ULK special brands, VU.K hard winter,
$10.60911.00 soft winter, 910.50.
HAY-Cholce timothy, fM.00OM.00 No. 1.
fn.00OM.00 standard, tn.0008.00 No.
standard and olover mixed, t2t.00OM.00
No. 8. g7.0002t00: clover, flt.00O22.00.
BUTTEH—Creamery, extra. S seote.
Etc higher scoring commands a premium
firsts, 91 score. Etc 88O90 score, ttftOMMe
seconds, 84087 score, 480Etye standard,
MOMtte ladles, 41®41%c re&vated, 44Hc
packing stock, 87088c.
BQ6s—Fresh firsts, «Mf®4414e ordinary
firsts, 41643c miscellaneous-lots, cases In
cluded. 40O4Sc oases returned, 880426 ex
tra, 49960c dtiecks, 280t8c dirties, SaOMc
storage packed, 46046c.
LIVE POULTRY—Turkeys, ttc fowls^
26080c roosters, 22Hc sprtng chickens,
28Hc ducks, 28030c geese, »s.
ICED POULTRY—Turkeys, 37%088c
fowls, [email protected] spring chickens, 80c roos
ters, 23%c ducks, 28®30c g«ese, 18c.
POTATOES—Early Ohlos, f2.E0G2.66.
CATTLE—Choice to fancy steers, fl8.00O
19.60 good to choice steers, fl6.78O18.00
plain to good steers. $10.60016.80 yearlings,
fair to choice, 81£60®18.60: stockers and
feeders, 87.75O13.60 good to prime cows,
[email protected] fair to prime heifers, $9.00014.76
fair to good cows, $7.50©9.00 canners, $6.40
@7.00 cutters, [email protected] bologna bulls,
$8.2508.80 butcher bulls, [email protected] heavy
calvee, $7.60®13.7E veal calves, 817.00®lA.W.
HOGS—Fair to good light, $20.60®20.80
choice light butchers, [email protected] 20.90: medium
weight butchers. [email protected] IJjs., $20.78020.86
heavy Weight butchers, 2700850 lbs., $2(^35
©20.60 choice packers, $19.26®
19.86 rough
heaw packings [email protected] pigs, fair to
good, $18.00Ol&S0 stags. [email protected]
SHEEP—Western lambs. $17.00018.00
native lambs, good to choice, $16.00017.00
yearling*. $14.00015.00 wethers, gotfd to
choice, $l!.00ff?13.25: ewes, fair to choice,
$10.80®12.00 feeding lambs. t16 00ffll7.0n.
Things Worth Knowing.
Guard within yourself that treas
ure kindness. Know how to give
without hesitation, how to lose with
out regret, how to acquire without
meanness. Show how to replace
in you* heart by the happiness of
those yon love, the happiness that may
-be wanting in yourself.—F. W. Faber.
:v"
mMl
VENTILATE YOUR COAL BIN.
It's to Prevent Spontaneous Combus
tion From 6ases.
To store Iowa coal so that there
will be no danger from spontaneous
combustion trpm escaping gases, it
should be placed In the bin in such a
manner that there is a circulation of
air thruout, acordlng to the mining
engineering department of Iowa State
College.
Lump coal will allow all of the nat
ural circulation of air required, if the
windows and coal chute are left open.
The fine coal, due to handling, that
will acumulate under the chute
should be spread evenly thruout the
entire bin. Preferably the bin should
have a cement floor and be well
drained. If more than' 10 or 12 tons
are stored in one bin, it Is well to
build in some flues of the large lumps
to allow a better circulation of air.
This should alsobe done if it is neces
sary to store "run of mine" coal.
The following are some hints in re
gard to proper coal storage:
Find out about the movement of
coal into your town and if you have a
choice of two kindB of coal, order the
one which is most easily transported,
especially if there is any Indication of
a freight congestion. Order the coal
which is the least brittle, which has
the least sulfur, and which is the beet,
prepared.
Fix up and drain the coal bin, and
keep the coal away from wet ground.
Do not pile coal more than ffve or
six feet high.
The drier the coal Is when placed
in the bin the better.
If to many "fines," complain to
your dealer.
See that you get clean coal. If there
is much dirt, slate or rock, enter com
plain with the state fuel administra
tion.
GOVERKOB SE5BS OCT A CALL.
Asks lewa farmers to Select Seed
Cora for Two Tears' Planting.
From Sept. 16 to 28.
A proclamation has just been issued
by Governor W. L. Harding calling on
the farmers of Iowa to get into their
corn fields sometime between Sept.
16 and Sept. 28 and select enougft
good seed corn for two years' plant
ing. That is the begining of a seed
corn selection campaign that will
reach every individual farm in this
and every other county of the state.
In this country, as elsewhere, the cam
paign will be directed by the county
agricultural agent, with the help of
the farm bureau co-operators, one of
whom has been chosen for every
school district
"Every farmer 100 per cent on seed
corn," is the slogan for the campaign.
Following the proclamation, every
farmer in this county will be reached
thru the newspapers, by telephone and
by personal calls and asked to take
care of the seed selection job at once
and to pick enough for two years.
Then, on October 1, the governor
will ask the farm co-operators thru
out the state to make a visit to every
farm and find out just how much seed
has been selected and what its condi
tion is. The results of that census
will be reported to the county farm
--V
W. C. A. ACTIVITIES.
The "Y_ W. C. A. is doing for the wo
men of this country and of France,
what the T. M. C. A. is doing for the
men. It Is caring for the women of
the industrial armies of both coun
tries at the request of the two govern
ments.
At the munitions centers in France,
"foyers" or clubhouses have been es
tablistiei. There are cafeterias, recre
ation halls where the women may play
games, have concerts and gymnastics
during the rest period at noon, and
rooms fitted up for resting, writing
and sewing. In conection with each
is a recreation field. -At base hospiCala
in France, the Y. W. C. A. has a hut
for the nurses, with a secretary in
charge who arranges for their recrea
tion, Is always at hand to help them
and to s«rve them with hot chocolate
in the middle of the night or whenever
they come off duty. Three welfare
centers lave been opened in Russia.
In this country, the T. W. A., at
the request of the government, has es
tablished service clubs in 22 munition
making cantonments. In
mmmmmrnrn
rvi$
CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS
OF ALLIED BANKS OYER
$210 MO.00
Combined RESOURCES over Three Quarters of a Millien
Dollars.
Security Savings Bank -Greeley, Iowa.
Oneida State Savings Bank Oneida, Iowa.
Delaware Savings'Bank Delaware, Iowa.
Dundee Sevings Bank Dundee, Iowa.
Security Trust and Savings Bank Ryan, Iowa
Security State Bank Manchester, Iowa.
Receives deposits—time, demand, savings, and subject
to deck, sells foreign and domestic exchange- issues Letters
of Credit and Travelers' Cheques buys mortgages and well
secared negotiable paper rents safety deposit boxes at rea
sonable rates acts as executor or administrator of estates
and in all fiduciary capacities provided by the laws of Iowa.
Four per cent, interest paid on time and savings deposits.
Open Saturday Evenings.
F. B. WILSON, Cashier
W. 1L NORRIS, President E. B. STILES, Counsel
QUALITY
FURNITURE
For the Best in Furni
ture and Rugs go to
BROWN.
Sells Cedarine Furniture Polish
•••»»»»»•«•»»»»»•»••••»»n»•»•»»•»•»•••••»•••
bureau and then to the governor.
The whole program is of utmost
impoTtaace because Iowa must safe
guard Itself against any more such
desperate situations as it faced last
winter nnd spring in the matter of
seed com. This year the prospect for
seed Ib line in such a year enough
seed ouflit to be saved to take care of
two yearB' planting.
Bome
S. C.,
CLASSIFIED ADS.
Classified Advertisements in THR
DEMOCRAT are sure to bring qaiok
results. If you have an artiele to sell,
advertise It in the Classified Column.
If yon us In the market for some
thing. na&ke yoar wants known by
stating them In this column.
RA*na—II cents per line tor first
Insertion, and eents per llae for eaeb
consecutive Insertion. No "Classified"
advert la anient taken for less than J5
oents.
FOR RENT—Six-room house on South
Brewer street Inquire at this of
fice. 38-2.
REGISTERED GUERNSEY BULL
FOE SALE—22 months old. A good
laid and a good pedigree. The
Tin Fwiftsrs Wis. I
demand is coming for a better quaHty
of milk and cream for which better^
prices will prevail than at presen'
To meet that demand and to produce
milk and cream of the highest quality
at the least expense the Guernsey has
been carefully bred for many gener
ations. Grade up your dairy stock
by the use of a good Guernsey sire
and now is the time to begin.
HENRY GILLESPIE, Manchester.
4(8-2.
FOR SALE—Bay mare, 6 years old,
weighs about 1800 poundB well
broke. Inquire of Strickland A Son.
38tf.
FOR SALE—A few big, close wooled
Buck lambs, pure bred Shropshlres.
For early maturity of lambs and line
wool (one-half blood) which com
mands the best prices. Grade up your
flock with Shropshlres.
HENRY GILLESPIE,
cases,
a cafeteria is ran by the club in oth
ers it is- merely a recreation center.
91 hostess hoases, both fn colored and
white, are nowing being operated by
the Y. V. C. A. in cantonments in this
country. Requests for hostess hemes
are ccnjLng' in at a rate of one a day,
as none is put up exeept at the request
of the commanding officer ot the
camp. Assistance is being given to
the government in the matter of emer
gency haiuing at centers where war
industrtae have brought many girls
togetliar. A model dormitory is being
built at Charlestown,
1 1
and the
congestion In Washington, D. C. is
being- relieved by the opening of
homes and clubs for girls. Patriotic
Leagues have been established in com
munities near camps and
111
cities to
direct tbie patriotic impulses of the
younger girls. 400,000 girls are en
rolled In this organization.
I I
LOST—A small black velvet hat, on
the highway Just east of Manches
ter. Finder please leave at this of
flee.
Have Pete aake year next salt* at
Cffldaers. It will he nude right
FOR SALE—Thoroughbred Holsteitt
hull calved Feb., 1918. Fine Individ
ual, nearly white and well bred. Call
and see pedigree and calf. We know
he will please yon. Weighs 1600 lbs.
—Jos. Hutchinson, Manchester, Iowa.
3Tw2.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC.
The public is requested to make
written report to the undersigned of
any disloyal or treasonable acts or
utterances, or any other information
which will be of use to "the govern
ment in the present war.
E. Mj. CARR, Postmaster,
35tf. Manchester, Iowa..
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF
EXECUTRIX.
State of Iowa, Delaware County, Mt—
Notice is hereby given, that the un
dersigned has been duly appointed and
qualified as Executrix of the estate
of King H. Goodwin, late of Del
aware County, Iowa, deceased, All
persons indebted to said estate are re
quested to make immediate payment
and those having claims against the
saipe will present them duly authenti
cated, to the undersigned tor allow
ance.
AUGUSTA A. GOODWIN.
Executrix.
Dated Sept 9th, 1911 J8w3.
0'i
Mi-
-1.
'ft
ijgPj!
lit*.
Manchester.
32-2. •.V
FOR SALE—Not cheap lumber, but
No. 1 stock for sale cheap. If you
don't buy of me, we both lose.
35tf. GEO. H. BARR.
Mrs. A. F. Slack of Manchester has
ripe tomatoes and also cucumbers of
all sizes for pickling ffit sale. Any
other parties having tomatoes and
other garden products, please aotlQr
this office. There have also been
calls for ground cherries.—Jessie P.
Hastings, County Home Demonstra
tion Agent
'"•cii
Im
if,-4

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