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The Toledo chronicle. [volume] (Toledo, Tama County, Iowa) 1873-1924, January 16, 1873, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038485/1873-01-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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FIRST NATIONAL BANE
or
TAMA CITY.
%. A
riMl
1
v
IOWA.
all,
arren,
Pres. G. W
Cashier.
oughtonII.
A.
L.
Asst. Cashier.
We 1-efe to all of our Customers. *^dti
ork Correep indent, Chatham Na
fUnal Bank,
Chiengi) Correspondent, Manufacturer*'
WtionalFank. [iT
.MABBItOM. B. t.BALL,
iAMACOUNTY BANK
—or—
Iowa.
ttAllim. SALL 4.WA2H3N, BAHEEES
Correspondents: K^untie Brother*, New
Y«tk, and Tliir National ISauk, Chicago.
WN. H. HARRISON,
feeneral Insurance Agent,
•01,*DO, IOWA.
ftsprssents Ik*
CHARTER OAK
LIFE INSUEANCE CO..
OF HARTFORD,
JL93ET3
SlO.OOO.OCJO
And lh* fellewing reliable Hr» laserarrc
Cliupanitl:
Jltaa, of Hartford, assets $3,000,000
T1 ia«, of Haw York, asseti 5,000.0(10
tlastford. of Hartford, ansets 2,750,000
^lissnii, »f Hartford, as*«ls 1,735,000
Sptsial attention will be given to ilium-
K t)WBf,LlK(lS. I5AHNS in I CONTENTS
against Flftg and LIG IITNI SO, for a pari
4 #f "n#. T)irat and Five rear*, and a/
fllM »i l»w «J any int fan potsibly git*.
OFFIL'B—la Tama County lUnk.
4-S __
II HHHI JACOB TtlBEB,
BF.RSER & YEISER,
(fla«s*fs(rs to T. K. Atras'.roag
Wheleeele ill re**d dealers is
X^=L
XJG-Sf
MIDIC'IMS, aaJ CilK.VllCAI.S. PAINTS,
OILS, VAUNISUES AMD
l»ts stuffs,
KAMI'S, PUTTT, GLASS, As.
3R o 37 rxi ©2? 37%
ft«Ai«. TOILCT PRKPARA-
TTOXS.
TlBSHlS, SiOULD**-B*
ACIS, At., ft«
tihacoo.
CITY
sxurr.
A Hll
OlQ-ARa.
HWM8 ef an kinds and stvlss, and
every thing esually kepi iu a flisi-jlass
Stora.
HT Pliysisiie's Prawnipiiona carefully
eee^caaUJ.
•j i'OLKDO. IOWA.
BLOSS,
A N K S V N K E K 7 S 7 O A
Quit Claims and Justice* Blauli
at Iba Cur.emci.ic Office.
»o
want
Tot
a Mipei tor ai i icm- olj Wool-
Ian Yarn and •ome extra In avy I"1 in
eels lri«m tl:o German Mill*, iIteu call
at tli* UNION M'oKK.
Y©» aim some new plain or figured
Optra KUnnel, heavy Water Proof,
fancy Scotch Plaids, Merinos or oth
er serviceable Dress Goods, call then
at the UNION STOKE.
Yob
wait
s
lome ^ooil Jituwt, hsnvy
Sitinet, firm Caaaimcrr, Broadcloth,
Alaska Cloth, or Heaver—yon will
And lh«m at the UNION STORE.
IPO
Y«« WA»T
the
the nclehrated Whitney
Boo*, for men or boy«, or wool lineS
Boots or new ntyle Alaska ot'emhoee,
Water Prool Gaitera, Ki«l, Calf or
any other *hoe, clhow your way iuto
UNION STOini.
DO
fx.
want
norne fine suit* of good
Rtanlial Clothing, lotne choice
Groceries, or a line ot best Crocke. y,
donjt buy them until you have ex
•mined (jooils and figurea at tha UN
ION BTOlltt.
DO
Yor not know that the above Damed
goods and many others have just
been newly purchased, and are of
lered to the public at the vury lowest
prices, at the UNION STORE, To
ledo, Iowa, by thu proprietors,
Wieting Bros'.
M. CAMERY,
DEALER IN
Maehinary of all kinds. Pumps,
Sl)c Solcito
TABLE POCKET
BOOKS & STATIONERY,
Memorandum Books,
School Books,
Blank Books,
Pocket Books,
Playing Cards, Rulers,
Slate*, Chalk Crayons, &c., &c.
BOOK STORE,
ToleciO, m* m, m, Iowa.
NOW ON EXHIBITION
1 MAMMOTH ST00I
For the Fall Trade!
DOMESTIC DltY GOODS & DRESS GOODS,
LARGE VARIETY.
READ -MADE CLOTHING,
BOOTS AM) SHOES,
HATS AND CAPS,
18 5 loq«H ng
Vol. VII, No. 3. TOLEDO, TAMA COUNTY, IOWA, THURSDAY, JAN. 16, 1873.
Miscellaneous Books,
GOLD PENS.
Toy Books.
Writing Paper of various descriptions,
INITIAL NOTE,
Pets, Ink, Pencils, Mucilage, Ink Stands, Pap Weights,
Paper Cutters, Ink tfrasers, Pen Racks, Clips,
Stationers' Gum, Visiting and
QUEENS WARE,
HOSIERY & GLOVES, GLASSWARE.
WJHTE GOODS,
LACES, iNOTIOXS
Aiming to keep pace with all movements whose object is
to make low prices, and to encourage the handling of Goods of
supeiior manufacture, I solicit tin examination irom the best
judges and the closest buyers. H. GALLEY.
DEEDS, MOETGAGES &c
For Sale
AT THIS OFFICE.
THE PEOPLE'S STORE
W. F. JOHNSTON &r CO.,
Have now open and on exhibition, the
Largest £tock of General Merchandise
in
Tama
County,
ztsroTicosrs
i'aina CouiiLy Goods ot the
SHA^ LS*
CUTLERY,
GROCERIES,
TOBACCO, d-c., &c.
Gonsisligg ol
Domettic and Fino Dress Goods,
Ready Made Clothing,
Boots and Shoes,
Glass and Queens Ware, Hats and Caps, Groceries, Hardware and Agricul
tural Implements, Umbrellas, Parasols and
cxf all zkzihstids.
Shawls, Marseilles Quilts, Wall Paper, fcc., to. which they are prepared
to Sell at LOWKST ices lor CA&H.
Aiming to lead in all movements, having for their object
SMALL PitOFl'J'S and Quick Returns, and
to
Hest Quality ami Manufacture at greatly reduced marginal
prutits, they would solicit an examination of their stock, con
tident that they can give
ENTIRE] SATISFACTION
24tf Both as to QUALITY and PRICE.
iuruish lo the peopi« ol
W. F. JOHHSTON AND CO.
^fht ^olnld ^hroniflc.
Is publisliol every Thifrsilay morning by
Wakrks HARMAN.
tf puiil ttrintly in adeanet the subacription
pries ot' t!ie t'liuoxiCLts will be $1.75 a
year otherwise It will be $2,00, onl no
auhscripiion will be allowed lo rua over
two yearn unpaid.
Office on High Street, Cast of Tana Coun
ly Bin it.
Cash Rates of Advertising.
1 Inch, 1 week ......$
1 Ire I month
1 Inch, !i!OQl!is.....*i.v,.
1 Inch, 1 year
Column. 1 year.......a.
Colnmri, 1 year............
Column, 1 year
Column, I year
1 Column, 1 year.
..y
The Caliph's Magnanimity.
A traveller acro-'s thu [desert waste
Fiund on hii way a cool, palm-shaded
spring,
And the fresh water seamed to liis pleased
lane,
In all the world, the most delicious thing.
Great is the caliph!" said he '-I for hioi
Will fill my leatharo bottle to the brim Poverty, which
Ho sank the ttle, forcing it to drink
Until ihe gurg'c osafed in its lank throat believe that salvation
Then started on once more, and smiled to continual sell-sacrifice
think
He bore tor thirst God's only antidote.
iHya after, with obeisance low and meat
lie laid his present at the calipi'a feet.
spring wai
And soon the issue of the
you red
In a gold cup, on who o embossed oat
side
JaWels. like solid water shaped a gourd.
I'lie Caliph drank and isemeJ woll satis
ed,
Nay, wisely pleased, and straightway gave
cammand
To line with gold the man's wsrk-har
dened hand:
grftC8j
Caliph ans '«red I
throne,
"Touch noithe water it is miue alone
Tli* Caliph told his courtiers the inteat
Of his denial, saying "It is base
Not to accept a kindness, if it is pressed
Willi no low molivc of self-interest.
"The water was K gift of love to me
Which I with golden gratitude repaid
I would not let the honest givej- see
That on its way, the crystal of the shade
Had changed, aud was impure. And so,
no less,
Ilis love, if scorned, had turned to bitter
ness.
I granted not ths warm, distasteful
draught
To ask lips, because of firm mistrast,
Or kiudly fear, that if another quiffe4,
lie would reveal his feeling of disgust,
And he wbe meant a favor would dvpart,
Hearing a wounded aud dejected heart.*'
Oh spring! of kindness in life's desert found
O'ershadcd fendly by the palms of peace,
Rise everywhere, and in each heart abound,
Tint strife anl angsr in t/ dajline aud
.cease
No traveller need fear to give from thee,
For ihere is naught can mar thy purity.
—[Henry Abbey in Appi'-tont Journal.
LIFE Itf
The Miseries Depicted by .Miss Alex
ander, the j»ult Lake Actress.
Miss Alexander,who was *en years
in the family ot Bngliatn Young, de
livered a Jieoturo it: Chicago
lui
lence. In 1S ")S they joined the
Church and journeyed to Salt, Lake
City. In lsGD «hu roeeiveit the en
dowment ceremonies. Within the
walls enclosing the temple was an
old and classical building where
these services were peaiormed.—
There tho obligations were made
that joined them lo the Chureh, and
where the plural marriages were per
formed in utter necrecy, and with
forms worthy the ages ot darkest su
pemtition. From tliis elofe secreev
Young avoids the possibility ot proof
of his numeiotis mrariages, and
boast ot it. Women thus married
are dead, indeed, to all future happi
ness. The first mairiagu ean be
6.t0
.801
2 00
4 oo:
1
"iade in publii but future alliatiees
12.so are consiiinin:it ed in this state ol see.re
ey. To apostatize irom the Mormon
2*2.40
28.hO
41.40
80.00
I.«gal advertising, U'jral rates.
For th.) use of larjxe cuts nnil wo»d type
an additional iliai-fie. varying from 10 to 20
percent., will be made.
Church is a sin from winch there i*
no redemption. The punishments
tor revealing the secrets of the en
dowinent house were worse than
detlh. There was no oath so saered
among the saints as those joinii
them to their chureh. Not one ot
Prompt se.'tlcments willbe expee'ed with them cares for any authority ontsidi
all time-advertisers, at. tlie close of each the chlircll. No clan.«0 in the Coil
calender quarter. Transient advertise
ments must be paid for in advance.
stitutton of the United States, no
American law is paramount, to the
Church obligations, Tho question
was atked what made the women re
main in Utah? The Church sent
every year to distant countriea its
missionaries, who pictured in the
most j!owiiig colors. Poor people,
believing in these statements, are in
duced to go to Utah, where ihey are
kept by systems ol tithes in a stat«
ill not admit of
their leaving the country. Hy an in
fatuation tho women are made lo
lepends upon
She believes
that her husband has a peWect, right
to a plurality of wive*, and that she
is doing henluty in sharing domestic
'happiness with other wio'*. Tlivy
were obliged to conceal their wrongs
aud huiniliati.jns. They thought they
were doing their duty by holding up
Church doctrines, and consequently
'state to all strangers that they *r*
happy. Thery was no opportunity
i
for them to earn money and leave
Mot-monism. Apostates are brand
I ed by their relatives as women ot
bad repute. What was the induce
I ment lor them lo break their bonds
Without money, without friend*
Hngliain Young understood this and
The courtiers, now seeing the feward, held them in a state ot servitude that
Fancied some unheard, Wv,nlrous virtue 'almost precluded the possibility ot
escape. She herself had been an ob-
The bottled burden borne fer their lotas i Mouwon spite. Sho had
lorj i learned A profession upon which she
And of .'he liquid gift asked but to ta.te:! "he could depend lor a liv
The Caliph ans '«red frem his potent "'g-•»'"« »»ad been able to abandon
thu hated region. She hail no doubt
but that their enmity would pursue
hei it it could. If they lettthu ('hurch,
But when, soon after, tho humble giver judgments diru were bound to tol
went,
O'erllowing with delight, which bathed
his face,
low them,
pernicious
the
evening of the lid, at tho Academy ol
Music, on Moruion lite in Utah. It
was the first timo that the lady had
been before an audieucu iu thu char
acter of a lectures*. Her debut
was a suucesslul one, aud the quiet,
prepossessing a ipuarauue of the lady
won the sympathies ol the audience.
Miss Alexander has a fine, clear, dis
tinct delivery, good voice, a pleasing
Bta»e presence, and withal ttie cle
uienis of a suceesslul leciuress. Sue
introduced the suhlect by stating
that she endeavored to give in her
lecture but a brief outlinu ol her ex
perience among the Mormons. The
following is a Uriel synopsis of her
lecture:
She was born in Wheeling, West
Virginia. Her father dk-d wlion she
was too youug to know his face.—
Her mother soon alter removed to
St. Louis, where she (her mother)
was induced to join tho Mormon
Church. They did uot think at the
time that she was devoting herself
to the eligi' n, as tar as its indorse
ment of polygamy was concerned.—
She thought whatever her mother
did was right and proper. Had she
known what sho was oomuiiittug
herself and daughters lo, che would mestio affairs
The elders used all then
powers lo bring punish-
ment upon them. There are lew who
could lace tho calumnies heaped up
on llietn by leaving Utah. Young
once said in the pulpit, that no virtu
ous woman would wish to leave
Utah He used to say ol Gentiles
that they ought to "go to hell cross
lots." In l!?t3o, by request ot ling
ham Young, sho became an actress in
the Mormon theatre. Together with
this came a command that she take
up her residence in Mie Lion House.
She at onoo wished to avoid the
theatre, but was aroused by the
thought that by the study ot the
drama sue might escape the marriage
institutions ol the sect- During the
first three ye/irs and a half of her tho
at.rie.al experience tho company play
ed without salaries, for tho theatre
was a church organization tor the
saints AH ambition in her pro es
sion was subdued in various ways.—
When she had attained a degree ol ex
cellence she was told that she acted
by direction «f the Lord, and that if
sho lelt tho Church sho would be
powerless in her protession.
It is considered most disreputable
for a woman to remain single. Any
woman could marry if they would
accept a traction of a man's heart,and
a vulgar fraction at that. She was
glad that her spirit had been strong
enough to keep her Irom entering
the matrimonial state. She was
called a lire hi and and an emissary ot
the devil on this account. After a
while it was decided to pay salaries
at the theatre. She got £15 per
week, §10 ot which went to Hrighain
Young for board. Sim would have
committed suicide rather than sub
mit to tho odious requirements of
the Mormon system.
It was one ot their doctrines tho
greater the sacrifice the higher the
exaltation in heaven. There great
teachings were: Obey your coun
sellors pay your tithes. It was
asked what was meant by tho blood
atonement. Young was spiritually
advised that some of his tribe were
in a spirit of aposlacy aud their blood
was shed to prevent it. It gave a
person a fresh probation in eteruity,
to take tho lilo of an upostate. As
far as relationships were concerned
in marriage eremonies, tfiero were
no rules. Ono generous elder had
offered to mt»rry her mother, her sis
ter, and herstlf. Brothers were some
times married to sisters, and she be
lieved that Brigham Young had mar
ried a man lo hi* own daughter.—
The granting ol female suti'rge was a
ohurch farce: it had been granted by
the elders to help them carry out
their schemes. Tliey had a right to
vote iu the manner dictated. They
were not allowed a voice in their do-
have shrank Irotn it as Irom a pcati- officers took plaoe serai Annually- A
The election of church
dignitary of the church rose and said:
-'Brethern and sisters, it is moved
and seconded that Brigham Young
be elected President and Trustee ol
the Church." There had been no
motion and no second, but no one
dare vote iu opposition to this, and
Bi-iirhani Young is continually re
elected.
People w»re misled in th'nr opin
ions of the domestic and social rela
tions it Utah, from visitors an cor
respondents. But thay hid n
chance ot ascertaining tho true con
dilion of domestic affairs. The wo
men were too well trained not lo de
lend their religion before Gentiles.—
The lady gave her an alFeet.ing ae
eount of ti,o sufferings entailed upon
her by tho Mormon system in hast
ening the death ol her mother,
through the man whom Ihey ha i
looked upon as being a kind father
taking to himstdi another wife. She
also alluded in a tou.siting manner to
the death ot her sister, whose child
she had taken to educate aud sup
port, and for which end she had en
tered the lecture field.
Mow Much to SeM
"WIipi»
are the buyers?" is the
cry all over tho country. One far
mer with a 200 acre larm, a dairy ol
twenty cows, his ••••ribs crowded and
his garners and cellars filled with
grain and vegetables, his orchards
We have therefore too many pro
ducers ot food products in this coun
try in proportion to our population.
We have too little skilled labor em
ployed in manufacture*. Too many
are engaged in producing what we
eat, and too fuw are employed in pro
ducing wlia we wear and use to con
tribute to our comfort and conven
ience. in other words, tho food pro
ducers ot tho United Slates are too
far from the food consumers engag
ed in other vocations, or the means
of communication or transportation
are too limited, which a mounts to
the s»me thing.
The boys are told lo stick to the
farm an 1 yet tho farm does not
need them, judging by the present
status ot things there. But it the
boys leave the larm they cease to be
ifl-oducers, aud hero is thu mistake
that is made. They engage iu traffic
They help to add to the cost of all
products as they pass between tli-?
different classes of consumers. They
do not add to, but take Irom the
wealth ol ihe country. They he
come leeches upon industry, and
block the way beiwen producers and
consumers, levying tax upon the in
dustry of both. Our boys who
leave oil producing oil the farm
should become producers ot what
the farmer cousuiues. True,
iio
It is therefore becoming a serious
question to American farmers how
they can dispose ot their surplus pro
ducts. Shall tho consumers thereof
come to them tho shape of labor
employed in developing the manutu3
tures,of the country, or can the fac
ilities lor transportation be increased
and cheapened and their products
thus be brought within the reach ot
those who need them? It is a ques
tion which every tanner in the coun
try is interested in solving, one that
should be gravely considered by
every man who would have the
workshop lor the farm, impressed
with the idea that tho farmer's is tho
only independent lifo that can be Ibd.
It is plait! to us that the schemes tor
securing immigrants to settle upon
aud cultivate the cheap railroad lands
ot ihe West and the i ioh soils ot the
South ought not to be encouraged.
We need more men to spin cotton,
work our mines, forge our iron, man
ufacture our uottou, lead, tin, aud
Whole No., 315.
nrme, expending upon the raw ma
terial ww may produce all the labor
that can be employed upon it to fit
it tor our multifarious uses. This is
what we need. Then our fanners
will not complain ot too much to
sell and too lew buyers. We sli&il
have markets at our doors. Oar
money will be retained among our
solves, lixuhauges will be i ct
Transportation monopolies wit!
cease, end yet the local traffic will
inunerato railway investments.^*
Will cheap food and abounding nat«
ural resources invite such iniinigri"
tion —N'ic York World.
A Much-Married Woman.
There is a woman in Washingueft
who has buried five husbands. It*
cenlly she married a sixth. Upon
the day of the wedding, a man called
at the bouse of thu groom, asked for
that gentleman, and then proceed to
measure his body with a tape line
Tho infatuated groom entertained ao
idea thai this might, perhaps, be a
man sent aroun by his tailor. Alter
the ceremony in church, however,
the husband was surprised to observe
this same person standing in the
yielding abundantly, with young titul lit—beautiful!" When tli lap
stuck ready lor tho shambles, told us
that since the 1st ot April last lie
had not l»o«n nblo to selll worth
of farm produce for cash aud yet
lie is within twelve hours' ride of
New York ami a less distanco from
other large inland cities. Money is
scarce we can get no money. No
one wants produce there is no
money to buy with." This is the
cry which roaches us from all parts
o! the country where the population
is dependent lor its income upon the
value ot the products ot the soil in
market. It is a disheartening cry,—
Tri e, it is a satisfaction to know that
there is plenty of food in the country
to oat. It may be a satisfaction lo
know that there are plenty of men
aud women somewhere on tho globe
to eat it but it is not so assuring to
know that there is no disposition lo
move this surplus, or, if there is a
disposition, there is no means tor do
ing it. If the money was at hand the
transportation is inadequate and
litis inadequacy compels tho »y
ineut of extiorbitaut freight tariffs,
which affect the ability ol American
producers to compete iu loruign mar
kets »vith foreign producers.
ves­
tibule aud winking furious.y at tlie
bride as the party caria out to the
I carriage. Just us they wero starting
off the mysterious being put his head
into Ihe carriage win low, and whis
percd to tho bride: "Got a ready
ma le one that 11 just suit him Bean*
py man demanded the name cd
lbs
intruder, the bride blushed, and Kati
she believed ho was some kitid ot aa
undertaker. Then lio man was not
so happy. lie was hardly happy
at
all, and a certain gleom seemed
to
overcast tho honey noon. Perhaps
the undertaker was loo prompt. But
still, we like to see a man take an in
terest in his business.
A Well-Kept Secret.
Brailleboro, Vermont, tells a story
of a well-kept secret. The story
goes that a boy way back iu 1811,
made a kite and attach'-d a paper
lantern to it, in which he put a candle
and arranged it so that when the
caudle had burned out it would ex
plode some powder which was iu
the bottom of the lantern. He kept
the secret entirely to himself, and
waited lor a suitable night in whnsb
to rai*o Ins kite. Tho boy got hM
kite into the air with jut being dis
covered, for it was so dark that noth
ing but the colored lantern was visi
ble. It went dancing about ia th»
air wildly, attracting much notice,,
and was looked upon by ignorant
people as some supernatural oinen
The evil spirit., aw many supposed it,
went bobbing around for about
twenty minutes and then explode#,
blowing the lantern to pieces. Nefct
morning all was wonder and excite
ment, and this lad, who had carefully
taken his kite aud hidden it alter the
explosion without beint: found out,
had his own tun out ot the matter.—
The people ot Bratlleboro never had
any explanation of the mystery un
til nearly sixty years alterwaru,when
the boy, who had become quite an
old man, published the story in a
Brattleboro newspaper.
An English journal st tes that tho
greatest comb manufactory in llie
world is in Aberdeen, Scotland.
There are thirty-six lournaces lor
preparing horns and tortoise sh
ell
lor combs, and no le^s than one hun
dred and twenty iron screw presses
are continually going in stamping
them. Steam power is employe to
cut the combs. The coarse coinba
are stamped or cut out, two bein£
cut in one piece at a time. The fins
dressing combs are cut by fine sawS^
some as tine as to cut forty teeth Ml
the space of otto inch, and revolvir
times i
one minute There are some twi
live thousand limes iu the space
mat
ter what their vocation, they continue
to be consumers but what lliey con
sume is takeii out of the granaries of
tho tanners aud the manufactories
without adequate return. They be
come mediums ot exchange but it
tho commissions paid ihetn lor their
supposed services cripple either ot
the parlies who they serve, such ser
vices can well be dispensed with.
thousand varieties of cotnbs made,
and the aggregate number p-oduced,
of all tl. ese different kinds, is 8,000,
000 annually—a quantity that
if
laid
together lengthwise would extend
about seven hundred miles. can
nual consumption ot ox-horns
is
about 730,000, and th'j annual con
sumption of hoots amounts to 4.OC0
the consumption of tortoise-shell an4
buffalo-horn, although not Knl it»«. U
correspondingly valuable. A hoof
undergoes eleven distinct operations
before it becomes a finished cotnb.
A singular fatality appears to have
attached to the new building of the
Young Men's Christian Association,
as no less than eight sudden deaihS
have occui ed among the artists, occu
pants ot its studios, and ot those in
timately connected with them, with
in a peiiod of a little more than IWO
years. Edward J. Kuntze's death
occurred first, shortly attn the open
ing of the building Edward D. Nel
son was killed, a few hours after leav*
Ing his studio, on the Harlem Kail*
road. Adolph Vogt died a fe*
mouths later, very suddenly, ot smaUr
pox Mrs. Trait, wife ot the ai tis^
Tlied in her husband's studio last win
ter. Ames, the portrait painter, wit
stricken down in iiis studio while
working before his easel last summeafj
and died a few days later. Mi§«
Vincent Colyer, wiio ot the artia||
was drowned at Daried Connecticut,
in October. Mr. Kensett's death o0»
ante, spin and weave our wool, flax, 'cured suddenly on the 11th ot lilts
hemp, and jute, work up our ramie, present month, and betore the ei||*
spin and weave the silks ol Calilor-1 i,|i
ma, produce essential oils from our
ni3
1
mourning were removed
rom his 8tll(llo (loor) Mr
hobs and flowers, ean and preserve pitman, the art puhlishsr, was slriofeV'
our fruits, make wines from our
en wiih
grapes, distil liquors fr.)in our grains, died before he could be removed |A
mdeed utilias ell our reeoroes hare at'
Q^o^, •,
appoplcxy in his siore, ai|4
his home
This is a bad rocord.

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