OCR Interpretation


The Toledo chronicle. (Toledo, Tama County, Iowa) 1873-1924, September 11, 1873, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038485/1873-09-11/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Vol. VII, No. 37.
FIRST NATIONAL BANE
OF
TAMA CITY. rOWA
B. A HALL, iVi'e. G. JI. W.AR&KN, Cusitier.
A. L. IIunoiiroN, Asst. Cashi«r.
JflT We refe 10 all of our Customers.
New Vorlc Comsp indent, Chatham Na
lioiitl Bank,
CiiiCAt^o Correspondent, Manufacturers
f.ationul l'aiik. [17
W. IIABB1S0N. U. I.I1ALL, O.II. WABRKN
TAMA COUNTY BANK,
—or—
roledo» Iowa.
HAaaisoif,
HALL WAEBEN. BANKERS
Correspondents: K-untzo brother?. New
ork, atid Third National Hank, Chicago
••PHESERVE THE SHADOW, ERE TilE
SUBSTANCE FADK!"
y,
is now prepared to produce
BHADOW PHOTOGRAPHS
t« the
most improved style of modern art
Vail and examine sample* of his work
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
0ALLEKV OVER BBOWNS UUOOEKY
rOLBUO, IOWA. [3-ly
INSURANCE.
WM. H. HARRISON,
General Insurance Agent.
Toledo, Iowa.
1?
presents the
CHARTER OAK
LIFE INSURANCE' 00.,
OF HARTFORD.
ASSETS$1000
And the •following reliable Fii* Insurance
OINJI IIIII'S
AKTS.(, of Hfu'COv!, T.««rts fO.OOO.O'tO
Ik'JIK, ft". N'".v OIK, ass
(MS A.trtll), UO"
1
Kitt'oiJ 'jf Fliiitf'onl, a netf 2.7 -0.Ots.
rhui'iiis. c.f H.iiiiciJ, .'iss-els I,7So.00l'
Special nUentivi!: will hegi^entn insur'rip
I»W t-.LI.!*,
I:a!uNS and Ct ».\"i'KVi
HjaiuFt KIKE
HIKJ
I.U« II I NING, tar u peri
edoT (hie. Ilneeaml live yo:ii.». i.nd at us
Uu rales as an// oil" ran porsib'ygive.
OFFICE—In Tu.nia (.'ounty Hank. .* 5-8
•i'aji
CONNECTl CUT MtJTUA
Lile Insurance Company.
Org mated in 14340
Net Asset5
/39,000,000.
DiviUnls to Policy II ld«ri,'oa Ptemi
um*, for 1371, 47 per cent.
N. C.'ltlCE, Agent!
n.y
ntJCKlNfllfAM,
A New Wagon.
.The
placc to
get
tllHt
J, M. SEARLES.
O.OOO
Ksi'AB.usuro
IOWA.
OH Yes,
A NEW THING.
the best WAGON
BUGGV made in Iowa is ftl the
or
BRADBROOK
WAGON'S CARRIAGE
Where is kept a full supply of WAGONS
»nd BUQIIES on hand and everything in
Vfal ler liradbroik's line made to order:—
All orders for repairs or cqnatruction
eromptly filled.
None but the i
BEST MATERIAL
used, and only the
SEST WORKMEN
BMr LOVED.
All Work Warranted',.?
to give satisfaction.
A nsw thing about hia Wagons is th
BRASS TIIIMliLK SKElKS,'
which «xcell all oili*#r». All w*antin| Wag
•At
or Carriages should call upon the un
4er«i|rn«d before purchasing
tar WAGON aj»d CARRIAGE PAIHT
W(l done o ordf r.
WALTBlt-
BllADBROOK,
TOLEDO. IOWA,
^CORNELL .COLLEGE.
1
?or
HOTH'SKXES,
WKFil T£M.j£ir
I'EUIKNCKI* l*rotes»oi'« and leachertsi
full Classical and Scientific ottrsea L're
parntory, Commercial ond Ornamental Dc«
partmcntB ample buildings and appliances,
aBd375 students anniihlly iu a town not
ed for tcmperance, Board and Tuii ion lov
'oi 0:inio4'i« ifi Iross the President, R.E
WM. F. KlNi3,D,n. Alt.^cruB. oira.
Toledo, Iowa.
£40tf
THE PEOPLE'S STORE
w. F. JOHNSTON & CO.,
Have now open and on exhibition, the
Largest Stock of General Merchandise
in Tama County, consisting ot
Domestic and Fine Dress Goods,
lieady Made Clothing?,
Glass and Queens War.', Ilats and Caps, Grocer
i^IIardwaif]!!f A'
ural Implements. Umbrellas. Parasols and Africa!
ZtTOTXOITS OF AT,T| $6lZhTIDS
sNIAixi-ftoVi'iN1' ™uV™e'lls.
1n'!rnQV!"y
.m'ht*, they would solicit an examination of their stock con
tideut
th#»v
lident that they can give
nnn »i».» SlUCK,
ENTIRE SATISFACTION
•Mtf Both as to QUALITY and P1UCE.
CKDAIt II 1']Its
MARBLE WORKS!
SBARt^S«
DEALERS IN
FOREIGN AND AMERICAN
Largest and Best In Linn or any Adjoining Count)'.
:IRST BUSINESS H0USI3 BELOW IRON BRIDGE
ls"'
J. W. COE, Agent, Toledo
1
#-a«
Is Now Established in tne
NEW BRICK BLOCK,
And has already filled up with new staple and fancy
DBT GOODS,
Foreign ind Domestic 7ress Goods, Heady Made Clothing
arnetinga and Oil Cloths, Hosiery, Gloves, Corsets,
VV lute Goods, Lanes. Sha'vls, Silk and Cotton
Threads, Notions, Hats and Caps, Boots
and Shoes, Trunks, Wall Paper,
Window Paper, Table and
Pocket Cutlery,
Scissors, Queeusware, Lamps.
A FULL LINE OF GROCERIES,
Including lea, Coliee, $ugar, Syrup, Dried Fruit, ^c
Adhering strictly to fair legitimate dealing, and holding
out rare inducements, I expect to merit a large^trade.
Toledo, April 10th, 1873. GALLEY.
THE MEDICAL EMPORIUM
or Tama County
—is the place to find—
PURE DRUGS AND MEDICINES,
jpaints, Oils, Tarnishes, Glass, Puttjr,
Toilet and Fancy Articles, Perfumery and Toilet Soaps, School
Books, and Stationery. In fact, everything usually
kept in a first class drug store.
Call and examine our stock and prices. We-are determined
not to be undersold by any Drug House in the county.
Thankful for past "favors, we hope by strict attention to
business, to merit a liberal share of patronage in the future.
DEEDS, MORTGAGES.
AT
Tf fit
'B JH Bist
°P 7
BUBBLE
Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
TOLEDO, TAMA COUNTY, IOWA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11,
11
E. P. BA1.UW1N, (Jen'l
REMOVED!
J* N. SPKINGER.
For Sale
-r
1 \,i 7'"
$|li» f|»lei« (^hmitirle.
Is published every Thursday mornin* by
WARRKN HARM**.
If paid strictly advance
1
i
llilvi,'S
fur
at
tlieir object
sreatly reduced marginal
COn-
W. F. JOHKSTnNFiwn CO
J. 0. BAXTER.
the
Inch,
subscription
price of the CHROHICL* will b« $1.75 a
year otherwise
It
will be $2.00, anil no
subscription will be allowed to rim over
two years unpaid.
Office op High Street, East of Tame Conn"
tj Bank.
Cash Bates of Alvertlsing.
1 week
1 lscb, I month
1 Inch, 6months.
1 Inch, 1 year
Column. 1 year
Column, 1 year
Column, 1 year...........
Column, 1 year..,**....
1 Column, 1 year.
.$ 80
.. 2.-00
4.00
6.10
12.80
22.40
28.80
41.40
80.00
For Iluj use of large cuts aed wood type
an additional charge, varying from 10 to 20
per cent., will be made.
Prompt settlements will be expee'ed with
all time-advertisers, at the close of each
calender quarter. Transient advertise
ments must be paid for in advance.
Balloonaria.
The preparations lor the transbt
lalitic balloon voysgo arc now lar ad
vanced, and our enterprising uotem
porary, the Daily Orphic, tells us that
an extra lorce ol lianIs working y
and night, will h.isiun tliein to coni
plulion. It is believed that the great
Inbrio will be ready for filling by the
30ih of August, when it will start oo
lite journey aa soon as lully irflated.
Besides the large boat suspended un
der the car, a smaller tanoo will be
carried, to serve as a lile boat. This
latter cralt is fourteen leet long by
twenty-eight inches broad, and is
made ol paper three-eighths ol au
inch thick. It is a fine piece ol work
manship, and is constructed with air
chambers so as tj be practically ua
siiikuOlc. In event ol the leakage
fi otu the balloon causing a decent
ami rendering it necessary to take to
the water, Mr. Donaldson will at
tempt to .reach laud in the smaller
vessel, whilo the real of the party
will navigate the larger boat. The
ibove menlioned gcuilcman recently
raile'd the canoe on a trial trip be
tween ihia oily and Long Branch,
o
u
perl* ct saiety, altbJugh the sea was
(|Uile tui'buk-nt.
The capabilities ol the carrier pig
eons are being thoroughly tested,and
some ol the birds have shown a won
derlul speed. The Ariel, a pijeon
thai won the 12,000 prize in the in
ternational coulest in Belgium ill
1871, aectMiipiished the distance be
tween New York aud tittaiioid,
Conn sixty lour miles, iu thirty iniu
utes. Another bird, known as No.
G, luaJe tlie jouruey in almost us
quick time. The pigeons are ol
tile linebt Belgiau s'ock, and some
two and a hall years ago were im
ported iy Mr. O. iS. 11 ut tel I. It is
related that the flojk, some two doz
en birds in all, were imported in two
deUctunculs, aud uu theit arrival
were carefully ccotiiicd Ur a long
time in then coles. Alier they had
been thus inert ed up, sufficiently
long, as it was supposed, lor tiiem to
forget ail about then trausatlautic
home, the doors of the cages Iwere
opened but to the dismay of their
owuer, who i.ad invested upwards ol
thousand dollars iu them, every
pigeon flew promptly away. Iu
about lour days, however, ail retain
eJ apparently very much exhausted
and ravenously hungry, since which
time none have ever attempted to
leave their piesent abode. It is con
jectured that the birdo, on being re
leased, made for the Atlantic coast
and flew along its whole length,seek
ing to recognize some feata:es ol
Belgian birthplace. They have since
multiplied Very rapidly, and at ttie
present lime number about one thou
sand.
A number of these pigeoiu will be
carried iu the car ot the balloon, and
released at intervals with dispatches
which they will carry, it is believed,
directly to their cote at Iitvercliff.
As it is thrown troui the balloon,
each bird will probably fly wild an
til it sights land, to which it will un
mediately direct its course. The
carrier pigeon has uo peculiar in
sunct which directs bim homeward,
but seems to possess a memory tor
places, coupled with a very strong
attachment lor its abode. In its var
ious excursions uear the latter, il
becomes acquainted with objects,
say lor a radius ot seventy miles, se
that, it once it sights any part ot the
circle, it cau easily find its way home.
On being let go. it first flies upward
and perhaps looks over a circumfer
ence sufficiently largo to inolude
portion of tlio cirsim
it
to, toward which it immediately
travels. But in
ca
so it sights no
known object, then it wilffly in a
chance direction for some distance,
and then try again, and so on for
about three times, when, if disap
pointed, k returns to its starting
point and begins a new flight. A
good bird will keep up this repetition
until it discovers its home locality,
or else it tries so olten as to be dis
eon raged then it seeks a uew home.
The humorous side of the voyage
seems to lorra a staple exercise lor
the wits ol Ihe daily journals. Puns
of various degrees of atrocity have
been perpetrated on tho name of Pro
lessor Wise, and the word "balloon
aiio j| a°|requentfy Used that fe bid*
fair to become a part of the language.
One journal suggests sending up an
experimental balloon, with a car load
of a selected pariy from the dozen
or so emotionally insame murderers
now in the Tombs in litis city, and
then, when at a sufficient elevuiiou
spilling them out. Another exuber
ates to the effect that Wise's expedi
tion cannot but. be fruitful, because
he is sure to fiud so many currents
in the air. A t' ird obseryes that, it
finning torpedoes are to bo dropped
along the course ol the balloon, it
might be well to provide the passen
gers of ocean steamers with cast iron
umbrellas. Some of the alleged
answers ot correspondents to invita
tions, from the managers, to a seal iu
the car ro quite amusing. One re
marks that the voyagers are pretty
sure to reach some locality, but
whether in this or the other world
is questionable while another, poet
ically inclined, replies thai
"If I could read my title clear
To mansions in the skies,
l'4*id farewell to every fear
Atod with your gas arise.*'
Scientific American, Sept.
6.
Queen Victoria's Fortune.
Nobody Knows lis Amount—Splendid
Real Estate Speculation of Her
Late Husband.
Upon the subject of their private
fortune*, the Sovereigns pi England
•ro«» Ilenry VIII to Victoria, have
always preserved a curious reticence
a.id secrecy. Not long ago a gentle
man went to Doctors Commons.and,
alter tendering Iho usual lee,demand
ed permission to* examine the wills
of all the Kings and Queens from
Ilenry VIII (town. lie was told
that not one of these wills were on
file there, aud they were in the ctis
tody of the Archbishop of (canter
bury. The gentleman crossed the
river to Lambeth, found the Arch
bishop and made his quest to him
But the Archbishop replied that he
was not iu possession of any ot the
wilU, and had not the slightest idea
where they were. Alter the death
»t George I., when George II. first
receivetl his Minister, the Archbishop
of Canterbury produced the will of
One may live as a conqueror, a
king a magistrate but he must die
as a man. The bed of death brings
every human being to his pure in
dividualily. to the intense conteinpla
Hon ot that deepest and most solemn
of all relations between ihe creature
and his Creator.
will of the deceased monarch, but
George II. instantly look tLe parch
ment and put it into his pocket, and
uothing more was heard of it. Tho
wills of all subjects must be proved
and recorded at Doctors Commons
but tho will ot an English Sovereign
is always kept secret, and whether
its provision* are ezetuted or not
seems to depend wholly on the pleas
ure ot his successor. Now Prince
Albert was not a Sovereign, but his
will has been kepi a secret to this
day, and no one knows what it con
tained. The rumor is that tho Prince
left everything to tho Queen, and
that he also laid injunctions upon her
not to convert auy ot the property
into money tor tho purpose of giv
ing the money to the Priuco ot Walts
That young gentlemau, it may be re
membered, was iu disgrace with his
papa at the time ot the latter's death
—indeed, the death itself was the
consequence of a cold caught on a
sudden journey to Oxford, wmther
Prince Albert had beeni-ammouod, iu
luste, to get his son out ot a dis
graceful aud dangerous scrape iu
which he was involved. No one, at
the present day, knows exactly what
are the "private estates" of the
Queen- The estate of the Balmoral
and the Osborue estate are known,
and their value can be estimated
but there are in addition the Ken
siugton estates, ot which DO one bat
1873.
know anything. When the plan tor
the construction ot the South Ken
sington Musuim was first devised,
there wore miles of unoccupied land
lying around the spot chosen for the
great collection ol buildings now
known as th(),Exliibuinn,the Museum,
aud Albei Hall and ihere are other
miles ot streets only partly br ill, and
having for the most part cheap and
poor houses upon them. A little
ring" was formed—Prince Albert,
Mr. Dilko (afterwards Sir C. W.
Dilke), aud two or three others com
posed it—and by this ring the great
er part ot ihis properly was quietly
bought up before the plan for the
Aluseum, etc., was made public. This
was mora titan
twenty go. The
WllOle oi itiai legion is uun
covered with fine houses) and what
cost only a few hundred thousands
is now worthjnanyjmilliotis. Prince
Albert's share of this is now the
properly ot the Queen, aud these
'Kensington estates" are in them
selves a verj la ge lorluue. Alto
gether, in money and in lauded pro
perty, to say nothing of the jewels,
ller Majesty is supposed to possess
something like £o,000,000 sterling,
while no one really knows how much
she has and the amount ma) be
110,000,000, or even .*60,000,000,
tor aughtjany tone, can.sl.ow to the
contrary.
Daring Feats ofi'an Aero
naut.
Biumc, Wis., Sepicnttwr 1.1879.
Mr. 11. A. Palmer, the aerouaut
gave a tine exhibition to a large au
dience at the Beioit Driving Parkou
last Friday. Tho day was clear aud
calin, ami hisiaige balloon rose iu al
most a directjiue. _Mr. Palmer had
uo baskel, nor was ho lied or secured
to itie trapeze or rings ou wliich he
performed his hazard ju* teats. The
balloon being inflated aud held dowu
by twenty men, the aeronaut sealed
himself ou the trapeze-bar aud cried,
let go everybody," when the bal
loon went up like a shot. W hen at
the height of 1,000 leet, Palmer let
uro the ropes, aud, failing backward,
hung by his tois to ltie bat uis" toes
slipped troin the bar, aud as he
dropped his bauds caught the two
rings which were suspend eight leet
below the trapeze his feet swung
downward, aud he tvas seeu hanging
by one hand to a ling, waving his
Laud kerchief to tho wondering inoi
lals below. This feat has never be
lore been attempted, aud Palmer per
formed it here tor the first time.
His dariug and skillful performances,
which were continued uulil the bal
loon began to desceud, were brilliant
and thrilling.
Mr. Palmer is about 22 years old,
and h»s made more tliau one huudred
aud sixty balloon ascensions. He
understands and attends to his bust
ness, aud is undoubtedly the most
daring aerial gymnast iu the world.
—Chicago Journal. G.
'A correspondent of the Pall Mall
Qanelte, Englaud, sends to that paper
tho following religious statistics ot
India, as gathered by ihe Missionary
Conference recently held at Allaha
bad, India "During the ten years
between 1861 aud 1871 the nun ber
ot Christians has more than doubled
in Bengal, while the communicants
have increased nearly threefold. Iu
Central Iudia the native church has
multiplied by almost tour huudreu
per cent iu Oudu by one huudred
aud seventy-fivu per cent. in the
northwestern provitioe it has nearly
doubled while the total increase for
the whole ot India is sixty one per
cent. The missionaries have thus
established,writes the correspondent,
in a startling manner that Cliristian
iiy is a really living faith among the
natives ot India, and that it is..spread
ing at a rato which was altogether
unsuspected by the general publio.
The number of native ordained min
isters has risen during the ten )ears
in ques.ion trom ninety-seven to two
hundred and twenty-six, and the
number ol communicants lor ail Iu
dia has more than doubled."
They had a ''donation ua-ty*Ht ihe
house ot a minister in Connecticut a
day or two ago. About a hundred
and fifty dollars worth of presents
were.received but as the company
ruined a five huudred dollar' piano
and some impious kleptomaniao em'
bezzled the spoons, the minister coi»
siders mat it will take just about two
tuore donation parties to burst hitix
into ditpinuiive smithereens. Yoti
can distinctly understand that the
text, "It is more blessed to give than
to receive," was erased trom tho fara.
ntyiy.e .r&lctrfd tho Queen and Lor privatengeuti tly Dtble tom that djiot cjmiraign.
•, i '.j 1
1
Whole No., 349?
The Farmer of the North*
west.
It is amusing to the grave manner
in which certain ot our city jour*
nalists attempt to discuss the larmeMP
question. These young sprigs, w|b
swell around iu fancy neck ties aitd
light boots, and who do not know a
pitchfork from a McCoimick's rea£*%
er, are full ot the gravest advice to
the farmers.
One ol these gentleman attempte^^T
elucidato the agricultuial quel.
tion iu Friday's Timet. Iu doiug
he put the following question iuCcfc''
ihe mouth ot an imaginary lariner£
to
What is it that hinders me lro^ ,,
occupying a position on n level wil&
W|L"
in
In various ways the writer leafa.
those as ignorant as himself to sup.
poBe that the larmers are a class oi
mendicants, or rather feebie, unen
lightened, and poverty sticken peas
aulry( who need advico aud com
miseration^lrom any, little upstart
who writes suaudal aud senatiou tor
that paper. If tho writer would
gain some little knowledge of the
class lie *o patronizingly counsels, ho
should lay dowu his pencil lor a lew
weeks aud travel through the great
Northwest. IIj will be hospitably
i Oueived, notwithstanding his ques
tionable character, and iu the quiet,
cheerlul, comfortable farm houses of
that vast agricultural region he will
find, notwithstanding the present
disadvantages under which liiey la
bor, the happiest aud.most independ
eat body ot ineu and women ou earth.
Let him atteud a grauge picnic,
i "harvest teasi,"and behold the groan
ng tables, piled full ot dishes that
I even the richest cannot procure in
our largo cities, and see (he whole
soulcd and cheerlul manner in which
the meeting is condnoted then this
wiso young man will come back
much sadder ami wiser than ho .went
away, and freed trom at least halt of
his selt-iinporiauce.
Tho trouble is not, as the writer
referred to supposes, that the farmer
is not the social equal to the miller
nr»/l ilin rai1w.iv fiiri-Airtr Kivl ha.
cause, through unjust regulation, he
is deprived of that lair and equitablo
remuneration tor his labor which he
has a right to demand. Injustieo is
equally injustice, whether hoapod
upon the banker, tho miller, the rail
director, or the farmer. The condi
tion in life of ihe sufferor makes no
difference. A regulation which crip
ples and om ban asses the merchaut
will inert with the opposition of the
mercantilo^community aud iu tho
same way a law, or regulation, or a
system, which imposes undtio bur
dens on the farmers will meet with
their active enmity. Tho farmers oi
the West are not mendicants thejr
aro not suffering for the necessariep
of lite, or calling for donations to
savo them from rags aud beggary.
They are simply endurtug an op
pression from railways, from monop
olies, and from various torms of
roguery, which is suffered iu common
with them by nearly all classes, but
by them most of all, and this oppres
sion lliey demand shall cease. When
they require the tears aud pity of tbo
T»met at iheir alarming conditiou they
will no doubt apply tor them!—Initr
Ocean.
A correspondent of the Vermont
Chrittton Messenger says I don't lik«
lo see people who are sick ou Sun
day when ou Mouday aud ou all oth
er dav«t o» iho week they aro in
strong or robust health." Nor do
we like to see it. Yet many excel
lent people ot nervous temperament
who are liable to hvadache, neuralgia
and lesser ills are lar more apt to t^|
ill on buuday ihan ou other days'
Ordinarily they are kept up during
the week by the stimulus of dail£
and pressing duties. On Saturday
uiglit lin y lie dowu wiih a necossaiy
feeiing of relief, aud are apt to
"ruu dowu" nervouhly that they afc
almost sure to suffer the effects #f
reaction amid tbe peaceful hours
Sunday. Sunday sickness therefore
is olteu tor.above the satire of theft
robust tempirameut that go evenly
slow all through the week. TiM
tendency is inevitable, aud prayer
will not ordinarily remove it. Theft
very pnople would be glad oi relitl,
—.Exchangt.
The NeW York Timet a o^opini&n
that Ben Butler's chances ot being
elected' Governor*'®# IHlMMdhisettgl
are good, unless*hi*tfppon«rits adopt
a different policy of: courtncting the
Q. »4 .4f» tel.,-* i x,% v'l. 7 ie-i
V'iV. «.

xml | txt