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Los Angeles daily herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1873-1876, July 11, 1874, Image 2

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CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIAL PAPER.
SATURDAY JULY 11, 1874.
Bad Advice.
lv referring to the election under
the Local Option law, soon to take
place at Los Nietos, thenar says: " If
the intermeddlers with others' business
carry their point, wethink we are giv
ing good a Ivice to those who deal in
liipiors in any way to say to them to
stick to their business just as though
nothing had happened. No grand
jury will ever indict them." We
thtHk this bad advice, very bad advice.
No man will abandon his claim to In
telligence by asserting that the focal
Option law is not now a law of tbe
State in actual force. It was the Act
of the people of California, in Legisla
ture assembled, and when the Act re
ceived the signature of the Coventor,
it became a law as binding as any in
our statute books. All elections held
under the Local Option law are legal,
and to advise men to disregard the
law which such elections establish, is
to advise them to violate the law, and
thereby jeopardise personal liberty
and individual property. We are no
stickler for Local Option, but we re
spect the law and recognize tjie will of
the people as the law of the land. We
hold that in any community where a
majority of the qualified voters have,
iv accordance with the provisions of
the Local Option law, voted against
the retail of lirjuor, to retail liquor
within the boundary fixed by the elec
tion, is an unlawful act, and certainly
those who advise tho commission of
such an unlawful act, are giving bad
advice. The assertion that no grand
jury will ever indict those whocommit
such unlawful act is unwarranted, and
could only hold good with a grand
jury composed of men having rather
vague notions of the sanctity of an
oath. Local Option may be an un
constitutional luW, but has not yet
been so pronounced by the proper tri
bunal, and until it is so pronounced it
is a law of tbe State, and its violation
is an illegal act subjecting the violator
to the penalties named, hence we say
advice to disobey the law is bad ad
v ice.
Freights and Fares.
Our attention lias been called to an
error which occurs in the Herald's
article on freights and fares, which ap
peared in yesterday morning's issue.
We then stated, upon what we ac
cepted as good authority, that prior to
the appearance of Goodall, Nelson
<Sr. Perkins' steamers on tlie coast
route, the Pacific Mail charged seven
dollars per ton on all freight brought
from San Francisco to the port of Wil
mington. Had we saiil the old line
charged these rates while owned by
BfiN Hoi.LADA V, we should have been
correct. Since the line passed into the
hands of the Pacific Mail, the nominal
charge has not exceeded five
per ton, though we have no doubt that
averaging the freight by weight thej T
netted seven, and perhaps ten, dollars
for every ton brought down before the
appearance of the opposition. The
classification rates by which freight is
received, has, we presume, been prac
tised ever since men began to learn
the tricks of trade, but it is always an
expensive rule to the shipper. A baby
wagon or a light buggy may be made
to measure a ton, when in reality it
does not weigh as much as the steam
er's clerk. This, however, is practised
by all steamboat and railroad compa
nies, and will be remedied when the
Grangers are through with other and
more important matters. With regard
to the rates for freight as now charged,
we are informed that the freight which
goes out of this -valley is largely in
excess of that brought in. This bning
the case, it would not be to the advan
tage of the people to equalize the rates
hy taking off of the down freight and
adding to the up bound. Merchandise
from Sau Fraucisco to Wilmington
now costs five dollars per ton —the
same as charged by the Pacific Mail
before the opposition was placed on the
route.
The Express of last evening devotes
its entire editorial and part of its local
space to a personal attack on the Her
ald's correspondent, "T. A. G." We
regret that our cotemporary should
deem it necessary to attempt a defense
of itself in this way. It certainly
committed a mistake in its statements
concerning tho Granger's mottoes in
the Fourth of July procession, and
when that mistake is corrected the
response is a series of personal attacks
on our correspondent. Nothing is to
lie gained by tlie pursuance of sucli a
policy. Tlie author of the letter pub
lished in the Herald is a respectable
citizen of wealth and position, and the
charge that he owes the Express for
subscription which he will not or can
not pay, will be received with a smile
ol'incredulity by (lie people of Los An
geles.
Tin; San Francisco Post says it dot s
not care acontinental about German
subscribers, and that it does not make
any dilt'erence if every German in the
State refuses to touch it. We presume
the Germans are a great deal more in
difl'erent on the subject than the Vo*t
can possibly be.
William c Hardy announces
himself aj a " free and independent"
candidate for Delegate to Congress
from Arizona. The Miner vouches for
Jus being a true-blue Arizonian, what*
ever that m iv mean.
Woman Suffrage.
Have the contests under Local Op
tion advanced the cause of woman
suffrage? A number of leading jour
nals bave reached conclusion that it
bus. From our own standpoint the
question presents v different aspect.
After the Ant few elections the posi
tive influence ot women over voters
appeared great, and it really was such,
but it was a waning power and faded
like morning dew before a parching
sun. Later elections have demon
strated that women can neither per
suade nor awe men into voting other
as their interests or inclination dic
tate. HOW this undeniable fact will
advance the cause of woman suffrage,
we are unable to determine. As an
argument it certainly requires careful
and logical handling. Unless the
ladies' efforts produce better results in
tbe future than have followed their
labors for some time past, public faith
in their power as street electioneered
will undergo a radical change, and
thjs change cannot but adversely
affect the popularity of the woman
suffrage proposition. In fact, we
doubt if the more intelligent, thinking
class of men and women are now, or
ever will be, strongly impressed with
the theory that great beneficial results
will flow from investing women with
the ballot. They believe that woman
commands most when she seems to
follow. That her influence on the
politics of the nation as an adviser
and counselor is. greater than when
she appears as principal and contest
ant: that as the home oracle she does
more to win the victory than when
she goes to the field as an armed bel
ligerent. Intelligent, thinking men
do not wish to transform women into
men, and they think that when a
woman becomes a street politi
cian, she unscxes herself and di
vests herself of all those gentle
qualities and refined and refining traits
which make her a woman and make
men love her because she is a woman.
A woman's very weakness is an ele
ment of strength. It is because she is
weak and helpless that man loves and
protects her. When she asserts her
right and ability to protect herself—
when she denies that she is weak —she
at once deprives herself of that power
which comes of her weakness —which
she holds over man because she is a
woman. There is another argument
which may be urged against woman
suffrage. The ballot is abused now.
Too many men have the right to use
it who lack both the intelligence and
principle to use it properly. If all the
women in the United States were legal
voters, not one-half of them would ex
ercise the privilege. With men, it is
the better class who remain away
from the polls. The same peculiarity
will be noticeable when women vote.
The better portion will seldom vote,
while the worser class will vote early
and often. Again, the influence of the
husband over the wife's vote would be
greater among those men who sell
their own vote than with the intelli
gent liberal classes who would scorn to
exercise an influence over the vote of
a wife or of anyone. On the whole,
we are not yet convinced of the great
good which will result to woman or
the nation by extending the right of
suffrage to all citizens of a given age,
without regard to sex, color, or pre
vious condition of servitude.
Local Option has developed some
curious phases in the San Francisco
newspaper world. Tho Post felt
called upon to rate the Germans in
language more caustic than compli
mentary. The Germans are not in the
habit of nourishing a viper after it
bites them, and orders to stop the pa
per have begun to fill the Post order
book. To save itself the Post threat
ened to publish a list of those discon
tinuing their subscription. The Ger
mans didn't scare at this, but other
subscribers did, for they knew that if
the Post carried its threat into execu
tion its columns would be filled with
German names, to the exclusion of
everything else, and they began to
stop the paper. Then the Chronicle
come to the rescue, and talked in favor
of tho Post. This was the signal for
the Germans to fill the Chronicle or
der-book with "Stop my paper." It
is an amusing contest to all except
those journals who have committed
hari-kari. Wonder if the Legislature
anticipated these lively times when it
passed Local Option?
The following from the Alta will be
of interest to the people of Los An
geles: "The Supreme Court of the
.State has decided in tlie case of San
Francisco against the Spring Valley
Water Company, that the Legisla
ture cannot confer on corporations any
peculiar powers, or subject it to pecu
liar duties by special legislation. The
constitution provides for the organi
zation of corporations under general
laws, the provisions of which can
not be altered for special cases."
It turns out that the Independents
hold tlie balance of power iv the Ore
gon Legislature. The Democrats are
stronger than the Republicans, from
which it is apparent that the Inde
pendents drew their strength mainly
from the Republican ranks.
A party of San Francisco reporters
recently took a tramp through Santa
Clara Valley, and the Mercury thinks
the Grangers will soon receive a great
deal of advice on how to cultivate the
soil.
The Arizona Miner is. on hand again
as natural and fresh as ever, after its
trial by fire. Marion is not a man to
Weaken under a little blaze.
The furnace at the North. Ahnaden
mines will soon be in working order.
Latest Telegrams.
ASIATIC CHOLERA IN BROOKLYN.
An Indian Battle in
Nebraska.
The Union Paetflo Tnhes
n Trick.
EASTERN.
Ufa I lis from Cholera ami H.xii oj-'iii
bln.
Nkw York, July 10.—Mary Har
mon died in Brooklyn to-day of Asi
atic cholera. Wm. MeGinnis died in
New York of hydrophobia.
The Km Telegraph Cable.
Portsmouth (N. H.J, July 10. —The
steamer Faraday arrived safely this
afternoon, having been detained seven
days by fog. The Ambassador is ex
pected to return here immediately,
when the cable will be laid forthwith.
Lifeboat Nlatlon*.
Washington, July 9.—The work of
providing life-saving stations on the
Lakes and Pacific coast will be com
menced soon. The stations on the
Lakes and the Pacific coast will be
lifeboat stations, provided with ac
commodation's for apparatus and boats.
Some will be furnished with regular
crews and others are expected to be
operated by volunteer crews.
Fire in Ottawa.
Ottawa, July 9.—A fire to-day de
stroyed Boyes Carding Mills, Stock
dale's Carnage Factory, Skinner's
Iron Works, and a number of smaller
buildings. The loss is not estimated.
One for the In ion Pacific.
Boston, July 9.—ln the matter of
the Union Pacific Bailroad and the
petition for its bankruptcy, notice was
to-day filed in the U. ». Circuit Court
of withdrawal by the petitioner and
creditor of his appeal from an adverse
decision of Judge Lowell, thus ending
the case in favor of the Board.
A Battle with tho in linns.
Washington, July 9.—The War
Department ha>i received to-day dis
patches confirming the accounts of a
battle with the Sioux Indians in Ne
braska. Lieutenant Young is reported
seriously WOUnded, Reports from
Captain Joseph Bush in the lower part
of Dakota, and from Captain Carlisle
Boyd at the Cheyenne Agency, state
that the Indians are in a warlike mood.
Col. John E. Smith, of the Fourteenth
Infantry, writes from Camp Robeson,
Nebraska, under date of June 22d,
that Indians recently arrived report
that large war parties are destined for
vorious parts of Nebraska. Gen. Rug
gles, Assistant Adjutant-General of
the Department of the Platte, in for
warding the dispatch, says the Depart
ment Commander has been notified of
the movements of these Indians, and
steps have been taken to intercept
them.
FOREIGN.
Japan ami China.
AMOT, June 9. —Japanese military
operations in Formosa have virtually
ended. China pays tlie expenses of
the expedition and guarantees the
safety of foreigners. Japan accepts
the airangement and retires.
SAN FRANCISCO.
llOHtriictlvc Fire — Severn! Buildings
I»o»<r«j'ed—Fire ill cm Suirocnteil nu<l
< nr. i<-. I Out by Their < 'ova pa v ions.
San Francisco, July 10. — A fire
broke out this morning in Allyne &
White's Pacific Oil and Kerosene
Works, corner California and Front
streets, and a disastrous conflagration
ensued. The building and those ad
joining are of corrugated iron and set
on piles. Tlie oil took lire and the
flames spread through the building
and basement with great rapidity.
Much of tlie stock was saved by the
firemen and volunteers. Schuftz &
Co.'s liquor store adjoining is de
stroyed; also R. Ch Gelein's cigar
manufactory, in the same building.
The fire is still burning, but is under
control. The aggregate loss will
amount to $33,000; insurance unknown.
Several firemen were suffocated, and
had to be carried away by their com
panions. None were seriously injured.
[second dispatch.]
J'lse Fire ExtiugrulMtied—l.o«ts Heavier
(ban ut I irsi Keportctl.
San Francisco, July 10.—The loss
by the lire to-day at the corner of
Front and California streets is estl
timated at $100,000. Allyne & White,
oil dealers, are the heaviest losers.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
After a Storm Comes a Cairn.
Anil after a good meal should come a good
cigar, It is a certain cure for indigestion. I
am always on hand to supply you with the
finest brands ofthe favorite weed.
L GOLDSMITH'S,
Main St., adjoining W. F. & Co.'s Express.
J 11-tf—3
Special Notice.
mRE HOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF LOS
_L Angeles county give notice that they
will be in session as a Board of Equalisation
on Wednesday, July 15th, IS7I, to hear com
plaints In regard to assessments, All parties
interested will act accordingly.
A. W. POTTS, Clerk.
Los Angeles, July 10th, 1871. jyll-td— 2
Paying Over 35 Per Cent, a Year.
A DAIRY BUSINESS FOR SALE, COX
sisting of 80 acres, situated one-half
nine outside Los Angeb s city limits, with im
provements thereon, four horses, two wagons,
thirty-Uve good dairy cows, with a good cash
paying milk route, etc. Price,«o,oOo.
For further particulars apply to
H. HAM MEL,
Jyil-lm— 2)4 U. S. Hotel.
Notice of Sale of Real Estate.
ADMINISTRATOR'S SALE OF REAL
Ksi'A'i E —Notice is hereby given, that
in pursuance of an order of the Probate
Court of the county of Los Augeles, State of
California, made on the iith day oi July, 1874,
In the matter of the estate of Pierre Richard,
deceased, the undersigned, the administrator
of the said estate, will sell at private sale, to
the highest bidder, for cash, gold coin of the
United States of America, and subject to con
firmation by said Probate Court, on Thurs
day, the ;ioth day of July, 1871, at 12 o'clock M.,
of said day, all the right, title, interest, and
i-late of the said Pierre Richard at the time
ot his death, and all the right, title, and in
terest that the said estate has, by operation of
laworotherw.se acquired other than, or In
a Idltlon to, that ofthe said Pierre Richard at
the time of his death, ln and to all that cer
tain lot, piece, or parcel of laud situate, lying
and being ih the el ty and county of i.os An
geles, state of <'ii 11 tornia, and bounded und
described as follows, to-wit:
Beginning on the north side of Spring street
at tin- southeastern corner oi tile lot •! Allen,
thence south fronting on said Spring street j |
feet 4 Inches to a point; thence westerly toN ew
High street; thence north along New High
street H feet 4 inches to said lot of Allen;
theme easloily along said lot h»Bpring street,
the point of commencement being No. ■ on
said Spring street.
The bids or oilers must be in writing, to be
left at the office of Stanford a Ramirez, Tem
ple lllock, Los Angeh s city, at any time after
thefl st publication of this notice and before
the making of thesule. F. LEMAIRK.
Administrator ofthe Estate of Pierre Rich
ard, dccc. sed.
UM Anieles, July 1 lib, |S7I. (vll-td 7
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.

THE SAN FRANCISCO
CIRCUS!
A N I) CO LIjECTION OF
PERFORMING ANIMALS!
Off A TOOK THROUGH CALIFORNIA,
•Her AH unpaialled NMM of one linn
dred ami twenty nights in snn Praneincojwlll
exhibit a* lhe«>l.l » Ire at (>roiiiuN,
Cor. New High and Temple Sts.
Commencing on
KIMDA v. JULY l?ni.
Atul will remain for a few niohts o.vi.t.
Matinee on Saturday Afternoon.
The Management oi this stupendous Aggre
gu lon takes pride in preeentllljt lo the public
th" io I lowing br ll le lit array orunepproaoha
ble performer*, Highly Trained Horses, Per
fartnlni Goats, and Hie wonderful
PERFORMING ELEPHANT.
PRINCESS Moi^E,
3t years 01d,43 inches high, Weighs TS!i pounds
—tne entallest elephant In the world—win be
introduced at each exhibition, by his trainer.
SEVENTEEN STAR PERFORMERS
LKU BY
Miss Katie Holloway,
The Great Equestrian and Manage Artlite.
Q-eorge Holland,
Champion Somersault Rider, late of CliUui
ni's circus,
Mile. Laura,
The o,ue< n of I he Air;
flawy < 'lorli,
The Celebrated Gymnast, or" Tho Man with
the Iron .law;"
Master .A-leco,
The renowned Peruvian Indian,ln his great
Bare-back-, Trick, Hurdle and Grotesque Arts,
from J. it. Hudson's North and South Aiuer
can Circus.
Wm. Warner,
The popular Musical and Talking Cl WDJ
Jlons. ITnproz,
Champion Dare-Devil Rider;
(ieoi'se Shyrocli,
The wonderful Gymnast and Tumbler:
The Sejrrina Uros,
The celebrated Acrobats; together wilh
Messrs. DODGE. ROGERS, SPALDING,
NOKTH and SMITH in their specialties.
Beautiful Stud of Trained Horses
and Ponies.
Tho advent of the Ctrous will bo heralded in
each place of Exhibition by Prof.
Chas. J. Schlppert'g
CORNET BAND,
Conveyed through the streets in the nev.- and
most elegant Band Chariot ever on the coast.
ADMISSION $1 | CHILDREN 50 cts.
Doors open nt 7 o'clock; performance to com
jyli inencoatS. st-12
Notice of Intention.
ALAMEDA STREET.—Notice Is hereby
given that the Common council ofthe
ouwot Los Angeles Intend to grade aud estab
lish the width of Alameda street as follows,
as perresolutlon passed and adopted May 21st,
1*74:
That Alameda street from Its Junction with
Main to Aliso street shall have a uniform
width of ninety-six feet, and from Aliso street
to First street sliall be of, and have a uniform
width of eighty feet, nnd the whole thereof
from Main to First street shall be graded and
improved in tlie following manner, to wit:
A redwood curbing .'ixl2 Inches shall be laid
down on both sides ofthe street; this curb
lug shall be spiked to lxl-.neh square red
wood posts, said posts to be feet long and
set In tbe ground two feet below the bottom
of the curbing, and on the Inside ol the curb
ing.
The sidewalks on either side of the street,
shall be 12 feet wide, and shall be made of
ground filled up to the top Of the c urbing, and
shall conform to the grade of the street.
The roadbed shall have "> Inches of g.'avel
on the top of the street when it is raised up to
the grade; the filling necessary to be done,
can be done with any kind of earth up to the
level.. Inches below the grade of tne road,
from this level the graveling shall begin.
The Bide Slope of the roadbed shall be' one
foot to thirty feet, the surface of the street be
ing ten Inches below tho topof the curbing at
I he sidewalk.
By order of the Common Council.
M. KREMER,
Clerk of Common Council.
Jyii-iu
Notice of Intention.
SECOND AND OLIVE STREETS.—Notice
is hereby itiven, that the Common Coun
cil ofthe city of Los Angeles, intend to grade
Second street, from the crossing of Second
and Fort streets, to the westerly line of olive
Street; also to grade Olive street from Sec
ond to Fifth street, as follows:
That the crossing of Second and Fort sheets
shall be 35 feet above the datem plane of
levels as now established in this city, accord
ing to the grade map now on Hie, in the office
ofthe Mayor and Common Council ofthe
city Of*LoS Angeles.
The crossing of Second and Hill streets
shall be 45 feet, aud the crossing of Second
and Olive streets shall be TS feet, and the
crossing of Third and Olive streets sliall be
1.111 feet, and the crossing of ( Hive and Fourth
stieets sliall be 02 feel, and the crossing of
Fifth and Olive streets shall be 12 feet above
tlie datem plane before mentioned.
That tbe distance to lit graded on Second
street, from its crossing with Fort street to the
westerly line of Olive street isS'iO feel includ
ing the crossing of Hill nnd Second streets,
and that the distance to be graded on Olive
street from second to Fifth street is 1,920 feet,
Inouldlng tbe crossings of Third and Fourth
streets.
Tbe above named streets shall be graded to
a width of sixty feet, and shall conform to the
crossings of street levels before mentioned;
theslope of the streets shall be straight and
uniform between the different sheets, and
shall be one foot higher In tbe center of
the street than at cither side Ofthe gutter.
By order Of tbe Common Council.
M. KHK.MF.It,
Clerk of Common Council,
jyll-iot
Notice of Intention.
rpEMFLE STREET.—Notice is hereby given
_1_ that the Oemmon Council of the oily of
Goe Angeles, Intend to grade Temple street
from Fort street to Hunker Hill Avenue, as
follows: The official grade of Temple street
from the point of Intersection with Fort street
to the central point of its intersection with
Hunker Hill Avenue sliall be the uniform
rise of one fool to every twenty-two feet.
Hy orderol the Common Council.
M. KRAMER,
Clerk rf Common Council.
Resolution passed .May 20th, 1871.
Jyll-lOt
NEW YORK BAKERY,
MAIN STREET, BELOW THIRD.
ALL KINDS OP
BREAD,
CAKES,
PIES,
CRACKERS,
And PASTE RY k«T>t constantly on hand.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty.
Delivery to any part of the city. — |
my6-tf BUKHARD & EItTNUER.
CjJ ood Chanoe.
FOH SALE—A LARGE LOT OF NEW
Wagons of every description at VERY
LuW PRICES. Apply at AI,ISO SHOP.
my2l-3a it. ukasd.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
PIANOS
O li /V Jj B
In Easy Installments.
Large Discount for Cash
HALLET, DAVIS & CO S
OF BOSTON,
Are tlie best e&d cheapest Instruments now
In use on Ibis Ooasl.
following parties have purchased
them in this city, ami we refer to I hem, with
their consent:
HON. M. MORRIS,
l>. V. WALDRON, Ks«.,
SAMUEL PRAGER, Esq.,
L. 11. TITUS, Esq.,
W. F. EDGAR, Esu.,
W. WILSON, Ksq.,
W. WOODWOHTH, Esq.,
11. C. AUSTIN, EM.,
It. PICO, Esq.
WM. G. BADGER. San Francisco.
7 and 1) Sansome street,
SOLE AGENT OF THE PACIFIC
< OAST.
I. E. COHN,
Ofllce at Han Is A- .lacoby's Cash Btore, Main
Jytltf street. —12^
Santa Barbara College,
SANTA BARBARA, CAL.
A BOARDING SCHOOL FOR BOYS
AND GIRLS,
OffeMng all the advantages of a thorough
modern education.
Prof. c. v. iiopkins Principal
Miss E. C. HATCH Vie. Principal
Tho Natural Sciences, French,
Cerman, Spanish, Latin, Creek,
Drawing, Gymnastics and
Dancing
Taught Without extra charge.
Vocal and instrumental Music
RECEIVE PARTICULAR ATTENTION.
milE FIRST TWENTY WEEKS' SES
_l_ si,in of the scholastic your, IS7I-75,com
mences August :id ami ends Decern be, lsrh.
Tin'second session commences January lull
and ends May 2H.
The points In which Santa Barbara College
differs trom most other educational institu
tions are as follows:
1. Special attention Is given to Physical Cul
ture. In connection with the institution is a
tine gymnasium, fitted up With nil tho appar
atus necessary for practising both light and
heavy gymnastics.
2. Modern languages receive special atten
tion. Those desiring will have constant op
poi t unity to converse in French,< lei man ami
Spanish. •
8. Analytical Chemistry and Mineralogy
will be practlcully taught by tbe Principal.
4. The Institution Is not of a sectarian char
acter, and is governed by a Hoard of Directors
of eleven ofthe most prominent citizens.
5. Hooks and stationery arc furnished to ull
the pupils free of expense. Pupils, in addi
tion to their ordinary wearing apparel, fur
nish only a pair of blankets.
ti Each pupil will have a separate sleeping
room, well ventilated and lighted.
ELL WOOD COOPER,
Pre Ident Board of Directors.
G. P. TEnBETTS. Secretary.
BBs~Por further particulars, write for cata
logues. jy7 Iw
NOTICE.
THE SAN PEDRO IRRIGATING COM
pany, principal place of business being
Compton, Los Angeles county, State ef Cali
fornia, Notice—There is delinquent upon tlie
following described stock, on account of as
sessment levied on the 23d day of May, 1874,
Ibe several amounts set opposite tbe names
of the respective shareholders, us follows:
V. «■ 'J.
John (1. Ilalln on 1 1 jt .", Ht
A. M. Hough « i Ull
Alfred Highie 1.", 1 24 K1
Geo. W. Flood 10 l |5 83
John W. < lames SO 1 2 88
Harry Smith !M 1 45 til)
J. H. Vasburg 27 1 24 61
Ht'ii. Howard jJB 1 40 oo
And lv accordance wilh the law, and an or
der ofthe Hoard of Directors, made on the 33d
day of May, 1874, so many shares of each par
cel of such stock as may be necessary will be
sold at the otlice of the Secretary of said cor
poration, in Compton. said county and Stale,
on the 20th day of July, 1*74, between the
hours of 0 o'clock A. M. and 5 o'clock P. M. of
said day, to pay delinquent assessments I here
on, together with costs of advertising and ex
penses Of Hie .i ||p,
C. W. TWISS, Secretary.
Compton, Los Angeles county, State of Call
ifornia, July ;:, 1874. Jy-S )Ut—B
E. E. kishek. 1,, w. THATCHER.
FISHER & THATCHER
FORMERLY
E. E. FISHER & CO.
Wo niako specialties of fine Watches, Jew
elry. Diamonds, Silverware, Clocks, specla
cles, eic. We make aIT kinds of solid "gold
jewelry, set diamonds, enameling In all col.
<irs, gliding, cngruvdng Tn ever st> je <. fTi j curb"
Etruscan Jewelry made and
or recolorcd. Solid gold chains mode to or
der. Old chains repaired and rf colored to look
like new. All kinds of watch work made
from a screw to a perfectly adjusted watch
Prices lower than Ihe lowest, for qua Thy of
goods and win k.
FISHK It A THATCH F.H.
Jyl tf—fi Manufacturers, 07. Main St,
Dissolution of Partnership.
Tin: PARTNERSHIP HERETOFORE
existing under the name and style of
PHIL, LA 1 TH it CO., is this day dissolve!
by mutual consent, Louis Sobwari retiring
therefrom. The business will be continued
by PHILIP LAUTH and FRITZ MEN/, un
der Un- name ot i'liil. Lauth A Co., at the old
Ni w oik Brewery,
Loi Angeles, July li. 1K74. JyS-4w "i
A GREAT BARGAIN.
100 ' 1; " vl: vlt OI " ORANGE
TREES FOR SALE AT NEVENTV-ITVE
CENTS EACH. AUdie.s Bag Gul, Los Au
geles P. O. Jys-lw--2
MISCELLANEOUS ADVERTISEMENTS.
\g .* s;. 11. . Oo n x,
JJAS JUST RECEIVED A FINE ASSORTMENT OF
HAIR, HAHI ISIJAII>*.
Ladies' and Childrens' Underwear and Fancy Millinery Goods.
Clonks Mini 9 )n»swos
MADE TO ORDER AT THE LOWEST PRICE AND IN THE LATRST
STYLE. WARRANTED TO PLEASE.
km Km, il. COtm Mf. Hprlat Had Te»ple »ts U E
WITTELSHOEFER & RAPHAEL
(FORMERLY. ('. RAPHAEL AND CO.).
HELENA STREET, OPPOSITE TJ. S. HOTEL
DEALEUH lIN
I*3) illt>i.
Oili,
XltMlsliOfii* and
Looking-glass Plates, Wainut, Rosewood and
Gilt Mouldings of all Styles and Sizes.
PICTURES FRAMED AT SHORTEST NOTICE & AT LOWEST RATES
A(JKNTS FOR THE "
California Chemical Paint Company.
LIUEKAE INDUCEMENTS OFFERED
TO niySuin 10
PAINTERS AND COUNTRY DEALERS.
C IST ID ( ) IST ZEE OTE Z_j,
Bfoitt Street, jLiOM A iifc»-<*I«»H.
A First-class House - - J. A. BROWN. Proprietor.
TH EC SLiKK E» I TS" H A3P VKXMIO JM T SS
Are large and well Ventilated, uud in tin; bent possible condition.
THE TABLE ALWAYS SUPPLIED WITH THE BEST OF THE MARKET.
No expense will be spared 'o make the Hotel equal to any on tbe Coast, t.20-tr—
CLOSING OUT SALE!
A I
THE CAPITOL
OK
SUMMER GOODS
At the lowest rates in tho present market t<
make room fur an extensive siock of
Fall and Winter Goods
Soon to arrive direct from New York, whl.l
we will also offfer to tbe public at very icasor,
able rales, wholesale and retail.
H>fisV GOODS,
FANCY GOODS,
CLOTHING,
Gents' Furnishing Goods
HATS AND CAPS,
BOOTS & SHOES,
YOUTHS', BOYS & CHILDRENS
CLOTHING,
MADE lIP IN THE LATEST STYLE.
also
0A T * 1* E? r JT J**
Avi»«l Oil-Olotliw.
OV ALL OMCRIFTIOXg,
Wblob will be ottered to the public at
Lower Rates than the Lowest,
The public are cordially Invited to attend and
examine our Immense stock
— AT —
THE CAPITOL,
Hr»rcipsro street
Nearly Opposite tho Postoffice
M. EDWARDS. M. HOFF.
' angj .im— -,o\
EVERYBODY WANTS ONE OF THOSE
Emerson Pianos.
HAVING RETURNED TO Til IS CITY,
I now resume mv business, heretofore
conducted by j. d. Patrick, and havelusl or
dered a fresh Installmi nt ofthose
SPLENDID INSTRUMENTS,
(if which there has been more sold within tbe
ast six months in Ibis city than of all others
put togel her, AI so
Dunham & Decker Pianos, and Estey
and Mason & Hamlin Organs
For sale on ejuy Installments, Pianos and
Org&ns for rent GEO. A. ARMSTRONG,
At Photographic Parlors,Downey Block,
Jlyaim—.l
«T. J. REYNOLD'S
PIONEER MACK LINE.
CLARENDON HOTEL.
Contracts for Hacks. Harouches, Carriages,
1 'oaehes.etc., fo Weddings, llcules, Rullsaud
Funerals, Nono but careful drivers em
ployed. jiy-nr-2
IT R >I 383 T* N
OBSERVE THE
CALIFORNIA HARROW
MANUFACTURED BY
Kimball Manufacturing Co.,
OF SAN FRANCISCO.
rplll-: HARROW OFFERS GREAT IX
-1 ducements to the former over all others.
The faculty with which it can bo conducted
from one to another Held; the .saving of labor
over tlie f)bl method of Walking alter; the way
it can be regulated, to work deep or shallow;
lis adaptability to Irregular surface ofthe soil;
tlie division of teeth, whereby space is divided
by t l ._, inches, thus working over tbe surface;
with the thorough material and workman
• ship, render it next to perfect.
Tillers of the soil, one and all, will phase
call and see for themselves, orders made in
i advance will lessen the cost. The deliver}
; will be made to meet tin' wishes of subscrlb
; ers. for any further information, apply to
I the undersigned.
T I t S3
EAGLE HAY PRESS
KIMBALL MANUFACTURING CO.
Sole Proprietors of California
I The cheapest, quickest, most satisfactory
Hay Press extant. Only nve to eight seconds
I required to press the bay. Requires no stak
'■ imr. Set 'em level and go ahead.
Over tlve hundred of these presses are In
j use on this coast. They give complete satls
' faction. Three men. with a pair of horses,
press easily
80 TO 100 BALES DAILY.
Every farmer should have one, and bale hi.
bay, when time serves best.
TIME I>-4 MONEY.
ArPLY TO
&. I I>EWEY,
Agent for the Company,
Stoddard's, No. 78 Main St.
Hoffman and Hudson River
Rcsendale Cement
In lols of m barrels and upwards, for sale.
Juutf — U
I
LOS ANGELES COUNTY
SAVINGS BANK
MAIN STREET,
I-or* -Aiijgxilejs, C«l.
CAPITAL STOCK, :::::: $300,000
PBSSISEKT I. S. SLAUSON
VICK-pBEBt»ENT J. M. GRIFFITH
DIBECTOMI
J. 8. f-LMsON, .). tt. GRIFFITH,
V. A. HOOVER, ROBERT 8. BAKER,
•l. HiXBY, H. B. TIOHENOR,
GEORGE K. DODGE.
Open for business font 10 a. m. till .1 r. ii.,
and .Saturday evenings from tilutf o'clock.
Deposits received In any amounts.
Honey to loan on real estate 1 in amounts
and for length of time desired.
jiviMf-a
FARMERS' AND MERCHANTS'
BANK,
OF ANGELEIS.
rTiHgj FARMKRV AND MERCHANTS'
J_ .auk in Los Angeles n moved to their
.\. w Bulhllng, adjoining the Lafayette Hotel,
on .Monday, ihe j.,n, ,„ Bt . '
JOHN (i. DuWNKV, Frcsldent.
isAtA-j W. iii-.i.i.uAN, Cashier. Joiatf—3%

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