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Los Angeles daily herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1873-1876, October 28, 1874, Image 2

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CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIAL PAPER.
WEDNESDAY OCT. 28, 1874.
At St. John's Presbyterian Fair,
held in San Francisco lately, the vis
itors voted on which was the most
popular newspaper In the city. At
last accounts the Examinrr and Alia
lod and were nearly even. The CAron
icle stood third and last, while neither
the Bulletin, Call nor Post were en
tered in the list.
Once more, and for the fortieth time,
Hon. Chas. E. DeLono announces
from the stump that he has not with
drawn from the Senatorial canvass of
Nevada. He affects to believe that
something—a thunderbolt, an earth
quake, or a Providential visitation in
some other shape —will defeat Shar
on. Charlie's hope is fallacious—a
Will of the wisp. The only show to
defeat Sharon is to elect a Democratic
majority in the Legislature, and even
then the majority must be men blind
to the glitter of gold, or honest old
William will make them see virtues
in him that his recording angel never
dreamed of.
Those of our visitors who had occa
sion to pass along or across Main
street any time during yesterday, will
form very curious ideas concerning
the remonstrance of certain property
holders, in which it was set forth that
the street was in as good order as it
could be placed. After the rain of
Monday night, Main street was in a
deplorable condition for traveling pur
poses. The mud was deep — deep
enough for any purpose—but its con
sistency was not all that was desira
ble. It was too thick for boats and
too thin for wheeled vehicles. A stout
man with high-topped boots could
ford the thoroughfare if he was careful
to keep on the riffles, but for women
and children, or even weak men, to
attempt the passage was simply to
tempt Providence ; yet when the
Council propose to improve the street
the property - holders solemnly aver
that it is in as good condition as it is
possible the place It.
Party Mud Slingers.
If the Granger is compelled to de- j
cide for which party's candidate he
will vote from information obtained
through reading the'partizan papers,
he will have great difficulty In deter
mining which ticket is most deserving
of his support. The argument for and
against is one of crimination and re
crimination—of the kettle's denuncia
tion of the pot's color. The Republi
can journals aver that whatever is
wrong is made no by tlie
and the Democratic papers fill their
columns with the exclamation "Thou
canst not say we did it; we were not
in authority." The Republicans re
spond that the Democrats would have
shown no cleaner hands than they,
had the opportunity for plunder, mal
fesance and other ugly business pre
sented itself. It seems to be a case of
"your another," and if the facts are
ever reached it will not be accom
plished through light shed by party
organs. The Granger is not, however,
so easily duped as party leaders would
have us think. In this State the par
ty record is a book within the reach of
all, and the chronicles are so legibly
written that all may read and under
stand. The leaders may denounce
each other and the organs may charge
aud deny but all will not suffice. The
honest voter has learned to read and
think for himself. Men—especially
the laboring men—have reached that
stage in the scale of political progres
sion when they will no longer accept
as fact the unsustained assertion of a
political leader or a partizan journal.
They have learned the importance of
demanding the proof and if it is not
forthcoming from the party organ,they
will satisfy themselves by applying to
the independent journal, which they
know speaks of party and candidates
as it finds them, influenced by interest
and unbiased by prejudice. With
this source of information within his
reach the Granger will turn from the
partizan pleading and cast his vote
for candidates that are honest and ca
pable, recking little on which ticket
their names appear.
The Farmer and the Ring.
The failure of Morgan's Sons, the
accredited shipping agents of the
Grangers, seems to be a matter for ex
ultation on the part of that portion of
the press which has never been able to
see anything good In the Grange
movement, aud there are not a few of
those sapient gentlemen who are cry
ing out " I told you so!" We have no
disposition to argue the right or wrong
of the policy adopted by the Arm that
has just found itself compelled to sus
pend business. A glance at the case
inclines us to the opinion that the
house of Morgan's Sons fell into an
ambush laid for it by the wily old
wheat ring managers, who would wil
lingly spend a few million dollars to
break up the system of protection
guaranteed the fanner through the
Grange organization. The Grange
Agency secured a large amount of ton
nage at figures which would have been
considered reasonable under the ton
nage monopoly. This contract system
seems to have been the only weak and
assailable point in the programme,
and circumstances conspired to make
the attack on this point very efleetive.
The ring had also secured a large
amount of tonnage, which at the rates
they intended to charge they could not
use, for the reason that they could not
obtain the wheat to load it. Their
plans were soon laid. They held their
own tonnage and waited until the
Grange agents had contracted for all
the tonnage to be secured. They then
reduced the rate of the tonnage under
their control below the price at which
Morgan's sons had contracted to pay
ami commenced loading with wheat
purchased at the price demanded by
the farmers. This bit of strategy ena
bled them to deliver wheat in Liver
pool at a less figure than Moroan's
SOll9 could afford under their tonnage
contract. It was a clear case of over
reach, and the pains and expense to
which the ring went to accomplish
their purpose only proves how anxious
they were to destroy a system which
completely broke up their old monop
oly and prevented the continuance of
a business by which they were realiz
ing millions at the expense of the
farmer. If, as is claimed by some of
the monopoly organs, the Grange did
not interfere with the purchase and
profit of the ring dealers, it seems a bit
of absurdity on their part to incur the
expense and trouble they have to break
up the Grange agency by bankrupting
the house of Morgan's Sons. We are
told in a tone and spirit of rejoicing
that the farmers have lost heavily
through the failure of their wheat
agents. What is the aggregate of their
loss we are not informed, and will con
cede that it is a large amount, but
large as it is, we do not believe it will
foot up one quarter of the sum they
would have been swindled out of had
the ring been permitted to carry out
their hitherto successful programme
of purchasing the wheat at their own
price. A new line of argument re
cently adopted by the ring journals is
the ringing of changes on the word
"merchant" with the evident inten
tion ol'creating an impression in the
minds of the public that the merchant
is the "middleman against whom
the Grange is protecting the farmer.
This would be a shrewd dodge, were it
not so transparent that it will not de
ceive a single well informed man. The
Grange does not fight the merchant.
Its warfare is with the ring and its
agents, which are the real middlemen.
We cannot discover the force of the
argument against the Grange which
some of our contemporaries affect to
see in the failure of the house of Mor
gan's Sons.
Orange Culture In Los Angeles County.
Editor Herald: Some three or
four years ago I was requested by a
gentleman resident of this city, to
answer a letter Which he had received
from a native of Los Angeles county,
then a student at the Santa Clara Col
lege, to whom application had been
made for information respecting the
culture of the orange in this county.
The letter contained v number of in
terrogatories which will in some re
spects account for the form and char
acter of the answer. A copy of the
answer was at the time furnished the
editor of the Star and published in
that paper, but as there are at this
time many persons engaging in the
cultivation of the orange who were
not residents of this county at that
time, and who may not have read it,
aud as it has been suggested to me
that its re-publication might be accept
able to many of your readers, 1 have
revised and re-written it, and it is at
your service if you think it worth
printing in the Herald.
J. J. "Warner.
The orange tree in respect to the
food which it obtains from the earth is
a coarse feeder. It thrives well in a
soil of vegetable mold, in micaceous
and granite sands containing alkali
(natron) aud but little clay or vegeta
ble mold in gravelly clay and volcan
ic soils. In respect to soil its chief
requisites are warmth, friability and
moistness. It does not flourish" in a
wet cold soil, but in a dry soil it can
not be irrigated to excess if the soil is
kept loose and friable.
While not readily aii'ected by the
constituents of the soil traversed by
its roots, the orange tree is extremely
sensitive respecting the state and con
dition of the atmosphere which sur
rounds its limbs and foliage. A warm
and serene atmosphere is its delight.
It is propagated from seed. The
orange trees of this county are mostly
seedlings They are a long lived tree.
They commence bearing when eight
or ten years old. The oldest orchard
in California is at San Gabriel. It has
been in bearing more than fifty years,
and the trees are still vigorous and
fruitful, although they have not re
ceived the best of treatment. From
where the trees or seeds of that orch
ard came I am ignorant, although, as
the orchard was planted by Spanish
Roman Catholic Missionaries, who
came from Mexico through Peninsular
California, which has been occupied
by Jesuit Missionaries for many
years previously, it is probable that
the seeds were brought from Lower
California. They might, however,
have been brought from some one of
the Mexican ports on the main. A
large proportion of the orange trees of
this county have been propagated
from seeds from the San Gabriel
orchard.
There has been some importation of
trees from the coasts of Mexico and
Central America, and of seeds from
the Society and other Islands of the
Pacific, but I am not aware of any no
table difference in the product of these
trees from such a variety and wide
apart sources. Within the past few
years some few trees have been intro
duced from China and Japan of a dif
ferent variety.
The seed is sown ami the trees culti
vated in nurseries until they are from
two to four years old, when they are
transplanted into the orchard. They
can be removed from the nursery and
planted out at all seasons of the year,
but the early part of Summer, after
the ground has acquired a goed degree
of warmth, is, whether correctly or
not,most generally considered by those
who have had the most experience the
preferable season. Thirty feet apart
is a common distance for planting the
trees. It is the opinion of some per
sons that the trees should be forty feet
apart in order to permit the rays of
the sun to have free and direct access
to the ground, which they can have
only in a limited degree after the trees
are grown, if planted only thirty feet i
asunder. As the trees will grow and
flourish and bear as abundantly for a
number of years at a less distance than
thirty feet, it might be both economi
cal and profitable, If the trees for
planting are not too costly, to plant
the trees only twenty feet apart, and
subsequently as they grow and over
shade the ground, remove one-half of
the trees and make a new orchard, or
sell them, as might be most desirable.
With care, orange trees can be suc
cessfully taken up and carried a con
siderable distance and replanted, ufter
they have come into bearing, without
a loss of more than two crops.
In transplanting from the nursery,
where, to force the rapid growth In
height of the young tree without re
gard to the girth of the bole, they are
cultivated in such close proximity that
neither lateral branches or roots can
grow, the tap or vertical roots should
not be cut or broken, and the hole in
which they are to be planted should
be deep enough to admit these roots in
their former or natural perpendicular
condition. The lateral roots should
not be deeply buried, but should be
near the surface, so as to receive the
heat communicated to the soil by the
sun.
With regard to the season of the i
yearforthe transplanting of the orange
tree with the least check to its growth,
there are reasons for doubting the
more prevalent practice of transplant
ing late in the Spring or in the early
part of the Summer, The best time for
transplanting the orange, as well as
other trees, being when the trees are
at rest, or in that condition most nearly
approaching a state of inactivity.
While the circulation of the sap is the
least active, and when it is descend
ing rather than when the ascending
current predominates. The roots of a
tree cannot be separated from the soil
without destroying a large number of
their spongioles,and the damage sus
tained by a tree in the process of trans
planting, is in proportion to the num
ber of spongioles it loses in the opera
tion. If a tree is taken up when it is
at rest, when the circulation of the
sap, if not suppressed, is languid and
the flow to the roots predominates, the
loss of the spongioles will be less hurt
ful, and new ones will be soon formed
by the descending sap; while if, on
the other hand, the tree is torn from
the ground when the spongioles are
strained to their utmost capabilities
by the heavy and constant draft made
Oil them by the leaves, every pore of
which is distended in the work of ab
sorption and exhalation, and while
the upward flow is largely in excess of
the downward flow, and the sap pro
viders suddenly diminished in num
ber, their connection with the source
from which their supplies are derived
severed, the tree must receive a shock
from which every part of the organic
system must suffer, and great exhaus
tion of the tree will ensue before the
supremacy of the downward flow can
be secured and new rootlet9with their
spongioles formed and its connections
with the soil re-established, so as to
furnish a sufficient supply of sap for
its laboratories.
It is not improbable that prac
tical orange culturist9 may have
reached an erroneous conclusion
as to the best time for replanting from
an error in their mode of planting out
an orchard. It is not unusual in the
replanting of a tree to plant the roots
much deeper in the ground than they
originally grew. If an orange tree,
the roots of which require, in this lat
itude, all the heat they can obtain
from the sun, should be taken up in
the fall or Winter season, and instead
of being replanted at the same depth
in the soil which it previously occu
pied, should be buried much deeper, so
that the roots received no warmth
from the sun during the Winter and
not until the heat of the Summer's
sun had penetrated the soil down to
where they had lain buried in the cold
for so long a period, it would not be
surprising if the tree should suffer
more by the operation than if it had
i eemained in its original position until
the soil in which it is destined to have
its roots buried had acquired some
warmth from the late Spring and
early Summer 9un.
fTo be concluded to-morrow.]
Mutual Aid Election.
The annual meetingof the Southern
California Mutual Aid Association
was held yesterday when the follow
ing new Board of Directors was elect
ed: Thos. A. Garey, J. G. McCoinas,
Geo. G. Gibbs, L. M. Holt, Rev. C.
Grindley, of Anaheim; Dr. Geo. W.
Wolfe, of Los Nietos; I. S. Smith, Prof.
C. A. Storke, of Santa Barbara; Dr.
Ed. A. Preuss, Dr. J. H. McKee and
Milton Thomas. The Board met in
the afternoon and elected the follow
ing officers:
President—J. H. MeComas,ol'('omp
ton.
Vice President—Geo. C. Gibbs, of
San Gabriel Mission.
Secretary—L. M. Holt, of Los An
geles.
Treasurer—J. H. Gray, of El Monte.
Finance Committee — Thos. A.
Garey, Geo. C. Gibbs and I. S. Smith.
Executive Committee—Dr. J. H.
McKee, Ed. A. Preuss and Dr. J. W.
Wolfe.
The annual statement made by the
Secretary showed a very healthy
state of finances aud gave very general
satisfaction. Over fifty applications
were acted upon and other important
business transacted. The annual
.statement and Secretary's report will
l>e published to-morrow.
Merced Theatre.
A full house assembled to witness
the second appearance of the Florence
Kent Troupe at Merced Theatre last
night. The play presented was Uncle
Tom's Cabin, the part of Eva played
l>y little Miss Lulu Wilson and
the other parts well sustained by
Florence Kent and tho full company.
To-night will be presented for the first
time in Los Angeles the comedy in
three acts entitled " Caste," and on
Saturday afternoon a matinee will be
given. This company is constantly
increasing in favor with our theatre
goers, and full audiences may be "ex
pected during the rest of the engage
ment.
The following is a list of officers
elected at the last regular meeting of
Los Angeles Grange, No. 26, for the
ensuing year: Master, Thos. A. Garey,
re-elected; Overseer, J. Q. A. Stanley,
re-elected; Lecturer, J. S. Thompson,
re-elected; Steward, N. S.Montague;
Chaplain, J. M. Stewart; Treasurer, C.
H. Hass, re-elected; Secretary, S. A.
Waldron, re-elected; Gate - Keeper,
Mathias Dalton; Ceres, Mrs. Stanley,
re-elected; Pomona, Miss Bella Lewis;
Flora, Miss Graves; Lady Assistant
Steward, Mrs. C. H. Hass, re-elected.
Rev. John Marquis of Westminster
brought to our office yesterday two
mammoth sweet potatoes, grown upon
a single vine, the two weighing
IL'J pounds. They are of the Burmuda
variety, smooth, with light yellow
skins.
The Sacramento Bee of the 23d Inst,
says: '' The train from the East came
to-day with twelve, and left for the
West with thirteen cars. There were
two baggage cars, showing that the
people bring their baggage with them
to a considerable extent.
BORN.
rLRIHRMAN.—Sunday, tictobar 251h, to the
wife of H. Fleiehroan, a *>n.
NEW TO-DAY.
The Races—Admission Free
To the stand where I he finest Cigars and To
bacco can be had. 1h o ( Hist received a fresh
supply of Imported Cigars. Havanas two for
25 cc its, and everything of the best quality.
Don't forget to stop before going to the track,
us there Is no fun without a good cigar such
as can be had at I. GOLDSMITH'S,
Main St., next to W. F. A Co.'s Express.
The latest Illustrated Papers always on
hand.
LOST.- A GOLD KEY STONE with the
following inscription: Solomon Cahen,
Los Angeles Chapter, No. 23. The finder will
be suitably rewarded by leaving same nt the
store Important. oct2su
Strayed—slo Reward.
A RAY MARK, branded with a figure S,
attached to ■ light spring wagon, ran
away from the I'air grounds Monday after
no in. I will pay n reward ofSlO for the return
nt same to the Puny Siahles, or to Ferguson A
Metzker's. PAUL SCHILLER,
oc 128-2t
HUMAN HAIR.
1\ HAYS
Respectful I v calls the intention of the En
dies of this City t<i the tad that he is prepared
to supply them With
Switches,
Braids,
Curls,
Frizzettes.
ami every aitlcle in
H U >1 A IN II A 1 is.
Ladies' own hair manufactured at the short
est uotest, and at
San SVaneiatoo T-i»t«'«.
43 Main street.
OOtOB I'
WANTED. -A FURNISHED ROOM IN
a private family, by a single gentleman.
Address, stating terms and when the room
may be seen, Box 214. Postoffloe. oet27-6tt
"VTOTICR.-BIDB WILL BE RICEIVED to
excavate 2,300 cubic yards of earth.
Apply to P. BEAU DRY.
octestr
RanchoFor Sale.
FINE FARMING AND GRAZING LAN D,
22,000 acres, *7 5(1 per acre. Address Box
IKS, Los Angeles I'ostorflce. oct24-2w*
Call on C. H. BUSH when you
want to buy a Seth Thomas Clock.
PIANO WAREROOMS,
Curner Main nntl Neeoutl Nls.
Don't buy a Piano until you have
seen
AVIS'
SQUARE GRAND PIANO
The one that took the
F 1 RS T T» R IZ E
At the State Fair In ISM. Also the New York,
now exhibiting at the Rink.
A. H. HAVELL.
001271 f
MERCED THEATRE!!
LESSEE aud \
M ANAGERESS, j MISS FLORENCE KENT
COMMENCING
Monday Evening, Oct. 26th
And continuing
Every Evening During the Fair!
GRAND STAR ALLIANCE!!
MISS FLORENCE KENT!
MISS LULU WILSON!
(The child Wonder',
Supported by the following Artists:
MB. L. K. HOWAUD,
MR. LOUIS BEI.MOUR,
MR. GEUIt'JE BIRD,
MR. J. McISAAOS.
MR, B. DUNNING,
MR. G. W. LEE.
MISS KITTIE JORDAN,
MISS N. ROBINSON,
MISS B. WILSON,
MISS E. DENIN.
WONDERFUL ATTRACTION !!
Dora, Romeo and Juliet, Lady
of Lyons, Caste, Jack Shep
pard, French Spy, Dick Tur
pin and Tom King. Uncle Tom's
Cabin. Rough Diamond, Day
After the Wedding and Mr. and
Mrs. Peter White.
>vDMISSION :
DRESS CIRCLE 91. | GALLERY .00 cts.
Reserved Seats without extra chatge, can be
secured at Btodriek"s Bookstore.
CHANCE OF BILL EVERY NICHT,
oct2t-lw
g rXnd bXITITT
OF THE
Southern District Agricultural
SOCIETY!
/ t TURN-VEREIN HALL,
Wednesday Evening, Oct. 28th.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
Dr .1 S Griffin, Gov J G Downev,
L J Rose, Frank Sabichl,
Judge Sepulveda, E F de Celis,
John Jones, Wm Werkman,
i ton Btoneinan, T D Mott,
F F F Temple, Judge O'Melvenv,
Herman \V Hellman, F A MacDougull*.
CoIBC Whiting, HFSlauson,
Don Pio l'ieo, J deßShorb,
Hon Wm A Conn, Jarrett T Richards,
Cant Geo A Johnston, F P Forster,
P Beaudiy, J M Greaves,
Johu Wilson, Win Ferguson.
RECEPTION COMMITTEE.
Albert J Johnston, Aaron Smith,
Gov Downev, Hen C Truman,
Geo A Tillaiiy, T W Temple.
FLOOR COMMITTEE.
\V R Rowland, C Prager,
T E Rowan, Wm J Brodrlck,
II T Hazard, J J Melius.
MUSIC by I'IKPENHEHO'S
FULL
lli-mmm nnd String; Uand.
DANCING TO COMMENCE AT 9 O'CLOCK.
AiuUslon, including- Cieutleman
and I,ailles SHOD
oct24-td
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
CITY OF PARIS!!
GRAND OPENING
-or turn—
FALL SEASON,
Monday, October 12. 74.
Eugene Meyer & Co,,
51&53 Main Street
win optn Their
NEW AND ELEGANT
stock or
Fall and Winter Goods!
NEW STYLES
O F
DRESS GOODS:
Cashmere de Bagdad,
Serges,
Diagonals,
Vigognes,
Camel-Hair Cloths,
G l-iamillciN.
PonclieeN'
Black and Colored Silks
In all Qualities and Shades.
PARTICULAR ATTENTION Is called to
this line of good;., being our direct importa
tion from the celebrated manufactories of
l.yon (France), and which win be sold at lm«
porter'! Prices.
Plain Black Goods:
CRETONNE,
CASHEMERE,
LONDON CLOTH,
PAMISE CLOTH,
EMPRESS CLOTH,
BOMBAZINE,
FOULARDS,
ALPACAS.
ALSO,
A UOOiplete stock of the latest styles of
1 st<-*.-* aud I riiiiniin-^.
'fw match our DRESS GOODS,
(*HAWLS !
FRENCH BROCHR, SCOTCH SHAWLS,
In great variety.
Baby Linen and
Ladies' Underwear,
Ladies' and
Children's Hoisery,
White Goods,
Linen Damask,
Damask Napkins,
Towels,
—AM) OTHER—
Housekeeping Goods !
HANDKERCHIEFS,
LINEN SETTS,
CUFFS, COLLARB,
PARASOLS, FANCY
ARTICLES AND
RUFFLINCS,
In all the Different Styles!
GENTS' AND BOYS'
O Tr4 Orr H lIV <i !
11l greut variety of the lutes! styles.
Gents' Furnishing Goods,
Comprising a full line of the celebrated
ATKINSON WHITE SHIRTS
California Made Underwear,
COTTON and WOOLEN HOISERY.
Etc., etc., etc.
Complete AJMMMT&ment
-OF-
Callfornia and Eastern Made
BOOTS Sl SHOES!
We Invite the people to examine our new
goods. Our stock Is complete in every branch,
having extraordinary facilities in the purchase
of our goods, most of which we receive direct
from the manufacturers. Wo are enabled to
sell them at lower prices than other house,
here. We shall continue the
ONE PRICE 8\ BTEM.
CITY OF PARIS!
EUGENE MEYER & Co.,
(Successors to S. LAZARD & Co.)
octio
REAL ESTATE BROKERS.
J. M. BALDWIN". CHAM. E. BEANE.
Real Estate and Money
BROKERS.
THE FIRM OF
J. M. BALDWIN
Will negotiate Keal Estate s ties und Money
Loans, at 79 1-a Downey Block, ground
floor.
FOR BALK.—CHOICE DWELLING, cen
trally located. Six rooms with hath room,
(hounds and trees In perfect condition. Bold
with or without Furniture, and at a bargain.
FOR SALE.-RANCHO OF 153 ACRES
wllh two houses, well with thirty feet of
water. One half under Since. S.OOQ Orange,
i.Hue. Lemon, Walnut and other trees, an.
-000 vims. Ampie suppiv of water tor Irri
gation. Title perfect.
FOR SALE.—»» ACHES rARMING land
with dwelling house. Cnder cultivation
lust year. location, Deal* Downey City depot.
Water ditch runs through the tract. I'iice.
SI.OOO.
FOR SALE.-to ACRES EXCELLENT
corn or Tobacco land in Akusu Township.
Price, H'&O per acre.
CTOR SALE—IN LOS NIETos TOWN
-1 slilj), cultivated farm of 120 acre*, witli
house, ham. corrals, etc Located near 11. H.
depot. Price, 835 par acre.
COR SALE.-35 ACHES LAND- part of
san Antonio Uanchosplend d land.
Price, 81.700.
FOR SALE. -ONE TRACT, 20 ACRES,
with I.Moo vines; one tract, ucO acres; one
of 100 acres; one of acres, near Anaheim.
Also, Building lots In that thriving town.
FOR SALE.—CHOICE BUILDING LOTS
in this cdy at prices ranging from 8200 to
•IJSOO. Apply to
3. M. BALDWIN,
Ground Floor, Downev Block.
oct2",tf
CHAMBER LIN
&
BANCROFT,
REAL ESTATE
BROKERS,
21 SPRINCST., - - LOS ANGELES,
Nearly opposite Poatnffloa andCotfrl House,
FOR SALE.—HEAUTIFUL PROPERTY
inside city limits, l>j miles from Post
office—lo acres, choice and excellent land,
covered with fruit trees, many of them hear
ing, consisting of Orange, Demon, Lime, Cit
ron, Apple, Pear, Peach, Appricot, Almond
and Walnut trees. Also, about 2,000 foreign
(.rape vines bearing, and a large variety of
Flowers, Shrubbery Ac. Good House of eight
rooms in good repair, Barn, Henhouse Ac.
Good well of excellent wutei. Also the stock
consisting of 2 horses, 2 cows, 2 hogs, chick
ens, wagon, harness, carts plows ami farming
tools Ac, <vc, included. Tills is one of the
most desirable places in the market, and will
be sold at a bargain, Price, 8H.500.
FOB SALE.—A COMMODIOUS HOME
stead property, pleasantly located near
the centre of the city, ready for immediate oc
cupation (with furniture, kitchen utensils,
fuel, chickens, etc.. If SO desired by the pur
chaser, will t esold on moderate and easy
terms, if applied for soon. Price, $5,000.
8A1.E.-20 ACRES CHOICE LAND
j on San Pedro street, opposite the proper
ty purchased by Mr. Geo. H. Davis. Soil equal
ti> the best, and extremely low at Hla per acre.
FOB SAI.E.-80 ACRES GOOD LAND
(sand loam soli I located within a few roils
ot the Race Track. Splendid soil for the cul
ture of orange and lime trees. Price jer acre,
$35 00.
Ti*OK SALE.—4O ACRES IMPROVED
[} Land, artesian well,good house and barn
U.,0 bearing vines, and a nursery of .'ioO.OOO or
ange seedlings. Located wil bin three mhes ol
Postoffice. Price, 14,000.
LIOB SALE.- 40 ACRES IMPROVED
1 Land, (line sandy loaui soil) located four
miles from I'ustoftlec. Good house, well, 50
Fruit trees bearing and one acre in Muscat
und Alexandria grapes bearing. Property
partially enclosed by live fence. Owners
must sell. Price, £2,500.
1.108 NAI.E-—AN IMPROVED FA KM OF
J OO acres, good house of live looms, corral
granery and artesian well. Located near
Florence. Price, 18,600.
IjlOlt SALE.-55 ACRES SPLENDID soil
■J in city limits, with lull water privileges.
a fine chance for speculat on. The property
can be subdivided and sold to great advan
tage. Price, SlO 000.
FOR SALE.-IUULDIN(i LOT ON Fort
near college, 130X185. Price, f1,300.
FOR SALE.-TWO HUNDRED BUILD-
IngLotson Sepulveda, Turner and Ban
ning streets. Prices from 14)0 to $800. Terms
' easy.
FOR RENT. -FAHM OF SIXTY ACRES
near Florence, well Improved. Terms
easy.
CHAMBER!IN &, BANCROFT,
Real Estate Brokers,
21 SPRINCST.,
Nearly opposite Postofiiee and Court House.
WANTS-LOST-FOU N D.
WANTEIL— FOUR OR FIVE fair average
Carpenters. Apply to
F. BUTLER,
octlltf At Aldej) Fruit Drying Works.
WASTED. V THOROUGH GOOD BOOK
keeper having daily a few hours at his
disposal, would like to keep a sc. of Books,
oct.i-lm Address .W. D., this office.
WAVt'Kfl. A WET NUHSE...-Applv a'
Dr. Shorb's officii, opposite the Post
Office. sepiKMm
rpo I.El—TWO NICELY FURNISHED
JL and very plcasanilv situated rooms at E.
Dunbar's, West side of Hill street, between
Second and Third, near new building. First
Class board can be had near by. octlxtf
SITUATION WAXIEK.-A voting man
who writes a lair band, and Is familiar
with mercantile business and office work, de
sires a situation ol some kind. Will go any
where. The best of references furnished.
Address P. O. Box 375, Los Angeles.
oetso-siw'
WAJNTjEI*.
law or other copying in eng
llsh, German or French. Translations
correctly made. Terms moderate. Apply
P. O. Box 157 octlT- Ira*
MISCELLANEOUS.
WOOLEN MILL STORE.
The proprietors of the Woolen Mill Store
offer a heavy stock of
Home IMaiiiifuctiire,
together with fine English and French wool
ens, at.
VEH\' LOW l»H.lCJJffif>».
In our Merchant Tailoring department, we
have a Ilrst class cutter, aud will make suits
to order at from ?25 to fTO. A good fit guaran
teed. Farmers and others who desire it can
have suits cut and trimmed to be made at
home.
PFEIFFENBERGER A SCHAITER.
ec!2T-lm
NOTICE.
■VJOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN lhat Ihe
J_> Common Council of the City of Los An
geles intend to Improve, open, widen and ex
tend Alameda street, in said City, so as to em
brace and Include therein, and as a part of
Raid street, and lor the use of the public, all
that certain strip or piece of land In said City
of the uniform width of eighty feet, the center
line of which strip is described as follows, to
wit: Beginning at a post In Alameda street
as now laid out and located, forty-Aye and
one-halt feet East from the Southeast corner
of the office building of J. <J, Jackson, on the
lumbar yard at the Northwest corner of Ala
meda and First streets, runnlngthence South
flfty minutes East one thousand seven hun
dred and 11 fty feet to a post sot forty feet from
the gate-post of J. W. Wolfskill; thence South
west, three thousand four hundred and
eighteen feel to a post; thence South 2 J 50'
West, twothousand six hundred und seventy
five feel to n post In road or street opposite to
S. W. corner of the land belonging to Thomas
Leahy; thence South 2" 42' West, three thou
sand six hundred und forty feet to a post
thence South 53' East, one thousand one hun
dred and twenty feet to a post in the Southern
boundary line of the City.
By order ol the Common Counoll of tho City
of Lo*Angeles. M. KREMER,
Cleik of the Common Council, said city
Los Angeles, Oct. 27Hi, 1874. 2gtt
Bring in your Watches A, Clocks,
that all others have failed to make
run. C. H. BUSH
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
THE LOS ANCELEB
Poultry jjk Market!
126 & 128 Main Street,
Is the only place In town where you oan gel a
FULL FAMILY SUPPLY
— at the —
Lowest Market Rates.
They keep constantly on hand
All the Delicacies of the Season,
GROCERIES,
PROVISIONS,
POULTRY, AND
of every description.
Fresh Eggs and Butter
Received every day from the country.
Vegetables, Fruits and Nuts,
CIGARS and TOBACCO.
C?lioi<»«» Vojretnblcis!
Received by e\ cry steamer from San Fran
cisco.
Also, a full supply of
Pickled Pigsfeet,
I (oloo'UH StUlNityC.
Smoked Beel Tongue,
SWISS, Limberger, Holland, Cream, Eastern
and California
C ZEE EESE .
LAKE SUPERIOR
White Fish,
Pickled Salmon,
HOLLAND AND CALIFORNIA
Herrings,
Sardellen,
Anchovies,
Russian Sardines,
and Caviar.
ALDEN DRIED FRUITS!
ITim***!! d"«iil*c>i*i*i««,
And many more things too numerous to
mention.
Orders from thx country trade are promptly
attended to at lowest wholesale prices.
Consignments of
PROD XT C E
Respectfully solicited,
Cuine und »cc our stock and cons ince yoiii -
Cgermain &, CO.
IMeOLTEII^TOUS.
oct24-lm
MISCELLANEOUS.
IMPORTANT!
"LIVE AND LET LIVE,"
IS OUR MOTTO.
And WO mean to do the fair thing with the
public. Not sell a few leading articles below
cost, und make It up on other goods; but we
will sell
All Class of Goods
al merely a living profit. You will find now
In our store, the very best slock of
DOMESTIC GOODS.
ALSO,
A fujl line ol'the newest and prettiest
DUKSS GOO I> H,
— such as —
Black Silk.
Fancy Silks,
Poplins,
Serges,
Merinos,
Delaines, &c,
Ever brought to this market. Furthermore
Ihe best make of
California Boots and Shoes,
For Ladies, Gents, Misses, Boys aud Children.
Also, a full line of the best
Clothing and Furnishing Goods.
We do not blow nor brug, but If you wish lo
be convinced, come lo the store
IMPORTANT,
M-A-lIV STREET,
(Underthe Lafayette Hotel,)
And you will find
NEW AND FRESH GOODS
Cheaper than elsewhere.
oetldtf
NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, THAT
bids will be received by the Common
Council of Los at Its session of
October 2»th, 1874, for Hip construction of the
Main street sewer, according to specifications
furnished by the City Surveyor.
By order of the Common Council.
M. KREMER, Clurk.
Los Angeles, October 53, 1871.
oct24-td
Special Notice.
CARS WILL LEAVE depot, until further
nonce, at 3:45 f. M., to connect with steam
ers Orizaba and Ventura, for San Francisco.
Other days, usuul time.
E. E. HEWITT,
ocl9ff Superintendent.
TO THE PUBLIC.
THE POOL SELLING for the coming meet
ing of the Southern District Agricultural
Society was awarded to Messrs. Noyes A Dur-
Bse, who will sell at the Fashion Saloon and
at the Park, and no other parties will be al
lowed to sell at ihe Society's grounds, and tho
Directors will not be responsible for pools sold
by outside parties.
JOHN G. DOWNEY,
i oct2J-lw President S. D. A. S.

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