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Los Angeles daily herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1873-1876, December 20, 1874, Image 2

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CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIAL PAPER.
SUNDAY DEC. 20, 1874
Tilton announces himself in better
health than at any previous time
within the past ten years. Still THE
ODORE hates HENRY with the cordial
intensity of an earnest Christian.
Tim Continental Hotel, Philadel
phia, pays $160 per year for water. A
number of smaller establishments in
Eos Augeles pay about 5000 per year
for water and don't get it all the time
at that.
Oi r San Francisco coteniporaries
are trying to find out which can print
the greatest number of double sheets
within a given time. The Call and
Chronicle have distanced all compet
itors and now sta«d neck and neck.
Both are sinking mon-y by the opera
tion.
The California Alden Fruit Preserv
ing Company have been awarded the
gold and silver medals of the State
Agricultural Society. In noticing
this fact we will take the opportunity
to say that Mr. Geo, B. Davis, pro
prietor of the Alden Fruit Works in
this city, yesterday received a letter
from one of the largest wholesale
grocery firms of San Francisco,stating
that the Los Angeles Alden preserved
fruit was a superior article to that
from any other portion of the State,
and readily commanded the highest
price in the market. The Alden will
open a fine market for all the fruit
grown in Eos Angeles valley.
T. B. Peterson & Brothers, 300
Chestnut street, Philadelphia, publish
this day "The Fair Maid of Perth,"
by Sir Walter Scott, being the
second volume of an entire new edi
tion of the Waverly Novels, now in
course of publication by them, enti
tled " Peterson's Cheap Edition for
the Million of the Waverly Novels."
Each book is printed from plain, clear
type, double column, aud each work is
issued complete in one large octavo
volume, with a newly illustrated cover
on each book, and will be completed
in twenty-six volumes, at twenty-five
cents each, or five dollars for tlie com
plete set. This will be the cheapest as
well as the only complete edition of
the Waverly Novels published in this
country, as it will coutain all the
author's notes, as well as all his last
corrections ami additions. A full set
of the twenty-six volumes will be sent
at once, post-paid, by mail, to any
one, to any place, on their remitting
five dollars to the publishers. At this
low price all persons should possess
themselves of a full °<>t of tho \V«v*»rl v
at once, and we would take this
occasion to advise all of our readers to
make a remittance of five dollars at
ouce, per first mail, toT. B.Peterson
& Brothers, Philadelphia, for the
twenty-six volumes, who will send
them to any oue, at once, free of post
age, on receipt of that sum.
The "Herald's" Prosperity.
The prosperity of the Herald with
in the past eight months is unprece
dented in California journalism.
From almost nothing, the business
lias expanded to the utmost capacity
of the largest and best appointed job
and newspaper ofiice south of San
Francisco. Our steam job presses are
ruu fourteen of every twenty-four
hours, the job-room is always crowded
with work and we are doing more and
of a superior quality of job work than
all the other printing houses in the
city, With new type, line presses,
steam power and first-class workmen,
we are enabled to fill the orders of our
patrons in the best style of tlie art and
in tlie shortest possible time. Of
newspapers alone, there are now
printed on the Herald presses, one
daily, one semi-weekly, two Weeklies
and one monthly. Tlie large Taylor
power press, though capable of throw
ing otf fifteen huudred impressoins
per hour, is taxed to its utmost capac
ity with the large editions of these
regular publications. To meet this
demand upon our press-room, we are
preparing to add another large single
cylinder press to those already in use.
The circulation of the Daily Hmr.vld
is already large — nearly or quite
dogble that of any other daily pub
lished in Southern California—nnd is
steadily increasing. It furnishes all
the news of the day and each issue
contains more reading matter than all
the dailies published in the city. Its
editorials are intended to bo frank,
fair, outspoken and impartial. It is
not the purpose of the editor, nor is it
expected, that his articles will uiewt
the approbation of everybody. The
individual or journal that labors with
the single object of pleasing
everybody possesses neither individ
uality, force or distinctive character.
An honest, candid opinion may not
please and it cannot receive the en
dorsement of all, but it is entitled to
and receives greater consideration and
respect than the non-committal,
shilly-shally bosh with which some
publishers till their editorial columns.
The editor who hews to the line, let
the chips fall where they maj', will
have readers who will not endorse all
or his views, but they will respect his
honesty of purpose aud iadei»cndeut
position. We had rather have half
the world quarreling with our opin
ions than to have all the world saying
that we were wanting in the manhood
and intelligence to have an opinion.
The Hekald advocates what it be
lieves to be right and just and con
demns what In its judgment is wrong
and unjust. Its advocacy or denunci
ation is never equivocal. It is our aim
to so express ourselves that t.ll who
read may understand. The Weekly"
Herald Is conceded to be the largest
and best paper published in Southern
California. Its eight pages are filled
with news and reliable Information
concerning the "New Italy" toward
which the steps ot thousands are now
turned. The circulation of the
Weekly Hkuai.l) now approximates
two thousand, and hundreds of copies
are mailed each week to subscribers in
the Southwestern and Northwestern
States. The circulation is so rapidly
increasing that we are warranted in
saying the next year will enable us to
shew an edition of at least four thous
and copies.
Cause of Idolatry.
It is a fact universally admitted that
man is a religious animal. The ado
ration of his heart must be bestowed
upon something. There is another
fact quite as well established, and that
is, that each Individual man will adore
that which he believes to be greatest
—.that which possesses most power
&*ud able to bestow or communicate
the greatest good. Consequently the
worship of the Creator has ever been
most common among mankind, be
cause the power to create carries with
it tho Idea of the power to bless, and
to do all things. For this reason
the savage tribes of earth nearly all
worship a great spirit, who they sup
pose controls the destiny of man. It
is an acknowledged principle of phil
osophy that the mind of man is so
constituted that he is compelled by
the very law of his being, not only
to worship that which he considers
the greatest and noblest, but he will of
necessity assimulate his own charac
ter as much as possible, to the charac
ter of the object or being he worships.
"We lay down these as facts, though
stated in the simplest manner possi
ble, which are universally acknowl
edged. With these facts as abasia, we
can very redily discern the cause of
idolatry and trace it through all ages
to the same source. The savage in
his native wilds is less idolatrous than
the more cultivated, or as we term the
more civilized. Tlie reason Is obvi
ous. When he stands upon his native
mountain top and views creation
around him he sees a world teeming
with life and beauty. Tlie scene to
him is grand and there is a conscious
ness within him that declares these
all to he the work of a great Creator.
At once he lifts his heart and pours
out his devotion to that Great Spirit.
From what he can see of the laws that
gv crn-the world he concludes that
this Great Spirit has something to
do with the affairs and destiny of
mankind. This (Stan* OfitmH .'o
acknowledged to be the governor or
ruler of the world, and the character
of the savage is formed by his idea of
the nature of this great ruler. In re
gard to the formation of character the
same principle holds good with all
classes and grades of humanity. As
men or nations ascend in the scale of
intelligence and science their ideas of
Deity change, and the change is in
variably enstamped on their charac
ter. When science takes a material
istic turn, pantheism is the natural
result. The scientists of to-day are
teaching naturalism. Plants and ani
mals, brute and human are taken to
be all one, evolution causing the dif
ference. Plants are endowed with in
telligence and the ape is the father of
man, and all are to end in dust.
Nature la God continuously as the
most, in-most of all life. Will they
not soon plead, " What harm if peo
ple fall clown and worship nature, or
some portion of it, as the heathens do,
and erect altars to gods that can be
seen and known?" This speculative
paganism, if continued, must end in
pagan idolatry. The scientists of to
day have made but few, if any, new
discoveries. The Egyptians taught
very nearly the same materialistic
doctrines four thousand years ago, the
effect of which was seen in the char
acter of the Israelites as long as the
generation which was brought out of
Egypt lived. They were so imbued
with the materialistic views that they
were taught in Egypt and were glad
to give their richest treasures to make
a visible golden calf to fall down and
worship. The invisible, unknown
God of Moses was not tangible; all
the science of Egypt could not com
prehend him. They must have a god
that science could not demonstrate.
They had been taught that the cow
was the superior of all animals and
nearest allied to man, and that gold
was more valuable and controlled the
affairs of mankind more than all
metals; hence a calf made of gold was
the proper object for man to worship.
We can only conjecture as to the first
idol that will grace the altar of the
scientific materialist of this genera
tion. Doubtless gold will enter
largely into its composition.
From San Diego.
fciA_N Dikuo, December 19th. —Gov.
Villagrana, of Dower California, says
a commission is on the way from the
City of Mexico to establish a system
of land laws, holding out superior in
ducements to settlers.
■ ■ ■-— i —' i
Cessation of Indian Troubles.
Victoria, B. C, December 18th.—
Her Majesty's steamship Myrmidon
has returned from Jarvislulct and re
ports an interview with the Indians
and a satisfactory arrangement of af
fairs. No further trouble is antici
pated.
Educate the head to think, the heart
to feel and the body to act.
THE GRANGERS AND THE RAILROADS.
[Continued from yesterday.]
Wf have a railroad running across
tlie country iv the northerly !>:■.rt of
its territory. One is projected am]
partly huilt across the Southern bor
der. Tt is a work of such magnitude
that the prospect of its being com
pleted in a reasonable purioil of time,
if ever, without tha aid of the whole
people, acting through the Severn*
ment. is not hopeful, and t he quest ion
now presents itself to the people and
more especially to those devoted to
farming and agricultural pursuits than
' any other, Is it for the interest 6T tbe
nation, for that of the farmers and ag
riculturists generally, that this assist
ance should be rendered ?
The difference in the climate und
character of the country over whidi
the two routes pass are almost as op
posite as could be imagined. Ihe one,
cold in Winter and hot iv Bummer,
covered with snow at one Beaton and
drenched with rain at another, and
having its requisite number of streams
to carry ort' the superabundance Of
water, which are crossed by bridges
and culverts, continually exposed to
damage by Hoods and heavy rains, tlie
washing away of eHbsnkftlotitsj the
freezing and thawing of tiie road-bed,
together with the greater wear and
tear, cost and delay iv operating a
road of high grades and sharp curves,
are items which amount annually to a
much greater sum than the interest
upon the money expeuded in the con
struction and Stocking of the road.
The 3:2 d parallel route is free from
cold and snow, unexposed to the dam
aging effects from the freezing and
thawing of the road-bed, with minor
extremes of heat and cold. The
amount of rain-fall is Inconsiderable,
consequently but little or no damage
is to be suffered by the washing away
of bridges, culverts or embankments.
No part of the route lias a high alti
tude, but runs over extensive plains,
giving a low aggregate of ascents and
descents and without high grades, the
wear and tear of the road ami the cost
of the propelling power will all be so
much less than upon the present road,
that the rate of freights and fares and
the length of time In transit may be
greatly lessened and still leave the
operating of the road a profitable bus
ness.
Most of the delays and expenses
caused by obstructions constantly re
curring upon the northern route, will
be avoided on the more southern one.
From the shores of the Pacific to the
Mississippi river or a maritime port in
Texas, there are but two rivers of
magnitue, both of which would be
crossed far down their courses, which
is of no inconsiderable importance.
The products of the soil can be trans
ported with greater ease and less cost
In proportion to distance in the direc
tion of the flow of the rivers of a
country than in the opposite direc
tion. Thus, a railroad along the32d
parallel, crossing the rivers at right
angles and near their mouths, will
drain the country of its products with
greater ease and at less cost than one
traversing the country near the sources
of its rivers and streams.
While it is undisputed that in tlie
past,railway corporations and specula
tors in tiie Construction ol* railways
Lave overreached the people and the
Government and have unjustly drawn
large sums of money from the people,
it does not follow that for that cause
the Government should henceforward
abstain from aiding und assisting in
pie for their welfare and which, with
out such assistance, must be iiulifi
nitely postponed. Such is not tho
policy that guides individuals. No
man oi energy folds his arms and sub
sides into inactivity because he
has been overreached, swindled
or cheated by a competitor or
employe. It only serves to stimu
late him to greater care and watch
fulness. His experience serves as a
beacon in his future course. Ho, I
conceive, it should be with the people,
acting through their Government. If
in the past they have been de
frauded, instead of supinely turning
their backs toward great and beneficial
enrerprises, they should be only the
more ready to engage in them; as,
from their past experience, they have
acquired a knowledge of the snags and
quicksands which lie in the way and
are better prepared to avoid them in
the execution of similar enterprises.
If those who have been entrusted with
tlie powers of the Government have
been deceived and outwitted in tlie
past, they have that experience to
guide and direct them in the future,
so that they are'better able to guard
and protect tlie interests of the people.
If the people have been deceived and
defrauded by those to whom they have
entrusted the Government, this dere
liction of duty by their agents should
operate as an incentive to stimulate
the people to bestow that care and the
exercise of that sound judgment in se
lecting to whom is committed the
management of the affairs of the na
tion, so as to insure an honest and
eflicient discharge of those duties.
It would be a humiliating fact, if
such should be proven, and one which
would destroy all faith in our form of
Government, that the people are in
competent or unable to select proper
agents to manage the business of Gov
ernment; but I am far from harboring
a belief in the existence of such a fact.
An intelligent man finds no insupera
ble difficulty in making a bargain or a
contract in such a form and manner as
will leave little or no room for decep
tion and non-performance. And what
any intelligent man can do, moat cer
tainly can be accomplished by a hun
dred or more intelligent persons.
There are not wanting among twenty
millions of men a few hundred of
honest, upright and competent citi
zens, who might be selected and sent
into the Congress of the United States,
if such men are not to be found there
at present, who could readily frame a
law, contract or act of incorporation,
by the operation of which this great
and needful enterprise could be ac
complished without much, if any,
risk of the peoples being defrauded.
I believe in the power of tho Grange
organization of the country not only
to secure the aid of the Government
for the immediate construction of this
great commercial highway, but to de
vise and direct tiie mode and manner
iv which that assistance «hall be given,
without risk or prejudice to the agri
cultural, tax-paying citizens of the
country.
Respectfully, your ob't servant,
J. J. Wauneb.
The Mariposa Gazette says that the
waa between the Steele family and
Madden, which culminated in the re
cent tragedy at Merced, commenced
over the tight between them for the
county printing.
Sunday, the 6th mat., a vaquero by
the name by Albert Piedro, in the em
ploy of the Steele Bros., lassoed and
killed a grizzly bear on the Kauchita,
eight miles from town,which weighed
700 pounds.
Latest Telegrams.
EASTERN.
Purine Mall InK'nllrstloii.
Washington, December 18th.—In
the Pacific Mail investigation, John*
son, Secretary an 1 Treasurer pro torn.,
testified that checks to the amount oi
17n6,000/Were Rixde payable to 1 rwln.
Ho knew nothing of the transactions
involving the amounts. Mellows,
formerly Vice-President, testified to
the s:\sne cllVcL
The NOS! Cable—Steam Line Hubble -
Contributions for N«lirssioi anil
Kansas -Mure Steamboat Itumorn.
New YORK, December IBth.—Offi
cials of (lm Atlantic and Pacific Tele
graph Company ray that the steamer
Faraday had 1 eft Torbay station pay
ing out the oew cable. They will
splice it when they reach the buoy
and complete Ihe connection. They
expected to make the connection to
day.
Tlie Tribune and Time* are the only
morning journals which give credence
to the Oriental nnd Occidental Steam
Line bubble, asserting that the con
tract with tbe overland railroads
closed yesterday. The report is gen
erally disbelieved.
Contributions for Kansas and >,' ( -
bTaSka, reach $2,229. Money is com
ing in :it the rate of $400 or SIOO per
day.
Agent Curtis, of iho White Star
Line is ignorant of the pretended
charter of the steamers Belgie, Gaelic
and Celtic for the new China line.
Huntington's declaration that the
new line was incorporated by San
Francisco merchants, is the joke of
the streets.
Wool Market.
Philadelphia, December isth.—
Following are the latest wool quota
tions: Extra Merino pulled, [email protected]
California line auJ medium, 30(« 40c.;
coarse, 28 (n. 35c.
Necreey-20.000 People in Waul,
Chicago, December 18th.— The
Committee of Ways and Means con
tinue secrecy in regard to the Irwin
testimony. They do not wish to pub
lish until it is complete.
Governor Osborn, of Kansas, says
that 2(),00t) people in Western Kansas
will require assistance during the
the Winter. The prospect of the
wheat crop is good, anil the weather
favorable.
FOREIGN.
From Over the Water-
Berlin, December 19th.—Tiie Gov
ernmental crisis is over. The Reich
stag passed a vote of confidence iv Bis
marck.
Bismarck stated on Monday that he
had heard of a plot against his life.
Constantinople, December 18th.—
The Herald publishes an account of
tbe famine in Asia Minor, and the
prospect is appalling.
SAN FRANCISCO.
Judge itoffsnan Gives an opinion in.
•liicst—Small Fight.
San Francisco, December 18th.—
The opinion of Judge HotFman in the
matter of the petition of tlie German
bondholders lo have the California
Pacific Railway thrown into bank
ruptcy, was filed to-day. It is under
stood that the defendants were over
ruled in till their points, except as to
the number of the creditors aud the
amount due them. This, of course, is
fatal to the.petition. , Ten days have
been granted to amend.
San Francisco, December 19th.—
The inquest ill the case of Mclnerny
was continued yesterday. The tes
timony only confirms that previously
received.
Wm. Rogers and Patrick Foley, la
borers, met in a liquor saloon on Berry
street, Bear Third, last night. Rogers
asked Foley to drink. The latter de
clined and angry words were ex
changed. Rogers, after receiving a
slap from Foley, stabbed that individ
ual twice in the back, producing two
wounds, which, though painful are not
considered dangerous. Rogers was
arrested on it charge of assault to mur
der.
NEW TO-DAY.
A Word of Advice to the Ladies.
The nicest present a lady can make to her
husband fur Christmas is a box of line Cigars.
It will be highly iippreciated. If you should
not like to call for it yourself you can send
tlie order and it will promptly attended to.
Tlie prices run from S3 , 0 to $22 60 per box of
IUO. Boxes of 60 accordingly. They will be
doubly welcome to tlie receiver if he knows
that they come from
f. GOLDSMITH,
Main St., next to W. F. & Co.'s Express.
Tlie latest Illustrated Papers always on
hand.
Now is the time to plant Trees.
ORANgE TREKS of all sizes for sale.—
Prices according to sizeand quality. In
quire at this otiice, or at tlie
CELIS VINEYARD,
deciitf Main St.. opposite Pico St.
Public Notice.
THE MAYOR'S court is transferred to
No. 13 New High street, opposite tlie Pico
House, and will be held there every morning
at nine o'clock. The Mayor's ollice is also
trans.erred to the same place.
P. BEAUDRY,
Los Angeles, Dec. 19, 1871. Mayor.
R. DAVIS &. CO
AUCTIONEERS,
Will sell on
Tuesday, Dec. 22d, 1872,
AT
No. 2 Arcadia Block, Los Angeles St.,
A large Invoice ol
Black Walnnt Marble lop Suites,
< Siamtier Suites, ; _
Elegant Parlor Suites iv Black Hair
Cloth and Hops.
Two SeooiKl-llantl Plauos,
Black Waluut Marble Top UoutTes,
Black Waluut Wardrobes,
Btuak Walnut Hat Backs,
Marble Top Center Tables,
Blark Waluut Extension Tables,
And a very large assortment of
Black Walnut Chairs and Rockers,
Spring and Top Mattrasses,
Kitchen Furnituro and Small Ware,
Crockery,
China Tea Sets,
Glassware,
Black Walnut Racks,
Looking-Classes (of all sizes and de
scriptions),
Marine and Mantle Clocks,
White Marseilles and Colored
Counterpanes.
Large assortment of
RUBBER AND COCOA MATS, BLACK
WALNUT SWINGING CRADLES AND
CRIBS, BED LOUNGEB,
Aud a large assortment 6f
of
1 o'other and i-fc*n>« Lounges
WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT RESERVE.
deiO tf
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
CHAS. R. JOHNSON,
INOTARY 1»1I*I„IC;
AND v -
CENERAL INSURANCE ACENT,
No. Si Temple niot'k. Low Anu'i'lr-i,
■StM
law Asiit ks, I tec. li, M7i.
Mr. J. J,. ArinsfraSM, ClKSJfnoftpo Hawtnl
DkahSik: f lium-H.'rii it announced in the
various boa Angalee papers. In which I sue
offered for sale lot* to mi it IB lue CtMantongo
Ranch.
I have been referred lo you m nelnc disin
terested as Veil lis having full knowledge.
Any intbiinution I assure >uu will bograto
fully received.
is the land tis mod as II is represented? How
is it about water?
If your reply be fuvotablc, It is my Intention
and someofmy Iriends to buy.
Yours rchpoclfullv,
LAWRENCE GATES.
P. S.-Answcr Immediately, del" lw*
PUBLIC LECTURE.
AI'ITBLIC LECTURE WILL HE (JIVEN
at tbe Court-house, commencing at 7
o'clock on Sunday cvenlnjc, the Sfth lust A
subject will be selected from the and once.
Heats free. dels td*
"NEW REST^Ij^NT.
THE PROPRIETOR HAS .II'ST OPENED
a Restaurant, called Commercial, in the
White House, on Commercial stieei, where
he IUM separate rooms ntted up for ladies ami
gentlemen, and where the public will llnd
(juiel quarters and a good meal for26Cents,
deiiiiin H. ROBINSON.
Public Notice.
MESSRS, COHEN A DAVIS or tbe 'Iden
tical," bet;to inform tlie public Hint they
have purchased from Mr. Williams bis popu
lar Cigar stand at the Palace Saloon. Their
new branch they intend conducting on the
same sound principles that base gained them
already so miivb public favor, namely by sel
llitgcheapand keeping the choteest goods the
market affords. declS-lt
]V O T I C K.
Goodall, Nelson & Perkins'S. S.
liis m.
The sailing of the Steamship
Eor San Kruncisco and Santa Barbara lias
been
POSTPONED
UNTIL
Sunday, December 20th, 1874,
At 10 o'clock A. M.
d-eIS d ,1. 1„ WARD, Agent.
REAL ESTATE BROKERS.
J. M. BALDWIN. CHAS. E. BEANE.
Real Estate and Money
BROKERS.
THE FIRM OF
J. M. BALDWIN
Will negotiate Real Estate siles and Money
Loans, at 70 1-it Downey Block, ground
floor.
FOR SALE.—CHOICE RANCH IN THE
orange belt. 137 acres, with water-right
guaranteed; two-thirds under fence; forty
acres in vineyard*; deed of warranty given;
dwelling bouse costing $1,500 on premisos.
FOR SALE. —RANCHO LOS EE LIS,
containing 4,000 acres; partly irrigable;
well timbered; 320 acres under fence; elegant
dwelling; dairy buildings; orange orchard
with part in bearing.
FOR SALE-—TWO dwelling-houses in
choice locations. Grounds set in orange,
with bearing vines.
POR SALE. — RANCH OK EIGHTY
■ acres, with improvements, located adja
cent to city limits. Title, U. H. P'Ocui.
FOR SALE.-CHOICE CITY LOTS AND
land in small parcels, both inside and
outside the city limits. Also, ranch property,
improved and unimproved, in various parts
of tlie county.
Horse and buggy kept for convenience ol
customers. Apply to
J. M. BALDWIN,
79 1-2 Downey Block, ground floor.
MISCELLANEOUS.
Christmas and new year
piano-fortesTpiano-fortes.'!
Great Reduction in Prices
during the Holidays!!
KOUR of the New York Pianos, Full Square
O'and—Concert Pianos— TV. octave. Price,
«300. Reduced 8100.
FOUR of the Vose, Boston, four round cor
ners, serpentine plinth mouldings ult round
7 octaves. Price 83 : J0. Reduced JIIIU.
TWO Bourne Pianos, very elegantly carved.
Price 8400. Beduced 8100.
THREE Full, Concert Square Grand, T% oc
taves, superbly carved, elaborately finished
Hallet Davis Pianos, lteduded toBojo. Han
Francisco prices $700.
Those Pianos are now in stock and are for
inspection at
A. H. HAVELL'S
Piano Ware-Rooms,
Corner Maiu end Second Sta.
Lqji Angeles, Cal.
N. B.—Pianos properly tuned. Also, the
Florence Sewing Machine
In every variety. decl2tf
WINSLOW S. MYERS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
OFFICE—Room No. 11 Downey Block,
Los Anuki.ks, Cal. dlltf
FOR SAInIS.
A YOUNG ORANGE ORCHARD of Ten
Acres, located on tho west side of Main
street In the city. Apply to
W. H. MACE,
declO lm 21 Temple Block.
A CARD.
11. S. RITCHIE would respectfully Inform
his numerous friends and the public, that he
lias taken charge of the DINING ROOM ofthe
KIMBLE M ANsIoN, New High street, where
he will at all times keep the table supplied
with the best the market affords, und will en
deavor to meet the wishes of Ills patrons.
dec4-lm
ALDEN FRUITS.
I appoint H. NEWMARK A Co., my agents
for the sale of Alden Goods for Los Angeleß
Oounty. GEO. B. DAVIS.
December Ist, 1874.
Referring to the above, we take pleasure in
informing the public that we have lv store
A Full Assortment
Ofthe celebrated
A L D E IT
Apples,
Pours, und
Ruisius,
From the Los Angeles Factory, which we are
prepared to supply In quantities to suit.
deelOtf H. NEWMARK A CO.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
PALACE
F. ?n. CUIOL,
wratm 9V
HUMAN HAIR AND PERFUMERIES.
Ii wit worked AND HADE OP i\
1. any stylo.
jL»it<li«M' Unit* I)i-<"Mc»i 11 a
Specialty.
Pffo. 3 ALISO BTREKT,
One Door from the Corner
of Los Angeles.
doclG-tf
NOTICE.
ALL Parlies buying pledges In my office
will call and redeem the same before the
20th of the month; If not, they will be sold at
public auction. E. GRELNBAIM,
Pawnbroker.
Los Angeles, Dec. 11th, 1871. 12td
Pawnbroker's Sale.
ON tfcftMd ofthis month, I will sell at Pub
lic Auction, a largo lot of Jewelry, Gems,
Pistols, Clothing, Dry Goods, Pools and Hboes
Ac. I invito all the Traders to cal I. Halo lo
lake place ut the California Loan and Bro
keroffice. E. GKEENISAUM,
declStd *>ro|yrtetor.
NOVELTAWRACTIvr
— AND —
L X II JL Z It j± I . !
Christmas Presents
CiIVEN AAV A V
— AT —
THE PEOPLE'S PALACE!
From and alter the first of December, 1871,
and opto Christmas Eve, Whoever will pur
chase goods at THE PEOPLE'S PALACE to
the extent of Five Dollars or more, will be
presented with a Christmas present.
The prosants will range in value as high as
FIFTY DOLLARS EACH,
And include useful as well as ornamental ar
ticles. Quito a numberof thorn will lie Japan
ese articles, such as cabinets, work boxes
trays. Jewel boxes, writing desks, dressing
eases, etc.
In addition to our stock of clothing and
gents' furnishing goods, wo have lately re
ceived a general assortment of
Dry und ITuuciy Gootle.
THE' PEOPLE'S PALACE,
NO. 40 MAIN STREET,
HERZOG & ROTH, Prop's.
deed 2w
OLDEST AUCTION HOUSE
—— IN * "
Southern California.
NOYES &, DURFEE,
Corner Tempie Block and Soring St.
SALE DAYS:
Wednesday and Saturday.
Special sales made in any part ofthe City or
County.
We also bny all kinds ot Property for
C'ANH I!!
Orders for Gentlemen* Light Driving Hors
en, Work and Saddle Horses,promptly filled,
and titles to all Horses sold public or private,
guaranteed purfect. E. W. NOYES,
nor2ltf C. A. DURFEE.
TEMPLE STREET
BARBER SHOP
Hign oT the Four Liishttt.
DOYLE & SILVER
Proprietors?.
Three Firsn-Class Artists
Always in attendance to wait upon customers
Shaving, - - %Zr> <-tm.
Hals? Cutting, - «r> <?t».
Shninpoouinff, - JUs*"> otM.
Give us a call. novl4tf
H. RASTER,
CI T V
Fish and Poultry Market,
WHITE HOUSE, LOS ANGELES ST„
third door from tbe corner of Commer
cial. A specialty made of all kinds of San
Francisco
FRESH FISH
In their season. Also,
Poultry, TZ&fga* Butter,
Game, IVutM, JETruit»,
and Country
Produce.
Consignments of produce respectfully solic
ited.
All orders promptly filled and goods deliv
ered free of chargo In any part of tbe city.
Oct29-tf
D. T. Moonsy. J. a. DIXOM.
OCCIDENTAL LAUNDRY.
MOONEY & DIXON
GIVE NOTICE that they have established
the Occidental Laundry, on
Flower street, near Sixth,
And are prepared to do
Hotel, Restaurant and Ladies and Gentle
men's Washing
promptly and on the most reasousble terms.
Clothes returned in Six Hours If needed.
Terms moderate and satisfaction guaran
teed to all.
NO CHINESE EMPLOYED.
No Chinese Thrashing Machines Used!
Leave your orders at the hotels and at the
Fashion Saloon. nov2Wtf
150,000
HEDWOOD SHAKEN
JUST RECEIVED AND FOR BALE BY
J. G. Jackson.
n\l7tf Corner First and Alameda Sts.
NEW ADVENT: CEMENTS.
Rooms and Beard
AT TUP. —
KIMBALL MANSION,
NOW Iliffli Wired,
NEAR THE CON GREG A I lON ALt bin eh.
Fine, large, well lurnlshcd suites ami
single rooms, with all modern Improvements
and a tirst-class table. The Rouse is
BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED
On high ground and commands a charming
view of mountain and valley. nvtfi lf
BACKMAN HOUSE.
NEW, COMPLETE AND ELEGANT.
MRS. BACKMAN
HAS LEASED THE ENTIRE SECOND
and third stories *f the Perry A KIN V
Block, Nos. 36,38 and 40, Slain street, and will
there conduct a first-class Hotel.
THE SUITES AND SINGLE ROOMS
Are unsurpassed In the city—well ventilated,
newly furnished, supplied with spring mat
trasses and in every way complete.
FAMILIES AND SINGLE GENTLEMEN
Supplied with the best accommodations in
hoard and lodging.
DA"V HOARDERS
Taken nt the usual rates.
TH Hi TABLK
Provided with the best Hut market affords.
Thotiaveling public and others will here Mud
all the comforts of a home. nv22 tf
■Sanaa—iiisiiii m mini m i—a— mm
WANTS-LOST FOUND.
\A7ANTED.— A YOUNG MAN to help
VV about the store and to take care of
horses. Must be reliable and willing. In
quire at the City Fish aud Poultry Market,
No. 28 Los Angeles street. di'.Ul
ROOMS.- FAMILY and Sinelo Rooms
wiih board at Col. Peel's ou Spring St.
novum
WANTED. —FIRST-CLASS HANDS at
tlie Eastern Dress-Making Rooms, cor
ner Los Angeles und Commercial streets,
novB9-lm
BOARD, with furnished rooms in a pleas
ant location in a private family. A min
utes walk from Postoffice. Gentlemen and
their wives preferred. Enquire next house
south of Synagogue. novKtf
A FLORENCE SEWING MACHINE FOR
Sale, as good as new, for $G">. Inquire ut
novSJAwtf 210 Main street.
ANEW WILCOX A GIBBS SEWING Ma
chine for sale at 25 per cent, less than
cash price. Inquire at this Office.
novlyf
WANTED.
SOUND APPLES AM) PEARS, BY THE
ToN, at the Alden Fruit Preserving Fac
tory. GEO. B. DAY Is-.
!STl*AYlb:f>.
171 ROM TIIE P.IiEA RANCH. NEAR MR.
> Vuldez's residence, H horses strayed,
among them one white gray, one sorrel, one
black gray, one dark colored marc and horse,
one buy and another roan, Tbe prison who
can give any Information that ".ill lead to
their recovery, or Know.' their Whereabouts,
can give notice at Ihe ollic- ot f,i CVftu'CO.
dels tf
L, O fS tT
A GRAY HORSE WITH NEW HARNESS
on ran away from the New York Bakery
la»l Monday morning. A reasonable rewsrd
will be paid lor the return of the animal and
harness to the owner.
LOUIS EBINGER,
declfi-tf New Yolk Bakery.
FOR SALE-FOR RENT.
IT'OR SALE.—The First-Class well estab-
J llshed Sewing Machine, Pattern and
Furnishing business; also lease stock and
Furniture. No. 00 Spring street.
decl2-2wt M. L. HA IT.
landTo¥lale7~
I HAVE 600 ACRES OF EXOELIIENT
land for sale near Old Los Nietos. About
200 acres will produce corn without irrigation.
The remainder is good fruit and small grain
land. Living water on tlie jueniises. Ptu
tially improved. .1. S. THOMPSON,
til and 53 Temple Block.
Dec. 17, 1874. del 7 If
Mules For Sale.
rpWENTY-ONE Largo Young Anierioau
JL Mules for sale by S. L. KINO,
decK-lm* Oue mile Eust of Orange.
Bee Ranch For Sale.
FOR SALE.—Oneof the best and most con
veniently located Bee Ranches n fbo
county, veil Ktocked and provided with all
necessary buildings. Apply at this office,
no\2ltf
Almond Trees.
Ii U U \ LANGUEDOC ALMOND Trees
jvUV/ averaging seven feet high, for
sule, on Figueroa street, 2'i miles south of
Postortice. Price $30 per hundred, or $5 per
dozen. Also,
1,000 Orange Trees
Four years old; and Pepper trees two years
old, ten feet high, at ten dollars per hundted,
or eight for one dollar.
J. M. STEWART.
Los Angeles, Doc. 4th, 1874. lm
MISCELLANEOUS.
New Stationery and Book Store.
C. M. TURNER,
Wo. 43 Main St., 3d door north of Lafay
ette Hotel,
HAS opened an extensive assortment of
Plain and Fancy Stationery-
Blank Boohs, Albums, tHcliool
Huppliefc), Cliromos, Ijitlio
graphs, lr»icture li'mine.,
Toy - ItooliM, Vuses,
Which she offers at reasonable prices.
doclOtr
INSURANCE AGENCY.
Commercial Insurance Conipauy ol'
California.
F 111 X AND MABINB.
Office in San Francisco, No. 228, California St.
Capital, paid up In gold, $200,000.
Assets M 875,000.
CHAS. A. LATON Tc. W. KELLOGG,
Secretary. | President.
A. R. GUNNISON, General Agent.
DIRECTORS:
W. W. Dodge, Clans Spreckols,
Solden S. Wright, W. B. Cummlngs,
James M. Barney, C. W. Kellogg,
A. W. Jee, Peter Dean,
John 11. Wise, C. J. Deerlng,
Levi Stevens, James Gamble,
Charles Main, W. B. Hooper,
G. L. Bradley, James Phelan,
James Llnforth, 11. S. Crocker,
N. D. Thayer. F. S. Freeman,
D.H.Haskell. Bartlett Doe.
Jos. A. Hooper.
B. Md.ELI.AW, Agent (or Los Angeles.
OfHee-36 Main St., or Pacific Mail S. S.
Co.'s office.
■OrTnhtCompany belongs to no combina
tion, but takes risks upon I heir merits; rales
based upon the hazard assumed. noB-oow-4w
Notice of Dissolution of Partnership.
THE Real Estate business heretofore enisl
ing between Chamberlln A Bancroft, Is
hereby dissolved by mutual consent. C. A.
Bancroft assumes all debts owed by the late
firm, and will collect all dues.
C. F. CHAM BERLIN,
declO-lm C. A. BANCROFT.

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