OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles daily herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1873-1876, February 26, 1875, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038806/1875-02-26/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Special Notices.
The Identicals are the Places
Where every one can be suited; anything sold
there is worth all the money paid for it. The
best fitting shlrU of all qualities, a largo as
sortment of gents' under garments, fancy
g.Mtds » great varlet" of scurts and neckties; :i
complete importation of English walking
canes, rug straps, gaiters, suspenders dog
collars, dog leads bells, etc. We also keep
the largest and finest stock of imported and
domestic cigars, cigarettes, smoking and
chewing tobacco, meerchaum and brier pipes
and all smokers articles. Anyone wishing to
buy » box of good cigars should come to see
us tiefore purchasing elsewhere. Teamsters
aud the trade supplied at the lowest manu
facturers prices. Call at either place and you
will be convinced of the fact that there is no
placoin this city where you can get suited
better than nt the Identical?. _
GOLDSMITH A DA\ IS,
"The Identicals," SH Main street, and
107 Main St., next to W. F. A Co.'s Express.
Garden, Grass aud Tree seeds for sale cheap
at S. HELLMAN'S.
Insurance Agency—Commercial of Califor
lfornia, Eire and Marine, assets $500,000; Cali
fornia Insurance Co., assets $500,000; Fire As
sociation of Philadelphia, incorporated 1830,
assets $6,000,000. These companies transact
their business at the lowest paying rates,
charging for each risk according t .> the hazard
assumed, wlthou; reference to any insurance
combination or arbitrary trift's. All losses
promptly adjust d and paid.
B. McLELLAN, Agent.
Office of 0., N. A P. 8. B. Co.,
fe2o «t Main street, Los Angeles.
Zero prices at the Bazaar for dry
goods, clothing, etc., for thirty days
only. Give them a call and save
money. f 20:1 m
To people in search of plesant homes,
within easy communication by rail
with Los Angeles, the land now being
ottered by Messerve & Sorby, just be
yond Spadra, presents every induce
ment to purchasers—cheap, good title,
well watered, fine soil and easy terms.
It*
Now is the time to lay in a good
supply of goods. The Bazaar, corner
Main and Requena streets, offers ex
tra inducements. Give them a
call. f 20:1 m
To thk Ladies.- iou can have a Brosse
DRESS Chart with full instructions lor cut
ting and fitting all outside garments, for
$2 00, at M. C. Baker's, sole Agency. febOtt
Insurance a o kncy — o mcc, Commercial
•street, (Ducommun's new building), Northern
Assurance Co ,of Loudon and Aberdeen, cap
ital, $10,000,000; Hartford, of Hartford, assets,
$2,757,010; Imperial and Queen of London, cap
ital, $18,000,000; Union Mutual Life Insurance
Co., assets, $8,000,000.
JoUN CAItLIN, Agent.
Liverpool, London * Globe lusurenee Co.,
assets $23,000,000; North British A .Mercantile
Insurance Co., capital, $I0,0U),00o; Fireman's
Fund Insurance Co.,assets, $607,000.
Wm. J. Brodruk, Agent.
Applications received for ihe insurance of
all Kinds of property, and policies issued di
rect. fe7tf
New Goods! New Goods! Marxsen Bros.,
ot the new variety store, corner of Main and
Third streets, keeps constantly on hand a
large variety of Dry goods, Clothing, Gents'
underwear, Boots and Shoes, Groceries, etc.
A large supply of new goods Just received,
and sold at reasonable rules. All goods are
of the best quality: no auction goods sold by
us. We respectfully solicit the public to ex
amine our goods and judge lor themselves.
Goods delivered to any part of the city free of
charge. feb;?-i f
Divorces obtained in forty-live days; no
publicity; no fee ln advance; legal every
where; residence in Utah not cenalfoa: an
extremely liberal divorce law; lucnmpatHill-
Ity sufficient cause; terms moderate; unex
ceptionable references. Addrejis " Lawyer, P.
O. Box 19, Corlnne, Utah." Ja27 IM
R. 8. Walkkk, Bill Poster an.l Distributer.
Headquarters at Star oftice. Orders left at
any ofthe other newspaper offices in the city,
will be promptly attended to. Janlti
Go to the Fashionable Tailor, Fitz
patrlck, when you want a fine suit of clothes.
If you desire recommendation, ask any of
his'numerous customers, and you will lie
told that" Fitz." always does his work well—
giving line work, good material and reasona
ble prices.
Sliver and gold plating; electrotyping; ivory
and metal turning; glass and metal drilling.
Locks, keys, seals and key-checks, stencil and
door-plates made to order; knives and surgi
cal instiuments ground and saws filed and set;
parasols and canes mended; musical instru
ments repaired; meerschaum pipes cleaned
and mounted; model making and repairs on
all fancy work and machinery, from a pin to
a locomotive. All kinds of sewing machines
bought, sold and repaired. Come and see the
new sewing machine engine. Hewing Ma
chine Exchange,39 Spring St. de3o tf
Bowling Alley, Billiard and Oyster Saloon,
in the basement of the U. 8. Hotel building,
formerly occupied by the Cucamongu Wine
Depot, a Saloon with a first class stock of
Wines, Liquors, Cigars, etc., etc , and the best
accommodation for customers. No charge
will be made to patrons for the use of Billiard
tables and Alley. A lunch will be served in
the evening. MELCHERT A HTOLL,
novOtf Proprietors.
Moore's Restaurant, on Commercial street,
Is the proper place to go fora good meal, with
a good cup ol coffee or tea to drink with It-
There Is probably no restaurant on t|ie Pacific
coast where so many of the substantial and
so many ofthe luxuries may be had lor 25 cts.
Don't forget the place—Moore's Restaurant,
Commercial street. Private eating rooms have
been neaily fitted up for the accommodation
of ladies. |5-tt
Bancroft A Thayek, Real Estate Brokers,
No. 21 Spring street. City and County Proper
ty Bought, Bold and Exchanged. Loans ne
gotiated, money advanced on Real and Per
sonal securities. Publishers ot the Los Ange
les Real Estate Reporter. declltf
The tide of immigration is steadily set
ting In, and the first thing eastern people do
is to throw away their New York Hats and buy
a new one of Desmond. They say there Is no
comparison between the two. 2%0
The light-running Domestic sewing
macine, the great favorite of the East,
is now to be had at the new furniture
business of Johannsen & Grossen, cor
ner Main and Commercial. *
The new furniture store in Ducom
mun's new building is now open;
Main street, corner Commercial. *
Have you been to the new furniture
store of Johannsen & Grossen, in Du
commun's new building on Main
street, corner Commercial? *
A large lot of furniture from the
East and San Francisco, at the new
furniture establishment in Ducom
mun's new building, Main street, cor
ner Commercial. *
Probate Notice.
JN the matter of the estate or Henry Schmidt
deceased.—Notice Is hereby given by the
undersigned executor of the last will and tes
tament of said Henry Schmidt, deceased, to
the creditors of and all persons having claims
against said deceased to exhibit the same wit h
the necessary vouchers, within four months
from the first publication ofthls notice, to the
undersigned at the offlce of George C. Gibbs,
Attorney, No. i'. t Spring street, Los Angeles
City. J. E. McCOMAS.
I,os Angeles, Cal. Feb. 16,1875. lm
Steam Water Lifter.
»
THE UNDERSIGNED DESIRES TO IN
form the public that he is now erecting
his machine shop on Requina street, near the
R, R Depot, where he may be found, and
will be pleased to see his friends and pa
trons, ALLEN WILCOX.
Jau24-tf I
o <o
CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIAL PAPER.
FRIDAY FEB. 26, 1875.
Dead Again.
By Atlantic and Pacific telegraph
dispatches we learn that the Texas
Pacific Railroad Bill is once more
dead. Before, it died in the person of
Colonel Tom. Scott. This time it is
the lobby that gives up the ghost.
Both the Alta and Chronicle of Tues
day contain dispatches beariag date
of Washington 22d, in which it is
claimed that the refusal of the House
to suspend the rules and take up the
Texas Pacific Bill is conclusive evi
dence that it cannot, pass that body.
It is said that the lobby accept this as
certain defeat and confess themselves
routed, horse, foot and dragoon. How
much of this is true and how much
false we leave the people to judge,
while remembering the fact that from
tbe same source we recently had the
positive assertion that a majority of
the committee was opposed to the bill,
when In reality just the reverse was
the case.
Shaded Streets.
Tlie man who plants a tree bestows
a blessing on posterity. This being
the case, Mayor Beaudry has con
ferred numberless blessings on future
geueiations. He is converting the
hill streets into avenues which, in a
few years will be shaded with the tall
eucalyptus and the waving acacia.
He has set out a line of young trees
along either side of Temple street
West of Bunker Hill Avenue to Pearl
street and along Pearl street North
erly to the reservoirs. Also along
Canal and Reservoir street from the
junction with Short street, Westerly
to near Figueroa streei. Altogether
he has planted out about three thous
and of these trees and they are all
growing finely. The eucalyptus is a
rapid grower and in au almost incred
ible short time these trees will present
a beautiful appearance greatly en
hancing the property in their vicini
ty- '
The Old Californians.
[From the N. Y. Evening Mail, Feb. 12th.]
The old Californians, of the Territorial
days, dined together last evening at the Stu
tervant House, Broadway and Twenty-eighth
streets. Between fifty and sixty gentlemon
sat down to an elegant dinner at 8 o'clock.
Either the climate of California is very pre
servative, or else these pioneers must have
gone there very young, for but few of them
bore the marks of having gone thither thirty
years ago. It will be twenty-five years this
Autnmn since California was admitted as a
State, and is twenty-seven years this month
since gold was discovered there. Among
those present were Commodore C. K. Oarri
son, General Gibson, ex-Governor Rodman
M. Price, 001. W. K. Rankin, Col. George
Leonard and Lieut. Sherwood. The party, a
very sociable one, was full of reminiscences,
and many an incident of early California life
w;;s well told. Some ol those present Had
roughed it in the mines, and whatever may
have been their experience at the time, their
retrospect of it was very Jolly and entertain
ing. Tnough some of those present long since
left the State ofCallfornia for good, they have
brought with thera an enthusiastic admira
tion and even affection for its climate, Its
scenery, and, above all, its Inexhaustible
mineral treasures. The party broke up at a
late hour, after a very enjoyablo evening.
An association entitled "The Asso
ciated Pioneers of the Territorial Days
of California,"—New York—was form
ed on the evening of the banquet and
the following officers were elected for
the ensuing year: President, Gen. H.
Gates Gibson, U. S. A.; Vice-Presi
dent, John Sichesl; Secretary and
Treasurer, Francis D. Clark. The
President and Vice-President are
forty-niners, and Mr. Clark was a
member of Col. Stevenson's regi
ment of New York volunteers, which
served in California during the Mexi
can war. It is contemplated that the
New York Association will number
one thousand members within the
next year.
Words of Caution.
The San Francisco Chronicle, which
has always maintained a friendly at
titude toward the agricultural inter
ests of the Stute, is of the opinion that
in organizing a Grangers' Business
Association, the Grangers are over
shooting the mark and undertaking
enterprises beyond the design and
purpose for which the organization
was intended. It claims that when
the farmers undertake to run mercan
tile business, manage factories, build
railroads and establish transportation
companies on a large scale, they are
venturing into deep water. These
suggestions of the Chronicle may not
be generally well received, although
they are doubtless well intended and
are certainly worthy of thoughtful
consideration. ' All business that may
be conducted under tlie immediate su
pervision of the farmer may be ven
tured upon with safety. He asks
nothing but what is right; does not
exact exorbitant commissions, nor
wish to grow rich at the expense of
his neighbors and co - operators.
Grange stores, Grange local railroads,
Grange agencies and Grange agricul
tural implement houses are well for
the community and safe for the in
vestors. They are simply competit
ors, and while they injure no trade or
business, they help to prevent monop
olies and corners and offer that compe
tition which secures fair prices. But
grand central organizations are nei
ther so safe nor profitable. Their cap
ital is supplied by the farmer, while
the business is conducted by agents
who approach very nearly to that
class to free the farmer from which
the Grange was organized—tke mid
dlemen. It will do no harm, and may
be the means of saving many hard
earned dollars, if the farmer carefully
studies the expensive schemes con
ceived by city brains to be maintained
by Granger support. It is always well
to know who and what number is to
be benefitted.
An Independent Newspaper Man.
Frank M. Pixley is once more
wielding the editorial quill of the
Chronicle, and his pungent articles
have drawn the fire of his enemies,
some of whom denounce him as a
journalistic charlatan and a political
ground and lofty tumbler. A part of
these charges at least are errors. Mr.
Pixley is not a newspaper charlatan,
hack nor fraud. He is not a charla
tan, because he writes well and forci
bly, aud the dictionary says a charla
tan is one who makes unwarrantable
pretensions. He is not a newspaper
hack because he is not compelled to
write for a living and only writes
when he feels like it and has some
thing to write about. He is not a
journalistic fraud, because he is an
educated and talented gentleman, with
brains enough to think for himself and
independence enough to write what
he thinks. We have worked by the
side of Frank "Pixley, and we like
him as a man aud as a newspaper
writer. His articles are a reflex ofthe
Man—pointed, forcible and alive. One
may quarrel with his opinions, but uo
one can mistake his meaning. He
does not dribble platitudes nor sail his
croft by the compass of some old fogy
around the corner. What he writes is
what he thinks, and this is more than
can be said of a great many newspaper
writers. Mr. Pixley's political opin
ions are his own. He is not the kind
ofa man who is likely to remain ln a
party longer than that party's princi
ples meet his approval, and he is just
the kind of a man who will go into
another party the moment its princi
ples please him better than those of
the party with which he has been act
ing. He is an independent politician,
an Independent writer, an independent
thinker, and, being rich, is an inde
pendent man generally.
Defeat or Scott's Texas Pacific Bill in
the House
Washington, February 22d.—C01.
Thomas A. Scott and the Texas Pacific
Railroad lobby met with a most unex
pected defeat in the House to-day.
Houghton, of California, who is a
member of the Pacific Railroad Com
mittee, has engineered the hill a long
time and offered it to-day, not for pas
sage, but in the shape of a resolution
directing its consideration on Wed
nesday evening next. On ordering
the main question, the vote stood by
tellers 151 to 62. This made the lobby
confident of success; but another
question had to be put and that was:
Will the House suspend the rules and
pass the resolution ? This called for
the yeas and nays, while the rules re
quired that there should be two-thirds
to carry it, the proposition did not re
ceive even a majority vote, standing
117 yeaa to 129 nays. New England,
New York and Northwestern delega
tions voted almost solidly against it.
The Pennsylvania Republicans were
generally for it, and the Democrats
against it. Maryland cast a solid vote
for it. The South, though, was di
vided, and there is where Mr. Scott
made A wrong count, for he expected
to get the full Southern delegations.
Another effort is to be made to pass
the bill; but in view of to-day's vote
it would seem to be hopeless.
Congressional News.
Washington, February 24th.—The
report of the Senate Judiciary Com
mittee as t* the legal obligation ofthe
Government to carry out the contract
with the Pacific Mail Company for the
China mail service, states in effect
that owing to the fact of the steamers
for the service not being tendered for
nearly a year after the time required,
the Government was released from
the contract.
The Cabinet held a session to-day..
The proposals of the Pacific railroads
were discussed and it was agreed that
nothing should be done with refer
ence thereto at present.
The Interior Department has sent to
California the patent for the rancho
Najalayegua, in accordance with the
recent survey, to which all the con
tending parties have given assent.
At the instance of David Felseu
held, of California, the Senators and
Representatives have united in a let
ter to the Secretary of War,requesting
that troops be stationed in San Diego
county to protect the stage road be
tween San Diego and Fort Yuma.
Washington, February 25th.—In
the Senate yesterday, bills fopthe ad
mission of Colorado and New Mexico,
as States, were passed.
In the House the night was passed
in fillibustertng on the sundry civil
appropriation bill.
The Senate has confirmed the nom
ination of John A. Campbell as third
assistant Secretary of State; George
W. French, as Secretary of Wyoming
Territory; E. Calloway, Secretary of
Montana Territory; N. W. Brazee, as
Assistant Judge of the Supreme Court
of Colorado. The Senate also con
firmed Miller as receiver of public
moneys atSusanville, California; T.R.
Harrison receiver of public moneys at
Oregon City, Oregon, Wade, as Reg
ister at same place.
Appropriations for California.
Washington, February 22d.—The
River and Harbor biU passed the
House to-day, containing in its pro
visions $805 for San Diego harbor,
$10,000 for Oakland, $30,000 for Wil
mington, and $15,000 for clearing out
snags in the Sacramento river.
The Sandwich island Treaty.
New York, February 24th.—David
A. Wells has given an opinion on the
subject of the Sandwich Island recip
rocity treaty. He considers it not ad
vantageous to the United States, but a
fraud to deplete th* teraty. There is
only one element of importance in the
treaty, sugar.
A Conservative Caucas
New Orleans, February 24th.—
The Conservative caucus has agreed to
accept the Wheeler compromise by a
vote of thirty-four to thirty-three.
French Senate to Organize.
Pabis, February 24th.—The Assem
bly to-day finally passed the bill for
the organization of the Senate by a
vote of 548 to 241.
San Francisco News.
San Fkancisco. February 25th.—
Louis Hansen, millwright by trade.but
more recently employed as a waiter in
the Grand Central Hotel, Oakland,
attempted to kill his wife and after
ward end his own life on Tuesday
laiit. Hansen had been married about
a year, but owing to his intemperate
habits his wife had left him, seeking
protection with a friend in Oak
land. On Tuesday Hanson came to
the house aud asked his wife to go
with him to a lawyer's, to institute
proceeding for divorce. On reaching
the yard he fired two shots at her,
taking effect in her face and neck. He
then turned the pistol on himself, but
it missed fire. He then ran to Broad
way wharf and threw himself into the
water, but was rescued by the by
standers and taken to jail. Mrs. Han
son's wounds are severe, though not
necessarily fatal.
No conclusion has yet been reached
in the examination of the affairs of the
Tax Collector's offlce.
Something About the Mountain
Meadow Massacre.
Sakt Lake, February 24th.— This
morning George C. Bates, lawyer, of
the firm of Sutherland & Bates, pub
lished a card saying that he has been
served with an order from the Second
District Court of Judge Bereman,
Beaver, Utah, to appear before him on
the first Monday in April, to show
cause why lie should not be punished
for contempt and disbarred; the of
fence, as stated, being that eight per
sons, indicted for murder at the
Mountain Meadow massacre, had em
ployed his firm,which had endeavored
to procure an order from the Judge
accepttiig bail in the amount of $10,
--000, each of the parties having fled
beyond the jurisdiction of the Court
and offering to appear for trial if no
arrests would be made.
A Railroad Defeat-After the Gamblers.
Carson, February 24th. —Iv the
Senate the Central" Pacific and Vir
ginia and Truckee Railroads were de
feated In their attempt to kill the
Assembly bill defining the manner of
assessing railroads. The objectionable
point to railroads was that which
enacts that in fixing the value of the
railroad, the Assessor shall assess it at
its true cash value as au integral part
of the complete continuous and oper
ated line, not as so much land iron,
rails, ties and couplings.
In the Assembly the Senate bill for
the suppression of gambling was
taken up, and after argument rejected
by a vote of 29 to 17. During the de
bate McDonnell, of Storey county,
stated that it was currently reported
that $10,000 were used to defeat the
bill; that $1,500 had been paid to the
Chairman of the Judiciary Committee,
$500 each to members from Storey
county, and the balance among East
ern members. Wren, the Chairman
of the Judiciary Committae, repelled
the charge and demanded *an investi
gation.
Robbery of the Julian Stage.
The stftge which left this city on
Monday morning for the mines was
stopped by two highwaymen about
dusk in the evening, while ascending
the Coleman grade, a distance of seven
miles from Julian City. Tlie robbers
demanded Wells, Fargo & Co.'s treas
ure box, which contained $1,000. The
driver refused, telling them lie would
not deliver it; that if they wanted it
they must take it from him. One of
ibeni covered him wilh a double-bar
reled gun, while the other, who was
armed with a revolver, climbed up and
passed down the box. They opened it
and took out the money, disturbing
nothing else. There were four pas
sengers aboard the stage, but when at
the foot of the steep grade, three of
them got out and walked on ahead,
the remainining passenger being an
invalid. As soon as the box was
taken the robbers ordered the driver
to go on, aud as he proceeded lie heard
the blows struck on the box in break
ing it open. Ou returning, the box
was found with letters, etc., intact,
nothing having beeu taken but mon
ey.—<Sa?i Diego Union.
The Next Excursion.
Editor Herald: As lam receiv
ing a number of letters and inquiries
as to whether I intend to run another
excursion train to and from "the
States," please make an item that I
shall leave San Francisco about the sth
of May, and returning leave Boston,
Mass., about the 15th of June. Tick
ets sold to and from any part of the
country. For particulars address me
San Gabriel, Cal. Yours, etc.,
N. C. Carter.
MARRIED
STAMER—LOMENBEIN.—In Los Angeles,
February 25, 1875, by Justice Gray, Mr. M.W.
Stainer, native of Germany, now resident of
Los Angeles, to Miss it. Lomenbein, also a
native of Germany, and now resident of Los
Angeles.
NEW TO-DAY.
I. O. O. JF.
NOTICE.-Tlie Officers und Members ef
I .OS ANGELES Lodge No. 35. I O. 0. F.
are hereby notified to attend the regular meet
ing of their Lodge on WEDNESDAY evening,
March 3d, at 7 I A p. m., as business of special
importance will be brought before the Lodge.
A full attendance is particularly requested.
By order,
BEN. A. STANARD, N. O.
A. Frank, Secretary. feb2Btd
Irishmen, Please take Notice.
THERE will be a general meeting held in
Steams' Hall on SUNDAY, February 28th
at 2 (I'd. i, k P.M. Ali Irishmen of City and
County who wish to participate in the celebra
tion of St. Patrick's Day, are cordially invited
to attend. By request of Committee of Ar
rangements. HUGH KEEN AN,
feb2e-3t Secretary'-
SPECIAL
AUCTION SALE
OF
Household Goods,
ON
Saturday, February 27th.,
Consisting in part of
One Parlor Rep Suit,
One Hair Cloth Suit,
Extension Tables,
Crockery and Glassware,
Clocks. Brooms,
Marsailles Quilts,
Cold Hunting-case Watch, Etc.
Sale to commence at
I I O'clock A. M.
JONES A BLAND.
E. W. NOYES, Auctioneer. feb26-2t
COLLECTIONS
ON
Panamint and Coso,
Made through reliable connections and with
promptness. J. L. WARD,
feb2ltf 36 Main street, j
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
THE THIRD ANNUAL
Grand Masquerade Ball
' OF THE
TURN-VEREIN GERMANIA,
To come oft" at
TURNER II A LI-
Saturday Eve'ng, March 6th 75
Will surpass anything of the kinil before
given ln the City of Los Angeles, no money
having been spared to make It an entl'c suc
cess.
Admission (for Gentleman and
Ladies in masks) fciJ.SO
V il 111 i-.sion (tot spectators) each 1.00
Tichets for masks, only to be had from the
following Committee:
Mr. UI'.INECKK, E. NKITZKE, J. SCUHOEIIKK.
at the Store ol M anxskn Bros., cor. Main and
8d SJt*.; and i I.' stiiNtir.KU, No. r>2 Main HI.
Spectators tickets can be had from all the
members of the society, and on the evening
ofthe Ball at the door. Reserved seats can be
procured at the store of L. Lewin, successor to
Brodrick & Co., ut 5o cents extra.
Kn trance ol masks from the rear of t he Hall.
Two Valuable Prizes,
now ou oxhlui ion at the Jewelry store of
Fisher A Thatcher. >vlll be giveu away, tine
prixeeskch to ihebe* Ludy and Genlioman
sh ; icter. All ainpl supply of
COST crnycES,
Entir ly new aud ma.lo to order for the occa
sion t.. 'ihe Sne.eiy. euii be procured al
Turners' Haii, Monday March 2d,
from 2to li and from 7 to!' V. M.
Towards the evening ofthe Ball, n lady will
be present to wait on ladies who wish to select
costumes.
At 12 o'clock, unmasking and the tloor lo be
free for ail dancers.
Arrangements will be made to have a
GOOD SUPPEIt.
All improper persons will be excluded from
the Ball. <cb24td
Don't go to a Grocery Store to buy Li
quors, or to a Liquor Store to buy
Bacon.
LIPS, CRAIGUE & CO.,
Importers and dealer* in
(foreign and Domestic
WINES. LIQUORS
AND
CIGARS,
No. 2 Arcadia Block. Los Angeles St.,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
LIPS, CRAIGUE & CO..
Take pleasure In announcing that Ihey have
established It! the Cily Ot Los Angeles, th(!
most extensive and complete
LIQUOR, WINE,
SB>
AND
CIGAR HOUSE
In California, outside of San Francisco, and
are pre pare J to offer to lieiuil dealers, bar
gains which cannot be equalled.
Champagnes,
Brandies,
Whiskeys,
Cigars,
And all kinds of
CA.SK OOOJDB
appertaining to the business, of the best de
scription and most favorite brands, will be re
eelved hy eaeli steamer.
REMEMBER THAT
LIPS, CRAIGUE & CO.,
Can and will give you better bargains than
yep can obtain in Han Francisco. Come and
examine our stock, ascertain the prices and
become satisfied. foblS-Cm
BEAUTIFY YOUR HOMES!!!
JUST ARRIVED AND IN FINK CONDl
tion, choice varieties of
Pears,
Apples,
-i Peaches,
Prunes,
Apricots,
Plums
Ktc, Etc., Mto.
Choicest Varieties of
FOREIGN GRAPES.
Fine lot of
Monterey Cyprus and Pines.
From on« to three years old
-— ALSO. —-
Jriow«?l'ill|f Shntlis,
Tallies having ordered by nio had better
call at once. Apply at tho
Alden Fruit Drying Works.
GEO. B. DAVIS,
—L Proprietor.
■' " «J" .
PRY GOODS.
rhe Baxaar, corner of Main and Request* .
A streets,
Lias decided to close out their
J£ntlre Fall and Winter stock of goods . 1
1
pelow cost, for thirty days only ,
A nother opportunity to buy Goods at
will not be found in this cily.
the prices at the Bazaar,
y\>id you will not tell to buy.
Remember the store, opposite the U. S.
Ihe el. leb2o-lin
REAL ESTATE BROKERS.
O. N. .TONKA. J. 11. BLAND.
JONES & BLAND,
Real Estate, Money
ehokbbi
ANT)
AUCTIONEERS.
L-jUct'i issous TO NOYES & DURFKE IN
0 Auctioneering and to RUGGLKS A
BLAND in Real Estate. Both branches M
business carried on 11s formerly.
E. W. NOYES
Retained in charge of the Auction Depart*
ment.
The Division of Large Ranches and
Auction Sales Thereof
A. SPECIALTY.
We have also a number of small pieces ol
land, suitable for homesteads, lv and around
1 lie city. Part ies in search of such will do well
to give us a call. Conveyance free of charge
to see any property we have for sale. Busi
ness entrusted to onr can will recive strict
attention.
OFFICE AND SALESROOM —At the old
Auction Stahd, corner of Temple Block,
Spring street.
Ja.iitr JONES & BLAND.
CHOICE LAND FOR RENT.
000 O I* J3 N
OF
A. No. 1 I.juml to Kent.
More than half of It Moist stand, adjoining
the new city of San Fernando, and within
100 yards of the Railroad Depot. Two crops
can he raised each .war. Apply at the ollice ot
LA CRONICA.
Jan24-tf
LOS ANGELES CITY
Homestead Association!
HOMESTEADS
JN THK
City of Los Angeles!
106 feet front by 176 feet deep,
One Square from the line ofthe
Main street Horse Railroad.
• S300"00!!!
Payable in Monthly Instalments
— of —
TWENTY DOLLARS EACH!
First Instalment Due Jan. Ist, 1875.
Lois lo be Distributed among Shareholders
on or about
MAY IST, 1875.
The land ofthe above Association Is situat
ed on Washington Street, near Figueroa,
One and a half miles from the
Court House.
The finest resiliences In the city are In lis
vicinity, and the pipes of the Los Angeles
Cily Water Company ure soon to be extended
to il,
TITLE PERFECT.
BOARD OF* DIRECTORS :
O. W. CHILDS, President,
HON. J. G. DOWNEY Treasurer
EUGENE MEYKR. DR. E. A. PREUSS.
11. McLELLAN Secretary.
For further information, apply to either ol
(he officers of the Association.
Subscription list at the ofllce of the Secre
tary. de2ll f
LEWIS LEWIN,
SUCCESSOR TO BRODRICK <ft CO.,
At the well known
BOOK AND MUSIC STORE,
Spring Htreet, adjoining the Postofflce,
Is ollering to his friends mid the public in
general, the finest assortment of Standard
POETICAL and PROSE WORKS,
Juvenile and Miscellaneous Books, Plain
and Musical Work Boxes, Musical De
canters, Writing Desks, Portfolios,
LADIES' AND GENT'S WALLETS.
Guitars, Violins, Accordcons, Banjos,
Concertinas, Flutes,
And many otuer useful articles suitable for
Presents.
FINE STATIONERY, BLANK BOOKS
PRAYER BOOKS, BIBLES
And hundreds of other articles, too numer
ous to mention.
No pains will be spared to meet the wants
or the public, and I hope to merit a fair share
of patronage.
Jan 3-tf LEWIS LEWIN.
To the Ladies.
FOR the prettiest and most tastefully and
elegantly dressed Dolls, go to the
CUYAS BAZAAR,
Next to the Pico House.
A Million Toys for Sale.
• , de
11 EMOVEI).
I. HAUCH.
MERCHANT TAILOR,
Has REMOVED WTO II is NEW STORE
in
Ducommun's New Block,
No. 4 Commercial street. A NEW STOCK
just received. Those desiring a
NEAT-FITTING SUIT
Give him a call. I. HAUCH.
Los Angeles, Feb. 3d. febB-lm
MISCELLANEOUS.
THE REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATES
Of Los Angeles.
s9t*>oldtWase*'o' Meeting:.
THK STOCKHOLDERS OK THK READ
Estate Association of Los Angeles, are
requested to meet at A o'clock i>. M. on Satur
day, February 27th, 1875, In the ofllce of Moore
A Kell. her. Temple street, second door irom
Spring, to select their lots. If two or more
members select the same lot the choice will
he sold Tor a premium.
By order ol Ihe Trustees,
JOHN R. BRIEKLY,
febatrS Secretary.
TH E BEST STOCK OF
CLOTHING,
DRY GOODS,
FURNISHING GOODS,
BOOTS,
SHOES,
HATS,
ETC., ETC., ETC.,
AT THE
Very Lowest Prices,
Are to be fourd at the
"IMPORTANT"
Under the
LAFAYETTE HOTEL.
NEW GOODS
RECEIVED ON EVERY NTKAMKH.
tehd f
The Aldine Company's
NEW PUBLICATIONS
SOLI) ONLY BY SUBSCRIPTION.
THE ALDINE: THE ART JOURNAL OF
AMERICA.
This splendid enterprise is notonly well es
tablished in every feature, hut is being con
stantly developed and Imeroved. it to-day
stands without a rival in the whole world of
periodical literature. The beautiful dog-por
trait, " Man's Unselfish Friend," a eardrop
prevented to every subscriber, is a decided hit
and will, If possible, add lo the popularity
Which this work lias gained. The Art union
leatut" also promises great and henitleenl re
sults, in arousing public Interest in ihe One
arts. Circulars ami tall Information on ap
plication.
Tarts I, 11, 111 and IV, are now ready:
SUTTON'S
Leisure Hour MiNeellaity
To he Completed iv forty parls, issued fort
nightly. Kach part will contain an elegant
front-piece, originally engraved on steel for
tho London Art Journal,
RE PUODUC I IN a
At a price within the popular reach, engrav
ings never before offerM at less than five
times tin" amount. These plates have been
the attraction of
THE LONDON ART JOURNAL.
Each part will contain 26 quarto pages, In
cluding tiie heavy front-piece, on heavy plate
paper. A superb title-page, richly illumin
ated in ied and gold, wi 11 be given with the
first par!, and the printing ol' Ihe entire work
will lie a worthy representation ofthe "Alden
Press," Which is a guarantee of something
beautiful an 1 valuable,
At a Cost of 25 cts. a Part.
I'AUTsI, 11 and 111, auk JUST PUBLISHED.
THE ART JOURNAL,
Complete in twelve monthly parts,at $1 each.
Reproducing the best full-page Illustra
tions from the earlier volumes
of Thk A i. dink.
Each monthly part will contain six supurb
plates, with accompanying descriptive matter,
and whether fur binding or framing, will be
entirely beyond competition in price or artis
tic characier. Every impression will be most
carefully taken on the finest toned paper and
no pains will be spared to make this the
richest production of a pren which baa won
iv a raarvelously short time, a world-wide
reputation.
CEMS FROM THE ALDINE,
ESPECIALLY ASSORTED FOR SCRAP
BOOK ILLUSTRATIONS AND DBA II-
Om CLASS COPIES.
A large collection of pictures of dilt'ereiit
..izesandon almost every conceivable sub
ject have been put up iv an attractive envi l
ope und are now ottered at a price intended to
make I hem popular iv every sense.
Envelope No. 1 (containing 50beautiful en
gravings) is now ready, und will be sent, post
age paid, to any address for ONE DOLLAR.
A liberal diseounl to agents and teachers.
Scinp-Uoolis.
A splendid assortment of SCRAP-BOOKS
have been expressly prepared for the holiday
season and no present OT more permanent in
terest can he selected for gentleman or lady,
old or young.
No. I—Hall-bound,cloth sides,gilt-back,
260 pp., 12x10 inches 85 00
No. 2— Half-bound, cloth sides,gilt-back,
500 pp., 12x18 inches 7 00
No. 3—Full morocco, beveled boards,gilt
and antique, very rich, 500 pp 12 00
Lettered to order in gold at 25 cts. per line.
Sentby moll postpaid on receipt of the price.
THE ALDINE PASSE-PARTOUTS.
in compliance with repeated requests, the
proprietors of The Ai.dine have prepared
Impressions of many of their most beautiful
plates for passe-partout framing.
The cuts arc mounted on a beautifully tint
ed azure nial, with a handsome red border
line. To attach the glass, it is only left for
the customer to paste and fold over AO already
attached border, and this may be done by a
child.
27 subjects, 12x15inches,25c: with glass,soc.
Six of t his size for $1, when select ion is left to
publishers.
6 subjects, inches, 20c; with glass, 45c.
7 subjects, tt%xB% Inches, 15c.; with glass, 40c.
12 subjects, Itxltf inches, 5Uc.; with glass, $1.
Sent by mall, without glass, post-paid, lor
price.
C>u.iivaH**ei*s Wauted.
THE ALDINE COMPANY,
5B Maiden Lane, New York.
declB
PROBATE NOTICE.
IN THE PROBATE COURT, STATE OF
California, county of Los Angeles.—ln the
matter of the estate of Ignacio Coronel, de
ceased.—Pursuant lo an order of this Court
made this day, notice is hereby given, thai
Tuesday, the second day of March, A. D. 1875,
at 10 o'clock a. m. of said day. Nt the Court
Room of this Coast, in the Cily und County of
Los Angeles, has been appointed forbearing
the application of A. F. Coronel, praying that
a document now on tile In this Court, purport
ing to be tlie last Will and testament of Igna
cio Coronel, deceased, be admitted to Probate
and that letters temtamentary be Issued there
on to A. F. Coronel, at which time and place
all persons Interested therein may appearand
contest the same. A. W. POTTB, clerk.
[skai.] By E. H. Owkn, Deputy,
ijos Angeles, Feb. 18th, 1875. VMmhH
gflt ECLIPSE WTJD MILLS ABE THE CHEAPEN
*° mar ket when power and durability
P Have very little Friction, and Run
qHHra >« Lightest Winds. Its regu
~^Osv'■ lation is Quick and sure. Will not
«e£ Pack or Freeze in Winter. Every
£3 M Stock Farmer. Cheese Factory and
2=} /M\ Dairy should have a Wind Mill.
f-> Al I % A xo ft. Mill will pump water for joo head
f9 nils of stock. Our 14 and lift. Mills shell corn
ter //111 and grind fe«d. We build W iiul Mills from
//111 10 to 60 ft. In diameter, also antl-freeilng
jSmU Force rumps, Pump HeadsandCylinders.
•3 l/xjWrJA nrive Wall Polatt warranted to k«ep out
Ssnd For Circular,
SffOPKjH {St;*--'****""****
J. W. CLARK & CO.,
ANAHEIM.
Hole Agents for l,os Angeles t unuty.
JanSO-lm

xml | txt