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The Wallace miner. [volume] (Wallace, Idaho) 1907-current, February 24, 1916, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85007266/1916-02-24/ed-1/seq-3/

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NOTICE TO DELINQUENT STOCK
HOLDERS.
Office of the Snowshoe Minins Com
nanv Mullan, Idaho, February 16,
1916.' * .
Notice is hereby given that there is
delinquent upon the following describ
ed stock' on account of an assessment
of five (6) mills per share, levied on
the 16th day of January, 1916, the sev
>ral amounts set opposite the names
it the respective shareholders as fol
lows, to-wit:
Cert. Shares Aint.
2.50
,50
No.
No.
Name
Anderson, Elma ....2072
Andrews, Arthur J . ,1383
Andrews, Arthur J ..1384
Andrews, Arthur J ..1385
Andrews, Arthur J ..1386
Andrews, Arthur J . .1387
Alvord, Attwater B .1298
Allen, G Y
Anderson, Chris ....2562
Adams, L R
Bagnell, B P
Bagnell, B P
Bagnell, B P
Berwald, Henry ....2355
Btrwald, Henry ....2356
Bartzen, Clem
Beck, W C ..
Bean, Jas A .1549
Bean, S C .
Butor, Paul
But-or, Paul
Butor, Paul
Bowie, A L
Brown, Anna Rae ..1103
Blackesley, A M ....1629
Blackesley, Mrs Flo 1628
Bunday, Geo F
Bunday, Geo F
Bunday, Geo F
Bunday, Geo F
Bunday, Geo F
Bartlett, Mr Grant ..2236
Bartlett, Mr Grant ..2237
Bartlett, Mr Grant ..2238
Bartlett, Mr Grant ..2239
Bartlett, Mr Grant ..2240
Cook, Florence P ...2123
Cochran, Willie J ..2820
Cedarerans, B H ....2509
Cartwright, W A ...2581
Collins, Alex J
Carmichael, A S ....2518
Davis, Mike .
Dow, T H ...
Dow, T H ...
Doran, Mary J
Drouin, A T .
Drouin, A T .
Day, Jerome J
Dubois, Louis
Edwards, Leulla Mrs 2678
Etterstad, K H _2299
Ell wood, Geo
Ellwood, Geo
England, O G
Fisher, Henry
Fisher, Henry
Fisher, Henry
Fisher, Henry
Fisher, Henry
Fisher, Henry
Ford & Stimmel ..,.2115
Gimble Henry
Gearon, P J .
Gearon, P J .
Gearon, P J .
Gearon, P J .
Gearon, P J .
Gearon, P J .
Gillman, D F
Gill man, D F
Graff, Otto ..
Graft Otto ..
Grisell, T J .1029
Grisell, T J ..2122
Grover, L P
Grover, L P .1760
Griffith, J H .
Hanson, Henry
Hanson, Henry
Heilbronner Co
Helm, Chas ...
Heilbronner, J A ....2450
Heilbronner, J A ....2451
Harrington. G B ....2473
Ho wart h, C
Howarth, C .2529
Howarth, C
Howarth & Stroh ..1933
Howarth & Stroh .. 1934
Hutton, A .2227
Hutton, A .2228
Hutton, A ...
Hutton, A ...
Hutton, A ...
Hoag. S W .
Hoag, S W .
Howarth, J F
Howarth, J F
Howarth, J F
H-owarth, J F
Howarth, J F
Howarth, J F
How'arth, J F
Howarth, J F
How'arth, J F
Howarth, J F
Howarth, J F
Howarth, Jas F ....2724
Herbst, Joseph
Hester, Herbert .... 1718
Hart, Mr ...
Ingram, C W
Irvine, H T
Koch, Ii J ..
Koch, H J ..
Koelbl, Mike
Koelbl, Mike
Koelbl, Mike
Keats, Louis
Keargard, H M ....2273
Keargard, H M ....2636
K,ragtorp, Anton ....1667
Kennedy, Thos G ..2222
Laldley, L L .
Laidley, L L .
Laldley, L L .
Laldley, L L .
Laldley, L L .
Lansing, S S .
Lansing, S S.
Lansing, S S.
Lansing, S S.
Lundgren, E .
Loop, H G ...
McGee, J ....
McGlinn, M S
McLeod, Harry A ...2572
McPhail, S A
McKay, H D .
Martin, Perry
Martin, Perry
Martin, Perry
Martin, Perry
Martin, Perry
Martin, Perry
Martin, Perry
Martin, Perry
500
.50 ;
.50 :
.50 j
.50
5.00 J
2000 10.00 |
5.00 |
5.00 :
2000 10.00
3000 15.00 I
1000
100
100
100
100
100
...
1672
1000
2835
1000
1499
1513
5.00 [
5.00 I
2.50 [
1.00 i
5.00 !
5.00
5000 25.00 j
3000 15.00 i
2.50
2.50
.50 j
5.00 I
1523
1000
500
200
2424
1000
1000
85
2805
.2843
500
2844
500
1809
100
500
1000
i
1000 5.00
5.00 1
5.00
5.00
5.00
1630
1000
2145
1000
2402
1000
2467
1000
2468
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
5000 25.00
2000 10.00
5000 25.00
2000 10.00
1000
5.00
2272
2000 10.00
2398
1000
5.00
2414
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
2000 10.00
1000 5 00
1000 5.00
500 2.50
1000 5.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
5000 25.00
2412
1857
2431
2432
2429
2430
2757
2758
1537
1902
100
.50
500 2.50
500 2.50
500 2.50
500 2.50
100 .50
3000 15.00
1000 5.00
1000 6.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
200 1.00
200 1.00
1000 5.00
500 2.50
2000 10.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
500 2.50
3000 15.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
2000 10.00
3000 15.00
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1936
2031
2165
2167
2824
2825
,2827
,2379
2380
1198
1970
172 1
1880
2575
2576
1985
1763
2528
2532
6.00
2849
1000
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
2000 10.00
3000 15.00
2850
2851
1396
1397
2510
2597
2687
2697
2698
2700
2701
2702
2703
2708
2717
2615
1000
5.00
5000 25.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
2000 10.00
2500 12.50
2000 10.00
3000 15.00
2740
2750
2304
2305
2602
2603
2823
202
5.00
1000
2000 10.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
3000 15.00
3000 15.00
3000 15.00
50Q0 26.00
500 2.50
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
2500 12.50
2000 10.00
1000 6.00
1000 5.00
1000 6.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
500 2.50
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000* 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
1000 5.00
500 2.50
5000 25.00
2651
2652
2653
2654
2657
2658
2659
2662
2664
480
2011
2759
2665
2680
1701
2332
2333
2439
2440
2441
2442
2445
•2456
Martin, Perry .2457
Martin, C D .
Mallette, C E
Mowery, Dr Chas R 1247
Mowery, Dr Chas R 1894
Mowery, Dr Chas R 1895
Mowery, Dr Chas R 1896
Mowery, Dr Chas R 1897
Mowery, Dr Chas R 2135
Mowbry, Dr Chas R 2136
Mowery, Dr Chas R 2137
Mowery, Dr Chas R 2138
Mowery, Dr Chas R 2139
Mowery, Dr Chas R 2140
Muller, Arthur
Mitchell, S B
Mitchell, S B
Martin, C ....
Nichols, Walter J ..1489
Nichols, Walter J ..2110
Nichols, Walter J ..2403
Northrup, F H
Noltlng, E L .
Olson, Allen J .-2647
Olson, Allen J .
Olson, Allen J .
Presley, Mrs Winni
2801
2266
866
2606
5.00
1000
,2868
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
2000 10.00
500 2.50
1000 5.00
200 1.00
4000 20.00
2591
1740
1428
5.00
..
2667
5000 25.00
2645
3000 15.00
2000 10.00
1000 5.00
2357
fred
Pilgrims, Wm M ....2775
Fohlman, Edw .
1561
Paul, H M .ms
Paul. H M .'...1464
! Paul, H M .
P au J. H M .
Paul, U M .
£ au !' » .
1 aul, H M
Peterson, l.illian A.. 1594
Pickrell, W B .2633
Roberts, J T ...
Roberts, J T ...
R°y. Cora .
R°y. Cora .
1000
1000
1000
1000
1000
moo
1000
300
5250
500
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
ed
:s3
:S4
!85
.00
'86
87
5.00
1.50
26.
448
50
449
500
.0
13
2000
2000
1000
10.Oi
10 00
-
| Rand, C D .1813
j Rand, CD.
Rand, C 1).
Rand, C D.
Read, H B.
5.00
-1815
.. .,18*7
_1828
1000
5 0 '
1000
5.00
1000
1000
5.00
1656
; Rutke, HE .2082
: Seheave, Ida .
j Stroh, Fred .2103
Saklnson, Chas
J Smith, Dr W A _2311
| Schroeder, Walter ..2312
| Schroeder, Walter ..2313
: Schroeder, Walter ..2314
[Sharp & Irvine
I SRarp & Irvine _2546
5.00
I
5.00 1
- nfl |
»°00 i
r no i
Knn
Jr?
1 /.5o
„ 5 ^^n
2 5° |
10.00
10.00 !
1.00
1.00
.50 I
1.00
10.00 |
5.00 !
25^00 |
5.00 |
25.00
5.00
12.50 !
50.00
2.50
1000
5.00
;i
1000
5.00
20
.10
791
250
5000
100Q
1.25 i
25.00
5.00
1000
1000
I .vis
1000
5000
[ Sirginson, Ethel _2539
I Schedln, Alfred .2767
[ St Jean, J E .2627
i Smith, C ....
! Smith, Neil A
Smith, Neil A .2641
j Smith, Neil A .2642
i Sutherland, F S -1194
Sutherland, F S ....1195
Sutherland, F S ....1196
j Sutherland, F S ....1153
2.501Thornburn, E B ....2623
I Tilllnghart, Carrie
1000
1000
3500
1000
2689
1215
500
2000
2000
200
200
100
200
2000
1000
2616
2673
2261
2057
2315
Woods, O Chas _ 223
Woods & Keats _ 210 10000
Woody, Flora P ....1269
Wallace, Wm
Weise, Peter
Stone. C S .
And ln accordance with law so many |
i shares of each parcel of such stock as ]
may be necessary will be sold on the
15th day of March, 1916, at 3:00 p. m.
of said day at the office of the com
papy, Mullan, Idaho, to pay the delin
quent assessment thereon, together j
with the costs of advertising and ex- [
nenses of seiIg
j
II
1 Thompson, A L
Wood, Clark ..
Wilkinson, H T
Wiese, Peter ..
5000
1000
5000
1000
2500
500
1584 1000
2316 1000
2782 2500
5.00
5.00
12.50
H. G. LOOP, j
Secretary Snowshoe Mining Company, [
Mullan. Idaho.
F17-M9-4t [
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Office of the Flagstaff Mining Com
pany, Wallace, Idaho, February 17,
1916.
Notice is hereby given that at a
meeting of the board of directors of
the Flagstaff Mining company, held at
the office of the company, on the 17th
day of February, 1916, an assessment
of two (2) mills per share was levied
upon the outstanding capital stock of
the corporation, payable on or before
the 20th day of March, 1916, to F. P.
Candee, secretary-treasurer, at the
office of the company, 308 Third street,
Wallace. Idaho.
Any stock upon which this assess
ment remains unpaid on the 20th day
of March, 1916, will be delinquent and
advertised for sale at public auction
and unless payment is made before
will be sold on the 15th day of April.
1916, at 2:00 p. m. of said day at the
office of the company, 308 Third street,
Wallace, Idaho, to pay the delinquent
assessment thereon, together with the
costs of advertising and expenses of
sale.
F. P. CANDEE,
Secretary-Treasurer of the Flagstaff
Mining Company; 308 Third Street,
Wallace, Idaho.
F24-Mrl6-4t
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Office of the Empire Mining & Devel
oping Company, Limited, Wallace,
Idaho, December 23, 1915.
Notice is hereby given that at a
meeting of the board of directors of
the Empire Mining & Developing Com
pany, Limited, held at the office of the
company on the 29th day of November,
1915, assessment No. 7 of five (5) mills
per share was levied upon the out
standing capital stock of the corpora
tion, payable on or before the 15th
day of January, 1916, to Ida Seheave,
secretary, at the office of the com
pany, 608 Cedar street, Wallace, Idaho.
Any stock upon which this assess
ment remains unpaid on the 15th day
of January, 1916, will be delinquent
anu advertised for sale at public auc
tion. and unless payment is made be
fore will be sold on the 15th day of
February, 1916, at 8:00 p. m. of said
day at the office of the company, 608
Cedar street, Wallace, Idaho, to pay
the delinquent assessment thereon, to
gether with the costs of advertising
and expenses of sale.
IDA SCHEAVE,
Secretary Empire Mining & Develop
ing Company, Limited; Office 608
Cddar Street, Wallace, Idaho.
D23-J13-4t
Notice of Postponement.
Notice is hereby given that by or
der and resolution of the board of di
rectors, the time for payment of the
above assessment has been postponed
to the 15th day of February, 1916, and
the sale of delinquent stock has been
postponed to the 10th day of March,
1916, at the same hour and place be
fore described.
IDA SCHEAVE,
Mining Company,
Cedar Street,
J20-F10-3t
Secretary Empire
Limited; Office 608
Wallace, Idaho.
Notice of Postponement,
Notice is hereby given that by order
and resolution of the board of direct
ors, the time for payment of the above
assessment has been postponed to the
15th day of March, 1916, and the sale
of delinquent stock has been postpon
ed to the 10th day of April, 1916, at the
same hour and place before described.
IDA BCHEAVE,
Secretary Empire Mining Company,
Limited; Office 608 Cedar Street,
Wallace, Idaho
F17-M9-4t
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Office of the Old Veteran Mining Com
pany, Wallace, Idaho, February 7,
1916.
Notice is hereby given that at a
regular meeting of the board of direct
ors of the above named corporation,
held on the 7th day of February, 1916
an assessment of two (2) mills per
share was levied upon the capital
stock of said corporation subject
thereto, payable on or before the 9th
day of March, 1916, to L. L. Brainard,
secretary-treasurer of the company,
at Wallace, Idaho.
Any stock upon which this assess
ment remains unpaid on the 9th day
of March, 1916, will be delinquent and
advertised for sale at public auction,
and unless payment is made before
will be sold on the 1st day of April,
1916 , to pay such delinquent assess
ment, together with the costs of ad
vertislng and
F10-Mr9-5t
Secretary-Treasurer,
-such
NOTICE TO DELINQUENT STOCK -
expenses of sale.
L. L. BRA1NARD.
HOLDERS.
Office of the
Western Star Mining
Company, Wallace, Idaho, January
10, 1916,
Notice is* hereby given that there is
delinquent upon the following describ
ed stock on account of Assessment No.
26, levied on the 6th day of December,
1915, the several umounts set opposite
the names of the respective sharehold
ers as follows, to-wlt:
l
No. No.
Name Cert.. Shares Amt.
John Biotti . 1 2000 2.00
W B Barrough .22 10000 10.00
John Constan . 8 105100 105.10
Larry Dcoling .14 160835 160.83
Herman Froelich 5 6000 5.00
Stanley P Fairweather 7 105000 105.00
Stanley P Fairweather 21 30410 30.41
otto Freeman .18 75690 75.69
William Hedlund .15 160835 160.83
Ben E Jenkins .19 1000 1.00
Abner G Kerns . 9 50000 50.00
io
U »V„^n er . a "no ®™
T R Mason . 4 5000 5.00
T R Mason .20 30410 30.41
H. J Rossi . - 1000 l.oo
G w Sparenberg -1* 77500 77.50
Mary Treasurer! . 3 3000 3.00
Sam Treasured .10 125363 125.38
W W Woods .17 60820 60.82
James A Wayne .11 14262 14.62;
And ln accordance with law so many
shares of each parcel of such stock as
T
|
!
IDAHO DEMOCRATS FIGHTING FOR CONTROL
OF PATRONAGE -DAY AFTER ELDER'S PLACE
ganizatlon in this state. I hinted at
this some weeks ago ln calling atten
.. . .. .. . T ™
tion to the fact t,lat Chairman J. T.
Pence and his advisers had decided
to ignore the plank in the national
platform demanding a primary elec
tlon io each state for the selection of
War to the knife, the knife to the
hilt and the devil take the hindmost
is on for control of the democratic or
national delegates and a member of
the national committee, according to
the Boise correspondent of the Lewis
Since then the situation has devel-'
oped. Jerome J. Day of Moscow and
ton Tribune.
Wallace is now openly in the race for
national committeeman against Robert
H. Elder of Coeur d'Alene, the pres
ent incumbent, and the fight is on.
Ravenel Macbeth, the perpetual sena
tor from Custer county and secretary
of the Idaho Mining association, is
leading the fight for Day. He asserts
that there is a general uprising ln all
parts of the state against the present
regime and that his man will win in
a walk. Day has been in Chicago for
some time past in connection with
some scheme to finance Governor
Alexander's north and south railroad,
but even during his absence the cam
paign in his behalf has been pushed
forward with tremendous vigor.
owen or a ® airman.
i !' ' e ^ n ? °i i 6 con ne
to this one point. On the contrary
Chairman Pence is to lose his scalp
!,' " ' . le J? anS ° e nsurrec os go
through The man picked to succeed
P,»c, „ Arthur M. Bowen ot Twin
25 *|T2YE5, Z
the state senate and made the race'
the state senate ana made tne race
for a seat on the state supreme bench
against Justice Stewart in 1912.
has many elements of strength as
politician and* has been in open oppo
sition to the faction in power since
the nomination and election of Presi
dent Wilson.
These two—Day and Bowen—will
make a strong combination, it is con
ceded, as against Elder and Pence. It
will be a fight of the outs against the
ins. Elder and Pence will have the
advantage of being in the trenches.
They will have the disadvantage of
the widespread opposition that has
been aroused over the distribution of
the spoils, both national and state.
Appointments Cause Trouble.
He
-
a
In every place in Idaho where there
has been a postmaster or other fed
era! official appointed there is a hot
bed of revolt, large or small, against
the men responsible for the making of
the appointment. This would be true
no matter who was the winner in the
scramble for the plum. There were not
enough of the good things to go
around among the faithful, and ln al
most every case where one member of
the party is elated over his victory,
there are a dozen disgruntled over his
defeat. This is one of the curses
the spoils system. It is charged, too,
that in many instances Elder and his
kitchen cabinet were autocratic in the
making of appointments—that they
put men in office with a view to the
strengthening of their political ma
chine, and not with a view to the bet
terment of the public service, or even
with a view to satisfying the influen-j
tial party members in the particular
community.
Pence Alexander's Goat
It Is unfortunate for Elder and
Pence, furthermore, that in most In
stances the men who secured the Jobs
are now lying dormant while the men
who were turned down are out with
knives, tomahawks and bludgeono. El
der is charged up with the federal ap
pointments that have been made while
Pence is cursed and execrated for the
sins of omission and commission of
the state administration—In the minds
of many he is made the goat for the
vagaries of Governor Alexander.
And so the fight is on and it prom
jses to be a dandy. The preliminary
skirmish will come at the meeting of
the democratic state committee in
Boise March 6. This meeting is called
to arrange for a state convention to
name delegates to the St. Louis con
vention and to name a member of the
national committee. The idea of hold
ing a state-wide primary has been
brushed aside as unnecessary and too
expensive. It Is held that the party
may be necessary will he sold at the
■office of the* company in the Otterson
block, Wallace, Idaho, on the 31st day
lof January, A. D. 1916, at 8:00 p. m. of
day to pay the delinquent assess
ment thereon, together with the cost of
[advertising and expenses of sale.
JAMES A. WAYNE,
Otterson Block, Wallace,
J13-27-3t
Secretary
Idaho.
Notice of Postponement.
By order of the hoard of directors,
the above mentioned sale was ad
Journed and postponed until March 1,
1916, at the same hour and place.
JAMES A. WAYNE,
Secretary Western Star Mining Com
pany; Otterson Block, Wallace,
F3-24-4t
-
NOTICE.
~ "
'X» All Whom It May Concern:
Notice Is hereby given that H. G.
ot ugee, the owner of an undivided
one-sixth Interest In the Virginia min
ng claim, situated In Beaver mining
district, county of Shoshone, Idaho,
will not be responsible for any debts
" r obligations however incurred by|
Patrlck Burke, or his assigns, or by
any per>on or corporation whatever.
0 |. any work Hone upon, or for any
machinery or supplies furnished for or
upon said Virginia lode mining
claim, or for any contract debt, lien
or obligation made or incurred In re
sped to said lode mining claim.
Dated this 21st day of May, 191!.
\fv28-Ag27-tf H. G. LOUGEE.
ho.
pense.
concession will be made to the let
the-people-rule faction in the party,
The democrats of any county will be
permitted to hold a county primary, if
has not the necessary machinery for
the holding of such a primary and
that it has no way of meeting the ex
Machine to Make Concessions.
It is announced, however, that a
they wish, for the selection of dele
gates to the state convention. It may
be that they will be even permitted to
express a choice for member of the
national committee and for delegates
to the national convention.
Elder and Pence men here in the
capital express absolute confidence in
their ability to control this meeting of
[ the state committee next month.
j would be strange indeed if they could
! not after having been in complete
control for four years. But the real
[fight will come at the state convention
a month or two later, and here is
j where the opposition expect to oust
1 Robert H. Elder and set the forces in
I operation for the ousting of Joseph T.
Pence a little later.
II
j
I
[
jcome down from the north with strong j
backing. He and his brothers of the
Coeur d'Alene mines have the money
[ tQ enable them to make a fighti and
[ lhe information I get is that they are
read y tu S p e nd the necessary amount,
A(]ded tQ thl „ D; , y has the support of |
a „ irlm , le „ element In Ul of
'■»«"» " «"
' Jerry haS boen snuKg,,n * up f '- vv£l ' 1 -
| , y clofje to Governor Alexander in re
|
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j
'
[
j
j
[
I
Day Relies on Money.
| But, whatever the outcome, the
[ scrimmage promises rare fun for the j
I man up a tree. Jerome J. Day will |
He has been talxing
cent months.
:
- i north and south railroad just about as
a [ vociferously as the governor lately. Of
'course there are those who insist that
in all this "Jerry'' is trying to "use"
i the governor and that the governor is
[ trying to "use" the would-be national
committeeman. This can be taken for
what it is worth but it is all interest
ing as having a bearing on the main
contention.
Bowen of Twin Falls has been pick
ed to run against Pence for two or
three reasons. One is because he has
the ability to fill the job; another is
[that he has been consistent in his op
position to the present order; and still
another is because he lives in the
fourth judicial district, the bailiwick
of Roy Jones, the present fish and
game warden, one of the most astute
politicians in the party, who is now
using all the influence of his office in
the support of Elder and Pence.
Moses Working Both Factions.
One of the real points of interest in
all this—one that is causing widest
[speculation—is as to where Governor
j Alexander will land in the party mix
up. It is said of him that he natural
ly inclines to the Day-Bowen combin
of.ation; but on the other hand Elder,
| Pence and Nugent—especially John F.
| Nugent—Impress him at every turn
1 of the road that they made him all
that he is, politically, and that it would
j be worse than harikari for him to de
| sert them now. My own opinion is
that the governor will keep up a vlo
, lent flirtation with both sides from
the start to the finish, and that no
man Will know at any stage of the
game just where he did stand. After
the fight Is all over he will be with
the winners, horse, foot and dragoons.
i
j
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of
in j
to
A Serious Oversight.
"What do you think of his nerve?"
exclaimed the old man, who was
notoriously tricky in business. "He
called me a bare-faced robber."
"Oh, well," replied the man who
j knew him, "probably in his excitement
he didn't notice your mustache."
HOOPER &
KINGSBURY
...BROKERS...
We make a specialty of Coeur
d'Alene mining stock*. Will
furnish information on request.
13 SIXTH STREET WALLACE
I
Queer Mining Accidents
(P. B McDonald in Mining and Scientific Press)
In the Mining and Scientific Press
jUj,
K'tober 23. last
a peculiar blasting
ot
recorded in the
wood news letter. Three men in the
oro Hondo shaft had lit the fuses of
dead center, one man became excited,
from the bucket, his light went
out and the bucket was hoisted.
accident
round of 15 holes and climbed into
the bucket. Ow ing to a delay In start
ling the hoisting engine which
,s on
companions missed him, and grabbed
[the bell cord, giving the signal to stop;
[but the man in the shaft, not knowing
. , , . ,
wtartlHi *° climb the bell cord,
thus giving another signal which car
jed the bucket and two men to safety
. ..... f . , . .
tlu ot "* • 1 '" s ' Ul<
bell cord broke, leaving the man in
the mk ,st of 15 holes, loaded lu-avilv
, . . , . , ' ...
nd about t0 ex I ,lotie ' G< ' ltln ^ ln 11
corner he barricaded himself with
planks and heard 8 of the holes fired:
, . , ..
lie aays he hpnr(i no mole untl1 llls
[companions dug him
mt intending to
take his remains to the undertaker. I
Aside from a few slight bruises
nervous shock, he was not harmed
[and in a few days was as before. The
fault, in this case, was carelessness in
and a
not having kept the ladder extended
to the bottom of the shaft.
A somewhat similar case occurred ln ;
Valley. The I
hoist refused to work, leaving several !
miners in a shaft among a round
holes with lit fuses. All but one of [
the men tried to climb the timbered
sides of the sljflft. That one with a !
praiseworthy coolness, cut all the
fuses with him knife, and succeeded I
in beating the round.
In another instance in the Lake
Superior iron region, during the sink- j
ing of a vertical shaft, the bucket had
been removed to enable the cable to
lower timbers, etc., held with a chain.
On one occasion when the empty cable
was being hoisted a miner caught hold
of it foolishly thinking to ride up the
shaft by hanging from the end of the
chain. Of course the cable swayed so
much that he was dashed against the
timbers, killing him.
g0 ] d mine at Grass
I
At the Tioga mine, Bodie, Mono
county, California, in 1879, a man es
caped death in a remarkable manner.
The story as told by a prominent mln
i
Ing engineer of New York, and veri
lied by the man who was his foreman
at the time of the accident, is as fol
the night shift
if
lows: Nine men
were being lowered in the cage down
advance, but began to lower the cage
bolding it merely \>y the brakes, prob
ably intending to throw in the clutch
,, |t
L P , 1()l8t man CO uld not stop it; the
amount of friclion he was able to give
it only 8erved kePp the cable taut
„„ „ f , ly
In foot, h "'ouhl here,
better had the cable broken, as in that
the hoistman in the engine room did
no t throw in the clutch of the hoist in
orders
vertical shaft; contrary t<
The cage fell rapidly, so that
case the safety catches would have
caught and stopped the cage.
cage and men fell 520 feet, went
T ' ie
through a bulkhead of 8-Inch square
timber and dropped 20 feet int
a dry
sump. Six of the men were killed, two
were mangled and crippled, so that
they subsequently died of the injuries,
but the ninth man in some miraculous
way received only a few insignificant
abrasions. When rescued he was
speechless but not unconscious.
The same authorities vouch for the
truth of the following equally marvel
ous escape. In early days on
Comstock lode, a miner named Tom
Oliver fell 170 feet in the Yellow Jack
et shaft, went through a 2-inch wood
the
PHONE 23
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Aetna Accident & Liability Company

en platform into a sump of water, and
was uninjured.
\t a mine in Colorado, another en
gineer was being lowered in a bucket
low n a rough exploration shaft in
clined at 75 degrees. Ice had formed
in the shaft, particularly on the peel
ed poles along which the bucket slid,
to such a degree as to constrict the
opening. The bucket caught and stop
ped, the cable piling up there. No one
was within sight or hearing, and quick
action was necessary. The engineer
jumped out, clung to the timbers,
kicked the bucket loose, slid down the
'
rope into the bucket and rode on with
nothing worse than torn hands.
In a recent blast of 11 tons of pow
der at a gravel mine in Sierra county
California, the fumes spread about ao
widely that four men were asphyxiated
and the smell of the fume was notice
able several miles away. Ten tons of
the charge was black powder and one
ton, the primer, was 40 per cent dyna
mite.
Similarly a great many queer acci
dents take place around a mine: acci
dents In the hoisting, to engineers
carrying transits underground, from
electric trolley wires, during roof scal
ing, on ladders, In sumps, around the
steam, air and water lines, at loading
chutes, etc. Some are seemingly un
avoidable, but others If better under
stood would not happen again.
LOST IN A MINE.
Thrilling Experience of Miner in Nev
ada Mine.
(Tonopah Times)
About 4:30 o'clock Wednesday af
ternoon Alex Smith, mine superin
tendent of (he Tonopah Ex., and John
Murray, mine foreman of the same
property, were in the Hoist room of the
No. 1 shaft when suddenly the signal
bell rang for the cage and then sound
ed the distress signal. As the day
shift had come off at 3:30 and no one
was supposed to be in that part of the
mine at that hour of the day, every
one within hearing distance was star
tled.
John Murray was lowered to the
bottom of the shaft with all possible
speed, where he found a very much
frightened man, who had no Idea of
After
wkere he was and had no light,
being brought to the surface he re
covered sufficiently to be able to ex
plain in broken English how he came
to be In that predicament. He gave
his name as Mike Rodovieh and said
be had been working for the Tonopah
Mining company only a few days.
When the shift went off Wednesday
afternoon he became separated from
, companions and lost his way. In
1
i
[ pure ] lK , k j,e came to the Extension
h aft wh^re he was able to simmon
7, '" L" "h,
.n^* ^,1" n" on. . J might ,L
j 1Iy have ended in a tragedy,
j a short time his light went out, but he
kept on walking and finally, out of
The two mines are about half
j mile apart and it is believed that the
lost man walked several miles in the
a
; dark through the network
of under
g ro und workings before he finally got
i to tk e Extension shaft,
j
j
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How Silver Bow Creek Got Its Name.
Silver Bow creek received its name
from a party of prospectors who
j reached its valley in the vicinity of
While discussing the
best name for the stream the clouds
; Butte in 1864.
on the creek as it circled around the
mountain suggested the name Silver
Bow, and it was accordingly so called.
broke away and the sunshine falling

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