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The Wallace miner. [volume] (Wallace, Idaho) 1907-current, October 31, 1918, Image 6

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After the Great War, What?
close; and a victorious close it will be.
Every kind and honest heart is re
jolcing that the suffering of Europe s
people will not be prolonged much
further. But with the prospect o;
(Engineering and Mining Journulf
The great war is drawing toward its
^
peace within a year, our thoughts are
bound to turn to the changes In eco
nomic conditions that are impending.
The problem is so confused and coln
plex that there is no one who Is able
clearly to forecast events. 1 lie best
mlnds are almost as much in tiie darK
they were in August, 1914.
say "almost ' rather than quite, for
without any doubt we hu\e learned
during the last four years to think
more broadly and with better know!
eogo of fundamental factors than WP
used to.
as
that the
We can see, for example,
great underlying factor is labor,
have suffered from shortages of ma
terial, and concomitantly high prices,
owing to lack of men enough to get
It out of nature's stores; nor have we
We
time to provide ade
had sufficient
quate mechanical power to replace the
deficit of man power. We could not
make the necessary war material and
manufacture the
material,
at the same time
supply of peaceful
former
and therefore we have had to forego
the latter. Not only have we had to
deprive ourselves of many very desir
able things, but, also, we have had
to deplete tiie stocks In warehouses
and retail stores. When tiie war in
dustries board boastH of saving lea
ther, rubber and paint by reducing the
number of sizes and shades that may
be manufactured, it does not mean
that It saves any consumption of
those things, but simply that It re
duces tiie stock that dealers previ
ously had to carry. As soon as deal
ers can obtain supplies freely again,
they will naturally stock up and there
will furthermore he a great demand
for and consumption of all things for
delayed work. Similar conditions will
exist in Europe, besides which there
will be Immense demand for material
for reconstruction in devastated
These premises, which appear
areas.
reasonably safe. Indicate a strong de
mand for raw materials, and espeelal
ly the metals.
But It does not follow that such a
demand will develop immediately up
on the coming of peace. On the con
trary, we must Inevitably contemplate
a period of readjustment, and much
will depend upon how things are
handled during that period. The gov
ernments will undoubtedly possess
large reserves of metals at the ter
mination of the war. Will they re
sell those supplies, or will they re
serve them for national use In recon
structions and improvements? How
long will it take private contractors
who have converted their machine
shops into shell factories to get back
to their ordinary Industrial basis?
What Is going to become of the swol
len, congested populations of Bridge
port and similar places when their
present occupation ceases abruptly?
It is easy to foresee that such neces
sary changes will produce dislocations
that will curtail temporarily the con
sumption of raw materials. Mani
festly such dislocations will be irregu
lar.
We are not among those who look
for the arrogance of labor to continue
unabated. Labor supply will continue
to be short, considering the broad
needs of the world, but there will no
longer be the pressing need of grant
ing labor's every demand lest the
great cause be jeopardized. We shall
continue to build ships, locomotives
and other things In great quantities,
but when on a commercial basis, and
when time is not so vital, the employ
er may talk more upholdlngly to his
men, and the day will come when 15
will not have to be hired to do the
work of 10. This will In Itself ease
the labor supply, as will the migra
tion of thousands from the munition
factories. Even if basic commodity
prices undergo no alteration, there is
a large lost motion between the in
crease in the cost of living, measured
by the factor of about 1.5, and the In
crease in the rate of wages, measured
by the factor of about 2,
words, wages should go down faster
than commodity prices. We may look,
moreover, for the abolition of govern
mental price fixing to let play onee
more natural factors that will be sal
utary.
Many changes of these kinds will
institute themselves before the troops
begin to come home,
will introduce new conditions that as
yet nobody can well forecast. It Is
certain that many of these men will
have experienced such alterations of
habit and thought during their life in
the field and in the trenches that they
will not be willing to return to their
former occupations. They will be far
more used to mechanical work, and
their whole outlook upon life will have
been changed. In such ways did the
men of this country become different
after the civil war. Who will venture
to prognosticate what the veterans of
the great war will do?
But there seems to us to be a fun
damental, far-reaching economic con
dition ahead of us that will eventu
ally dominate everything else, and
that Is the net loss of man power. The
world will have more work than ever
to do and will have fewer men to do
It with. Every country of Europe and j
North America will be staggering un
der a tremendous load of debt; some I
more than others. How are they go
ing to carry and discharge those loads
except by Increasing the efficiency of
their depleted man power toy means j
In other
I
a
Their return
of mechanical power? For examples,
imagine the national electrification of
Great Britain and the more extensive
U(!e 0 ( hydroelectric power In the
United States, which would release
, men f roni the collieries, from trans
the line,
portation, und so on down
and set them free to build houses, to
J ma | {e
1
machinery for Siberia and
China, etc. Whence would come the
.capital for such colossal undertak
'!i n g g v By national provision. It is
hardly oonce ivable that nations that
))ave bppn H f, pn( u n g many billions an
| nua iiy | n destruction would boggle
"'"'over a few billions for construction,
| Thoughts of this nature cause us to
L p 0 ptimistlc respecting tne position
I f j| )p metn | H after the war, barring
(he prol)ablllty of a depression, per
j haps a sharp one, during the period
j of readjustment. All of the metals
should be regarded favorably In tills
view, but not all just alike. Copper
Is probably in the best position, for
tiie reason that natural demand has
been most severely repressed during
the last year, and lead probably
stands next to copper, for a similar
reason. Iron and steel may be slow
er In responding, and zinc is likely to
lag last. Indeed, the zinc producers
will probably have to do something to
promote their market. So long as we
are unwilling to let gold go to the or
ient, and until we can exchange goods
freely with that quarter of the world,
silver ought to keep high.
RECALLED BY FORNEY
PROMINENT DEMOCRAT TELLS
HOW HE SHIRKED HIS OF
FICIAL DUTY.
Immediately following the nomina
tion of H. F. Samuels for governor,
the Miner recalled Ills record as prose
cuting attorney in this county and the
fact that he refused to prosecute mem
bers of the Wlestern Federation of
Miners who were charged with having
blown up the Bunker Hill & Sullivan
mill. What the Miner said has since
been confirmed by Bartlett Sinclair,
who represented the state during
those turbulent days, and now Mr.
Sinclair Is confirmed by an authoriz
ed statement from J. II. Forney, of
Moscow, who with Senator Borah and
ex-Govemor Hawley, was appointed to
represent the state In the prosecution
of the men charged with the crime.
Special interest attaches to Mr. For
ney's statement for the reason that he
has long been and Is today one of the
most prominent and Influential dem
ocrats in the state, and It clearly in
dicates his attitude toward Samuels
as the democratic candidate for gov
ernor. .Mr. Forney's statement fol
lows:
Samuels Shirked His Duty.
"At the request of Governor Steun
enberg and Attorney General Hayes, I
visited Shoshone county and was re
quested to investigate the depreda
tions there, where certain persons had
been killed and the Bunker Hill mill
had been blown up. When I arrived
Bartlett Sinclair was on the ground
representing the governor.
"He informed me that he had re
ceived no assistance from the county
officials and that the county attorney,
Mr. H. F. Samuels, had flatly refused
to take any action in vindicating the
law and bring the guilty parties to
justice.
"A little later I took the matter up
with Mr. Samuels In Mr. Sinclair's
presence. Mr. Samuels stated that
tiie parties who were being investi
gated and who were suspected of the
offense were his friends and associ
ates and the men who had elected him
to office; that he felt disqualified to
act as prosecutor and would resign or
disqualify himself before the court.
"A few days later he wrote out a
statement disqualifying himself as
prosecutor on the grounds just stated.
Mr. Samuels prepared and filed the
document himself. Mr. Hawley, Mr.
Borah and myself were then appointed
to take charge of the matter. In the
prosecution of the parties charged
Mr. Samuels took no part whatever."
terable friendship of Belgium to her
great benefactor. That purpose Is ac
[compllshed by conferring
the title of honorary citizen and friend
the Belgian nation, which has been
borne by nobody since Belgium has
existed as a state.'' The preamble Is
signed by all the ministers.
FRIEND OF THE BELGIANS.
The Belgian government has con
ferred the title of "Honorary Citizen
and Friend of the Belgian Nation" on
Herbert C. Hoover, the American food
administrator. The preamble of the
decree conferring the honor on Mr.
Hoover renders homage to his force
ful personality, when he stood at the
head of the colossal undertaking for
feeding Belgium, says the Engineer
ing and Mining Journal. It adds that
the government would have liked to
give him testimony of its admiration
and gratitude in the usual form, but
owing to the fact that Mr. Hoover is
now an American government official
the Belgian government refrained
from doing so, in respect for Ameri
can traditions. "That is why the
government," says the announcement,
"proposes to the king to reserve for
him a place of honor in the Belgian
family, over which he has been the
agent of Providence, and to affirm in
public official document the unal
ors
at
ttal
on
the
upon him
UNITED WAR WORKERS
EVERY DOLLAR OF GREAT FUND
FOR THE BENEFIT OF OUR
FIGHTING FORCES.
"One grand push for Pershing"—
that is the word to the workers in the
united war work campaign, State Di
rector Richard E. Randall asks the
newspapers of Idaho to give to the
workers in the big drive for the $170,
500,000 fund for the seven welfare or
ganizations and which begins the
week of November 11-18.
"Nothing stops our boys over there
—nothing must be permitted to stop
those who are loyally backing them
Public meetings to
arouse enthusiasm can not be held.
The influenza epidemic has made that
impossible. But the spirit of love and
service, the spirit of devotion to our
lads overseas and In the cantonements
at home, will find opportunity for ex
pression notwithstanding this great
handicap.
up at home.
All on Common Ground.
"The very fact that Jew and Gen
tile, Protestant and iCathollc, have at
last found a common ground on which
they may stand—have been drawn in
to mutual cooperation In the great
cause of humanity, Is one of the most
thrilling Incidents of the age. It
makes one eager to participate in the
wonderful service of these organiza
tions: The Y. M. C. A,, Catholic War
Council, Y. W. C. A., Jewish Welfare
League, W]ar Camp Community Ser
vice, Salvation Army and American
Library Association, are doing for the
soldiers and sailors in the American
and allied armies and who themselves
are making the supreme sacrifice for
liberty.
"1 feel that the Individual workers,
cooperating with the loyal and patri
otic press are going to put such tre
mendous energy Into their efforts that
before the date for the beginning of
the big drive the message will have
reached the heart of every citizen of
the state, and they will be anxious to
give and to give to the limit—to give
so generously that in the gift there
will go part of themselves, that they
will sacrifice to make their gifts
greater, and with dollars articulate
their love for the lads fighting for
them.
"Every dollar of this great welfare
work fund and every cent of It will be
spent to make the boys in the army
and navy, at home and abroad, happy
and more comfortable.
Pershing Approves.
"President Wilson and General
Pershing both heartily approve the
work of the seven organizations rep
resented in tiie united campaign. Es
pecially does General Pershing, be
cause of his personal contact with
that work, realize and appreciate the
tremendous service they are rendering
to help maintain the morale of the
soldiers.
"So I am asking all the workers of
Idaho and all the people of Idaho, to
make the united war work campaign
one grand push for Pershing's heroic
lads, who are fighting for the things
that make life worth while, and who
do not count the cost they may be
called upon to pay but press on and
on and give all if needed."
Must Replace Mining Machinery.
A mine was leased under a contract
binding the lessee to operate the mine
continuously, "keeping the machinery
In as good working order as when he
takes possession 10 days hence, less
the natural w : ear and tear of the
same." While the lessee was In pos
session, an unusual flood practically
destroyed the mill on the mine prem
ises, and he did not restore It, al
though he continued to mine ore. Un
der these circumstances, the Arkansas
supreme court holds that the lessee
was guilty of a breach of the lease in
falling to rebuild the plant within a
reasonable time, entitling the lessor to
terminate the lease.
Holliman, 202 Southwestern Report
er, 469).
(Bradley vs.
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
No. 1.
Office of the Mingo Chief Mining
Company, Limited, Wallace, Idaho,
October 4, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that at a
meeting of the board of directors of
the Mingo Chief Mining Company,
Limited, held on the 4th day of Octo
ber, 1918, an assessment of one (1)
cent per share was levied upon the
capital stock of the corporation, pay
able to John H. Van Dorn, treasurer,
his office In Sweet's Hotel, Wal
lace, Idaho, on or before November
12, 1918.
Any stock upon which this assess
ment remains unpaid on the 13th day
November, 1918, will be delinquent
and advertised for sale at public auc
tion, and unless payment Is made be
fore will be sold on the 12th day of
December, 1918, to pay the delinquent
assessment, together with the costs of
advertising and expenses of sale.
L. L. SWEET,
Secretary,
JOHN H. VAN DORN,
Sweet's Hotel. Whllace,
O10-N7-5t
Treasurer,
Idaho.
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Office and Principal Place of Business
of the Rockford Mining Company,
Limited, Wallace, Idaho, September
14. 1918.
Notice is hereby given that at a
special meeting of the board of direct
of the above named company, held
the offlee of the company In Wal
Idaho, on September 14, 1918, an
assessment of two (2) mills per share
levied upon the outstanding cap
stock of the corporation, payable
or before the 29th day of October,
to W. H. Hanson, secretary of
company, in the Gyde-Taylor
building, at Wlallace, Idaho.
Any stock upon which this assess-
ment remains unpaid on the 29th day
of October, 1918, will be delinquent
and advertised for sale at public auc
tlon and unless payment is made be
fore will be sold on the 25th day_ of
the delin
November, 1918, to pay
quent assessment, together with costs
of advertising and expenses of sale.
WALTER H. HANSON,
Secretary.
03-31-61
Notice of Postponement.
Notice is hereby given that by or
der of the board of directors of the
Limited,
Rockford Mining Company,
the time for payment of the above as
sessment has been extended from Oc
tober 29, 1918, to November 29, 1918,
and the date of delinquent sale has
November 25,
been postponed from
1918, to December
hour and place above named.
WALTER H. HANSON,
21, 1918, at the
same
Secretary
017-N28-7t
NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF
STOCKHOLDERS.
Office of Rockford Mining Company,
Limited, Wallace, Idaho, October 9,
1918.
Notice is hereby given that by or
der of the board of directors of the
above named corporation, the annual
meeting of said company (in the na
ture of an adjourned annual meeting)
will be held at the office of the com
pany, to-wit: The office of Walter H.
Hanson in the Gyde-Taylor building
at Wallace, Idaho, on the 1st day of
November, 1918, at 7:30 p. m.
Said meeting Is called and will be
held for the purpose of electing a
board of five directors, to pass upon
bills, reports of officers, communica
tions, to authorize expenditures and
to do any other business that might
legally come before a regular annual
meeting of the company.
WALTER H. HANSON,
Secretary.
()10-31-4t
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Office of the Oreano Mining Company,
Limited, Wallace, Idaho, October 7,
1918.
Notice Is hereby givep that at a
meeting of the board of directors of
the Oreano Mining Company, Limited,
held on the 5th day of October, 1918,
an assessment of two (2) mills per
share was levied upon the outstand
ing stock of the corporation, payable
on the 5th day of November, 1918, to
F. P. Candee, secretary-treasurer,
308 Third street, Wallace, Idaho.
Any stock upon which this assess
ment remains unpaid on the 5th day
of November, 1918, will be delinquent
and advertised for sale at public auc
tion, and unless payment is made be
fore will be sold on the 7th day of
December, 1918, at 7:30 p. m. to pay
the delinquent assessment, together
with the cost of advertising and ex
penses of sale.
F. P. CANDEE,
Secretary-Treasurer of the Oreano
Mining Company, Limited, 308
Street, Wallace, Idaho. 010-31 -4t
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
In tlys Probate Court of the County
of Shoshone, State of Idaho.
In the Matter of the Estate of Thomas
B. Dennis, Deceased.
Notice is hereby given by the un
dersigned, Thomas McCabe, executor
of the estate of Thomas B. Dennis,
deceased, to the creditors of and all
persons having claims against the
said deceased, to exhibit such claims,
with the necessary vouchers, within
four months after the first publica
tion of this notice to the said Thomas
McCabe, executor, at the office of the
Wallace Miner, "Wlallace, Shoshone
County, Idaho, which the undersign
ed selects as the place of business in
all matters connected with said es
tate of Thomas B. Dennis, deceased.
THOMAS McCABE,
Executor of the Estate of Thomas B.
Dennis, Deceased.
Dated this 3rd day of October, A. D.
1918, and first published October 10,
1918.
JOHN L. FITZGERALD,
Attorney for Executor.
O10-31-4t
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Office of the Western Union Mining
Company, 1210 Old National Bank
Building, Spokane, Washington,
September 3, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that at a
regular meeting of the board of di
rectors of the Western Union Mining
company, held at Wallace, Idaho, on
the 3rd day of September, 1918, an
assessment of five (5) mills per share
was levied upon the outstanding cap
ital stock of the corporation, payable
on or before the 15th day of October,
1918, to Ben L. Collins,
treasurer, at his office, 1210 Old Na
tional Bank building,
Washington.
Any stock upon which this assess
ment remains unpaid on the 15th day
of October, 1918, will be delinquent
and advertised for sale at public auc
tion, and unless payment is made be
fore will be sold on November 15,
house, Wallace,
Idaho, at 3:00 o'clock p. m. of said
day, to pay the delinquent assess
ment thereon, together with the costs
of advertising and expense of sale.
BEN L. COLLINS,
Secretary-TYeasurer of the Western
Union Mining Company; 1210 Old
National Bank Building, Spokane,
Washington. S12-O10-5t
secretary
Spokane,
1918, at the court
Notice of Postponement.
Notice is hereby given that by or
der of the board of directors of the
Western Union Mining company, the
time for payment of the above
sessment has been extended from Oc
tober 15, 1918, to November 15, 1918,
and the date of delinquent sale has
been postponed from November 15,
1918, until December 15, 1918, at the
same hour and place above named.
BEN L. COLLINS,
Secretary-Treasurer of the
Western
Union Mining Company, 1210 Old
National Bank Building,
.Washington,
Spokane,
O10-N14-6t
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Notice is hereby given that at
meeting of the, board of directors of
the Buffalo Mining company, held In
the Brunswick hotel at Missoula
Montana, September 30, 1918,
sessment of ten (10) mills on each
share of capital stock was levied, pay
able on or before November 5, 1918, to
Geo. Dunham, treasurer of said coin
pany, at the Brunswick hotel or 321
Pine street, Missoula, Montana,
Any stock upon which this assess
ment is not paid on or before Novem
ber 5, 1918, w ill be declared delinquent
and advertised for sale at public auc
I
an as
*
THE • UNITED • STORES • CO.
♦GROCERIES
WALLACE
MULLAN
BURKE
PECIAL ATTENTION
s
is given to Miners' and
Prospectors' patronage.
We Know We Can Save
You Money—Give U» a Trial
tion, and unless payment is made be
fore will be sold on the 4th day oi
December, 1918, to pay the delinquent
assessment together with the cost of
advertising and expenses of sale.
J. W. CONROY,
Secretary' of the Buffalo Mining Corn
Aider Street, Missoula,
O10-31-4t
pany, 334
Montana.
ALIAS SUMMONS.
In the Justice Court for Wallace No. 1
Precinct of Shoshone County, Ida
ho, Before L. Lelghty, Justice of the
Peace.
C. H. Boyles, plaintiff, vs. G. H.
Deshon, defendant.
The State of Idaho Sends Greeting to
the Above Named Defendant:
You are hereby summoned to appear
in the above entitled court to be held
at Gyde-Taylor block In said precinct
in the above entitled cause at 10:00
o'clock a. m. upon the 1st day of No
vember, 1918, and answer plaintiff's
complaint on file in said court, or
plaintiff will take Judgment against
you as prayed in said complaint.
Witness my hand this 25th day of
September, 1918.
L. LEIGHTY,
Justice of the Peace.
S26-031-6t
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Assessment No. R-2.
Notice is hereby given that at a
meeting of the board of directors of
the Lucky Swede Gold & Coppc Min
ing company, held on the 18th day of
September, 1918, an assessment of 5
mills per share was levied upon the
outstanding capital stock of the cor
poration, payable on or before Octo
ber 19, 1918, to John F. Ferguson,
treasurer, Shoshone building, Wallace,
Idaho.
Any stock upon which this assess
ment remains unpaid on the 19th day
of October, 1918, will be delinquent
and advertised for sale at public auc
tion, and unless payment is made be
fore will be sold on the 19th day of
November, 1918, to pay the delinquent
assessment, together with the costs of
advertising and expenses of sale.
JOHN F. FERGUSON,
Treasurer, Shoshone Building, Wal
lace, Idaho.
03
Notice of Postponement.
Notice is hereby given that by or
der and resolution of the board of di
rectors of the Lucky Swede Gold &
Copper Mining company, the time for
payment of the above assessment has
been postponed from the 19th day of
October, 1918, to the 1st day of No
HOWES & KING
GROCERS
The Store That Has Stood the TEST OF TIME.
Established in 1886.
Fresh Stock Full Weight Prompt Delivery
Fresh Fruit and Vegetables in Season.
Phone: 194
606 Bank St.
When you toy
• ••
Sunset Bud
Your money stays
at home
The product is
second to none
vember, 1918, and the sale of delin
quent stock has been postponed from
the 19th day of November, 1918,
the 26th day of November, 1918, at
the same hour and place above
scribed.
to
de
JOHN F. FERGUSON,
Treasurer of the Lucky Swede Gold &
Copper Mining Company; Shoshone
Building, Wlallace, Idaho.
O10-31-4t
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Office of the Cedar Creek Mining &
Development
Wlallace, Idaho, September 28, 1918.
Company, Limited,
Notice is hereby given that at a
meeting of the board of directors of
the Cedar Creek Mining & Develop
ment Company, Limited, held on tiie
28th day of September, 1918, an as
sessment of one (1) mill per share
was levied upon the outstanding capi
tal stock of the corporation, payable
on or before the 28th day of October,
1918,
Treasurer, of the corporation, at the
office of the company, 710 Hotel street,
Wallace, Idaho.
Any stock upon which this assess
ment remains unpaid on the 28th day
of October, 1918, will be delinquent and
advertised for sale at public auction,
and unless payment Is made before
will be sold on the 29th day of Novem
ber, 1918, at 7:30 p. m., of said day,
at the office of the company, 710 Hotel
street, Wallace, Idaho, to pay the de
linquent assessment thereon, together
with the costs of advertising and ex
penses of sale.
to Wm.- Becker, Secretary
WM. BECKER,
Secretary-Treasurer, of Cedar Creek
Mining & Development Company,
710 Hotel Street, Wallace, Idaho.
Oct.-3-to-31-5ts.
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Office of the Tarbox Mining Company,
Wallace, Idaho, October 9, 1918.
Notice is hereby given that at a
meeting of the board of directors of
the Tarbox Mining company, held on
the 5th day of October, 1918, an as
sessment of ten (10) mills per share
was levied upon the outstanding cap
ital stock of the corporation, payable
on or before the 5th day of Novem
ber, 1918, to R. E. Seysler, secretary,
426 High street, Wallace, Idaho.
Any stock upon which this assess
ment remains unpaid on the 5th day
of November, 1918, will be delinquent
and advertised for sale at public auc
tion and unless payment Is made be
fore will be sold on the 5th day of
December, 1918, at 7:30 p. m. of said
day at the office of the company, -426
High street, Wallace, Idaho, to pay
the delinquent assessment thereon, to
gether with the costs of advertising
and expenses of sale.
R. E. SEYSLER,
Secretary of Tarbox Mining Company,
O10-31-4t
Wallace, Idaho.

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