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The Wallace miner. (Wallace, Idaho) 1907-current, November 21, 1918, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

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«me mi
EMSMOFMII
SITUATED IN INDIA AND 18 OP
ERATED UNDER MANAGE
MENT OF AMERICANS.
On his way from Xaintu, India, 61
miles from the Chinese border, Thos.
E. Mitchell, formerly assistant sup
erintendent of mines of the Anaconda
company, stopped off In Butte yes
of his old friends,
terday to see some
the Anaconda Standard,
resigned Ills position as general
of the Burma Mines, Limit
He
says
lias
manager
and Is going to London to meet
the board of directors before finally
settling down In this
Mitchell decided that the nearly live
he spent in India was enough,
the long journey home Mr. and
Mrs. Mitchell and their two . children
Hong
eil
Mr.
country.
years
On
by the Malay straits.
came
qong, Japan, and Honolulu,
left Namtu on Allgust 11, and landed
October 9.
They
in San Francisco on
Mr. Mitchell Is leaving a wonderful
organization on the Indian property.
employed from 4000 to 14,
000 persons, the larger
lng In the dry season from
of November to the 1st of May. I he
force Is cut down during the wet sea
when it Is Impossible to do any
All of
There are
number work
the middle
son,
construction or forest work.
and there ore
the labor Is Chinese
about 150 Europeans on the Job. Slx
of the Engineers are Americans.
A Great Mine.
ty
by the
The mine being operated
Mr. Mitchell terms
Burma company
the greatest silver-lead-zinc property
In the world,
about 2000 tons of lead and 200,000
ounces of fine sliver a month,
ductlon has been Increased more than
200 per cent In the last seven months
and they are still planning for the
One of the features
It Is nnw producing
Pro
of the
future.
mine is a tunnel two and a quarter
As Its products
were
miles long,
needed for war purposes, it 1ms been
fostered by the British
since the war broke out.
government
The
ever
property covers 64 square tulles and
It has a reserve of 90 square miles. It
Is a town In Itself.
"Namtu, I believe now, to lie one of
the most beautiful spots
world,'
tlcally.
sickness among our
went at sanitation in a scientific man
We secured a wonderful niedi
in the
Mr. Mitchell said enthuslas
"We had much trouble with
forces, but we
ner.
cal officer in Dr. Sills and he organ
ized a staff that successfully cumbat
ed the fever. We drained the swamps,
the forest and Introduced
Australia, until
cut away
healthy brush from
now we have cut down our sick rate
and made the place ft delightful spot
to live if one can stand the enervating
effects of tbe Indian climate. It does
not do for a European to stay too long
In that country, however, without
change.
Tribute to Administration.
"One can not say too much of the
British administration of India,
mere handful of men are successfully
governing 320,000,000 of people and
despite the German propaganda that
was carried
A
on in India, chiefly
through educated Hindus,
received their education in this coun
try, there has not been a single up
rising among the natives,
government has handled affairs in a
most diplomatic and tactful way.
believe the British civil servant in
India is about the finest type of pub
who bad
The civil
1
met any
wondorful
lie man that I have ever
where.
work there and they are deserving of
every praise that any one can give
They have done
them."
American engineers now are play
ing a prominent part In the develop
ment work carried
pany, Mr. Mitchell said,
ericans arrived at Namtu a year ago
and are still there. All the heads of
departments, including the mine man
ager, chief mechanical engineer
chief electrical engineer, are Ameri
cans. One, Thomas Foote, is a for
mer Butte man.
Evory Englishman Volunteers.
When the war broke out the com
pany lost its English employes.
""Every Englishman employed by the
company promptly volunteered,"
Mitchell said. "Forty-seven of them
got away at once."
The mine is one of the most ancient
Forty Am
and
Mr.
of which authentic information is to
be had. It was in continuous opera
tion from the year 1412 until 1858,
when It 'was closed down by the re
on by the corn
belllon and remained closed until
opened up again 12 years ago by the
present company.
"There are manuscripts in the ar
chives at Mandalay which have been
authenticated and show that the mine
was operating in 1412. There are nl
martuscrlpts in Peking which are
which would
there was a
SO
of doubtful origin but
attempt to prove that
mine In operation as far back us 2200
years.
"Another historical fact is found in
the trenches which surround the
property. There are 26 miles of them
and they are built on both sides of
the skyline with occasional commun
icating trenches. These trenches
were built 400 years ago and evident
ly were for defense of the property.
Trench warfare would not seem to be
such a modern idea after all."
Planning Big Things.
The Burma company Is planning
big things for the property in the
future, despite Its present size. In
the next six or eight months there
wlll be a mill erected that will treat
experT
la In operation that
The ore
runs 43 per
An
1000 tons of ore a day.
mental mill now L
handle 150 tone dally.
now
can
they are treating
lead and 40 ounces of silver. Last
year extensive coal Helds were open
these have been developed
cent
ed up and
to the extent where they will meet the
requirements for all
company's own
time.
Work has been started on a hydro
electric plant that will produce be
4000 and 5000 horse power and
recon
tween
there has been completed a
aissance survey of a hydro-electric
that Is expected to produce
horse power or as much
n
scheme
about 80,000
as Is necessary.
The company
which Mr. Mitchell 1*
formerly presided over
leaving was
by Herbert Hoover, who was chalr
the board until the outbreak
Mr. Hoover threw up his
work of feeding
man of
of the w ar.
Job to take up the
Belgium
with food problems ever since.
been dealing
and be has
CONDITIONS
PRESENT LABOR
RENDER COMPAIGN CON
TINUANCE URGENT.
(Froln bulletin Issued by California
Metal Producers' Association).
indications,
of the shortage,
character
proportion of available labor, tbe
prosecution of mine safety work some
times loads to discouragement. The
continuance
gently needed In order:
1. To conserve human life.
and
Under present
largely on account
inefficiency nad migratory
of a
of the cmapalgn Is ur
Every
To conserve manpower.
•Ulent In which a miner is injured
him for a certain length
act
incapacitates
uf time, possibly permanently.
are needed on
At
tills time, when men
the lighting front and in the essential
Industries, Is the patriotic duty of all
to make an effort to conserve man
power.
The reduction
3. To reduce costs,
of Injuries to miners must eventually
result in a reduction of Insurance rates
but it is only by « concerted and sus
tained effort that this condition can
it is well known
he brought about,
that whenever a miner Is killed or in
jured, that particular work on which
lie Is engaged Is more or less demor
Frequently much repair work
allzed.
Is necessary at the scene of the accl
an accident
There is seldom
dent.
that is not the cause of financial loss
to the operator.
Without duplicating what has been
written in former safety bulletins,
desired to direct special attention
the chief causes of accidents in
and around mines.
it
is
to
This is the
1. Fall of ground,
most common cause of mine accidents
and the resulting Injuries are usually
of a serious nature. The Injured man
Is, in most cases, removed from the
ranks of the physically fit, and much
suffering is brought to bis relatives or
dependents. Also, accidents of this
kind are costly to the operator. A
serious or fatal Injury from falling
ground usually causes a cessation of
work In the place where It occurs.
Frequently, accidents of this type de
moralize work throughout the whole
mine. The prevention of accidents
from falls of ground is largely In the
hands of the underground bosses.
They should be repeatedly cautioned
to exercise vigilance, and frequently
to warn miners of the necessity of
picking down loose rock. The reduc
tion of accidents of this kind will go
a long way toward cutting down the
total of accidents from all causes.
2. Handling explosives. The care
less handling of explosives Is the
cause of many Injuries to miners, and
a great loss to the operator. For the
prevention of accidents of this kind,
careful attention should be directed to
the proper making of primers, In or
der to prevent misfires. Great care
should he used In the handling of
misfired holes. The danger from mls
llres is well understood, but it is prob
able that their cost to the operator
is sometimes overlooked. The impro
per breaking of a round of holes in a
drift, crosscut or stupe means less
rock or ore, possibly a day's work to
do over again, and more powder to
be used,
j miners are killed and injured from
falls down unprotected raises, chutes
3. Falling down open places. Many
j and bins. A certain company in Mlch
j igan, in studying its accident record,
! found that a great number of men
were being injured from falls. A
campaign was at once begun to guard
all open places, with the result that
the following six months showed a
i reduction of more than 50 per cent in
! accidents of this
i pie matter to guard open places and
class. It is a sim
; bosses should be Instructed to give
close attention to this phase of safety
work.
the Turk look like a gentleman.—De
trait Free Press.
4. Unguarded
dangers from unguarded machinery
are well understood, and certain reg
ulations are prescribed in the mine
safety rules. The proper guarding of
machinery is largely a matter of com
mon sense. Where a belt or pulley is
exposed, it is not difficult to devise a
suitable guard for it* Precautions of
this kind are Imperatively necessary.
machinery.
The
Accomplishing the impossible.
We'll say this for the Hun, he made
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Office of the Tarbox Mining Company.
Wallace, Idaho, October », 1911.
Notice ia hereby given that at a
meeting of the board of director! of
the Tarbox Mining company, held on
the 5th day of October, lilt, an aa
aeasrnent of ten (10) mille per share
was levied upon the outstanding cap
ital stock of the corporation, payable
on or before the 5th day of Novem
ber, 1918, to R. E. Seyeler, secretary.
426 High street, Wallace. Idaho.
Any stock upon which this assess
ment remains unpaid on the 6th day
of November. 1*18. will be delinquent
and advertised for sale at public auc
tion and unless payment Is made be
fore will be sold on the 5th day of
December, 1918, at 7:80 p. m. of eald
day at the office of the company, 4l»
High street, Wallace, Idaho, to pay
the delinquent assessment thereon, to
gether with the costa of advertising
and expenses of sale.
R. E. 8EY8LER,
Secretory of Tarbox Mining Company,
Wallace, Idaho, O10-31-4t
Notice of Postponement.
Notice is hereby given that by or
der and resolution of the board of di
rectors of the Tarbox Mining com
pany, the time for payment of the
above assessment has been postponed
from the 5th day of November, 1918,
to the 19th day of November, 1918,
and the sale of delinquent stock has
been postponed from the 6th day of
December, 1918, to the 20th day of
December, 1918, at the same hour and
place above described.
R E. SEY8LER,
Secretary of the Tarbox Mining Com
pany, Wallace, Idaho.
N14-21-21
NOTICE TO DELINQUENT STOCK
HOLDERS.
Office of the Cedar Creek Mining A
Development Company, Limited,
Wbllace, Idaho, November IS, 1918.
Notice Is hereby given that there Is
delinquent upon the following de
scribed stock on account of an assess
ment of one (1) mill per share, levied
on the 28th day of September, 1918,
the several amounts set opposite the
names of the respective shareholders
as follows, to-wlt:
No. No.
Cert. Shares Amt.
1000 1.00
1291 1600 1.60
1250 1.25
Name
Anderson, Gust _1332
Breslln, Wm
Brunner, Emllie ... 707
Cookson,
Cookson,
Elmgreen, C P
Cassidy, K E
Griffith, O H .1372
Head, Simon .
Janson, Henry
Lamphere, Joshua G 334
Meyer, Fritz .
Preislnger Heinrich 1416
1422
Schenk, Ernest ... .1304
Wingert, Henry .
Wingert, Henry .
Wingert, Henry .
Wingert, Henry- .
Waltner, Joe ....
Waltner, Joe ....
Waltner, Joe ....
Walrath, H H ...
.50
500
Carrie ... 942
Carrie . „. 943
.50
500
1000
1.00
1329
1.00
1000
1380
1.00
1000
6.00
5000
1202
.75
750
1419
1.00
1000
1.00
1000
1314
2.00
2000
it
250
Stone, C S
2000
2.00
1.00
1000
785
1.00
1000
786
1.00
1000
713
. 887 500 .50
.1261 2000 2.00
.1262 2000
.1263 1000 1.00
.1361 1000 1.00
And In accordance with law so many
shares of each parcel of such stock as
may be necessary will be sold on the
29th day of November. 1918, at 7; 30
p. in. of said day, at the office of the
company, 710 Hotel street, Wallace,
Idaho, to pay the delinquent assess
ment thereon, together with the costs
of advertising and expenses of sale.
WM. BECKER,
Secretary-Treasurer of the Cedar
Creek Mining £ Development Com
pany, Limited, 710 Hotel Street,
Wallace, Idaho._ ^14-28-3t
NOTICE OF A88E3SMENT.
2.00
Notice is hereby given that at a
meeting of the board of directors of
the Buffalo Mining company, held in
the Brunswick hotel at Missoula,
Montana, September 30, 1918, on as
sessment of ten (10) mills on each
share of capital stock was levied, pay
able on or before November 5, 1918, to
Geo. Dunham, treasurer of said com
pany, at the Brunswick hotel or 321
Pine street, Missoula, Montana.
Any stock upon which this assess
ment is not paid on or before Novem
ber 5, 1918, will be declared delinquent
and advertised for sale at public auc
tion, and unless payment is made be
fore will be sold on the 4th day of
December, 1918, to pay the delinquent
assessment together with the cost of
advertising and expenses of sale.
J. W. CONROY,
Secretary of the Buffalo Mining Com
pany, 334
Montana.
Alder Street, Missoula,
O10-31-4t
Notice of Postponomont,
Notice Is hereby given that by or
der and resolution of the board of di
rectors of the Buffalo Mining company
the time for payment of the above as
sessment has been postponed from the
5th day of November, 1918, to the 4th
day of December, 1918, and the sals
of delinquent stock has been post
poned from the 4th day of December,
1918, to the 4th day of January, 1919,
at the same hour and place above de
scribed.
J. W. CONROY,
Secretary of the Buffalo Mining Com
pany, 334 Alder Street, Missoula,
Montana.
N7-28-4t
ASSESSMENT NO. 2.
Office of the Alpena Copper Mining
Company, Limited, Wallace, Idaho,
October 22nd, 1918.
Notice Is hereby given that at a
meeting of the Board of Directors or
the Alpena Copper Mining Company,
Ltd., held on the 22nd day of October,
1918, an assessment of one mill (.001)
per share was levied upon the capital
stock of the corporation, payable to
A. H. Featherstone, treasurer, at his
office In the Gyde £ Taylor building,
Wallace, Idaho, on or before December
2nd. 1918.
Any stock upon which assessment
remains unpaid on the 3rd day of De
cember, 1918, will be delinquent and
advertised for sale, at public auction,
and unless payment la made before,
will be sold on the 21st day of Decem
ber, 1918, to pay the delinquent assess
ment together with the costs of ad
vertising and expenses of sale.
A. *H. FEATHERSTONE,
Secretary-Treasurer, office in Gyde
* Taylor building, Wallace, Idaho,
Oct.-24-to-Nov.-28-6ts.
SUMMONS.
In the District Court of the First Ju
dicial District of the State of Idaho,
in and for Shoshone County.
Margaret Ann Johnston, plaintlil, vs.
John Johnston, defendant.
The State of Idaho Sends Greeting to
John Johnston, the Above Named
Defendant:
You are hereby notified that a com
plaint has been filed against you in
District Court of the Wrrt Ju«
District of the SUte of Idaho. In
and for the County of Shoahone. by
the above named plaintiff, w ^* r ® n . *
alleged that plaintiff and defend
lntermarried at Poplar PoJ"t
Province of Manitoba,
Canada, on the 13th day of March,
tm; that plaintHf - ha8^been a^bona
than one
dal
ant
the
fide resident in
State of Idaho, for more
next preceding the commence
year
rnent of this action.
Plaintiff prays for a decree of dl
ofi the grounds of willful neglect
failure of defendant to support
vorce
and i
said plaintiff. , .
And you are hereby directed to ftp
pear and answer the said complaint
within twenty days of ths ««rvlce of
this summons if served within said
Judicial District, and within forty
days if served elsewhere; and you
further notified that unless you »o
appear and answer said complaint
within the time herein speclfied the
plaintiff will take judgment against
you as prayed In said complaint.
Witness my hand and the seal or
District Court, this 29th day of
October. A. D._ l»* aLAHJ5>
are
said
Clerk.
By G. A. MORTIMER.
Deputy Clerk.
(Seal)
031-D5-6t
JAMBS A. WAYNE,
Wallace, Idaho,
Attorney for plaintiff.
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT.
Notice Is hereby given that at *
meeting of the board of directors of
Idaho-Nevada Exploration Company,
Limited, held on the 19th day of Octo
ber 1918, an assessment of two mills
per share was levied upon the out
standing capital stock of the corpora*
before the 5tn
1918, to John F.
tion, payable on or
day of December,
Ferguson, treasurer, at the office of
the company, No. 7 Shoshone Build
ing, Wallace, Shoshone county, Idaho.
Any stock upon which this assess
remains unpaid on the 5th day
ment
of December, 1918, will be delinquent
and will be advertised for sale at pub
lic auction, and unless payment Is
made before, will be sold at the office
of the company on the 81st day or
December, 1918, to pay the delinquent
assessment thereon, together with the
costs and expenses of advertising aad
sale.
JOHN F. FERGUSON,
Treasurer, Shoshone Building, Wal
lace, Idaho. N14-D5-4t
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that I, Chal
mer E. Shuff, having been convicted
of the crime of murder in the second
degree, in the District Court of the
First Judicial District, in and for the
County of Shoshone, State of Idaho,
in the August term, 1903, and sentenc
ed by said court to serve a term of
natural life Imprisonment In the pen
itentiary at Boise, Ada county, Idaho,
will make application to the Honor
able State Board of Pardons, at the
first meeting of the newly elected
board, after the legal publication of
for a full and absolute
(Signed)
CHALMER E. SHUFF,
November 1, 1918.
this notice,
pardon.
N7-28-41
COPY OF ALIAS SUMMONS.
In the District Court of the First Ju
dicial District of the State of Idaho,
In and for Shoshone County.
May Holmes, plaintiff, vs. Frank A.
Holmes, defendant.
The State of Idaho Sends Greeting to
Frank A. Holmes, the Above Nam
ed Defendant:
You are hereby notified that a com.
plaint has been filed against you In
the District Court of the First Judi
cial District of the State of Idaho, in
and for the County of Shoshone, by
the above named
Holmes, wherein,
plaintlfr and defendant were married
at Wallace, Idaho, on the 23rd day of
December, 1908, and now are husband
and wife; that for more than one
year last past the defendant has fail
ed and neglected to provide the com
mon necessaries of life for plaintiff
and her minor children and that the
plaintiff has been oompelled to sup
port herself; plaintiff also asks for
the custody of her two sons, Earl
Holmes and Wayne Holmes and for
support for herself and her minor
sons.
And you are hereby directed to ap
pear and answer the said complaint
within twenty days of the service of
this summons if served within said
Judicial District, and within forty
days If served elsewhere; and you
are further notified that unless you
so appear and answer said complaint
within the time herein specified, the
plaintiff will take Judgment against
you as prayed In said complaint.
Witness my hand and the seal of
said District Court, this 11th day of
October, A. D. 1918.
J. C. GLAHE,
(Seal of the Court)
plaintiff, May
it is alleged that
Clerk,
By G. A. MORTIMER,
Deputy Clerk.
017-N21-6t
NOTICE TO DELINQUENT STOCK
HOLDERS.
Office of the Rainbow Mining £ Mill
ing Company, Limited, 745 Peyton
Building. Spokane, Washington, Oc
tober 21, 1918.
Notice Is hereby given that there is
delinquent upon the following de
scribed stock on account of an assess
ment of two (2) mills per share, lev
ied on the 27th day of August, 1918,
the several amounts set opposite the
names of the respective shareholders
as follows, to-wit:
Cert. Shares Amt.
.701 1500 3.00
.250 1000 2.00
Name
Arnold, H L
Arnold, H L
Anderson, Oscar R ..704 750 1.60
Anderson, Oscar R ..590 500 1.00
Austin, Roy D
Austin. Curt .
Bergleen, Peter . ...100 1000 2.00
Bishop, Lilly L .713 750 1.50
Bishop, Lilly L
Baillie, Handle
Balllle, Sandie
Belhumeur, Lactance 720 6500 13.00
Belhumeur, Lactance 301 500 1.00
Belhumeur, Lactance 350 1000 2.00
Belhumeur, Lactance 351 1000 2.00
Bonner, Sarah Mae .676 1250 2.50
Bonner, Harry S ....677 1250 2.50
ButtenhofT. Carl F ..561 2500 6.00
Brebner, Chas
Brebner, Chas .583
Bemis, Fred
Bern Is, Fred
Bemis, Fred
Boyd, Wlm
Beck, Frank
Cooper, Walter 8 ... 726 1000 2.00
Copper, Walter S ....218 500 1.00
Carlson, Oscar H
Carlson, Oscar H
Carlson, Ounnard
Carlson, Gunnard
Chyden, Charles
Chyden, Charles —731
Clough, R S
Clough, R S
Clough, Mabel M ...688 2509 5.00
Cameron, A J .957 2500 6.00
Cameron, A J
Carey, John M .931 5000 10.00
Cass, Ashley B
920 2500
953 2500
5.00
5.00
163
500 1.00
718 1500
258 1000
3.00
2.00
894 1400
2.80
500 1.00
722 3000
494 1000
495 1000
741 1000
6.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
941
500
1.00
729 750
635 500
730 750
655 500
669 180
1.50
1.00
1.50
l.oo
.36
270
.54
917 1250
686 2900
2.50
4.00
691 1260
2.50
924 500
1.00
' THE UNITED • STORES - CO.
^GROCERIES'#
WALLACE
MULLAN
burke
P ff.riAL ATTENTION
given to Miners' and
Prospectors* patronage.
S P)
is
We Know We Can Save
You Money—Give U« a Trial
1000 2.00
932 1.86
250 .50
Drumheller, Chas .• -734
Drumheller, Chas ...587
Downs, Thos E
Downs, Thos E
Dodson, CM..
Dodson, CM..
Ekman, Elmer
Frederick, John .838
Fulton, J F
Fast, B B
Greiner, John J -758
Greiner, John J .209
Gleischner, Joe .604
Goodwin, John P ...762
Goodwin, John P ..502
Garrlty, John ...
Gick, Mrs R J • •
Hassard, Hugh ..
Hallan, Hans ...
Hallan, Hans .*66
Henneck, Jesse M ..744
Hull, A D .568
Hallan, Hans .530
Heuer, August .
Heuer, August .<27
Heuer, August .
Hanenkrat, Bonnie ..937
Hensler, Wm F and
L .
Jack, Wm
Jack, Wm
Jaquette, Walter P ..780
Jaquette, Wlalter P. .419
Jaquette, Walter P. .420
Jansson, Gust
Jansson, Gust
Jansson, John .784
Jansson, John
Knutson, Nora
Knutson, Nora
Knutson, August O .675
Knutson, August O .793
Knapp, B F .932
Latimar, Elija .794
Latimar, Elija
Latimar, Elija
Ludlngton, Kirk -595
Latimar, Elija
Leaf C W
Ludlngton, Harley ..804
Ludlngton, Harley ..624
Lovett, Arthur
Lovett, Arthur
Lorentzen, Conrad .. 667
Lorentzen, Conrad ..670
Lorentzen, Conrad .. 806
Ludlngton, Harley ..678
Morrow', John W
Morrow, John W
Morrow, John W
Morrow, John W
Mangels, August
Mangels, August
Mangels, August
MangelR, August
Mangels, August
Mangels, August
Mangels, August
Matthews, Robt F .. 809
Mathews, Robt F ...111
Montgomery, Alice ..813
Montgomery, Alice ..632
Matson, Louis
McGuire, Scott
Nourse, Art H
Nourse, Art H
Nourse, Art H
Newland, Joseph ... 666
Newland, Joseph ...831
Nelson, Gust ..
Oppenheimer, E
Oppenheimer, E
Overom, Ingebert ...282
627
.75
375
736
750 1.50
500 1.00
500 -1.00
1000 2.00
2000 4.00
1000 2.00
1500 3.00
735
619
365
.910
934
2.00
1000
2500 5.00
1500 3.00
2.00
1000
1000 2.00
1000 2.00
1000 2.00
1500 3.00
500 1.00
500 1.00
933 1.86
500 1.00
500 1.00
680
..697
.. 33
773
628
2.00
1000
2000 4.00
777
4.00
3000 6.00
1500 3.00
500 1.00
6000 12.00
1000 2.00
1000 2.00
750 1.50
500 1.00
375 .75
250 .50
1500 3.00
918
779
305
783
638
644
792
2.00
1000
636
1000 2.00
1500 3.00
3750 7.50
3000 6.00
1000 2.00
1000 2.00
2500 5.00
2500 5.00
2500 5.00
2750 5.50
2000 4.00
1500 3.00
184
185
575
.536
805
2.00
1000
637
500 1.00
2500 5.00
750 1.50
i
50
1X56
00
500
114
500 1.00
1000 2.00
1000 2.00
7500 15.00
500 1.00
1000 2.00
1000 2.00
500 1.00
1000 2.00
1000 2.00
500 1.00
115
131
132
807
191
202
203
215
225
226
250
.50
1500 3.00
600 1.20
2000 4.00
2500 5.00
1000 2.00
64500 129.00
17500 35.00
500 1.00
750 1.50
2000 4.00
693
524
147
392
599
919
000
6.00
832
873 7.75
2500 5.00
181
HOWES & KING
GROCERS
The Store That Ha* Stood the TEST OF TIME.
Eatabliahed in 1886.
Fresh Stock Full Weight Prompt Delivery
Fresh Fruit and Vegetables in Season.
606 Bank St.
Phone: 194
pm
When you buy
• ••
Sunset Bud
>
Your money stays
at home
The product is
second to none
834 750 1.50
434 250
Olson, H A
Olson, H A
Odell, Nathan A ....538 4000 8.00
Olson, Ben F .630 1000 2.00
Olson, Ben F .662 1500 3.00
Olson, Ben If .835 3000 6.00
Olson, Christian and
Elvira .193 2415 4.8;!
Powell, M Kittie ....836 6750 13.50
Powell, M Kittle 165 500 l.oo
Powell. M Kittie ....488 2000 4.00
Powell, M Kittle 490 1000 2.00
Powell, M Kittie 491 1000 2.00
Peterson, Morris - 98 1000 2.00
Person, Chas A .840 2250 4.50
Person, Chas A .508 500 1 .
Person, Chas A -....499 1000
Pietsch, Otto ...841 750 1.50
Pletsch, Otto .629 500 l.oo
Rossi, Herman J .... 6 25000 , 50,00
Reid, T F .123 1000 2.00
Rideout, Sumner -842 1500 3.00
Rideout, Sumner ...16'2 1000
Rasmussfen, J P ....843 1000
Rasmussen, J P .... 76 1000
Raulie, Noah .320 1000
Roberts, C B .922 5500
Rossi, Herman J ...608 8500 17.00
Rahn, Fred .531 1250 2.50
Rahn, Fred .587 1250
Rossi, Herman J ...907 10000 20.00
Roberts, C B .913 2500 5.00
Stevenson, W G ....849 1500 3.00
Stevenson, W G ....443 500 1.00
Smith, W L .,.214 5000 10.00
Sorenson, Peter W ..855 4000 S.00
Sorenson, Peter W ..236 2000 4.00
Seifert, Antone .858 4000 8.00
Seifert, Antone .101 1000 2.00
Seifert, Antone .447 1000 2.00
Sampson, H A .......549 750 1.50
Schwabe, Wm C ....567 12500 25.00
892 1500 3.00
527 2500 5.00
589 2500 5.00
634 1500 3.00
863 750 1.50
640 500 1.00
Sangsten, James ....864 750 1.50
Sangsten, James ....652 500 1.00
Thoen, Ole Nelson ..865 1500 3.00
Thoen, Ole 'Nelson ..172 1000 2.00
Tyler, H M .867 1000 2.00
Thurman, Harry ....870 3000 6.00
Thurman, Harry ....403 1000 2.00
Thompson, N T .873 1500 3.00
Thompson, N T ....644 1000 2.00
Towles, Therett .684 10000 20.00
Turnbloom. Gerhard 674 500 1.00
Turnbloom, Gerhard 875 750 1.50
Thornton, Wayne ...679 1250
WHlliams, J A . 61 2000 4 00
Williams, T C .883 500 1.00
Williams. T C .......522 250 .50
Wehl, John .562 2500 o.OO
Wyman, Abe .682 2500 5.00
Wvman, Abe .580 2500 5,00
Waltman, Ella .906 5000 10.00
And in accordance with law so many
shares of each parcel of such stock as
may be necessary will be sold at the
office of Therrett Towles, In the Gyde
Taylor building, Wallace,
the 22nd day of November, 1918,
the hour of 1:15 p. m., to pay the de
linquent assessment thereon, together
with the costs of advertising and ex
penses of sale.
■ 5u
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
11.00
>0
Smith, H R .
Smith, H R .
Smith, H R .
Smith, H R .
I Strum, Oscar
Strum. Oscar
2.50
Idaho, on
at
R. P. WOODWORTH,
of the Rainbow
Secretary - Treasu rer
Mining and Milling Company, Lim
ited, 745 Peyton Building, Spokane.
Washington. 031-N2t-3t

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