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The Wallace miner. (Wallace, Idaho) 1907-current, November 21, 1918, Image 5

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

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IHlI EXPLOSIVE ACI
JOSS FOR KMOMTS
A wA r measure used to re
ward AND ENCOURAGE
POLITICAL WORKERS.
Without questioning the wisdom of
in passing a measure for the
of controlling the sale and
congress
purpose
distribution of explosives during the
war, it must be admitted that the ex
act proved a most useful pol
plosive
itical instrument to appease the faith
ful while polities were adjourned. The
National Republican, published at
Washington, D. C., 'has made an
vestigatlon of the operation of this
law and has discovered that the ap
pointment of inspectors for the var
states has been made from pure
ly political considerations and with
out pegard to the qualifications of ap
An example of the system
in
ioUS
pointees.
adopted is found in Idaho.
The Re
publican gives a long list of appoint
ments, with the former business of the
appointee and the influences that in
duced the selection. This is the ref
to the Idaho inspector:
nence
•■Idaho—Edgar E. Elder, of
Lawyer.
St.
Has been ac
Maries.
live in democratic politics. Broth
of Robert H. Elder, democrat
or
i ( . national committeeman from
(Vhose influence he
Idaho, to
probably owes his appointment.
Never had any experience in the
handling of explosives."
Jobs for Democrats.
Commenting on this law, the Re
publican says:
"Masquerading as a war measure,
act to regulate the handling and
sale of explosives during the period ot
the war was enacted by the congress
and approved October 6, 1917. The
■tual result of this act, as revealed
by its operation, was to furnish jobs
for deserving democrats.
"Under its terms, the president has
appointed in each state and territory
of the United States, a federal in
spector of explosives, at a salary of
$2400 a year. In addition, there has
been created a horde of minor officials
and agents of the bureau of rflines,
among these latter petty officials who,
in the name of the director of the bu
reau of mines, issue licenses for the
sale and use of explosives, collecting
fee for the issuance of each license
amounting to 25 cents.
"All of the officials appointed under
the act are democrats, more or less
deserving. The state inspectors, as
disclosed by an investigation In each
state, include physicians, cigar sales
men, farmers, newspaper editors and
tailors. In only one state was a man
appointed who possessed known ex
perience in the handling of explosives;
that is the inspector appointed for
Colorado. The'Montana and Arizona
inspectors, as general store salesmen
once sold explosives,
men were appointed who had no pre
vious experience in or knowledge of
explosives,
ka the inspector being a miner had
probably had some experience in the
use of dynamite.
an
at
a
In 45 states
In the territory of Alas
Fear of Bill Expressed.
the bill
of
"During consideration
In the house of representatives repub
lican members expressed a fear that
if the bill was enacted in the form de
it
by the administration,
manded
would result in just this sort of ap
Accordingly, Represen -
pointments.
tative La Guardla, of New York (now
aviation captain in the American
army serving on the Italian front) of
fered an amendment on May 29, 1917,
(Congressional Record, May 29, 1917,
page 3285), providing that the inspect
shotild be appointed in accordance
an
ors
with the provisions of the civil ser
vice and striking out the provision in
th > bill that they should he appolnt
cil "without regard to civil
It is almost needless
service
requirements.'
to say that Mr. La Guardia's proposal
was voted down overwhelmingly.
How Appointments Were
"The exact manner in which these
appointments were made was explain
ed in debate in the senate on January
21, 1918, by Senator Penrose, as fol
lows : .
"'I called up the bureau of mines
and asked them how these appoint
ments were to be made; whether by a
civil service examination of from the
graduates of a technical college or
from men experienced in the manu
facturing of these articles. I was told
in cold blood by some gentleman at
the other end of the telephone, and I
have two witnesses to the conversa
tion who
was one of them, that these men were
to he appointed, in states where there
were two democratic senators, upon
the recommendation of these two sen
ators; and in states where there was
°ne democrat and one republican,_ up
on the recommendation of the dem
ocratic senator; and In states where
both senators were republicans, upon
the recommendation of the chairman
of the democratic state committee."'
there, my secretary
were
Vulcanized Rubber.
Vulcanized rubber—and
articles are now vulcanized—was first
fiiade at Woburn, Mors., by Charles
Goodyear about 1844. He obtained
''is first patent in that year, after he
harl spent years In experimenting and
had reduced his family to extreme
poverty. Before 1844 rubber had been
"sed for various purposes ns a soft,
sticky gum, but was of comparative
ly little value.
all rubber
F° re ign Trade in Copper, Lead and Zinc
The
imports
and exports of
Ported by the department of
lead, zinc, and copper, as re
, commerce for September, 1918, and the figures
for September, 1917, as finally revised, are as follows:
Imports, September, 1917, and 1918.
(In pounds, unless otherwise stated)
Sept.
1917.
. 1.475,335
. 5,609,906
Sept.
1913.
Metal and Ore—
Antimony ore, contents .
Antimony matte, regulus or metal.
Copper:
Ore, contents .
Concentrates, contents .
Matte, regulus, etc., contents .
Imported from (in part):
Canada .
Mexico .
Cuba . .
Chile .
Peru .
Colombia .
Venezuela .
Unrefined, black, blister, etc.
Refined, in bars, plates, etc.
Old, etc., for remanufacture .
Composition metal, copper chief value
Lead:
Ore, contents .
Bullion, contents .
Imported from (in part):
Canada .
Mexico .
Pigs, bars and old .
Zinc:
Ore, contents ...
Imported from:
Canada .
Mexico .
Blocks or pigs, and old .
6,201.579
4,253,038
4,936,050
1,639,732
10,308,267
2,971,254
3,613,346
. 2,536,556
. 5,056,161
. 4,742,302
. 2,969,790
. 494,977
. 170,881
922,200
.21,409.698
. 620,752
. 752,254
13,997
2,168,703
4,892,799
2,736,644
768,970
35,744
37,570,650
1.472,451
103,516
16,548
6 , 202,110
17,905,345
959,428
10,458,447
5,475,572
17,622,554
13,163
160,828
11,013,899
1,559,196
4,030.201
7,888,290
598,800
3,431,401
7,767
964,000
6,924,290
29,065
Exports of Coppor, Load and 'inc.
(In pounds)
Sept.
1918.
132,242
42,716
Sept.
1917.
Copper:
Ore, contents ..'.
Concentrates, contents .
Unrefined, black, blister, etc.
Refined, in ingots, bars, etc.
Exported to, (In part):
France .
Italy .
Russia .
United Kingdom .
■Canada .
Composition metal, copper chief value
Old and scrap .
Pipes and tubes .
Plates and sheets .
Wjire, except insulated .
. 380,100
. 64,584
. 2,017,838
.60,601,803
73.302,985
8,938.231
15,564,737
37,484,619
9,871,457
2,989,074
7,221,518
2,306,067
. 1,179,589
4,347
470,899
2,817,476
665,035
45,975,753
2,668,470
3,548
327,325
1.166,832
665,332
Lead:
Pigs, bars, etc., produced from domestic ore . 8,692,397
1,595,945
8,097,118
9,3*9,476
Pigs, bars, etc., produced from foreign ore
Exported to, (in part):
1,921,566
1,830,482
324,800
46,386
Denmark .
Canada .
United Kingdom
Argentina.
Japan .
France .
Brazil .
3.045.633
11,061.754
224,000
2,351,316
447,969
358.400
246,430
Zinc:
Dross .
Spelter:
Produced from domestic ore .
Produced from foreign ore .
Exported to, (In part:)
France .
Italy .
United Kingdom .
'Canada .
Mexico .
Japan .
In sheets, strips, etc.
2,366,669
4,313,501
10,513,200
3,794,068
.13,620,119
.39,249,110
3,287,303
1,908,298
5,661.518
340,167
. 16,467.576
. 7.137,059
.24,725,657
. 1,109,072
. 341,595
602
3,009,924
1,893,699
. 3,877,704
REPUBLICAN PLATFORM PROM
ISES—NAMES OF MEMBERS
OF BOTH HOUSES.
the general
The passing of
election has brought Into prominence
he new administration that will come
into power and the Inauguration of the
next legislature. Two years ago the
democrats went Into power with con
trol of all important elective offices
and the legislature, and the republl
wlll do the same thing January
1, 1919. Their victory is even more
complete than was that of the demo
crats, for they have captured every
state office. The incoming administra
tion will be able to enact Into law such
policies as it desires to adopt, for the
legislature will be under republican
As there Is a great period of
reconstruction coming It Is likely that
much beneficial legislation will be pro
posed to bring about Interior develop
Governor-elect D. W. Davis is
be in hearty sympathy with
cans
control.
ment.
said to
this class of legislation.
The platform of the republican party
it to the enactment of legis
pledges
lation beneficial to the farmer and ag
riculturist. It pledges the party to
pass laws that will help and strength
en labor. It Is for the direct election
if members of the public utilities com
nisslon, good roads, and for the re
establishment of the office of labor
commissioner, for the control and pro
motion by the stafe of the develop
of the unused waiter power and
the submission of an amendment to
the constitution to the people to bring
What may prove to be
the most important planks in
ment
this about.
one of
the platform Is the reclamation policy
in order that homes and lands may be
provided for returning soldiers.
May Rdpeal Direct Primary.
A strong effort will be made to re
peal the direct primary law, or at
least so amend It as to provide a prl
for the election of delegates to
state conventions which
mary
county and
will nominate the candidates of the
respective parties Instead of nomlnat
tliem by direct vote. Neither party
Ing
leaders in the parties be
that It should be so changed as
but many
lieve
to prevent capture of one party's or
ganization by nominating candidates
on Its ticket, as was done by the non
partlsans this fall.
It will remain with the republican
majority, however, as to what action
will be taken along any of these lines.
The election returns show that they
have elected 46 representatives to 18
democrats and nonpartisans, when but
33 are necessary to control,
senate they have 30 out of the 41, when
only 21 ,are necessary to control.
Members elected at the last general
election to both branches of the new
egislature, which convenes
state the first Monday in January,
1919, are as follows:
In the
in this
Republicans in House.
Ada—D. L. Young, C. D. Storey,
James D. Robertson, W. H.
I,. Givens.
Bannock—A. L. Bonnell, John
Bourne, E. D. Whitman.
Bingham—Lewis
Yorgenson.
Blaine—Wftlliam C. Adamson.
Boise—R. F. Gardner.
Bonneville—A. E. Stanger, Lee J
Tyer, H.
T.
Robbins, Soren
Nielson.
Boundary—A. J- Kent.
Camas—Victor La Valle.
Canyon—Cecil Weeks.
Cassia—Irel Gudmensen.
Franklin—Ezra P. Monson.
T. Murphy, W. O
Fremont—D.
Baird.
Idaho—Seth Jones.
Jefferson—Hyram Severson.
Kootenai—M. A. Kiger, Nels Nelson,
Chris A. McDonald.
'Latah—C. J. Hugo. Alfred Anderson,
Homer W. Canfield.
Shoshone—Richard E. Thomas, A. H.
FeaJtherstone.
Twin Falls—<Carrie H. White. Carl
J. Miner, Joseph R. Conover.
Washington—A. H. Morgan, T. H.
Gough.
Lewis—Curtis Browning.
Lincoln—A. X. McMahon.
Madison—R. S. Hunt.
Nez Perce—H. D. Carpenter.
Oneida—J. W. Haws.
Payette—Mrs. Emma Drake.
Teton—C. F. Cowles.
Butte—R. L. Sutcliffe.
Benewah—George O'Dwyer.
Democrata in House.
Adams—L. A. Thompson.
Bear Lake—H. H. Hoff.
Bonner—C.
Hitchcock.
v ;
S. Moody, Bleacher
Is pledged to the repeal of the law,
t'anyon—C. R. Peekham, P. J. Poley.
Clearwater—Frank Harrison.
Klmore—Daniel Korly.
Hem—H. A. Pugh.
Idaho—August Sehroeder.
Power—William Allard.
Shoshone—l.ester S. Harrison.
Valley—George A. Peterson.
Lemhi—William M. Snow.
Minidoka—G. O. Greenwood.
Custer—George L. McGowan.
Owyhee—James Carbutt.
Nez Perce—W. S. Shearer.
Republicans in Senate.
Ada— L. W. Thruilktll.
Adams—W. H. Witty.
Hear Lake—A. A. Hart.
Bingham—William A. Lee.
Blaine—W. F. Armstrong.
Bonner—Andrew Christenson.
Boonevllle—B. T Yoeman.
Boundary—W. S. Walker.
Canyon—J. S. Kerrick.
Cassia—John McMurray.
Franklin—I. H. Nash.
Fremont—8. W. Orine.
Jefferson—Robert Gilchrist.
Kootenai—ltalph S. Nelson.
Latah—S. W. Porter.
Power—John L. McKnown.
Twin Falls-—Joseph H. Scover.
■Washington—John D. Robertson.
Lewis—A. Kalime.
Lemhi—8. W. 'Whitcomb.
Lincoln—W. A. Heiss. '
Madison—Lloyd Adams.
Nez Perce—A. H. Johnson.
Oneida—Prank Metcalf.
Payette—Ross Mann.
Teton—Victor Hegsted.
■Custer—Charles F. Baker.
Butte—D. A. Pearson.
Benewah—O. E. Hailey.
Democrats in Senats.
Boise—Elmer Davis.
Camas—J. E. Daniels.
Clearwater—F. M. Judd,
Elmore—O. B. Faraday.
Gem—J. W. Tyler.
Gooding—George Wedgetvood.
Idaho—N. B. Pettibone.
Shoshone—Dr. Tracy R. Mason.
Valley—«. O. Sims.
Minidoka— C. E. Turner.
Owyhee—Edwin Shell.
Few Old Members Elected.
There are comparatively few former
members elected to the coming ses
sion, but among those who were elect
ed the republicans will probably select
the next speaker. The list includes
in this classification: D. L. Young and
C. D. Storey, Ada county; W. G.
Adamson, Blaine county; A. J. Kent,
Boundary; Ezra P. Monson, Franklin;
M A. Kiger, Kootenai; A. S. Ander
son, Lata'h; A. H. Featherstone, Sho
shone; H. B. Hunt, Madison. The
southeast had the speaker at the last
session in Harvey Allred. The north
had it the session before In A. H. Con
nor of Bonner county. The south and
southwest will therefore make a
strong bid for the speakership in either
Representative Toung, Storey or
Adamson. Storey was speaker of the
house some sessions back. It is likely
that the republicans-eleot from the
north will back one of their own mem
bers, probably Kiger of Kootenai, who
has seen two sessions of the legisla
ture as a member from his county.
Featherstone of Shoshone is also a
member of several sessions. Both are
lawyers.
KENTUCKY IS GOING DRY.
(Louisville Courier-Journal)
O there's brick dust in the cellar
Where the Bourbon used to stay;
And the colonel's lips are parching
For a drink to start the day;
And the birds have ceased their sing
Ing,
For the clouds blot out the sky;
And there's mourning In the morning,
Old Ken-tuck is going dry!
D the weeds have claimed the mint
bed.
And the julep is a jest;
And there's nothing left but water
They may offer to a guest;
Where the major meets the colonel
And in silence passes by,
With a grief too great to comfort—
Old Kentuck is going dry!
O the judge is staid and sober,
For there's nothing left to drink;
Even crafty politicians
Do not give tljelr friends the wink.
In the still there's naught but still
ness,
For the Bourbon and the rye
Are two things the natives dream of—
Old Kentuck is going dry!
O the pleasant clink of glasses
Is a sound of bygone days;
For the barkeep's Job has vanished—
He has gone the unknown ways;
And there's dust upon the counter
Where the highballs used to fly.
When they took 'em stilt and steady—
Old Kentuck is going dry!
BLOCK 8YSTEM.
Sinfpi* and Inexpensive 8ystem for
Long Min* Tunnels.
Haulage along mine adits can easily
be rendered safe for use by different
trains from several branch drifts by
simply running alongside the lighting
wires an extra lighting circuit on
which red lamps are placed at inter
vals of 200 feet or so along the drift,
depending on conditions. This auxil
iary circuit Is arranged in a series
of blocks, according to circumstances.
At each end of a block a simple lever
switch Is placed. Whenever a train
enters the block, the driver or train
man throws the switch, thus lighting
the red lamps along the block to tell
others that it Is occupied. Wlhen the
train goes out of the block the switch
at the other end' Is thrown, cutting out
the red lights, says the Engineering
and Mining Journal.
Such a block system Is Inexpensive
and saves much time. Ordinary elec
]trie lamps dipped Into red staining so
lutlon are effective.
[chance of accident
There is no
through lamps
burning out or break* In the circuit,
for unless the red lamp at the switch
Is
hoard lights when
thrown, the train is not allowed to
switch
the
The red lights along
enter the block.
the drift also serve us a warning to
any one in It that a train is coining.
Umi of Antimony.
Among the war uses for antimony
is an antimony-lend alloy, carrying 12
to IS per cent of antimony, employed
in the manufacture of shrapnel bullets
Mining and Development
Companies of the CoeurcTAlenes
Assessments Levied, Meetings Celled, Delinquent Lists—Doings of
Compsniee of Special Interest to All Stockholders.
ASSESSMENTS LEVIED.
Alpena Copper Mining Co. —Levied
October 22, 1 mill, payable December
2 to A. H. Featherstone, treasurer,
Wallace. Delinquent sale December
21 .
Ajax Mining Co. —Levied October
12, 1 cent, payable November 19 to
J. A. Havlghorst, secretary-treasurer,
W714 14th avenue, Spokane. Delin
quent sale at Wallace
her 14.
dtlce Decern
Amsrican-Commandar Mining &
Milling Co. —Levied September 12, 3
mills, payable October 30 to J. H.
Burns, secretary-treasurer. Mullun.
Delinquent sale Dcember 13.
Buffalo Mining Co. —Levied Septem
ber 30, 10 mills, payable November 5
to George Dunham, treasurer, Bruns
wick hotel, Missoula, Mont. Delin
quent sale December 4. Positioned to
January 4.
Cedar Creek Mining A Development
Co. —Levied September 28, 1 mill,
payable October 28 to William Beck
er, secretary-treasurer, Wallace. De
linquenteale November 29.
Enterprise Mining Co.— Levied Oc
tober 25, 2 mills, payable November
25 to Lee Prather, secretary, Kellogg.
Delinquent sale December 26.
Friend Mining Co. —Levied Novem
ber 5, 3 mills, payable December 7 to
Will I lam Sehierdlng, treasurer, 610
Empire State building, Spokane. De
linquent sale January 6.
Guelph Mining & Milling Co.—Lev
ied May 7, 10 mills, payable to Mrs.
Eliza H. Steffen, treasurer, Kellogg.
Delinquent sale postponed to Decem
ber 14.
Highland-Surprise Cons. Mining Co.
—Levied August 29, 1 cent, payable to
Clias. Weigand, secretary, Kellogg.
Delinquent sale postponed to Novem
ber 29.
Lucky Swede Gold A Copper Min
ing Co. —Levied September 18, 5
payable October 19 to John F. Fergu
on, treasurer, Wallace. Delinquent
sale November 19. Postponed to No
vember 26.
Nevada-Exploration
Levied October 19, 2 mills,
December 5 to John F.
treasurer, Wallace.
December 31.
Idaho
Co.
payable
Ferguson,
Delinquent sale
Mingo Chief Mining Co. —Levied on
October 4, 1 cent, payable November
12 to John H. VanDorn, treasureP;
Sweet's hotel, Wallace,
sale December 12.
Dellnquent
Mullan Mining Co. —Levied Septem
>er 12, 2 mills, payable November 6 to
j. Leighty, secretary-treasurer, Wal
ace. Delinquent sale December 2.
Daily Quotations of Silver, Lead, Zinc and Copper
Which Are the Actual Basis of Settlement
The accompanying table (Ives the
luotatlons of silver, lead, zinc and
topper as obtained by the Engineer
ng and Mining Journal and which are
generally specified as the baste of set
foment In ore contracts wltb the
imeltere. The quotations published In
.he dally press are usually higher for
the reason that they represent sale*
n small Tots, while the figures here
given are based on large transaction*
LEAD
Oct.
Nov.
ZINC
COPPER
N. Y.
St. L.
Silver
Si. L.
Elactro
8%
101 %
31
8.05
ft 8%
♦26
8%
101*4
1
8.05
7.75
•26
8%
101 %
8.05
•26
7.75
ft 8%
8%
101*4
4
8.05
7.75
•26
ft'8%
B
814
101*4
<
ft 8 *4
•2t>
7.75
8.05
copper producers and the
• Price fixed by agreement between American
U. S. government, according to official statement for publication on Friday,
September 21, 1917, and July 2, 1918.
MONTHLY AVERAGE PRICES OF METALS, 1918.
Aa Determined by th* Engineering and Mining Journal.
Zinc
St. L.
7.661
7.639
7.286
6.715
7.114
7.791
Copper
N. Y.
23.500
23.500
23.600
23.500
23.500
23.500
23.500
26.000
26.000
26.000
Silver
N. Y.
.87.702
.85.716
.88.082
.95.346
.99.505
.99.500
.99.625
100.292
101.125
.101.125
Lead
N. Y.
6.782
6.973
7.201
Lead
St. L.
6.684
6.899
7.091
6.701
6.704
.7.511
7.750
7.750
7.750
7.750
MONTH—
January ....
February .,
March .
April .
May .
June .
July .
August _
September
October ...
6.772
6.818
7.611
8.033*
8.050
8.050
8.338
8.635
9.092
8.431
8.050
snvs a statement Issued by the U. S.
Smaller quantities
geological survey,
of liquidated antimony sulphide are
used In the primers of shells. For the
last named purpose it Is claimed that
less than 2
the material must carry
per cent
of impurities insoluble In
Antimony sulphide.
hydrochloric acid.
as a powder, is used in the charge of
shells to produce, on explosion, a
some
dense white smoke, which is of service
in range finding.
sneeze and
Herald.
Sniff and the world suspects you;
sit alone.—Boston
you
Oreano Mining Co. —Levied October
5, 2 mills, payable November 5 to F.
P. Candee, secretary-treasurer, Wal
lace. Delinquent sale December 7.
Old Veteran Mining Co. —Levied on
October 7, 1 mill, puyable November
16 to L. L. Braltiard, secretary-treas
urer, Wallace. Delinquent sale on
December 2.
October
Royal Mining Co. —Levied
1, 2 mills, payable November 15
to
Suren Simonson, secretary, box 512,
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Delinquent sale
December 16.
Rainbow Mining A Milling Co.
Levied August 27, 2 mills, payable
October 14 to R. P. Woodworth, sec
retary-treasurer, 745 Peyton building,
Spokane. Delinquent sale ut office of
Therrett Towles, Gyde-Taylor build
ing, Wallace, November 22.
Rockford Mining Co. —Levied Sep
tember 14, 2 mills, payable October
29 to W. H. Hanson, secretary, Wal
lace. Delinquent sale November 25.
Postponed to December
21 .
Silver Mountain Mining Co.—Levied
June 3, 2 mills, puyable July 16 to W.
E. Horst kotte, secretary. Potlatch,
Delinquent sule August 21.
Idaho.
Postponed to December 21.
Sunshine Mining Co.—Levied Sep
tember 18, 0 mills, payable November
9 to H. J. Hull, assistant secretary,
Wallace. Delinquent sale November
29.
Tarbox Mining Co. —Levied October
5. 10 mills, payable November 5 to R.
Seysler, secretary, Wallace. De
linquent sale December 5. Postponed
to December 20.
E.
Tyler Mining & Milling Co.—Levied
September 10, 2 mills, payable Octo
ber 16 to Albert Hausaman, secre
tary-treasurer, Burke, Delinquent sale
November 20.
Western Union Mining Co.—Levied
September 3, 5 mills, payable October
15, to Ben L. ColliiiH, 1210 Old Nation
al bank building, Spokane. Delin
quent sale at court house, Wallace^
[November 16. Postponed to Decem
her 15.
mills_
STOCKHOLDERS' MEETINGS,
Sherman Dev. Co.—Special meeting
tj be held in Day building, Wallace,
November 22, at 2 p. m., for the pur
pose of confirming resolution of di
rectors providing for transfer of all
holdings of company to the Sherman
Lead company, a corporation to be
organized under the laws of Idaho
having a capitalization of 3,500,000
shares of the par value of 25 cents.—
H. R. Allen, secretary.
and are (onerally determined from re
ports made by producer* and selling
agencies. Both the New York and St.
Lo U | g prices of lead are given, the dlf
* nc# * n * re *ght b *tween the two polnta
The quotation* for spelter are for
prime western brands. To arrive at
the New York price add 35 cents per
110® pounds to the St. Louis price.
ferenc* being due mainly to the differ-

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